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Full text of "The New York Clipper (December 1917)"

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THE OLDEST THEATRICAL PUBLICATION IN AMERICA 



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DECEMBER 5, 1917 



PRICE TEN CENTS 




THE NATIONAL THEATRICAL WEEKLY 




THE NEW YORK CLIPPER December 5, 1917 



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At B. F. Keith's Palace Theatre 
This Week, December 3 



Ellen 



Terry 



Boyle 



Featured in Wm. B. Friedlander's, Inc. 

Production 

"The Reckless Eve" 



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Copyrighted, 1917, by the Clipper Corporation. 



Founded by 
FRANK QUEEN, 1853 



NEW YORK, DECEMBER 5, 1917 



VOLUME LXV— No. 4« 
Price, Ten Cent* 



SIXTEEN ARMY 

CAMP SHOWS 

CLOSE 

BAD BUSINESS THE CAUSE 



Boston, Mass., Dec. 3. — Sixteen 
dramatic and musical shows, organized to 
play at as many army camp theatres were 
closed last Saturday night by the White 
Lyceum Bureau, of this city, owing to poor 
business and indifference on the part of 
the men at the various camps. Sixteen 
theatres, to which the Government had ap- 
propriated $500,000, had been built at an 
approximate cost of $200,000 apiece, to 
house the companies that have been closed. 
What will now become of the buildings is 
unknown. 

It is understood that the White Bureau 
had put out the shows for the Y. M. C. A. 
War Work. Council, which is said to have 
paid all the performers and assumed all 
other obligations. 

The reasons for the failure of the plan 
is ascribed to the fact that the men took 
but alight interest in the shows, that there 
were long jumps between camps and that 
practically no accommodations were made 
anywhere for performers. The shows sent 
out were "The Mikado," "Chimes of 
Normandy," "The White Feather" and 
"The Old Homestead." The selections 
were made by the Y. M. C. A. It was 
planned at first to have companies take 
week engagements at each cantonment, but, 
after the first week, slim attendances at 
performances resulted in three-day stands. 
It is said that it cost about $2,500 weekly 
each to operate the companies. 

The jumps were greater than Western 
vaudeville time, one of them being from 
Rockford, Illinois, to Ayer, Mass., and 
another from New York State to South 
Carolina and Georgia. 

Another thing that worked against the 
plan was the fact that the War Depart- 
ment built camps as far away from civili- 
zation as possible to insure room for 
maneuvers, which meant long, expensive 
hauls of trunks, scenery and companies. 
Performers also complained of lack of ac- 
commodations in the camps, which were 
never intended to house actresses. Even 
in the nearest towns to cantonments, there 
were no hotel accommodations, and per- 
formers found that they must bunk as 
soldiers in roughly constructed barracks, 
or stay up all night. 

However, show people stood the bard- 
ships bravely, being contented with daily 
growling to managers, and it was not until 
box office receipts showed a steady de- 
crease that the shows were pulled off the 
road. 

"The Chimes of Normandy," which did 
the best business, closed last Saturday at 
Camp Devens, Ayer, Maes. 

Enlisted men declare that the shows 
were too tame. After drilling all day, they 
said, they wanted to see something with a 
punch to it Burlesque of the snappiest 
sort, such as is played at bouses that cater 
practically to men only, is what the soldier 
wants. Of course, the Y. M. C. A., with 
its religious associations, could not very 
well stand behind such entertainment. 
(Continued on page 4.) 



WILL COMPETE WITH EMPEY 

Another attraction of the Empey type is 
being arranged, the speaker and hero in 
this instance being Captain David Fallon, 
who has seen and felt everything there is 
to be seen and felt in the first line trenches 
on the other side, where he was with an 
Australian regiment. Wounded in half a 
dozen places he was made a Captain and 
invalided out of the service. 

Fallon has now been taken in hand by 
a number of ticket brokers headed by a 
man named Ryan, of Philadelphia, it is 
said, who have bookings for him for sev- 
eral months ahead. No name has yet been 
selected for the attraction, but "Wading 
Through Hell" is being considered. 

Stuart Lake, a newspaperman and press 
agent, has been engaged to go ahead and- 
blaze the way, and James Early, formerly 
of Klaw & Erlanger and other forces, is 
to remain with Fallon and look after the 
business of the venture. It is expected to 
open in about two weeks. 



RUSH OUT OF VANDERBILT 

The dispute that split the producing firm 
of Rush and Andrews several weeks sgo 
was settled last week, and, as a resujt, 
Edward F. Rush is now out of the Van- 
derbilt Theatre. 

The disagreement arose, it was stated 
at the time, mainly over a loan of ap- 
proximately $25,000, made by a downtown 
business man to carry on the work of 
completing the Vanderbilt and Norworth 
Theatres, now under construction in West 
Forty-eighth street. This has now been 
wiped out by Rush turning over his inter- 
est in the house, leaving it under the sole 
management of Lyle D. Andrews and as- 
sociates. The business man was also re- 
lieved of some obligations in relation to 
the Norworth. it is said. 

Rush, however, retains his interest in 
the Norworth house, which, it is expected, 
will be finished shortly after the first of 
the year. The VanderbUt is expected to 
open a little earlier. 



TICKET SELLER HELD UP 

M km puis, Tenn., Nov. 27. — Glenna Kel- 
sey, ticket seller for Loew's Lyceum The- 
atre here, was the victim of a daring hold- 
up last Friday night. As she stepped from 
the rear door of her ticket booth at the 
theatre to go into the theatre and check 
up, an automobile containing two men 
drove tip. One of the men jumped from 
the car and snatched a sack of silver 
change from the girl and returned to the 
car, which was quickly driven off by the 
other bandit, who acted as the driver. The 
bandits, in their haste, overlooked several 
hundred dollars in currency, which Miss 
Kelsey carried in her apron. No trace of 
the bandits have yet been found by the 
police. 



SHOWS ARE SCARCE IN MID-WEST 

Tekke Haute, Ind., Nov. 29. — Road at- 
tractions seem to be a scarce article 
through this territory, while Brazil, Ind., 
and Sullivan and Paris, 111., are also get- 
ting nothing. Terre Haute is only favored 
with a few, and, for the first time in the 
twenty years' existence of the Grand, this 
city, it was. unable to obtain an attraction 
for Thanksgiving Day. 



SHUBERT-K & E FIGHT IS 

EXPECT ED TO S TART AGAIN 

Injunction Sought Against Shuberts in Philadelphia Is Said by 

Many to Mean Re-opening of War Which Waged 

for Ten Years Prior to 1913 



"MARY'S ANKLE" GETS $2,000 
Allkntown, Nov. 30. — Sam Blair's 
"Mary's Ankle" Company did a $2,000 
business here on Thanksgiving Day, play- 
ing matinee and evening performances. 



What is declared by many persons to 
mean the reopening of the fight which 
waged for many years between Klaw and 
Erlanger and the Shuberts was begun last 
week in Philadelphia, when the former 
firm entered injunction proceedings against 
the latter, to restrain them from playing 
or producing shows in their new Chestnut 
Street Opera House and in another one 
now in course of construction. 

Since 1913, the two firms have been 
working together without friction outside 
of New York. At that time, a pooling 
arrangement was effected through which 
both sides shared in the profits and losses 
of first class houses in Philadelphia, Bos- 
ton, Chicago and St. Louis. Two years 
later, a further agreement was signed 
through which competition was eliminated 
in smaller cities and towns throughout 
the country. 

The injunction papers allege that the 
Shuberts have violated this agreement by 
booking "Hitchy Koo" into the Chestnut 
Street house. This theatre recently came 
into the control of the Shuberts, it pre- 
viously having been a picture house. By 
the terms of the agreement, it is said, 
they are only permitted to book in the 
Adelphia and the Lyric. 

Immediately after the injunction papers 
were issued, Samuel F. Nixon, managing 
director of the Forest, Garrick and South 
Broad Street Theatres, and Philadelphia 
representative of the Klaw and Erlanger 
interests, predicted the dissolution of 
booking and producing arrangements 
which nave been maintained between the 
two firms for the past four years. This 
change would take place, according to his 
statements, regardless of the outcome of 
the proceedings. 

A. L. Erlanger, who was in Philadelphia 
Monday for the opening of "The Rainbow 
Girl." said: 

"There has been no friction so far in 
the carrying on of our business with the 
Shuberts. We are preparing to make a 
full and' final test of the validity of cer- 
tain agreements between us. We signed 
the contracts in good faith, and, we be- 
lieve, carried them out in their full spirit 
and letter. 

"The Shuberts seem to have entirely 
different views about them, and we pro- 
pose to find out whether one party can do 
one thing and the other partv do another, 
in absolute contradiction, under the terms 
of the same contract." 
J. J. Shubert said: 

"'Hitehy Koo' will open at the Chest- 
nut Street as scheduled. Mr. Hitchcock 
was to play theatres booked by Klaw and 
Erlanger. He wanted to go to either Bos- 
ton or Philadelphia after finishing his New 
York run, but Klaw and Erlanger could 
not give him a house in either city. He 
therefore came to us and we arranged to 
put his show into the Chestnut Street." 

When Mr. Shubert was asked whether 
this was not a breach of the pooling ar- 
rangements, he said: 

"We simply build new houses to take 
care of our attractions. We do not per- 



mit others to dictate to us. As to the al- 
leged breach of contract, that is for the 
courts to decide." 

A split between the two camps, how- 
ever, was indicated last week in Provi- 
dence, whither Alfred E. Aarons, general 
representative of Klaw and Erlanger, 
journeyed and made negotiations, it is re- 
ported, to obtain the Modern Theatre tor 
his firm. This house has been playing 
movies, but has all the facilities for legiti- 
mate attractions. 

By the agreement made in 1913 the Shu- 
berts were to have full possession of Provi- 
dence, playing in the Opera House there. 
The alleged negotiations of Mr. Aarons 
brought a statement from Lee Shubert, 
in which he said he did not think it prob- 
able that Klaw and Erlanger would vio- 
late the terms of their agreement, which 
gave the Shuberts exclusive rights to 
legitimate bookings in the territory. 

The financial and theatrical Btrength of 
the Shuberts was greatly increased re- 
cently on the death of George B. Cox, of 
Cincinnati, when it was discovered that 
they came into possession of his extensive 
holdings of theatrical property throughout 
the country. 

This acquisition, added to the vast 
amount of property already held by the 
company, put them in a formidable posi- 
tion. The company now has over twenty 
theatres in New York City alone. 

It was more than a decade ago that the 
memorable theatrical war was waged be- 
tween the Klaw and Erlanger foetion, 
which was styled the Syndicate, and the 
Shubert faction, which was known as the 
Independents. The former group included 
Charles and Daniel Frohman, Al Uuyman, 
Liebler and Company, Cohan and Harris, 
A. H. Woods, ffk and Henry B. Harris 
of New York, and Nixon and Zimmerman, 
of Philadelphia, besides individual man- 
agers in various other big cities through- 
out the country. 

The Shuberts, whose strength bad been 
increasing for several years, were joined 
by John Cort, with his Northwestern Cir- 
cuit, Wm. A. Brady, Harrison Grey Fiake, 
James K. Hackett and others, with Henry 
W. Savage in sympathy with their move- 
ment but still booking independently in 
the houses of both factions. 

The Shuberts had secured a number of 
prominent stars, headed by E. H. Sothern 
and Julia Marlowe, and began a campaign 
of theatre building in various parts of the 
country, with the cities of Philadelphia, 
Boston, Washington and Chicago as their 
main objectives. Shubert owned or con. 
trolled theatres sprung up east and west, 
and these, with the Cort holdings, gave 
them a circuit to the Pacific coast. 

Fortified with a long list of the most 
prominent stars and many productions of 
various kinds, and with an adequate num- 
ber of theatres to house them, the war was 
started in earnest, and carried on bitterly 
for several years. 

Then came a time when both sides found 
they were playing a losing game. Book- 
ings of the same class of attractions were 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



December 5, 1917 



booked to play simultaneously in the large 
cities, and the theatregoing public was 
dividing its patronage with disastrous re- 
sults. E. H. Sothern and Otis Skinner 
would play against each other in one city, 
two big musical shows, one from each 
camp, would oppose each other in another 
city, and there was not enough theatre- 
goers to make business good at both. 

When the factions came to the full real- 
ization of the situation, an armistice was 
proposed, and in 1913 came the peace pact 
under which both sides have since been 
working. At that time in many big towns 
and small cities, which had a theatre from 
each camp and which was only capable 
of supporting one first class house, one of 
the theatres was turned over to moving 
pictures and the Klaw and Erlanger and 
Shubert attractions were each booked in 
the one remaining. The warring factions 
buried the hatchet and smoked the pipe of 
peace and until now there has been no 
sign that the war would ever be renewed. 

"Whether it will now break out afresh, 
with its bad effect upon the amusement 
business, remains to be seen. Last week's 
sortie may only be a skirmish which may 
mean nothing or it may portend a conflict 
more bitterly contested than the one now 
almost forgotten. 

MOORE PLANS SIX HOUSES 
Washington, D. C Nov. 25. — Tom 
Moore, owner of the Strand, Garden and 
the new Rialto, which is just going up, 
ha,? announced that he will build Bix more 
houses in this city, at a total cost of $1,- 
2OO.000. He also intends to erect four 
smaller houses in the residence districts. 
His corporation, just formed, with a capi- 
talization of $2,000,000, will do business 
undT the name of Tom Moore's Theatrical 
Enterprises, Inc. Sites for the other the- 
atres are already under option. 

Many prominent local financiers are in- 
terested in the corporation, according to 
report, and their names may be announced 
in the near future. The new company will 
hold the franchise of the First National 
Exhibitors' Circuit. 



MANAGERS SEEK 
WAY TO HELP 

BUSINESS 

CALL MEETING TO PLAN COURSE 



PASSAIC CLOSES SUNDAY MOVIES 

Passaic. N. J., Dec. 2.— The motion 
picture houses in this city will be dark 
hereafter on Sundays, the new order of 
things starting today. For the last two 
years Sunday movies have been conducted 
in Passaic, but the members of the Passaic 
Pastors' Association appeared before the 
city commissioners last Tuesday and pro- 
tested against this manner of "aiding 
charity," which is the ground upon which 
they hove been allowed to keep open. "nie 
ministers won and Commissioner of Pub- 
lic Safety John Kehoe ordered all motion 
picture theatres closed on Sunday. 

AUTO STRIKES PERFORMERS 

Minneapolis, Minn., Nov. 28. — IsabeU 
D'Armand, Eva Taylor and Lawrence 
Grattan had a narrow escape while play- 
ing at the Orpheum. The three were 
crossing the Btreet, looking out for cars 
in front of them, when one backed up 
from the curb directly into them, knocking 
all three to the street The driver of the 
automobile stopped just in time to prevent 
the car going over them. Ten per cent, 
of bruises and 90 per cent, of scare was 
all that resulted. 

MANAGERS DIDNT RESPOND 

George Blumenthal's invitation to New 
York managers to meet last Wednesday 
afternoon at the Hotel Astor met with 
little response, there being but one man- 
ager present, while others wrote express- 
ing regret at their inability to be present. 
Blumenthal explained that the object in 
asking the managers to meet him was to 
ask for their co-operation in the establish- 
ment of an American theatre in Paris dedi- 
cated to furnishing entertainment for the 
American soldiers and sailors who go to 
the other side. There was no meeting. 

TO ELECT BROADWAY RULERS 

At the "White Way" ball, to be held 
at Beethoven Hall on Dec. 15, the King 
and Queen of Broadway will be elected. 
A number of theatrical people have en- 
tered the contest, and it is likely that at 
least one ruler will be chosen from among 
them. 



Puzzled and perplexed by the tremen- 
dous slump experienced by theatrical at- 
tractions during the past few weeks, man- 
agers belonging to the United Managers' 
Protective Association, which includes all 
the important ones of the country, have 
called a meeting for the latter part of 
this week to devise some measures by 
which the losses they are now facing can 
be cut down if not entirely eliminated. 

This meeting has been talked about be- 
fore, but has never been called because it 
has been hoped that conditions would im- 
prove. They are now worse than ever, 
however, and some measure for relief is 
imperative to avoid a complete collapse 
of the business. The situation is now 
considered to be desperate, and it is freely 
predicted by men representing hundreds 
of thousands of dollars invested in the- 
atricals that fully 50 per cent, of the 
shows now playing throughout the coun- 
try will be forced to close before the first 
of the year. 

In New York four productions, "The 
Wooing of Eve," "On With the Dance" 
"The Star Gazer" and "Six Months' Op- 
tion" closed Saturday and went to the 
storehouse. "The Gay Lord Quex" is to 
follow next week and "Misalliance" is to 
do likewise. "L'Elevation," the Grace 
George play, is in its last week at the 
Playhouse. "De Luxe Annie" started out 
to try its fortunes on the road Monday. 

Just exactly what is causing the slump 
will be the first question taken up by 
the managers at the coming meeting. 
About this there seems to be a wide 
divergence of opinion. The offices of Klaw 
& Erlanger, when asked for their opin- 
ion, gave out the following statement: 

"The theatres are suffering very severely 
from the natural war depression, and that 
condition has been made more acute by 
the sudden imposition of the 10 per cent, 
war tax, which is difficult to make people 
understand that we are merely collecting 
for the Government. Even those who do 
understand it, feel that this, the chiefest 
of their diversions, should not be taxed so 
heavily in addition to their incomes and 
other sources of revenue. Then, too, the 
insane multiplicity of theatres is having 
its bad effect. There are real estate 
sharks and architectural promoters who 
are always out with landing nets for the 
unwary to build theatres. In New York 
City theatres are becoming as common as 
garages, and will be as indiscriminately 
used if the building continues. 

"What the future will bring no man can 
tell; but it will be a good thing if it 
purges the business of the incompetent and 
dishonest theatrical adventurers, who al- 
ways break into any business in a time 
like this." 

Lee Shubert, on the other hand, Bays 
that he believes that the whole situation 
has been brought about by a false sense 
of economy which has swept over the 
country, and has been unduly accentu- 
ated by the newspapers. 

With the cause determined upon means 
to improve conditions will then be con- 
sidered, and there are more than one of 
the managers who favor a reduction in 
the price scale of tickets. They declare 
that $1.50 is the most that can be ex- 
pected at this time, and Arthur Hopkins 
has already announced that he wfll charge 
only that amount at some of the perform- 
ances of "The Gypsy Trail" 



WORLD-TRIANGLE COMBINE HINTED 

A report to the effect that the World 
and Triangle film corporations may com- 
bine was circulated Monday, a meeting to 
perfect plans having been called for the 
latter part of the week, it was said. At 
the offices of both companies, however, 
any knowledge of such a move was de- 
nied. 



BRADY MUST PAY $1,000 

A verdict of $1,000 was rendered against 
William A. Brady in favor of the K. and 
R. Film Company on Monday. 

On Nov. 21, 1916, Brady entered into 
an agreement with the K. and R. Com- 
pany by which the latter agreed to ex- 
hibit the picture "The Masque of Life" 
at Brady's theatre, The Playhouse, at 
Wilmington, Del., for six days, commenc- 
ing Dec. 18, 1916, and to share the gross 
receipts equally, 

Thereafter, Brady canceled the contract 
and, in the time for which this picture 
was scheduled, Cohan's Revue played at 
The Playhouse. The suit was brought to 
recover damages for this breach of con- 
tract. 

An interesting angle of the case was 
proven by Alfred Steiner, of O'Brien, 
Malevinsky and Driscoll, attorney for the 
K. and R. Company, when he showed what 
the gross receipts had been on the show- 
ing of the same picture in other theatres 
prior and subsequent to the time which 
Brady had contracted to exhibit the pic- 
ture, as & foundation on which the jury 
might award damages. Brady's attorney 
contended that the damages were too 
speculative and problematical and that 
no proof could be made of any of the 
facts. 

There has been no adjudication in re- 
cent years upon this point. The nearest 
case was in 1892 in a case somewhat sim- 
ilar, where it was ruled that such proof 

would not be admissible, the court stat- 
ing in its opinion: "Those profits not be- 
ing susceptible of proof were not the sub- 
ject of recovery." 



ROSHANARA COMPANY READY 

The company which will support Rosba- 
nara in her cross country tour has been 
completed. Thomas Allen Rector, an 
American dancer, will be the third fea- 
tured performer, in addition to the star 
and Michio Itow, the Japanese artist. 

Alexandre Sedan will conduct the or- 
chestra. Among the numbers included are 
"South Sea Fantasie," "After the War," 
"The Little Red Shoe," "Japanese Girl 
Dance," "The Moon Flower," "The Trag- 
edy of the Festival Lights," and "Tori-No- 
Odori." All the Russian numbers, form- 
erly given by Adolph Holm's Ballet In- 
time, have been eliminated. Richard G. 
Herndon will direct the tour. 



GUS SUN TO BUILD THEATRE 

Springfield, O., Nov. 28. — Gus Sun 
has purchased the Columbia Theatre, the 
side walls of which recently collapsed, 
causing five fatalities, and on its site will 
erect a modern office building and theatre. 
The new house will have a seating capacity 
of 2,000. 



'TOM POM" GETTING COIN 

San Antonio, Nov. 29. — "Pom Pom," 
playing one night stands throughout Texas, 
got $13,200 last week, which shows that 
good shows will get money down here. It 
also got $3,100 on Nov. 24 at the Galveston 
Hall, in Tulsa, Okla., playing to a matinee 
and night performance. 



TO START ANOTHER MINSTREL CO. 

Performers are being engaged for an- 
other Gus Hill Minstrels, which will be 
sent out on the one-nighters about Jan. 1. 
The first company has met with such 
great success that Hill decided to send 
out another one. 



"AMONG THOSE PRESENT" HALTS 

George Tyler's new production, "Among 
Those Present," which has been breaking 
in on the road for four weeks, preparatory 
to its Broadway run, laid off this week. 
It will remain inactive for two weeks, as 
the first act has to be rewritten. 



MARIE BAKK1ENTOS DUE SOON 
Cable messages have been received stat- 
ing that Marie Barrientos, the Metropoli- 
tan Opera star, will shortly sail from 
Spain to take up her work here. 

BOOKED FOR EIGHT WEEKS 

"Nothing But the Truth," with Willie 
Collier, is booked to open at the Plymouth 
Theatre, Boston, Christmas week for a, 
run of eight weeks. 



C.F. U. HEARS 

RAT LEADERS 

ASSAILED 

MOUNTFORDS ACTION ASSAILED 



At a meeting of the Central Federated 
Union, held last Friday night, JameB L. 
Barry, of the Actors' International Union, 
denounced the accusations of Harry 
Mountford and James William Fitzpatrick 
made recently at the American Federation 
of Labor Convention in Buffalo, and de- 
manded an investigation of them. He 
asked that Mountford be called to task at 
the next convention. It was at this con- 
vention that the A. F. of L. refused to re- 
voke the charter given to the White Rats. 

A number of former White Rats mem- 
bers were introduced at the meeting. The 
first, who had been a member of the 
union for twelve years, stated that he 
had hunted for their office when the club 
house was closed up but could find no 
trace of it. 

E. Houghton, another former member, 
stated that "there is no White Rats 
Union at present and Mountford and Fitz- 
patrick buffaloed the Western and some 
Eastern delegates of the A, F. of L. Con- 
vention." 

Representative Brindell, who went to 
the convention, then made bis report. Re- 
ferring to the action of the Baltimore 
Convention of 1916, he said the executive 
council at that time had appointed a sub- 
committee to investigate the White Rats. 
This committee bad recommended a re- 
organization. By instruction of the C. F. 
U. he had introduced a resolution to this 
end at the Buffalo Convention. Brindell 
pictured the hearing before, that body, 
when Mountford and Fitzpatrick suc- 
ceeded in having the charter retained 

He stated that it was impossible to' re- 
organize the White Rats under existing 
conditions and proposed that the acton 
and actresses now organized continue 

their organization and the case be again 
fought out at the June convention of the 
A. F. Of L. 



The examination into White Rats af- 
fairs being conducted under direction of 
the Supreme Court has been adjourned 
until Tiee. 14 owing to the absence from 
the city of some of the principals. 



16 CAMP SHOWS QUIT 

(Continued from page 3) 

Consequently, the men in camp passed up 
"The Old Homestead," that almost every 
one of them had seen, when in knicker- 
bockers, and their parents had led them 
into the playhouse for the first time. Those 
whose liberty did not give tbem time to 
enjoy an evening in the nearest city, seemed 
to prefer to smoke and joke in the barracks 
rather than at the Y. M. C. A.- theatres. 
Then, when they bad a 24-hour leave they 
hastened to the theatres, in whose lobbies 
were posted photos of girls in tights. Man- 
ager K. M. White, of the White Enter- 
tainment Bureau, 100 Boylston Street, who 
booked the larger companies, said that he 
hoped that arrangements could be made 
soon to re-establish the cantonment shows, 
but admitted that the outlook was dubious. 

"We endeavored to give the War Work 
Council of the Y. M. C. A. the shows they 
desired, and we put out some very good 
stock companies, which produced The 
Mikado,' 'The Chimes of Normandy,' The 
White Feather 1 and 'The Old Homestead.' 

"The last show to be taken off was "The 
Chimes of Normandy,' " he said. "Of course, 
the undertaking was absolutely a new one 
to show business, and problems which we 
never dreamed of arose. The jumps neces- 
sarily were big ones, and it was found 
that three days was about as long as a 
show could get audiences in any one can- 
tonment, and these audiences were not large 
enough to make the shows a financial sue- 



December 5, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



BUSINESS POOR IN CINCINNATI 

Cincinnati, O., Nov. 28. — The wail of 
bad business is being heard here, from the 
first class dramatic houses down to the ten- 
cent movie houses. Good attractions seem to 
make bat little difference in the matter of 
f drawing business. An instance of local 
Ij conditions was seen in the recent John Mc- 
"'Cormack concert, McCormack always has 
{been a sell-out, with seats on Music Ball 
>i stage. His concert last week! however, 

• was not a sfijl^out, and the . stage seats 
t'. were not necessary. The Lyric Theatre, 

• with the opening of "So Long Letty," an- 
f noances a popular price scale, with $1.50 

the high, instead of $2. The Walnut The- 
atre, the leading moving picture theatre, 
announces a redaction of prices from 
twenty-five cents to fifteen cents. The new 
Gifts Theatre, which opened last week, is 
playing to ten and fifteen cent prices, with 
the theatre paying the war tax. B. P. 
Keith's is an exception, its business hold- 
ing up well, according to Manager Hast- 
ings. 

MANAGERS SORE ON SPEAKERS 

Much soreness was manifested about 
Broadway this week at the way speakers 
for various war charities are invading the 
theatres of the city, the 'managers feeling 
that audiences resent being asked for con- 
tributions when they are attending per- 
formances to which, in many cases, they 
have gone to escape all thoughts of the 
war. 

Several managers stated that patrons of 
their houses had spoken to them about 
the situation, explaining that they felt 
the payment of their war tax when they 
entered the theatre was quite sufficient. 
They suggested, the managers stated, 
that, if the organizations wish to make 
such a collection, they place a receptacle 
somewhere in the lobby into which those 
who wish to contribute can do so, without 
being appealed to in their seats. 

MICHELFELDER LOSES VERDICT 

Carl Michelfelder, owner of the Lincoln 
theatre and restaurant building in Union 
Hill, N. J., bad a verdict rendered against 
him last week for $1,000. The plaintiffs 
were Albert Sielke and his brother, paint- 
ers and decorators. Although they sued to 
recover $1,919.23, they only received $1,000. 

The complainants had been employed 
to re-decorate the interior of the theatre 
at a price of about $6,000, but amounts 
had been paid sufficient to reduce the bill 
to the sum sued for. Michelfelder proved 
that the decorating was defective and that 
poor materials were used and that he 
would have to have the work done over 
at a cost of more than $5,000 and began 
suit on a counter claim for that amount. 



DELAY IN CAMP 

THEATRES IS 

EXPECTED 

ONLY THREE NEAR READY 



WALTER REGAN 

Walter Regan, whose picture appears on 
the cover of this week's Clipper, has 
risen rapidly to importance in juvenile 
roles. Until last week he was with Mrs. 
Fiske in "Madame Sand." He closed to 
take an important part in "Yes or No," 
by Lawrence Goodrich, which G. M. Ander- 
son and Lawrence Weber are preparing. 
Mr. Regan recently received a flattering 
offer from a London producer, who wished 
him to come over at once to star in a 
forthcoming productin. Greater opportu- 
nities on Broadway forced him to decline. 

Mr. Regan is under the exclusive man- 
agement of Chamberlain Brown. 

ACTRESS SUES PANTAGES 

San Francisco, Dec. 1.— Elsie Schuy- 
ler, actress and song writer, has brought 
suit in the local courts against Alexander 
Pantages for $1,600 damages to her pro- 
fessional reputation and Iter health be- 
cause, she alleges, Pantages canceled her 
contract after one performance of her act 
at his theatre, this city, i Miss Schuyler 
alleges Pantages contracted with her to 
appear at his theatres bnt that, after the 
first performance, he informed her that, as 
the act was not suited to his audiences, 
she could not appear again. 



It is doubtful if the sixteen government 
theatres, planned for the training camps, 
will be completed by the first of the year 
aa planned. Only three show any signs 
of being ready. Lack of lumber, concrete 
and other materials are said to be factors 
in the delay. 

Camp Sherman, Chillicothe, O., Camp 
Devens, Ayer, Mass., and Camp Taylor 
at Louisville are the three which will 
probably be ready on the date set. As the 
shows to play the houses cannot be organ- 
ized until all the theatres are ready, it is 
probable that movies will be installed in 
the beginning. 

The delay in finishing the houses is 
holding up all the work of the commit- 
tee on training camp activities, headed by 
Mark Klaw. No plays have as yet been 
selected, and even the style of plays has 
not yet been decided upon. Over four 
hundred applications from managers are 
said to have been received. These will be. 
put up before the committee, and the six- 
teen desired will be selected by elimina- 
tion. 

Applications for the positions of man- 
agers of the theatres are also coming in 
rapidly. Each house will have a resident 
manager, a civilian, who will have entire 
charge of all details. Only one manager 
has been appointed so far. This is Charles 
Scott, who will handle the Camp Taylor 
theatre. 

It is probable that the companies will 
be shown on a percentage basis, with a 
guarantee by the government. Details of 
this have not yet been worked out. 

It is reported on good authority that 
another theatre is contemplated at the 
Hoboken disembarkation camp. This 
would make seventeen in all on the cir- 
cuit. 



CENTURY BARS IRENE CASTLE 

Mrs. Irene Castle, the dancer who was 
announced to have been dropped from the 
Century production "Miss 1917" at the 
end of last week, issued a statement on 
Monday night through her attorney, Wil- 
liam Klein, in which she stated that she 
had reported at the theatre as usual and 
had been denied admission. She declared 
that she had received no notice of any 
sort from the Century management, and 
that she would take immediate steps to 
enforce her contract. 

Mrs. Castle went to the stage door of 
the Century in company with her attor- 
ney, she declared, and was refused per- 
mission to enter and go to her dressing 
room. 

She also stated that the Century's gen- 
eral director refused to see her. 

Mrs. Castle was one of a number of 
players who closed their engagement in 
the big revue on Saturday night. 

Among the others were Adolf Bolm, 
Georgie White, Arthur Cunningham, 
Flora RavaleB and a number of Russian 
dancers. 

White and a number of dancers are also 
said to have reported at the theatre at 
the usual hour, only to be refused admis- 
sion. 



CRESCENT MAY HAVE BURLESQUE 

Negotiations are under way to put a 
burlesque company into the Crescent The- 
atre, Brooklyn, of which Fred McClelland 
is now the manager, with a feature picture 
policy being followed. It ia reported, how- 
ever, that the films are not doing as well 
as it was hoped they would, and that a 
change of some sort is desirable. Accord- 
ingly, when the suggestion was made that 
burlesque of the clean sort might be tried, 
the idea was not looked upon as coldly aa 
have former efforts looking toward the 
same end. 



BRATTON PLACES COMPOSITION 

J. W. Bratton has placed with Leo 
Feist a new characteristic instrumental 
number entitled "At the Grasshopper's 
Hop," 



"FIGHTING MILLIONAIRE" LOSES 

Charles Hauser, often called the "Fight- 
ing Millionaire," married Harriet Lewy 
the day after her eighteenth birthday. 
Miss Lewy is the daughter of the owner 
of Steeplechase Park. 

Recently he started suit for $50,000 
against her father for alienation of af- 
fections. At the trial last week the jury, 
after remaining out three minutes, ren- 
dered a verdict in favor of the defendant. 
Levi, Gutman and Stern were the attor- 
neys for Lewy. 

HOW ABOUT MacDONOUGH 

Much mystery has been thrown about 
the authorship of the new Hitchcock piece, 
"Words and Music," the attempt having 
been made to make it appear as the work 
of some society people. Persons who know, 
however, state that Glen MacDonough 
knows the thing backwards and forwards. 

HAVLIN WINS LEGAL FIGHT 

Cincinnati, Ohio. — John H. Havlin, 
manager of the Grand Opera House, won 
in the legal fight with the People's Church, 
which sought an injunction when Havlin 
refused to permit the use of bis theatre for 
Sunday afternoon meetings. The Court re- 
fused the injunction. 



ACTORS' FUND SUED FOR $50,000 

Emma Kendall has filed an action in 
the Supreme Court for $50,000 against the 
Actors Fund of America, Waldemar H. 
F. De Bille, manager of the fund, and 
Daniel F. O'Brien. 

She alleges the defendants are respon- 
sible for her detention and search last 
May as she was leaving the Grand Cen- 
tral Palace, where a fair had been held 
for the benefit of the Actors' Fund. She 
Bays O'Brien caused her to be searched 
for personal property alleged to have been 
taken. She Bays the search showed she 
had not taken anything. 

LOEW HOUSES CHANGE PRICES 

Atlanta, Ga., Dec. 3. — After returning 
from a two weeks' trip over the Loew 
Southern Circuit, E. A. Schiller, general 
manager of these houses, decided to re- 
adjust the admission scale in all of them. 

The prices of admission in the future 
will be 0, 18, 27 and 36 cents, instead of 
10, 16, 25 and 35 cents. Then, with the 
war tax added on, the box office price is 
10, 20, 30 and 40 cents. This new scale is 
in force now in the theatres in Atlanta, 
Memphis, New Orleans, Birmingham, Au- 
gusta, Chattanooga and Hattiesburg. 

FORDS AND MARSHALL SPLIT 

The Ford Sisters and Henry Marshall, 
who have been appearing over the United 
time, split last week. 

Differences regarding the billing axe 
said to have been the cause of the split, 
and Harry Askt, the pianist, is now re- 
hearsing with the girls. 

GRACE GEORGE MAY QUIT 

It was stated last week by persons said 
to have been present that Grace George 
recently declared she would permanently 
retire from the stage if "L'EIevation," 
in which she ia now starring at the Play- 
house, did not prove to be a success. It is 
now in its last week. 



LEE HOWARD IS DEAD 

Cincinnati, O., Nov. 27. — Lee Howard, 
fifty-seven, who for forty-two years, was a 
famous clown and circus acrobat, died in 
Toledo to-day of Bright's disease. He was 
with Barnum, the Ringlines, Sells-Floto, 
Hagenback, and was well known here when 
with Robinson's shows. 



"BEAUTY SHOP" GETS THE COIN 

Nashville, Dec. 3. — "The Beauty 
Shop," managed by Herman Moss, of New 
York, played to $2,400 here Thanksgiving, 
getting $1,000 at the matinee and $1,400 
at the night performance. 

"EXPERIENCE" GETS $1,252 

San Antonio, Texas, Nov. 30. — Playing 
here last Sunday night, "Experience" took 
in 51.252, at the Grand Theatre. It re- 
ports other good business along the route. 



THEATRES PAY 

$3,000,000 IN 

TAXES 

MORE DURING COMING YEAR 



Washington, Dec. 1. — That the world 
war has cost the theatres of the United 
States over $3,000,000 since it began in 
1914 was the astounding faet learned to- 
day with the publication of the annual 
report of Colonel W. H. Oaborn, former 
Commissioner of Internal Revenue, made 
public by his successor, Daniel C. Roper. 
The exact figures are $3,399,299.05, exclu- 
sive of the tax on admissions which went 
into effect the first of November. 

These figures represent the money paid 
by theatres and other amusement places 
in special license taxes. These were placed 
as soon as war was declared, as it was 
necessary then to make up the money 
lost in customs. The first bill for this 
purpose was enacted in October, 1914, and 
it was scheduled to expire on December 
31, 1915. At this time, however, it was 
extended for a year. 

It was hoped that this time it would 
really expire, but in 1916 it became ap- 
parent that a steeper revenue bill was 
necessary, and one was introduced by 
Chairman Kitchen of the Ways and Means 
Committee. This one proposed such high 
taxes on amusements that theatre men 
protested, and it was passed with modi- 
fications. It became active September 8, 
1916, and was not repealed when the war 
revenue bill of this year was passed. 

Commissioner Osborn's report shows 
that between July 1 and November 1 of 
the present year, the collection from the 
special tax on theatres under the law of 
September 8, 1916, aggregated $438,280.87. 
During the first three months of the fiscal 
year 1918— the months of July, August 
and September, 1016 — the collection from 
the special tax on theatres under the old 
law of 1914 aggregated $278,309.48, these 
figures disclosing that during the first 
three months of the current fiscal year 
the theatres paid in this special tax $159,- 
971.39 more than during the first three 
months of the fiscal year 1916. 

On the basis of a collection of $438,- 
280.87 during the first three months of 
the present fiscal year, the theatres of the 
country would during the whole fiscal 
year of 1918, which ends June 30 next, 
pay about $1,752,000 in special taxes, in 
addition to what they collect for the Gov- 
ernment from the admission tax. The 
special tax must be paid regardless of 
whether the theatrical business ia good 
or bad. It is a special license tax. The 
new admissions tax ia, of course, based 
entirely on the number of admissions to 
theatres and film houses and is collected 
from the public by the theatre. 

Section 3 of the War Revenue act of 
1914 imposed on proprietors of theatres 
and film houses these taxes : $25 annually 
on theatres seating 250, $50 on those seat- 
ing 250 to 500, $75 on those seating 500 
to 800 and $100 on those seating more 
than 800. When the Kitchin bill of the 
Summer of 1916 was brought forward it 
proposed to increase these taxes. It pro- 
posed to tax theatres and film houses on 
the basis of population, all such, regard- 
less of their seating capacity, in cities of 
3,000 and over to pay a tax of one-half 
of 1 per cent on their gross receipts, the 
tax to be paid quarterly. If this proposal 
had been finally enacted it would have 
required all theatres and moving picture 
houses in New York eity to pay 1 -200th 
of their gross receipts to the Federal Gov- 
ernment. 

Led by Attorney Llgon Johnson, of the 
United Managers' Protective Association, 
representatives of the film and theatrical 
industries of New York City came to 
Washington in the Summer' of 1916, and 
the result of their vigorous protests 
against the proposed increase in special 
theatre taxes was the maintenance of the 
old tax so far as theatres of cities in 
places of over 5,000 population was con- 
cerned. 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



December 5, 1917 




ACTOR'S ANGER 

GETS HIM OUT 

OF N.V.A. 



ED RICHARDS SUSPENDED 



Angered, it is said, at being refused a 
drink after hours at the National Vaude- 
ville Artists' clubrooms last Thursday night, 
Edward Richards, of Bennett and Rich- 
ards, started a wordy argument which 
nearly ended in blows and which finally 
terminated in his indefinite suspension 
from the organization. 

Richards came into the dining room 
shortly after one o'clock, the prescribed 
closing time for all alcoholic service. The 
waiter in charge explained that he was 
unable to serve him. Richards is reported 
to have abused the man soundly and in 
such a loud voice that everyone in the 
club was aroused. 

John Faulhaber, manager of the dub, 
was called in to settle the dispute. This 
only angered Richards the more, it is said, 
and an argument between him and Faul- 
haber began which came near being a 
fistic encounter. 

Richards was finally pacified, and the 
matter was brought up before the Board 
of Directors on Saturday. At this meet- 
ing the suspension was voted upon. 

Afterwards Henry Chesterfield, secre- 
tary of the association, gave out a state- 
ment in which he Baid that all instances 
of unbecoming conduct would be instantly 
examined and wiped out. 

Bennett and Richards played the Palace 
last week, in a sketch called Dark Clouds. 



BUTTERFIELD CHANCES POLICY 

Battle Creek, Mich., Dec 3. — Changes 
are being made in the Butterfield house 
policies. At Bay City the Bijou Theatre 
will discontinue a seven-day vaudeville pol- 
icy and will house vaudeville attractions 
on Sundays only. The remaining six days 
of the week the house will present a picture 
program with an effort being made to secure 
the better class pictures at the regular 
10-15 price. 

At Ann Arbor, the Majestic Theatre, 
which is also a Butterfield house, changes 
to a combination vaudeville and picture 
policy. The vaudeville acts which play the 
other towns of the circuit will make Ann 
Arbor on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday 
of each week, with the remaining days hav- 
ing a picture policy along the line of the 
Bay City Theatre. Generally, the business 
in the remaining Butterfield houses at 
Lansing. Flint, Jackson, Battle Creek, Kal- 
amazoo and Saginaw is reported very satis- 
factory. These houses will continue the 
regular vaudeville policy up to the usual 
closing time. 



FOLLY TO HAVE "WONDER WEEK" 

During the week "of Dec. 10 the Folly 
Theatre, Brooklyn, will have a "Wonder 
Week." There will be eight acts of vaude- 
ville instead of six for each half, and a 
feature photoplay. Virginia Pearson is to 
make a personal appearance on the 10th 
and 12th, and George Walsh on the 14th 
and 15th. 



GREAT EVERETT CLOSES 

The Great Everett closed his road show 
last week and contemplates going into 
vaudeville for awhile until road conditions 
are better. He carried seventeen illusions 
and a great deal of live stock. 



NAME OF PLAYLET CHANGED 

"Altruism," the Washington Square 
Players' playlet to go out over the Or- 
pheum Circuit, has had its title changed to 
"Love Thy Neighbor." 



EDWARDS NEW ACT OPENS 

The new Gus Edwards Revue, in which 
he is featuring Olga Cook, ten scenes and 
a big score of new songs, opened as the 
headline attraction at Proctor's Theatre. 
Yonkers, last Monday with marked suc- 
cess. The act is being groomed for an early 
showing at the Palace Theatre, and is due 
there the week of December 17, at which 
time Edwards will appear in it himself. 
The act is so constructed that it can fur- 
nish a full evening entertainment or run 
but forty minutes. 



BAERWrrZ HAS NEW ACTS 

A number of new acts to New York 
are announced by 'Samuel Baerwitz, who 
is at present routing the following: "Mel- 
ody Land,", Fields and Wells, Four Roses, 
Girls from Starland, Al Wohlman, Small 
Sisters, Lee and Cranston, Ash and Shaw, 
Litt and Nolan, Howard's Animals, and 
the Swiss Songbirds. All of these will 
appear around the first of the- year. 

MUST DROP HOUDINI TRICK 

Houdini has forced the Rigoletto Broth- 
ers to discontinue the use of his needle 
and thread trick, which he brought into 
prominence. Heads of the Orpheum Cir- 
cuit are said to have acceded to his wishes, 
and threatened to discontinue the time of 
the brothers if they did not give up the 
illusion. 



TAYLOR'S LIONS ARE HERE 
Peter Taylor's lions, which have just 
come in from South Africa by way of 
Italy, will open Dec. 3 in Detroit, playing 
Western Vaudeville time. Fred Saona 
will manage the tour of the turn, which 
is booked solid through the West. There 
are eight animals in the act. 

CLAIRE ROCHESTER TO RETIRE 

Claire Rochester plans to retire from 
the stage at the end of her present tour. 

Recently granted a divorce from Carl 
Helm, just before he went to Plattsburg 
where he received a commission as first 
lieutenant, she has been remarried to a 
non-professional in Kansas City. 



HENRY HAS NEW ACT 

"The Boys from the Trenches," contain- 
ing several men who have served then- 
time on the French front, will open on 
TJ. B. O. time late this month. The act 
carries five people and a special set. Jack 
Henry is putting it out. 

UNDER HAS NEW ACT 

Jack Linder will shortly present a mu- 
sical comedy in one act, entitled "Hello 
Broadway," by Lew Tilford. Harry 
Evans is featured, and sixteen people are 
in the cast. Special scenery and ward- 
robes of a spectacular nature have been 
prepared. 

LINCOLN BOOKED BY U. B. O. 

The Lincoln Theatre, at Union Hill, 
N. J., beginning December 10, will be 
booked by the U. B. O. Heretofore it 
has been an independent house, being 
booked by Fally Marcus. 



HART MANAGES CARROL MeCOMAS 

Carrol McComas is to make a vaudeville 
tour under the direction of Joseph Hart. 
She is to appear in "The Sun Dial," a 
playlet by Lester Lonergan. The tour 
started this week. 



HARRY TSUDA RETURNS 

Harry Tsuda has returned to America 
after a tour including fourteen months on 
the Fuller Time in Austrsl in and four 
months in South Africa. 



WILCOX HAS NEW ACT 

Bert Wilcox will be seen shortly in a 
new sketch entitled "His Mother In Law" 
on U. B. 0. time. Three people are in 
the skit. Jack Henry is booking it. 



LOEW AGENTS 

TO LOSE OUT 

IS RUMOR 

SHAKE-UP REPORTED SOON DUE 



Rumors of a shake-up among the agents 
in the Loew offices that will result in the 
probable elimination of several were in 
circulation last week, with the date of 
the upheaval set for early in the New 
Year. 

The reason, it is stated, is that the 
officials of the Loew offices are sometime 
almost led to wonder whether there are 
not more agents than acta, for it is ' be- 
coming almost a common thing to find 
two or more agents representing one turn. 
In a recent instance, it is said that no 
less than three agents were all supposed 
to be booking one act. 

This state of affairs has made it very 
confusing at times, it is reported, to say 
nothing of the frequent disputes that are 
bound to arise when such a condition ex- 
ists. Some action is necessary looking 
toward relief for the situation and the 
report that several agents would be elimi- 
nated, looks as though such a measure 
had been decided upon as the best man- 
ner in which to clear up the muddle. 

SIG REtNFELD HAS NEW ACT 
St. Louis, Mo., Dec. l.^-Sig Reinfeld's 
"Capital City Girls," formerly known as 
"Lady Minstrels" are now in rehearsal, 
and will open in Chicago in January. 

The act consists of ten people carrying 
five scenes with an entirely new wardrobe. 
Johnny Simon, of the Simon agency, is 
handling the act Sig Reinfeld is in part- 
nership with. Leo Le Faivre, and they ex- 
pect to send ont other acts later in the 
season. ' 



BOSTOCKS HAVE NEW ACTS 

Among the new acts announced by 
Claude and Gordon Bostock are James B. 
Donovan, in a new single turn; Pelham 
Lynton, who has just joined Charles 
Moriarty, and will do a comedy novelty; 
Marie Salisbury, single singing; and Fred 
Allen, who makes his first appearance here 
at the 81st St. Theatre tomorrow. 



MOSS BOOKING LEBANON HOUSE 

The Amalgamated Vaudeville Agency 
has taken over the booking of the Family 
Theatre, Lebanon, Pa-, and will install five 
acts a week. The house has been run- 
ning straight pictures for some time. The 
agency also books the Dix Theatre, Camp 
Dix, Wrightstown, N. J. 



BLONDF.I.I, BOOKING PHILLY HOUSE 
The Gerard Avenue Theatre, Philadel- 
phia, formerly booked by Fred Nixon- 
Nerdlinger, is now being booked by Ed. 
BlondeH, who will also begin booking the 
Lincoln Theatre, Union Hill, on Dec. 10. 
Five acts and a three-day change will be 
the policy. 



CURTIS IS BOOKING KEENEVS 

Fred Curtis is now booking Keeney*B 
Newark and Brooklyn theatres, under the 
direction, of the Amalgamated Vaudeville 
Agency. 



NELSON SISTERS BOOKED 

The Nelson Sisters, who have been 
playing in the West, have been booked 
solid on Loew time by Jack Potsdam, 
and open Dec. 10 at the Orpheum. 

KEITH HOUSE CELEBATES 
Jeesey Crrr, Dec. 3. — The B. F. Keith 
Theatre is celebrating its eleventh anni- 
versary this week. 



HARRY COOPER ENTERTAINED 
Friends of Harry Cooper gave him a 
beefsteak party, commemorating his twenty- 
fifth year in vaudeville, last Wednesday 
night at Edward Terp's Cafe. Sam Mc- 
Kee acted as toastmaster, and presented 
Cooper with a diamond cluster scarf-pin. 
This gift was from his friends. 

Among those present were : James Sulli- 
van, sergeant-at-arms of the Board of Al- 
dermen; Judge Groehl, Judge SniUrin, Al- 
derman Max Levine, Mr. and Mrs. Harry 
Norris, Harry Weber, Eddie V. Darling, 
Herman Weber, Hyman Bushel, U. 8. Dis- 
trict Attorney Edward Stanton, Assistant 
District Attorney Fred Sullivan, Mr. and 
Mrs. Joe Cooper, Dorothy Jardon, Jack 
Drucker, Phil Kornheiser, Eleanor Young, 
Marguerite Young, Gene Hughes, John J. 
O'Connor, Harry Fitzgerald, Bill Bailey, 
Lynn Cowan,- Artie M dinger, Moe Lazarus, 
Bennie Fields, Aaron Kessler, Mr. and Mrs. 
Lew Friedman, Yeoman George O'Connor, 
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Bermaut, Con Con- 
rad, Maurice Abrahams, Maxwell Kanzelle, 
Eddie Dowling, Mr. and Mrs. Jack Lip- 
sbitz, Mr. and Mrs. Leon Sherman, Young 
Chief Meyers, Irving Cooper, Maxwell 
Goldstein, Mrs. Harry Cooper and George 
Myers. 



PRISONERS SEE KEITH SHOW 

A. Paul Keith and E. F. Albee gave 
their 18th annual Thanksgiving Day show 
for the entertainment of the prisoners at 
Blackwell's Island last Thursday morning. 
The performance, which began at 10 
o'clock and ran till 12.30, was under the 
stage direction of John Hall, of the Or- 
pheum, and Dave Burke, of the Bushwick. 
The bill was made up of well-known per- 
formers and included : Ed. Morton, Ed. and 
Lou Miller, Margaret Young, Harry 
Cooper, assisted by Jim Rainey ; Dorothy 
Jardon, Phina and Picks, Kenny and Hol- 
lis, Bailey and Cowan, Eddie Dowling; 
Caites Bros, Edmunds and Leedham, Jenie 
Middieton, Wellington Cross and Brendel 
and Burt. The music was provided by 
Cameron's orchestra from Keith's Royal 
Theatre. After the show the prisoners 
were provided with candy and cigars by 
Messrs. Keith and Albee. 



SOLDIER ACTORS SING 

The Camp Upton Four, a quartette 
made up of former professionals, now at 
Yaphank, have been doing some singing 
on the side for their camp fund. The places 
attended were the St. Andrews Hotel, two 
weeks ago; the Biltmore, last Saturday, 
and at the Union League Club on Thanks- 
giving Day. The quartette is composed 
of Ben Brannigan, of the team of Baker, 
Brannigan and Sherman ; Harry Solomon, 
of the Three Funstons; Harry Wiesberger 
and Will Reading. 



BOTH CLAIM TAX JOKE 

Pat Rooney, of Rooney and Bent, has 
preferred charges of copying against the 
Parber Girls, and the matter is being set- 
tled by the N. V. A. and the V. M. P. A. 

Both claim the exclusive right to the gag 
regarding "tacks on seats," which has been 
very popular since the recent admission 
tax. 

ARMY ACTORS OPEN HOUSE 

Camp Lewis, Washington, Nov. 30. — 
The camp theatre was opened here last 
week with a bill of professionals who are 
in the National Army camp, at Camp 
Lewis. It included Willie Smith, Nate 
Busby., Giuseppe Bondonno, Earns and 
Maitiand, Herbert, Bennett and Thompson, 
Biggs, Broconno and Love and a colored 
quartette. There were, besides, many acts 
from nearby Orpheum Circuit houses. 



LA MONT HAS NEW ACT 

Bert LaMont is rehearsing a new act 
to be called "Palm Beach Frolics." Harry 
Smith is featured, and nine people axe in 
the cast. Both book and music were writ- 
ten by LaMont. It will open in about 
three weeks. . 



December 5, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 




PALACE 

The show was opened with Derkin's 
canine production, wherein he shows 
"Dogville on a busy day." Since last 
seen, this act has added much appropriate 
music and several comedy bits, such as 
near beer signs and a service flag, showing 
that Mr. Derkin has one member of bin 
family at the front. The act went over 
in great shape. 

Trovato was in the second spot and did 
not get started. It seems that he is in 
a rut with a routine which is as old as . 
bis act, with the exception of two num- 
bers in which a girl and a boy sing to 
him from a box. His mannerisms and 
gestures are the same and the playing 
of music, which he reads . from the floor, . 
does not enhance the value of the turn. 

"The Reckless Eve," a revamped version 
of "The Night Clerk," with new scenic 
embellishments and wardrobe, came next 
and is more fully reviewed under New 
Acts. 

Cecil Cunningham appeared in a beauti- 
ful black dress and started her act with 
her satire on comic opera. Her second 

Ewa6 a new number with a corking 
punch in which she derives many 
_is through telling of the trials and 
tribulations of the Statue of Liberty. Her 
third song was the orchestration' made-to- 
order number and she closed the act to 
tumultuous applause with the syncopated 
history of the United States. Miss Cun- 
ningham retired after making a speech. 

Paul Morton and Naomi Glass closed 
the first part with their musical satire 
called "1917-1950," which went great all 
the way. They open the act with a nov- 
elty song built on their alphabetical love 
affair, in front of a special drop, and then 

fo into full stage, where they get many 
lughs about their new futuristic bunga- 
low. The setting and wardrobe are worthy 
of comment and the songs, pieces of busi- 
ness and dancing all went over to big 
applause. The stair dance is now being 
done by both of them and is a sure-fire 
winner. 

Preceding them, Jack Munday, of "The 
Reckless Eve" act, made an announce- 
ment about the Red Cross benefit per- 
formance to be given this Friday morning 
at the Palace Theatre. 

After intermission, Constance and Irene 
Farber, in resplendent wardrobe, opened 
their act with a quaint popular number 
which served them to get laughs and 
make a dandy impression. Connie Farber 
then returned and put over a good comedy 
lyric with a punch which won many 
laughs. Irene Farber sang a high-class 
ballad in excellent style. A Southern 
number followed and they closed the act 
with a speech in rhyme in which Connie 
Farber requests the audience to knock the 
act but to do so with discretion. 

Herman Timberg, in eccentric make-up 
and a violin, stepped out and sang a song 
about Rosy, to which he accompanied 
himself in the extra chorus. He then 
played a violin solo in great style, obtain- 
ing a dandy singing tone out of the in- 
strument. In a comedy number about 
Nijinsky, he cuts loose several dance steps 
which started the audience applauding. 
He danced a la Russ and played the vio- 
lin simultaneously, going off to a big 
hit. The audience clamored for more and 
he returned and sang his well-known 
"usher" song, in which he states that he 
has been an usher in various theatres and 
gives imitations of Cohan, Fields, Bernard 
and several others. He then did the dance 
which set the house going. He does his 
eccentric Russian dance steps to fox trot 
music and was the big hit of the second 
half. 

Lady Duff-Gordon was presented by a 
French officer, who explained her mission 
as being one of charity more than self- 
exploitation, as her weekly wage for ar- 
ranging her vaudeville act would go to a 
French war charity. The curtain* parted 
and then Her Ladyship made her appear- 
ance and the remainder of her efforts win 
be found under New Acts. S. L. H. 



SHOW REVIEWS 

(Continued OB P«|H S and 31) 



RIVERSIDE 

Three dancing acts in a row are on the 
first half of the bill at this theatre, but 
as they are of decidedly different types 
they all did well. 

Herman and Shirley in "The Mysterious 
Masqueradcr" opened and the clever ec- 
centric dancing and contortionist tricks 
of Herman started the bill off in good shape. 

The Caits Brothers followed and the 
well executed steps of the boys, together 
with their original comedy opening in the 
dark, carried them over to a good finish. 

Hickey Brothers, the third of the danc- 
ing teams; was next, and in spite of the 
clever stepping that preceeded them, were 
well received. In addition to their danc- 
ing, the boys are acrobats of ability and 
a number of their stunts pleased greatly. 

Eleanor Cochrane, formerly of the 
grand opera and concert stage, is making 
her debut in vaudeville at this house and 
in a well selected program of operatic and 
popular selections scored a big success. 
Miss Cochrane is showing one of the most 
pretentious single singing acta ever seen 
in vaudeville, which, coupled with her ex- 
cellent singing, scored for her one of the 
big hits of the bill. Her offering will be 
further reviewed under "New Acts." 

Hassard Short is back at the Riverside 
again with the "Ruby Ray," a cleverly 
constructed comedy playlet which seems 
to have improved since the last showing, 
and scored many laughs. The "Ruby 
Ray," which is the name of a cocktail, is 
the thin thread which holds together a 
number of comedy situations, nearly all 
of which arise from several women par- 
taking of the drink. While there are a 
number of good lines and situations in the 
playlet, the fact remains that the spec- 
tacle of a young girl, still in her teens, 
who becomes intoxicated to the point of 
silliness, even on the stage, is hardly the 
highest type of comedy. 

Harry Tighe, late of musical comedy, is 
offering a new act made up of a number 
of special songs and one or two published 
ones, and is telling several new stories. 
He has an accompanist, Alice Lucey, a 
young lady who looks exceptionally well 
and plays excellently. Mr. Tighe's mate- 
rial is for the most part good and his 
personality is most pleasing, but evi- 
dently suffering from a severe cold on 
Monday afternoon his act failed to regis- 
ter. Under more favorable conditions and 
the discarding of one or two of the spe- 
cial numbers and the introduction of good 
published numbers in their place the act 
is bound to improve. Mr. Tighe has un- 
doubted ability and the changing of his 
material will undoubtedly bring the act 
up to standard. It will be more fully re- 
viewed under "New Acts." 

Valeska Suratt, after an absence of sev- 
eral years, during which time she. has 
been appearing in pictures, is back in 
vaudeville, but not as a singer and dancer 
as in the past. She is presenting a dra- 
matic playlet by Paul M. Potter and 
Chester V. de Vonde, called "The Purple 
Poppy." The scene of the piece is laid 
in the Greenwich village section of New 
York but the subject matter is Russian, 
dealing with the crimes and atrocities of 
the Russian revolution and the far-reach- 
ing vengeance of a Russian peasant who 
has followed a nobleman to America in- 
tent on his murder. 

Harry Carroll, singing a number of his 
old songs and introducing one or two 
new ones, scored one of the. big hits of 
the bill. From the usual songwriter's of- 
fering Mr. Carroll has succeeded in build- 
ing an act of much merit and one which 
is bound to score on any bill. » 

Cleveland Brenner's "Dream Fantasies" 
closed the bill and, considering the late- 
ness of the hour, held the audience in 
remarkably wel. < W. V. 



COLONIAL 

The electric sign in front of the house 
states that this is the sixteenth consecutive 
week that Belle Baker has played in New 
York. She should remain in town for 
fifty-two weeks each year, as she has 
broken many house records, and it appears 
that this week's business at the Colonial 
will be the best of the season. 

Monday afternoon the house was com- 
fortably filled; in fact, it was the best 
Monday afternoon in many months. The 
show got a good start and went along in 
rapid strides. Most of the acts scored a 
deserved hit. 

Hearst-Pathe News was followed by 
Seabury and Shaw in a singing and danc- 
ing offering. Seabury is a clever dancer 
and introduced a few steps that were heav- 
ily applauded. The girl makes a nice ap- 
pearance, but shows little talent. 

Phina and Company went to them from 
the start with one of the fastest singing 
and dancing acts in vaudeville. Miss 
Phina has been shouting coon songs for 
many years and has lost none of her voice 
volume. Bill Bailey puts over a comedy 
number in the right spot, and the girls 
are there when it comes to eccentric danc- 
ing. The little girl's imitation of Frances 
White singing "Mississippi" should have 
been placed earlier in the act, as it is not 
strong enough to follow the fast moving 
turn. 

Halligan and Sykes opened with a com- 
edy song by Halligan, followed by some 
gags. 

Then the curtain rose on an office set 
where Halligan endeavors to sell Miss 
Sykes some real estate, after learning 
that she has $1,000 with her. Many 
bright gags are interwoven into the skit 
and are capably handled by the clever 
team. Halligan is a splendid light come- 
dian and Miss Sykes capably assisted. 

Rockwell and Wood had a hard time at 
first but soon after had their listeners 
convulsed with laughter. Rockwell is a 
comedian who knows the art of delivery, 
while Wood is an excellent foil. Screams 
of laughter were in evidence almost all 
the time the boys were on view. The 
musical finish stopped the show. 

Hennine Shone and Company in "Mary 
Ann," a fantasy, was enjoyed. Glen An- 
ders is Miss Shone's main support and 
does very well. Most of the scenery 
should be repainted, as its appearance 
shows much wear. Miss Shone depicts 
characters from childhood to motherhood 
and conveys all in a clever manner. Five 
people are in the cast. After the act 
proper, Miss Shone made an appeal for 
funds for the American Red Cross. 

The Misses Campbell proceeded to en- 
tertain with a budget of songs that was 
accepted most cordially. A more refined 
act would be difficult to imagine. Both 
are artistes and deliver their wares in 
wonderful fashion. 

"The Corner Store" is a rural offering 
that was built for laughing purposes and 
it gets its full quota. The paint "bit" 
was a howl. Jimmy Allman works hard 
every minute and the surrounding com- 
pany shared in the laurels. 

Down next to closing came the incom- 
parable Belle Baker, a beadliner who not 
alone scores on her rendition of songs, 
but is also a box office magnet. Eight 
songs were delivered and the audience 
would have remained for a dozen more. 
Miss Baker was in splendid voice and put 
over a hit that will live long in her mem- 
ory. 

The Vivians displayed a flashy sharp 
shooting act. Both are crack shots. Then- 
setting is artistically arranged and fills 
out the picture. Many difficult shots 
were hit the first time. For a finish, they 
play "Yankee Doodle" on bells with their 
trusty rifles. J. D. 



ORPHEUM 

The show was given a fast start by 
Mancliichi and Company, a trio of Jap- 
anese equitilibrists, who gain favor as they 
go along for their good risley work and 
get laughs for the bright comedy that runs 
through their offering. 

The Geralds, a man and woman in the 
dress of gypsies, open their act with a 
violin and cello solo which they follow 
with a banjo number. They then go into 
one and play a selection using thirty-four 
mandolins, being well applauded for the 
feat. After playing n Hawaiian song, they 
finish with a very good war selection. 

The audience took to Tom Smith and 
Ralph Austin and their motor boat busi- 
ness just as soon as they made their ap- 
pearance, giving them a warm reception. 
The song and dance numbers with the 
dummies is a splendid bit of work, and 
was heartily appreciated, as was also the 
hokum stuff with which they finish the 
act. The girl in the offering deserves a 
bit of praise for the way she put the two 
songs over. 

Bertee Beaumont and Jack Arnold pre- 
sent their skit, "The Sargenteene," in 
which they go through a routine of comedy 
talk and songs. The skit opens in a re- 
cruiting office, with the girl trying to get . 
her quota filled. A young man comes is, 
is mistaken for an applicant and, before 
he is aware of what he is doing, is signing . 
the papers to join the army. A message 
calls the girl away then and he is left 
in charge of the office. Miss Beaumont 
then makes her appearance in the office 
and, before she knows it, is also signed 
for the Red Cross division. The pair than 
sing a song of the wise old owl, after 
which they do a few eccentric dances in 
which Miss Beaumont does some high kick- 
ing. The team was well applauded. 

Juliette Dika presents a good routine of 
songs and a beautiful array of gowns. 
Her personal appearance and the way she 
carries herself made a hit with the audi- 
ence. Her opening number is a song based 
on her life, from childhood up and into 
the theatrical profession. A ballad, for 
her second number, was well rendered. 
After singing two or three songs, she 
closes with a war song. She had to sing 
an encore of another war song, and was 
roundly applauded. 

Paul Dickey and Company next pre- 
sented their sketch "The Lincoln High- 
way." 

The Hickey Brothers, three in all, went, 
through a routine of songs and dim ■■ s 
that made a big hit with the audio: ce. 
They then went into some acrobatic stunts 
that were really clever. 

The Cameron Sisters, are presenting 
their repertoire of dances with the as- 
sistance of Burton Daniels, considered one 
of the best pianists in vaudeville, playing 
the accompaniments. The sisters are 
wearing some very nifty costumes and 
execute the routine of dance numbers 
which scored such a hit for them in "So 
Long, Letty." 

Felix Adlcr followed, entertaining with 
some comedy creations. With apparently 
no effort, he extracts laughs from the 
audience at pleasure, and good comedy 
out of his opening song. He then sings 
a few -hort rhymes that seem to go very 
well with the audience. He concludes his 
act with his well-known "I Know Them 
All" number, in which he introduces his 
ventriloquist burlesque. 

Lambert and Ball held the spot next to 
closing, and were one of the hits of the 
show. This pair found going over an easy 
matter. Miss Lambert's singing and 
Ball's piano playing shared honors alike. 
Miss Lambert's costumes received ap- 
plause from some women admirers in 
front, and the audience admired Ball's 
pluck in singing some other song writer's 
stuff. 

James Button and Company, a man and 
two women, closed the show with their 
entertaining bit of bareback stunts on 
the backs of galloping horses. M. L. 



8 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



December 5, 1917 




FIFTH AVENUE 

The Aerial De Groffs, man and woman, 
in number one position, found favor for 
their work on the rings and high cradle. 
The woman does all of the supporting and 
proves herself to possess remarkable 
strength for her size. They are thorough 
gymnasts, and well deserved the frequent 
applause that fell to their share during the 
progress of the act. 

The Sherlock Sisters and Jimmie Car- 
son, on in number two, scored a good 
sized hit with their comedy singing act 
(see "New Acts"). 

Harry Bulger, with songs and comedy 
patter, was one of the big hits of the bill. 
He starts the act with motion pictures of 
himself as an aviator, showing him getting 
into an aeroplane, the start and in full 
flight. Then a crash is heard and the 
lights go up, disclosing a drop represent- 
ing the exterior of the Punk Film Com- 
pany, with an aeroplane crashing through 
the skylight. Bulger sang four songs, with 
comedy patter between, and kept bis audi- 
ence with him to the end. 

Allan Dinehart, assisted by Marie Louise 
Dyer and company, appeared in "$5,000 a 
Tear," and were accorded hearty recogni- 
tion. The sketch tells the story of _ a 
young salesman who plans to get an in- 
crease of salary because of the inability 
of M—M and wife to live on his $5,000 
a year, owing to the expense he is put to 
in entertaining the firm's customers. 

He invites his employer to take dinner 
with him, and then instructs his wife to 
wear her oldest clothes and to prepare a 
most frugal meal. The "boss" arrives on 
time, and the young man seizes the first op- 
portunity to teQ him what he is up against. 
That his wife must dress poorly in made- 
over dresses and get along with one ser- 
vant. The young man's plea has taken 
some effect, when in comes his wife, wear- 
ing a new and elaborate evening gown, 
which she tells the "boss" she has just 
bought, and that it is her third for the 
season. A butler then brings in some 
mixed drinks and a maid delivers a tele- 
phone message. 

The "bosa" then believes the young man 
has lied and discharges him, but just then 
the maid appears and tells the young wife 
that the owner of the dress wants it re- 
turned at once, and that the man doing 
the butler and herself want the $1.50 
promised for their one and a half hour's 
work. 

This convinces the "boss" that the young 
man is all right, and he gives him a raise 
of $2,500. 

Mr. Dinehart, as the young husband, and 
Miss Dyer as the wife, did good work. The 
others had little to do. The sketch is 
founded on a good idea and has been well 
written. 

Cummings and Mitchell, man and 
woman, in their sketch, "One Afternoon," 
stopped the show. They sang four songs 
and finished with a dance. They were so 
well liked that after the sign was put out 
for the next number the applause con- 
tinned until Cummings made his appear- 
ance. He is a good slap-stick comedian, 
and his partner is a very attractive young 
lady. . 

The Amoros Sisters and company of six 
girls presented an act that almost went the 
full gamut of variety. The two sisters 
open in one with a song and dance. Then, 
on full stage, one of them plays the piano, 
while the other sings with the assistance 
of four girls, who go into a dance. A toe 
dance is then given, followed by a song 
rendered in French. The toe dancer then 
does some remarkable stunts on the trapeze 
and her sister does some "side" somer- 
saults. The sisters are clever and versatile. 
They won well earned success. 

Ryan and Lee presented their popular 
skit. "Hats and Shoes," and scored their 
usual big hit. 

Prosper and Maret. two men, closed the 
bill and held the audience with their clever 
athletic work. (See "New Acts.") 

"Dakota Dan." with William D. Hart 
as the star, was the feature film. E. W. 



AMERICAN 

A well arranged bill was received with 
marks of favor at the Monday night show 
here. Gold and Seal, in number one posi- 
tion, started off with a song and a few 
dance steps. They followed with a double 
soft-shoe dance, and then one of the team 
gave an imitation of George Primrose's 
famous dance, after which be gave his idea 
of the old style and modern buck and wing. 
They finished with a clog on roller skates. 
They are clever dancers, and were well re- 
ceived. 

Green and Miller presented an act made 
up of singing, card tricks, comedy talk and 
music After a little comedy dialogue the 
woman member of the team renders a song. 
The man follows with some tricks with 
cards, in which he proves himself to be a 
master of the art of palming. He then 
does a little juggling with blocks. His 
partner returns for another song, after 
which he plays a popular air on a long- 
necked violin. They finish with an instru- 
mental duet, the woman playing a cornet 
and her partner a trombone. They are 
pleasing entertainers and capital instru- 
mentalists. An encore fell to their portion. 

Don Fnlano, presented by Cowboy 
Elliott, unquestionably one of the most re- 
markable of the "educated" horses, was 
next on the bill, and scored a most de- 
cided success. The Don, in his various 
stunts, shows almost human intelligence. - 
In his routine he picks out colors, num- 
bers and flags designated by persons in the 
audience. He adds and subtracts sums, 
tells how many women are in a certain seat 
section, and does many other astonishing 
feats. Don captured much applause for his 
work. 

Ralph Bevan and Beatrice Flint have an 
act they call "A Slight Interruption," 
which they put over to a good sized hit. 
.They start with a comedy talk which is 
followed by a song by Beven. More comedy 
talk comes next, and they finish with a 
song. Bevan possesses a good voice, which 
he uses well, and they get their material 
over with telling effect. 

The Six Stylish Steppers, four men and 
two women, were on just before intermis- 
sion, and were cordially received for their 
dancing, at which they are adepts. Their 
opening number is a song and dance, fol- 
lowing which they offer five clogs and a 
soft-shoe dance, all of which are cleverly 
executed. 

Ward and Shubert, man and woman, had 
a pianologue and song offering which in- 
cluded two solo numbers and four duets. 
They received most hearty applause on their 
exit, but refused to respond with an 
encore. 

W. Olathe Miller and company, two men 
and two women, were seen in a comedy 
drama playlet entitled "On the Edge of 
Things." The skit has for its plot the 
proposed elopement of a young married 
man, the father of a babe, and a young 
girl. Just as they are preparing to elope 
the young wife appears with the babe, 
which she entrusts to the care of the Irish 
janitor, while she prepares her husband's 
supper. The janitor proves to be an angel 
in disguise. He prevents the elopement by 
telling the girl the true state of affairs, but 
keeps the wife in ignorance of her husband's 
intended flight. 

Miller did good character work as the 
janitor, and his supporting company did 
fairly well It is an interesting sketch, and 
has been well handled by the author. The 
scene is laid on the roof of a flat house 
with a special drop showing the tops of 
buildings in the distance. 

Andy Rice presented a Yiddish dialect 
monologue entitled "In Society," the sub- 
ject of which dealt chiefly with a banquet 
given by a prominent Jewish couple. He 
scored a hit, and took an encore. 

Pleas and Rector, in their gymnastic 
offering, closed the bill, and received much 
approval for hand-to-hand, head-to-head 
balancing and other stunts. 

Julian El tinge, in "The Clever Mrs. Car- 
fax," was the feature film. E. W. 



CITY 

A well arranged bill pleased the audi- 
ence at this theatre on Monday afternoon. 

The Bruno, Kramer Trio, two men and 
a woman, opened the show with their 
Roman ring act. They are capital per- 
formers, working with ease and grace and 
make an excellent appearance. They were 
well liked by the audience which gave 
them a good hand. 

Kenny and Walsh next appeared and 
started off with a song. They then ex- 
change some jokes that are a bit old, after 
which they do an eccentric high kicking 
dance. Miss Walsh gave an exhibition of 
fancy dancing, followed by a song by her 
partner, and they then finish the act with 
a good dance number. They make a 
good appearance and are clever entertain- 
ers. The woman has a pleasing person- 
ality and wears some very attractive 
dresses, making three changes. The act 
came in for a good amount of applause. 

Arthur DeVoy and Company, two men 
and two women, presented their comedy 
sketch and won favor. The skit tells of 
a man and wife who are drifting apart. 
The family's friend sees the state of af- 
fairs and tries to straighten matters out 
by trying to make the husband and wife 
jealous of each other. In the meantime, 
the friend is falling in love with the 
mother-in-law of the husband. After a 
few heated quarrels between the man and 
wife, everything is settled when the friend 
announces that he and their mother are 
to be wed. The work of the four was 
well done. 

The fourth episode of the Battle of 
Arras, showing the Retreat of the Ger- 
mans, held the attention of the people for 
the next fifteen minutes. 

After the picture came Oakes and De- 
Lure, man and girl, who opened their act 
with a neatly done clog dance. The cur- 
tain rises and the pair do a series of 
dances, their first being a one-step, fol- 
lowed by an eccentric dance by Oakes, 
in which he uses the Russian hoch step. 
His partner, dressed as a Red Cross nurse, 
then does a few dancing steps and they 
finish with a whirlwind dance. The turn 
is neatly dressed and was heartily ap- 
plauded. 

Curtis and Gilbert, in the make-up of 
school children, open with a song by Miss 
Gilbert, who then does a few dancing 
steps. . Curtis follows and immediately 
got laughs out of the audience by his 
make-up. He then sings a song, after 
which they put some comedy talk across 
that hit the right spot. They close their 
offering with an Oriental song, in which 
Curtis dresses as a Chinaman. This team 
also received a hearty reception. 

Joseph Byron Totten and Company, 
three men and a woman, open their sketch 
in one, with two pals who are in the safe 
cracking business, talking over the in- 
tended visit to their pal's home and to the 
mother who is waiting for the return of 
her boy. The curtain rises on an old- 
fashioned country kitchen, and the two 
pals being welcomed by the old woman. 
After being told about the mortgage that 
was to be paid that day and being with- 
out funds, the boys decide to make the 
first one who comes along the goat for the 
$300 needed to pay off the mortgage. As 
the squire happens to be the first, nat- 
urally he has to give up the money, which 
he does under much protest. 

Nat Carr stopped the show with his 
songs, jokes and comedy patter. He starts 
off with a great rush by singing a comedy 
song. He has the goods and certainly 
knows how to put them over. He had to 
make a speech before he was allowed to 
leave the stage. 

The Four Bonessettis, dressed in naval 
style white serge suits, offered a clean- 
cut equilibristic act consisting of hand-to- 
hand and head-to-hand balancing. They do 
single and double twists to hand-to-hand 
stands, which are very clever and earned 
the approval of the audience- 
Mary Pickford, in "The Little Princess," 
closed the show. M. L. 



DEATH CAUSES COMPANY LAY-OFF 

Dyebsvoxe, la., Nov. 28. — While Hal- 
ton Powell's "Broadway After Dark" 
Company was playing in State Center last 
Wednesday, Laurel Bennetts, of the com- 
pany, was notified by long distance tele- 
phone that her brother had passed away at 
Glarinda. Miss Bennetts left for Clarinda 
after the performance. On this account, 
the show was forced to lay off last Thurs- 
day, Friday and Saturday, again resum- 
ing its tour at Waterloo Sunday matinee 
and night. 

Taking advantage of the lay-off. Manager 
McAdam took a flying trip to Chicago and 
Indianapolis, the last named being the 
main office of the Woodhall Amusement 
Company, owners of "Broadway After 
Dark." 



NEW HAVEN SEES FAIRY TALE 
New Haven, Dec 4. — "The Golden 
Goose" opened at the Shubert here last 
night, under the direction of Silvio Hein. 
The play is in the form of a fairy tale, and 
one of the novelties was the presence of a 
chorus of twenty children. Edgar Smith 
and Herbert Reynolds wrote the book, and 
Schuyler Greene the lyrics. Eighty per- 
sons were in the cast, including Muriel 
Yvindow, James Foy, Muriel Southern, 
Mary Lane, Edna Crawford, James 
Kearney, Mary Milburn, Carl Gordon and 
Helen Borden. Anton Heindl conducted 
the orchestra. 



MUST KEEP CHAIRS OFF STAGE 

Syracuse, Dec 1. — An order was issued 
last week by Commissioner of Public 
Safety W. W. Nicholson prohibiting man- 
agers of local theatres from placing extra 
chairs on the stage or in the aisles. 

For several years it has been the cus- 
tom, where the crowds were too large for 
the seating capacity of the house, to put 
chairs on the stage and in the passage 
ways. 



TO TAX CABARET ADMISSIONS 

Cabaret patrons must pay a war tax on 
admissions, according to a decision handed 
down this week by the Treasury Depart- 
ment. Where no admission is charged, it 
is estimated that twenty per cent of the 
money spent on refreshments shall be 
equivalent to admission, and a tax of ten 
per cent will be levied on this. The tax 
does not apply to places where only music 
and no dancing is given. 



THEATRE CELEBRATES 

Logakspoet, Ind., Nov. 29. — The fourth 
anniversary of the Colonial -Theatre was 
celebrated during Thanksgiving week by 
Manager Harlow Byerly, he offering a 
Pickford picture and Boyle and Wolfolk's 
La Salle Musical Comedy Company. The 
Colonial is enjoying excellent business, and 
was entirely redecorated after a bad fire 
last January. 



STUDENTS AFFECT BUSINESS 

Aim Akboh, Mich., Dec 3. — Absence of 
about 25 per cent of the usual college at- 
tendance at the university here has cut into 
the theatres very seriously. 

LANGTRY GIVES "OVERTONES" 

London, Eng„ Dec 3. — Lily Langtry 
opened tonight at the Coliseum in "Over- 
tones," a playlet first presented in the 
States at the Comedy Theatre, New York, 
by the Washington Square Players. 



GLORIA L. FRIEND ARRIVES 

A baby girl was born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Al Friend, of Friend and Downing, at 
their home in Philadelphia, Pa., on Nov. 
27. The little miss will be named Gloria 
Lillian Friend. 



THEATRE TAX $100 A DAY 

Decatub, HL, Dec L — The theatre tax 
in Decatur, ID., is estimated at being about 
$100 per day or $3,000 per month. No 
collections have yet been made. 



December 5, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 




VALESKA SURATT 



Theatre — Riverside. 
Style — Dramatic sketch. 
Time — Twenty-five minutes. 
Setting— Special. 

"The Purple Poppy" is the name of 
Paul M. Potter and C. V. De Vonde's 
dramatic playlet, in which Valesca 
Saratt is making her reappearance in 
vaudeville. 

The scene is laid in a private dining 
room in "Little Italy," in Greenwich 
Village, New York. Here Nicholas 
Sarahoff, a Russian nobleman, has a 
dinner engagement with "The Pnrple 
Poppy," as one of the ■ ■ inter Garden's 
most attractive beauties is known. 

She arrives and, as the dinner pro- 
gresses she urges him to drink and to 
tell of conditions in Russia. He boasts 
of his treatment of the peasantry, and 
laughs as he tells of torturing the men 
while the women were confined in a 
church and the Cossacks turned upon 
them. He gleefully relates of his ex- 
periences with one of the peasants whom 
he burned in the face with a lighted 
cigar, and finally had knouted to death. 

She plies him with more drink, until 
be cannot arise, and then, leaping to her 
feet, tells him that she is not an Amer- 
ican, but a Russian herself, and the man 
he had murdered was her sweetheart. 
Snatching a silken scarf from her neck, 
a present from the nobleman, she throws 
it around his neck, and with a powerful 
twist chocks him to death. 

The noise of the struggle arouses the 
waiter, who rushes for the police but, 
before their arrival, a crash in the sky- 
light is heard, and a man slides down a 
rope in the room. He is her brother, 
who had been following the nobleman, 
intent upon killing him. 

The police arrive and put her through 
the third degree, attempting to force a 
confession. She denies all knowledge of 
the murder and, just as one begins to 
wonder how it will end, the brother, 
flashing a United States government 
badge, announces that he is authorized to 
take her with him. 

Bliss Suratt, as the "Purple Poppy," 
does some remarkably fine acting, in 
which she is well supported by Howard 
Hall as Nicholas Sarahoff, the Russian 
nobleman. Ralph Delmore, as the- police 
captain, does some excellent work, and 
the balance of the cast of three were 
good. 

Aside from the finish of the sketch, 
which is rather far fetched, it is strong 
in dramatic values, and in the hands of 
Miss Suratt and her company will make 
a feature for any bill. W. V. 



FANNIE'S LITTLE GAME 

Theatre — Greenpomt. 

Style — Comedy sketch. 

Time — Seventeen minutes. 

Setting— Parlor. Full stage. 

- Fannie'8 little game worked out only 
fairly well and there are parts that need 
explaining. The company consists of 
four people, two married couples. 

One of the men has an appointment 
with a girl at the French Students' Ball, 
but, being disappointed, picks out an- 
other one. Both being masked, recogni- 
tion is impossible. 

His wife finds out that he was at the 
ball, however, and an altercation fol- 
lows. His friend tries to straighten ont 
matters by explaining that it was be and 
not her husband that was at the ball, 
having lent him his costume. The sec- 
ond man's wife hears this and then they 
engage in a wordy war. The punch oc- 
curs when the first man's wife confesses 
to her husband that she was at the ball 
also and that she had been making love 
to his friend. 

The sketch needs a thorough working 
out before it is presentable for the better 
«m«ll time. L. R. G. 




'THE RECKLESS EVE 



Theatre — Palace. 
Style — Musical comedietta. 
Time — Forty-two minutes. 
Setting— Special. 

In offering a revamped version of 
"The Night Clerk," the William B. 
Priedlander corporation decided on 
'The Reckless Eve" as the title. 

The act opens with a snow scene in 
Times Square, showing the high build- 
ings as a background. 

The story starts here. A millionaire, 
in love with an heiress, is being chased 
by a policeman, and chances to meet a 
character of the neighborhood, who has 
a job as a night clerk. The rich fellow 
decides to change places with the clerk, 
and gives him his clothes and $300 as 
an inducement. The scene then shifts 
to the lobby of the hotel, and here most 
of the action of the skit takes place. 
The heiress arrives to celebrate New 
Year's ■ Eve, and runs into her sweet- 
heart, who is disguised as the clerk, 
while the clerk is making love to the 
telephone operator. 

A comedy character in the way of the 
engineer of the hotel is introduced, and 
he gets the most of the laughs in the act. 
A chorus of sixteen girls and four boys 
flit through the action, and sing and 
wear gorgeous wardrobe in good style. 
There is little or no dancing introduced, 
although the program states that Earl 
Lindsey is responsible for this part of 
the entertainment. Seven musical num- 
bers, nicely arranged, and well handled, 
were rendered in good style, and the 
talk was of the snappy kind. 

Walter Shannon, as the millionaire, did 
what he had to do in a fine manner, as 
did also Jack Mundy, who plays the 
original night clerk. Of the women, 
Ellen Terry Boyle sang and graced the 
stage bewitcbingly as the heiress, and 
Connie Craven charmed all with her voice 
and general performance of the telephone 
girl. Grover Webb was impossible in a 
minor part, and Cecil Summers won 
most of the big laughs as the engineer. 

"The Reckless Eve" is a corking good 
entertainment of the lighter sort, run- 
ning smoothly and quite speedily, consid- 
ering the Him consumed. The produc- 
ers have, evidently, not spared any ex- 
pense in giving vaudeville a great flashy 
tabloid with girlie girls, melodious 
music, stylish clothes and a good comedy 
story. S. L H. 



HARRY TICHE 

Theatre — Riverside. 

Style — Songs and stories. 

Time — Fifteen minutes. 

Setting — In one. 

Opening in one, Harry Tighe tells" of 
an Arab love song which he is to sing. 
In detail, he describes its story and the 
author's idea in writing the lyric After 
he has finished he adds that now that 
every one knows all about the song, there 
is no need of singing it. He then goes 
into a special song, and after a piano 
is rolled out, introduces Alice Lucey, his 
accompanist, who furnishes an excellent 
musical setting, not only for his songs, 
but his stories as well. Several of the 
songs are of the special variety, and are 
hardly up to the standard of the pub- 
lished numbers he is using. The "Wed- 
ding Bells" number is particularly good, 
and more of that variety will help his act 
greatly. He has several good stories, but 
the act needs considerable bracing up by 
the addition of more suitable material be- 
fore it can hope to successfully fill any- 
thing more than an early position on the 
big time bills. W. V. 



LADY DUFF GORDON 

Theatre — Palace. 
Style — Fashion parade. 
Time — Forty-two minutes. 
Setting— Special. 

"Here I am,", spoke Lady Duff Gor- 
don, as she stepped out of the fold of 
a blue plush drop. She is an auburn- 
haired lady, and was dressed in black 
velvet with white boots and carried a 
few flowers. 

Her ladyship then announced that her 
sister, Elinor Glynn, had encountered an 
experience while at the fighting lines 
which would form the basis of her own 
pantomimic, musical, fashion revue in 
aid of the French war charities, en- 
titled "Fleurette's Dream at Personne." 

That concerns a poor girl, who is 
caught in a cellar near the fighting lines 
with several other sufferers, and goes to 
sleep amidst the noise of the firing can- 
non. She dreams she is rich, and wears 
a great many new and stylish clothes, 
and sees others wearing them. 

A company of fourteen is used to put 
"Fleurette's Dream" over and, while the 
program stated that several scenes would 
be shown, but one at the opening and one 
during the running of the act were on 
display. 

However, during the running of the 
act, mannequins strutted across the stage 
with many varied colored wearing out- 
fits, differently made and designed, much 
to the delight of a multitude of dressmak- 
ers who attended the performance to get 
a line on the new gowns invented by her 
royal highness. They were not disap- 
pointed from a sartorial point of view. 
The act, or parade, interested the fem- 
inine part of the audience, and held the 
male contingent, as a closing feature, on 
account of the prettiness of the models. 

As a drawing card, no one can take 
it away from Lady Duff Gordon, who is 
playing a royal engagement at the Pal- 
ace. S. L H. 



ELEANOR COCHRANE 

Theatre — Riverside. 

Style — Singing. 

Time — Twenty-two minutes. 

Set ting — Special. 

With a beautiful blue silk cyclorama 
drop, three gorgeous changes of gowns 
and a concert pianist as an accompanist, 
Eleanor Cochrane, the American soprano, 
who has been singing abroad in grand 
opera, made her vaudeville debut and 
scored a decided success. 

Miss Cochrane is a stately blond of 
charming personality, and a voice and 
vocal method which - were a delight to 
the ear. Entering through the centre 
of the drop, she first sang in Italian an 
operatic aria, following it with a pop- 
ular song. 

After this Eric Zardo. her accompan- 
ist, rendered a solo, in which he dis- 
played marvelous technique and fine 
breadth of tone. This gave Miss 
Cochrane time to change to another 
beautiful gown, after which she effec- 
tively Bang the old ballad "When You 
and I Were Young, Maggie." Then 
came another piano solo and a costume 
change when the "Long, Long Trail" 
song was sung with remarkable effec- 
tiveness. Miss Cochrane has a patriotic 
chorus to the song which, rendered with 
piano and orchestral accompaniment, 
was electrifying. 

Miss Cochrane's voice is a pure, well 
trained soprano, smooth and clear 
throughout the entire register, and her 
enunciation is well nigh perfect. 

Acts such as Miss Cochrane's are a 
valuable addition to vaudeville. 

W. V. 



JOS. BYRON TOTTEN & CO 

Theatre — Harlem Opera House. 

Style— Playlet. 

Time — Fifteen minutes. 

Setting — Two specials. 

Joseph Byron Totten is a good actor, 
but bis sketch is so badly written that 
it frequently drags. The poor nature of 
his supporting people also tends to 
weaken the offering even farther. There 
is little novelty in the play, but at time* 
it has the heart appeal which is neces- 
sary to vaudeville. This may carry it 
over. It should be entirely re-written, 
however, eliminating the many solilo- 
quies, which are unnecessary. 

Totten and his assistant are two 
crooks in a small Connecticut town. 
They decide to ask for a meal and en- 
ter the house of an old woman, who is 
expecting her son to arrive that day and 
pay off the mortgage. The crooks recog- 
nize her son's name and realize that he 
is a pal of their's doing time in the peni- 
tentiary. 

They decide to pay off the mortgage, 
and, when the Squire comes to collect it, 
one crook holds him up for the' money 
while the woman is oat of the room. 
They then go, and the woman kneels 
down to pray for them as the curtain 
falls. 

Some good comedy lines and situations 
are present The whole is written In 
what is supposed to be crook dialect, but 
most of it is incomprehensible. P. K. 

PROSPER AND MARET 

Theatre — Fifth Avenue. 

Style — Hand balances and lifts. 

Time — Eight minutes. 

Setting— /» three. 

Prosper and Maret are two men who 
style themselves "Belgian College Ath- 
letes." They have a routine of hand lifts 
and balances that are all good, while 
several are remarkable. 

They perform hand-stand stunts from 
a variety of lifts and prove themselves to 
belong to the "natural gymnast" class. 

Their feature stunt is probably that in 
which the smaller of the two stands on a 
pedestal, while his partner stands with 
his back to him six paces away on the 
stage. They each put on a blindfold. The 
man on the stage leans over backwards 
with his hands outstretched and catches 
bis partner, who leaps head first from the 
pedestal, and brings him to a band stand. 
It is a most unusual feat, and when 
performed at the Monday matinee drew 
forth hearty applause. E. W. 



OCTAVO 

Theatre— Loew's Delancey St. 
Style — Singing. 
Time — Ten minutes. 
Setting — In one. 

Octavo is a young lady who sings a 
selection of songs, in as poor a style as 
this reviewer has yet heard. 

Wearing a pretty gown she starts her 
routine with a popular number, which 
she follows with a war selection poorly 
rendered. Her third and final number 
is an Irish melody. 

Octavo should learn the knack of put- 
ting her material over. M. L. 



NON PLUS ULTRA 

Theatre — Loew's National (try-outs). 
Style — Posing. 
Time — Ten minutes. 
Setting — Full stage. 

Four women and a man present thia 
posing act, in which they do a series of 
poses in white alabaster. 

The subjects are: A Symphony, The 
Three Graces, Justice. Quo Vadis, The 
Marathon, Diana, the Huntress and The 
Martyr. 

The offering is mnch along ordinary 
lines of posing acts but is very well done. 

M . L. 



10 



TH^NtW YORK CLIPPER 



December 5, 1917 



DRJ$MJi71C<md MUS1CJ3 




"ART AND OPPORTUNITY" 
GIVES MISS PAINTER 
A SPLENDID CHANCE 



"ART AND OPPOHTUNITX." — A 
comedy In three acta by Harold Cnapla. 
Produced Monday night. Nor. 26, at 
too Knickerbocker Theatre. 

OAST. 

Tenby .Martin Haydoo 

George Frederick Goaaamore. Grant Stewart 
Algernon George Frederick Goaaamore. 

Edward Dooglaa 

Pauline Cbarerelle Eleanor Painter 

Lady O'Hojle Katharine Stewart 

Algernon Horatio Goaaamore Cecil Yapp 

Henry Bently Prank Mil la 



"Art and Opportunity," -written by the 
late Harold Giapin, who was killed in a 
battle at Loos in 1015, was presented by 
Richard Lambert. 

The story revolves around Mrs. Pauline 
QievereUe, a young American widow in 
search of a second matrimonial venture, 
who makes an attack on an aristocratic 
old English family. She first engages 
herself to the son of the household, one 
Algernon George Gossamore, but, tiring 
of him, she throws him over for his 
father, the Earl of Worpleadon. She soon 
tires of the father, too, in spite of his 
title, and finally settles on Henry Bent- 
ly, the private secretary of the Duke of 
Kells, whom the Duke has sent to ward 
off an expected attack of the widow, as 
he fears she would prove too much for 
him. 

Bently it is who first really awakens 
her heart, and to break down hia appar- 
ent diffidence she sings a song of spring 
and love. This only partly docs the 
work. A note she sends him is the final- 
ity, and brings him to his senses and to 
the point where he proposes, and the 
widow has at last found her master. 

"Art and Opportunity*' was originally 
produced in London, where it met success 
with Marie Tempest as Pauline. If the 
decision of the first night audience can 
be taken as final the play will also find 
great favor here. It is brightly written, 
with a good basic idea, and is admirably 
constructed. 

The company has been well selected. 
Eleanor Painter, in the role of Pauline, 
has a character away from those we have 
been accustomed to see her portray, but 
she plays it with a touch of subtlety that 
shows how well she has mastered her art. 
She makes the widow a most fascinating 
creature, and so artfully does she sing 
of the tender passion that it is little won- 
der that her two vocal efforts each make 
a conquest. 

Cecil Yapp, Edward Douglas, Grant 
Stewart, Frank Mills and Katharine 
Stewart all did good work. 

WHAT THE DAILIES SAY. 

Sun — Brilliant dialogue. 
Times — Charming romancg. 
World — Subtle in it* humors. 
Herald — Charming comedy. 



"BRIGHT AND EARLY" PRODUCED 

Atxjlktic Crrr. N. J.. Dec 3.— "Bright 
and Early" was given its premiere here 
tonight by H. H. Frazee and Daniel Ar- 
thur. The umpany includes John Wes- 
ley. Evelyn Varden, Nellie King, Gabrielle 
Gray, Rose Morrison, Florence Edney and 
George Sidney. 

LONDON TO SEE HOBART FARCE 

George V. Hobart has made arrange- 
ments for a spring production in London. 
Eng., of his farce "What's Your Husband 
Doing?" Negotiations are pending to take 
the prsent company to the English 
metropolis. 

"WHY MARRY' COMING TO ASTOR 

Selwyn and Company's production, 
"Why Marry." now playinjr in Chicago, 
will be brought to New York to open on 
Christmas night at the Astor Theatre. 



PRODUCE PLAY IN YIDDISH 

Springfield, Mass., Dec 3. — David 
Levinson and Madame Bloch have produced 
a new play in Yiddish at the Court Square 
Theatre here It is called "The Value of 
a Mother" and deals with the present war. 
They also took the leading roles. 



'THE GRASS WIDOW" 
TUNEFUL AND GAY 
MUSICAL COMEDY 



RETD ADAPTS YIDDISH PLAY 

"Clear Conscience," a Yiddish play by 
Max Gabel, has been adapted by Hal Beid 
for the English speaking stage. In its 
original form the play had a long run at 
Gabel's Theatre, on the Bowery. 



"SIX MONTHS OPTION" 
A LIGHT COMEDY AT 
PRINCESS THEATRE 



"SIX MONTHS OPTION."— A comedy 
in three acts by AnceUa Analee. Pre- 
sented on Thursday night, November 
29. at the Princess. 

CAST. 

Franklin Kendal Stanley C. Ridges 

Andrew McClellen W. T. Clark 

Fanny Kendal .....Mums Gombel 

Ella McClellen Url. Jacques Martin 

Marion Eastman Jane Marbury 

Ernesto GlaneUo David Qulxano 

Frieda Marian 7~ 



One of the lightest of the many light 
comedies that have been produced this sea- 
son is AnceUa Anslee's "Six Months Op- 
tion," which was presented by Dorothy 
Donnelly. 

There is little novelty in the play, which 
tells of the old story of the husband who 
has grown tired of his wife. In this case 
a man who has a thoroughly good wife 
and helpmate becomes interested in a 
mannish business woman who continually 
talks of the stock market. This sort of 
conversation evidently pleases the man, 
who finally enters into a six months' con- 
tract with the business woman, whereby 
they are to become sentimental partners. 

By the terms of this unusual document, 
after ten o'clock at night they are to 
have the living room of the apartment to 
themselves, while the wife retires to her 
own room to spend the time as she best 
knows how. 

Needless to say matters of this sort 
can not endure for long, and the wife also 
meets one in whom she becomes inter- 
ested. He happens to be an Italian with 
a voice and, as she is musically inclined, 
it charms her. He expresses in many 
ways the things she has failed to find in 
her husband and she is on the verge of 
joining him in the romantic life which he 
offers. 

Her better nature, however, soon as- 
serts itself and the idea of a life with 
anyone but her husband is dismissed from 
her mind in an instant. 

In the end she wins her husband back, 
who has in the meantime grown hope- 
lessly tired of the business woman. 

In the role of the wife, Minna Gombel 
was altogether charming, Mrs. Jacques 
Martin did some excellent work, and Stan- 
ley C. Ridges was good. 

"David Quixano acted and sang surpris- 
ingly well. 

WHAT THE DAILIES SAY. 

Times — A moralistic farce. '- 

Sun — Altogether harmless. 

Herald — Has many taught. 

World — A fitful flight in comedy. 

Tribune — Mild comedy. 



SELWYNS CHANGE FARCE NAME 

Selwyn and Company last week changed 
the name of "Losing Eloise," the Fred 
Jackson farce at the Harris Theatre, to 
"The Naughty Wife." The change was 
made in the middle of the week, both names 
being used for two days, when the former 
title was dropped entirely. 



"THB GRASS WIDOW."— A musical 
comedy, book and lyrics by Charming 
Pollock and Bennold Wolf. Adapted 
from Blssoa and' St. AJbln's "Le Peril 
Jaune." Music by Louis A. Hlrsch. 
Presented Monday night, December 3, 
at the Liberty. 

CAST. 

An m-Hnmored Man J. C. Klein 

Annette Helen Lowell 

Vincent Tom O'Haxe 

Anatol Pirert George Marlon 

Larry Doyle Root. Emmet Keane 

Dorothy Ethel Stede 

Florence Edna Waddell 

Betty Marion Ford 

Angle .' May Hopkins 

Denise Natalie Alt 

Colette...; Gretchen Eastman 

Femand Victor Morley 

Fanebaa Marlon Phillips 

Claire. ......... ..........Anita Franceses 

Jacques. .................. .Howard Marsh 

Lucille Marguerite L. Fritts 

Monsieur Fareran Joseph D. Miller 



OPENING DATES AHEAD 

"A Night in Spain" — Cocoanut Grove, 
December 6. 

"Words and Music" — 44th Street, De- 
cember 22. 

"Flo-Flo;' — Cort, December 24. ' 
" "Why Marry" — Aston, December 25. 

"Cohan Revue, 1918" — Cohan & Harris 
Theatre, January L 

-r- '*•! 

SHOWS CLOSING 

"Hltcby-Koo" — 44th St., Dec 8. 
"L-'Elevatlon" — Playhouse, Dec. 8. 
"The Very Idea" — Astor, Dec, 16. 

SHOWS CLOSING OUT OF TOWN 

"Misalliance" — Washington, D. <X, Dec 17. 



With a clear, well-defined plot, which, 
contrary to the majority of musical 
plays, did not get lost early in' the first 
act, tuneful melodies and plenty of 
humor, "The Grass Widow" made a lively 
debut this week at the Liberty. 

The piece from the rise of the curtain 
started out with a vim and freshness 
which continued almost uninterruptedly ' 
until the end of the performance, and 
the all-round excellence of the singing and 
acting company combined to make the 
piece thoroughly enjoyable. 

The piece is adapted from Bisson and 
St Albin'a "The Yellow Peril," and is the 
story of a pretty French girl, who, fear- 
ing that her approaching marriage will 
ruin the career of her intended, runs 
away and becomes a waitress in a rail- 
way station restaurant. 

Disappointed because her lover had not 
searched and found her she accepts the 
attention of the restaurant owner, and a 
civil- marriage unites them. Before the 
church ceremony can be performed the 
lover arrives and bears her away and, 
after obtaining a divorce, is ready to 
marry her himself, when the restaurant 
owner arrives to upset everything. 

Needless to say the plans of the res- 
taurant keeper to separate her from her 
lover avail nothing, and in the end they 
are happily married. 

Miss Natalie Alt played the little 
French waitress with much charm and 
sang finely. George Marion, under whose 
direction the piece was produced, was ex- 
cellent as the restaurant keeper, and 
Helen Lowell, the cashier, in love with 
her employer, was exceedingly funny. 

Howard Marsh made of the young lover 
an attractive personality and displayed a 
tenor voice of exceptional quality. Rob- 
ert Emmet Keane won much applause for 
some clever bits, and one of the best topi- 
cal songs of the year fell to him. 

Gretchen Eastman, the soubrette of the 
piece, shared honors with Miss Alt and 
danced and sang finely. 

"GOLDEN GOOSE" PRODUCED 

Atlantic Crrr, Nov. 29. — "The Golden 
Goose," a spectacular musical comedy by 
Silvio Hein, Edgar Smith, Herbert Rey- 
nolds and Schuyler Green, was presented 
tonight at the Apollo. The cast includes: 
Joe Cook, Muriel Window, Ernest Adams, 
Muriel Southern, Mary Milburn, Mary 
Lane, Jimmie Fox, Alfred Deery, John 
Kearny. Edna Archer Crawford, Carl Gor- 
don and Dulce. 



"ART AND OPPORTUNITY" MOVES 

"Art and Opportunity" moved last Mon- 
day night from the Knickerbocker to the 
Cort Theatre. 



CHURCH IS NOW THEATRE 
St. Louis, Mo., Dec 3.— The Little The- 
atre of this city opened its season here 
Saturday with three new one-act plays. 
There are : "Beau of Bath," "Campbell of 
Kilhmor" and "Suppressed Desires." The 
theatre was formerly known 'as the Bethe- 
lem Church. 



ADOLF PHUJPPS NEW 
OPERETTA "AUTO LOVE" 
IS HIT AT YORKVILLE 

The latest production at the Yorkville, 
the three-act operetta "Autoliebchen" 
("Auto Love"), music by Jean Gilbert and 
book by Jean Kxen, promises well to be 
the biggest Mt the management has bad 
in years, and it seems safe to prophesy 
a long and triumphant run. The music is 
exceedingly pleasing, there being an al- 
most endless number of song hits which, 
from the very first, found favor. Prac- 
tically all of them had to be repeated, 
some three and even four times, and espe- 
cially a melodious ditty, "Ja, das haben 
die Madchen so genie," which was finally 
repeated by the entire audience. 

Herr Gort Goritz aa stage manager has 
succeeded in bringing out all the possi- 
bilities of the play to best advantage, the 
dance numbers especially being well drilled 
and splendidly executed, full of variety 
and surprises. They played an important 
part towards the success of the show. 

As to the rendition, every member of 
the cast deserves the highest praise. There 
is, first of all, Mizi Gizi in the part of the 
young, rich and vivacious widow who has 
just remarried. For the first time in her 
career on American soil Mme. Gizi baa 
found an opportunity to show herself as 
a full-fledged operetta soubrette, and she 
performs her difficult task so well that 
she surpasses any of her previous offer- 
ings and surprised even her most ardent 
admirers. , 

She found a partner well suited for his 
task in Herr Oscar Hoffmann, who, aside 
from being the owner of a very pleasant 
baritone voice, turned out to be a clever 
dancer who has laid aside all of the 
stealth iness which formerly used to mar 
the effect of his work to a large extent. 

Herr Kurt Goritz as the bashful, clumsy, 
provincial youth was a whole show by 
himself and brought forth screams of 
laughter. His dance number "To the Left" 
was splendidly executed and had to be 
repeated several times. 

A soubrette part of secondary impor- 
ance had been entrusted to Edit ha- Benjar, 
who played, sang and danced well. Frau. 
lein Hertha von Turk, a newcomer, worn 
favor with the audience by her youth and 
beauty, with which she combines well in 
the role of the energetic mother, anxious 
to round out the number of her husbands. 
Lie Schmidt was excellent as the anti- 
quated spinster pining for a home of her 
own; she has proved once more her ability 
to portray grotesque comedy parts well. 

Willy Frey and Herr Hansen acted their 
respective roles — that of an elderly Hun- 
garian and a well-to-do cooper — well. The 
rest of the cast, Hedda Bieger, Grete Rie- 
ger, Fritri Graf, Lilly Ackermann, Louise 
Hauser, Otto Berg, Louis Koch, Hermann 
Korn and Fritz Kiedaisch, took good care 
of smaller parts entrusted to them. 

BOBOLINA. 



"THE THREE BEARS" SOLD 

The English and Australian rights for 
Edward Childs Carpenter's new comedy, 
"The Three Bears," have been disposed of 
by Charles Frohman, Inc.. through J. A. 
E. Malone, for many years George Edwards' 
London manager. 



December 5, 1917 



THE NEW YORK Cfc*PP<ER 



n 



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Founded hUBbr Frank 
Pabli»hed by the 
CUPPER CORPORATION 
Orland W.Vaughan... President and Secretary 

Frederick C MuUer Treasurer 

1604 Broadway. New York 

Telephone Bryant 6117-6118 

ORLAND W. VAUCHAN, EDITOR 

Panl C Sweinhart, Managing Editor 



NEW YORK, DECEMBER S, 1917. 



Entered June 24, 1879. at the Poit Office at 
New York, N. Y., ai second class matter, un- 
der the act of March 3, 1879. - 
THE CLIPPER is issued every WEDNESDAY 
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A theatrical manager last week attrib- 
uted the depression to false economy on 
the part of the public. ' That explanation 
seems to be near the right track. Not 
false economy ! Cartful economy is bet- 
ter. With the prices of living commodi- 
ties sky-high and Mr. Hubby trying his 
best to make two and two make four, 
and with a tax on this and a tax on that, 
he's going to be very careful of where he 
goes for amusement. He's not going to 
run to see a show that is all title and 
no show or all star and no show. He's 
going to take his time and find out a 
thousand and one things before he slaps 
down two dollars for a seat. 

We've had some terrible excuses for 
shoWB during the past season. Where are 
all our great so-called great American 
play-wrighta I Maybe an improvement in 
their output would help the business 
somewhat. 



Address All Communications to 

THE NEW YORK CUPPER 

1(S4 Broadway, New York 

Registered Cable Aidrtu, "Aothoutt.' 



The CLirrsa can h obtained wholesale ajtd 
beta : :. , at our agents. Daw's Steamship Agency, 
17 Green Street, Charing Cross Road, London, 
W. G, England; Brentano's News Depot, 37 
Avenue de l'Opera, Paris. France; Manila, P. L: 
Gordon & Gotch, 123 Pitt; Manila Book and 
Stationery Co., 128 Eacolta Street, Sydney, 
N. S. W., Anstralia. 

WILL IT TAKE? 

The announcement of Claude Gilling- 
water that he will shortly revive the one- 
act playlet, "A Strenuous Rehearsal," 
should prove interesting to those vaudevil- 
liana who are on the alert in an effort 
to detect what will please the public, for 
the little piece is one of the most success- 
ful ever presented in vaudeville. It has 
a record of 104 consecutive weeka playing 
to its credit, of which it may well be 

proud. 

"A Strenuous Rehearsal" was first pro- 
duced in Chicago about sixteen years ago 
and is said to nave been the first one-act 
play ever presented in vaudeville in this 
country. Martin Beck had run across the 
piece, taken a notion to it and decided 
to put it on. Gillingwater, at that time, 
was playing with Mrs. Leslie Carter and, 
after looking over the field, Beck sent for 
him and told him that he wanted him to 
take the leading part in it. He did and 
the little piece scored a success that kept 
it working steadily for two years. 

Just how it will be received nowadays 
is problematical, the changing times hav- 
ing either debauched or elevated our vaude- 
ville tastes to a point where it may not 
be acceptable. Different persons whose 
experience makes them capable of express- 
ing intelligent opinions, seem to differ on 
the point. Therefore, it will be all the 
more interesting to watch the outcome. 



E. C. B. — John Philip Sousa can be 
addressed at Great Lakes Training Camp, 
Illinois. Yes, he has removed his beard. 

H. T. — Jean Sothern is not in pictures 
at present. She haa returned to vaude- 
ville. Her last film was "Peg o* the Sea." 



WHAT'S TO BLAME? 

Regarding the current season as com- 
pared with previous ones, a great diverg- 
ence of opinion among legitimate and va- 
riety managers seems to exist. 

On every hand is heard, "I don't know 
what if s coming to," and in reply some- 
one will answer: "Oh, wait until after 
New Year's and things will take on a 
different aspect." 

And still no one seems to know the 
real cause of depression. Some say, "War 
Tax!" sounds logical. But remember the 
fate of "Friend Martha," "The Lasso," 
"The Deluge," "This Way Out," "What 
Happened to Jones," "The Pawn," "Lucky 
O-Shea," "Over the Phone," "The Family 
Exit," "Scrap O" Paper," "Branded," 
"Mother Carey's Chickens" and "Saturday 
to Monday." To be explicit, just thirteen 
shows closed in the period of two months 
which were failures. And these, during 
August and September, when the war tax 
was unheard of. 



THE NEW UCENSE HEAD 

Probably the most important position 
in the city government to theatrical folk 
is that of the License Commissioner, a new 
appointee for which is soon to be named 
by Judge Hylan. The position is invested 
with power that is of the greatest moment 
to every manager in the city and, through 
him, to every employee and performer. 

Therefore, the man who is to fill the 
office for the next term should be chosen 
with the greatest care and, if possible, 
someone be selected who is not only thor- 
oughly acquainted with the license law 
from a legal standpoint, but also one who 
is acquainted with it from a practical 
angle. If such a man is named, many 
questions that often become knotty 
through unintelligent handling, may be 
avoided. Theoretical understanding is one 
thing, and practical comprehension an- 
other. Both are necessary to bring about 
a smooth running a dminist ration of any 
sort. 



PROTECTING AUEN ACTS 

Great difficulty haa been encountered by 
alien acta and troupes while traveling 
about the country by the constant de- 
mand for passports. The Government 
should establish some means whereby 
alien acts should be allowed to enter into 
restricted territory unmolested. The de- 
lay caused by the present rulings often 
compels the act to cancel its engagement. 

The latest ruling is that persona com- 
ing into the United States must carry 
passports or official documents establish- 
ing their nationality and have attached 
a signed and certified photograph of the 
bearer. The passports must be verified 
by American consular officers in the conn- 
try from which they come not more than 
two weeks before their departure, as well 
as in the country from which they em- 
bark or from which they enter the U. S. 

HASN'T LEFT "GROWN-UP BABIES" 

November 30, 1917. 
Editor New York Clippeb : 

Dear Sir: — I read in The Cltpfeb a 
few weeks ago that a certain Dolly Fields 
had been engaged to fill the soubrette role 
with this show (The Grown-up Babies). 
I wish you would deny the statement, 
as everyone is satisfied with my work with 
the show and the printed announcement 
must have been due to some misunder- 
standing. 

Sincerely yours, 

Louise Wbioht. 
Soubrette with 
"Grown-up-Babies." 



Answers to Queries 



R. R- P. — Jean Havez writes exclusive 
songs. He used to be married to Cecil 
Cunningham. 



R. T. — No, it is not the same man.. C. 
J. Bostock, who produces vaudeville acta, 
is a nephew of the animal trainer of the 
same name. 



G. H. K. — You can address The ilueio 
Trades at No. 501 Fifth avenue, and The 
Music Trade* Review, at No. 373 Fourth 
avenue, New York. 

When the 5 and 10 cent stores purchase 
sheet music they give the publisher the 
shipping direction. They do not distribute 
it themselves. 



L. K. — Goldwyn is at present making 
most of its pictures in the Universal 
studio in Fort Lee. The Universal com- 
panies have nearly all gone West. 

H. E. — Tea, Paths' produced a version of 
"Les Miserables" several years ago. We 
do not know the leading man. William 
Farnum is starred in the Fox version. 



L. O. A. — Louise Carder is leading lady 
with the Paul Cazaneuve stock in Mont- 
real. They opened Monday. 



O. C. — Pat Casey is president of the 
V. M. P. A. Their offices are on the ninth 
floor of the Columbia Theatre Building, 
Seventh avenue and Forty-seventh street. 



L. & R. — Don't tell us about the team 
that copied your act. We can't help you. 
Bring the matter up to the N. V. A. or 
the V. M. P. A., and they will investigate 
your charges. 



T. R. — The Alamac la a good theatrical 
hotel when you are in St Louis. Joe 
Wiseman is the manager. You will find 
the rates reasonable. Wiseman la an old 
showman himself. 



T. P. — Augustus Thomas will write 
plays as well as supervise the production 
of the new Raver pictures. This will 
probably keep him too busy to do any stage 
dramas for a while. 



L L. P. — A five-cent movie house cannot 
charge a tax. If you paid it you are 
stung. Report the name of the house to 
Mark Eisner, Collector of Internal Reve- 
nue. He is going after such places. 

I. Y. G.— "The Public Defender" haa 
not been released yet. It will probably 
play your town when it comes out. No, it 
is not a Griffith picture. His only big ones 
are "The Birth of a Nation" and "Intol- 
erance." 



J. J. J.— Philip Moeller, the author of 
"Madame Sand," first came into notice 
when he wrote "Helena's Husband," pro- 
duced by the Washington Square Players. 
We do not know how old he is. This is 
his first long play. 



TWENTY-FIVE YEARS AGO 

F. A. Gardner's Show was in South 
America. 

M. B. Curtis waa on trial for the shoot- 
ing of Policeman Grant. 

Mayor Grant of New York issued a 
license for the appearance of Cyril Tyler, 
boy soprano. 

Sam W. Gumpertz was in advance of 
Hopkins Transoceanics. 

New plays: "The Shetland Lass"; "A 
Midnight Frolic"; "Americans Abroad"; 
"The Irish Statesman"; "Lady Blarney"; 
"Diana"; "The New South"; "Leaves of 
Shamrock"; "The Power of Gold"; "The 
Favorite"; "Surrender"; "12 P. M."; "The 
Mountebanks"; "Barney Casey's Luck"; 
"A Test Case"; "U. S. Grant"; "McFad- 
den's Elopement"; "Out of the Storm." 



G. F. R., Jr. — Al Jolson is at present in 
Oakland, Cal., resting up. He will be 
back for the next Winter Garden show, 
however. 



Rialto Rattles 



BROADWAY'S MOST USED LUTE 

"N-o-t-h-i-n-g d-o-i-n-g! I know bar 
husband." I 



ANSWER TO CORRESPONDENT 

No, Dr. Victor Wilson, publicity direc- 
tor of the Strand Theatre, is not the 
father of Francis Wilson. 



GOOD IDEA 

Nat Goodwin is said to have another 
divorce on hand. la he doing it to pub- 
licize his play "Why Marry?" 



WHEATLESS DAY NOTE 

Princess Kalama, the Hawaiian dancer, 
says that she will not wear her shredded 
wheat costume any more on Wednesdays. 

ABOUT ANDREW T0MBES 

Just because Andrew Tombes has a nam* 
that is also borne by our famous Bastille, 
is not in the least indicative that he 
ever confined within it. 



TO HONOR FORBES-ROBERTSON 
At the Hotel McAlpin tomorrow night 
the Twilight Club will give a dinner in 
honor of Sir Johnston Forbes-Robertson. 
Among the notables expected to be present 
are Howard Dnffield, D.D., who will be 
toastmaster; James K. Hackett, David 
Bispham, Louis K. Anspacher, Arthur 
Brisbane and Poultney Bigelow. 



GOOD TITLE 

A play called "The Last Straw" haa 
been produced in London. That title 
would be applicable to many presented here 
this season, in the opinion of the critic* 
who bad to review them. 



NEW TAX IMMINENT 

A war tax on unnecessary hair must be 
imminent. Sousa haa shaved his beard, 
Lackaye haa removed his mustache and 
Arnold Daly has had his hair cut. 



ALWAYS FREE 

Percy Richards, "The Man in White," 
haa been sued for an advertising bill. Ha 
is probably so used to free ads that he 

thinks it unnecessary to pay for them. 



SPEAKING OF CARPENTERS 

Edward Charles Carpenter, author of 
"The Cinderella Man," and "The Three 
Bean," is probably the best known car- 
penter connected with the American stage. 

THERE'S A DIFFERENCE 

Just because they were sent to "the 
i Bland" on Thanksgiving doea not mesa 
that the Keith players who entertained 
the prisoners there that day, did any other 
than "big" time. 

CANT ENJOY FRENCH THEATRE 

Harry Steinfeld, the theatrical attor- 
ney, says that the acoustics at the French 
Theatre must be very bad indeed, fax, 
when he attended a performance the other 
evening, he couldn't understand a word. 

HE WAS PATRIOTIC 

Feeling patriotic the other day, Jay 
Barnes, the Morosco publicity expert, 
dashed into the Salvation Army head- 
quarters on Fourteenth street, and offered 
to enlist and help Uncle Sam thrash the 
Kaiser. 



WE KNOW OTHERS 

We have Just noticed that Florence Wal- 
ton is advertising the fact that she waa 
officially decorated with the Berry of the 
Chasseurs while In France. That's noth- 
ing. There's many a performer on Broad- 
way that has been similarly honored. Only, 
in their case, it was with the raspberry. 



WHAT SAY YOU TO THIS? 
MY ROWS AWRY. 

The hours I spend in sweater art 
Are as a string of purls — I sigh 
To count them over every one apart 

My rows awry — my rows awry. 
Each hour I purl, each purl take care 

To drop no stitch, lest I be stung 
I count, yes count until the end 

And there a sleeve is hung. 
Oh memories that blur and burn 

Of ravelling out at bitter loss 
I drop a purl, yet strive at last to learn 

To knit across, sweet art, to knit across. 

WELLraoTOR Cross. 



12 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



December 5, 1917 



JWESTERN OFFICE, 

Room 210 
35 SO. DEARBORN ST. 




HICJiGO 



FOR ADVERTISING RATES 
Phone Randolph 542 



TO KEEP SHOWS 

GOING EVEN AT 

MONEY LOSS 

MOROSCO MAKES PROMISE 



Even thoQgb his companies are losing 
money, Oliver Morosco will not withdraw 
anything from the road this season, accord- 
ing to a statement made by him this week. 
He declares it is a patriotic duty to keep 
the people amused in war time, even though 
the managers have to pay for it. 

As to the present slump in business 
which has been causing agitation among 
the managers all over the country, Mr. 
Morosco says he takes little stock in it. 
He has not suffered, he claims, more than 
in any other year. 

"I am not afraid of the slump," said Mr. 
Morosco. 'The period between now and 
Christmas is always one of the lean spots 
of the year. Many managers lay off their 
companies at this time, as in Lent. But 
I promise that whether business continues 
profitable or not I will keep all my com- 
panies out without any lay-offs, because I 
feel called upon to make the nation happy. 

"The least that the owners of theatrical 
companies can do is to keep laughter alive. 
I have eleven shows out, and all but two 
of these are comedies. The other two, 
playing "The Bird of Paradise," are doing 
aa good business as anything in America. 

"Blanche Ring, who has been playing 
'What Next?' for thirty weeks, could re- 
tire for the season now if she wished, but 
she is in hearty accord with me, and will 
continue tin Jane of next year. I hope 
the engagement will continue to be profit- 
able, bat it will continue playing, anyhow." 

It is doubtful if other managers will fol- 
low Mr. Morosco's lead and sacrifice finan- 
cial profit to make the country happy. 
Most of them consider that the expenses 
of traveling are too high to indulge in any 
such philanthropy. 



OLD TEAM MAY RE-UNITE 

It is contemplated that with the finish 
of the current season, Raymond Paine, 
playing the straight role with the "Step 
Lively Girls" on the Columbia Wheel this 
season, and his former partner, Inez Nes- 
bit, now appearing in a sketch, "The Night 
Boat," on the Orpheum time, will Join 
in a new act now being written for them. 



HOUSTON CLOSES "SPOOKS" 

Owing to a cut in salary "Spooks," 
which was on tour with a cast that in- 
cluded Charles G. Fletcher, Maude Parker 
and Aloise Houston, has been closed by 
Walter Houston, its owner, the company 
disbanding here a week ago. 



ANABELLE NEILSEN SIGNED 

Anabelle Neilsen, formerly with "Help 
Wanted," and of late a member of one of 
Harry Holman's sketches, has been en- 
gaged for the soubrette role in the "All 
American Revue" art now playing over 
the W. V. M. A. time. 



DE VELDE TRIO REPLACED 

The team of Munson and Kingsbury 
has replaced the DeVelde Trio on the 
W. V. M. A. time at Beloit, Wis., due to 
the non-appearance of the latter act there. 

ARRANGE DOUBLE TURN 

Don Clinton and Nellie McNamara, late 
of Harry Holman's "Selling Out" act, have 
arranged to do a double turn. The Hol- 
man act closed at a local house recently. 



EVELYN NESBIT AIDS HOSPITAL 

Evelyn Nesblt, who recently appeared at 
the Majestic Theatre, has arranged to en- 
dow a room in the American Hospital to 
be known as the Nesbit Room. 



GARRICK SHOW GETS RUNWAY 

The "Samurun" runway, for several 
seasons an interesting device in Winter 
Garden shows, was put into the Garriek 
Theatre production of the "Passing Show" 
Monday. Members of this company oc- 
cupied the first six rows of the orchestra 
at Billy Roche's Star and Garter Thea- 
tre last Friday matinee, witnessing a 
performance of Hurtig and Seamen's 
"Hello America," Columbia Wheel bur- 
lesquer. 

MAUDE ADAMS DATE CHANGED 

A change in the date of Maude Adams' 
local showing at the Blackstone Theatre 
in "A Kiss for Cinderella," makes the 
opening now on Christmas eve instead of 
Dec. 17, George Arliss probably extend- 
ing his engagement at that house till that 
date. 



COURCF.l.l.F. JOINS MANVILLE 
George L. Courcelle, the local pianist, 
joined the Charles Manville company at 
Springfield, Mo., last Saturday. The com- 
pany left the latter city the same night 
for a tour of Oklahoma, Shawnee being the 
first stand. 



PREPARE NEW ACT 

Billy Dunn and his wife, Blanche Baird, 
will return to the stage in the near future 
in an act especially written around them. 
Dunn has been engaged in the rubber 
manufacturing business for some time. 



LAMB LEASES COMEDY 

Arthur Lamb has leased his musical 
comedy "Golden Lay" to Manager Perry, 
of the "Bridal Night" show, the latter or- 
ganizing a company to open in it at Al- 
lentown, Pa., on Christmas Day. 



BEN DEELY GETS DIVORCE 

Ben Deely was granted a divorce in the 
Circuit Court last week from Marie R. 
Deely, now playing in the moving pictures. 
This is Deely*s fourth failure in matri- 
mony. Edward J. Ader was his attorney. 



SHOW NEW ACT HERE 

The team of Statson and Hnber showed, 
their new act at the American Theatre 
here, first half of the current week, after 
which they begin a tour of the Association 
time. 



ALLARDT IS IN CANADA 

Ix F. AUardt, of the Allardt Circuit, re- 
turned from New York last week and im- 
mediately went to Canada, where he will 
look over his interests. 



NICOLAI VISITS CHICAGO 

George Nicolai, general manager of the 
International Circuit, was a local visitor 
last week, rearranging bookings in this 
city for his circuit. 



"LURE OF CITY" NEAR READY 

The new Sherman, . Gazzolo and Clifford 
production, "The Lure of the City," will 
have its premiere on the International Cir- 
cuit at the Imperial Theatre. 



"SEVENTEEN" TO REMAIN 

The production of "Seventeen" will re- 
main at the Playhouse until Saturday, 
Dec. 15, before leaving for the East and 
Broadway. 

GARDNER LEAVING PICTURES 

Jack Gardner has terminated his en- 
gagement in screen productions of the local 
Essanay company and intends returning 
to vaudeville. 



HAMLIN JOINS "HOMESTEAD" 

Charlie Hamlin rushed to Kansas City 
a week ago to go into the cast of William 
Cnllen's "The Old Homestead." 



VENETTA JOINS "BRIDE SHOP" 

"Dolly" Venetta Presslar is again tour- 
ing the big time as the corset model with 
"The Bride Shop" act, now in the West. 



STOCK ANDROAD 

SHOWS GO BIG 

IN WEST 

BUSINESS BEST IN YEARS 



Reports of bad business in stock and 
road companies are seemingly invalidated 
by conditions in Chicago, where all the 
evidence is toward the fact that these 
companies are more successful than in a 
long time. 

One-night stand companies especially 
seem to be flourishing in the West and 
South. More of these are now playing, 
it is said on good authority, than there 
have been in several years. 

All the stock play brokers are being 
deluged with requests for plays, and these 
are being supplied as fast as the com- 
panies can handle them. 

Milo Bennett here reports a larger de- 
mand in his offices than for five years 
past. Within the past week he has sup- 
plied the following plays: 

"Little Lost Sister" and "The Little 
Girl God Forgot," to the Plaza Theatre 
stock, Denver; "The Little Girl God For- 
got," to the Howard Players, Vancouver, 
B. £; "Nature's Law," to Jack Bessey's 
traveling stock and to the Guy Stock 
Company; "Shepherd of the Hills," to 
William Maylor Stock Company, Poca- 
tello, Idaho; "Bunker Bean" and "Our 
Children," to Ed William Stock, Kokomo, 
Ind.; "The Road to Yesterday," to Mil- 
Iais Stock, San Diego; "Quincy Adams 
Sawyer," to Buckingham Players, Enid, 
Okla. 

Among other favorites which have been 
in demand throughout this territory are 
"Her Unborn Child," which has been used 
extensively ' by companies near Chicago, 
and "Playthings." 

That the companies are using such a 
great number of plays, and are succeed- 
ing in spite of difficulties of transporta- 
tion, should be a ray of hope to managers, 
for it goes to prove that conditions are 
becoming rapidly more prosperous. 

RAYCOB AND HAZELTON SCORE 

With, the date of the Gus Hill "Mutt 
and Jeff" company at the Imperial The- 
atre last week were two boys of known 
quality, in Al Raycob and Jim Hazelton. 
Big lettered programing bespeaks their 
value to the International attraction, which 
returns here next week for a week out in 
Englewood at the National. 



CARROLL AND LINN SICK 
Eddie Carroll, late of the Ringling Cir- 
cus, and Harry Linn, of Linn's Cats and 
Dogs turn, are sick at the American Hos- 
pital. Carroll is suffering; from gastritis, 
while Linn was brought on from Escanaba, 
Mich., to undergo an operation. 



M. P. OPERATORS DANCE 

The ninth annual ball of the Motion 
Picture Operators' Union was held at the 
Coliseum annex Wednesday night of this 
week. Preparations made for it made 
the affair surpass all previous ones. 

RUBY FRAMING A DOUBLE 

Ruby Lusby, the soubrette, has come to 
the conclusion that she will cast aside her 
single for the present and try out a double, 
surprise act, possibly with Blanche Hazel- 
ton as partner. 



MAY ANDERSON IS VERY ILL 

May Anderson, of the "Passing Show" 
company, playing at the Garriek, is in a 
critical condition at the American Hos- 
pital. 



HOFFMAN JOINS TAB ACT 

Dave Hoffman, former burlesque comic, 
has joined the act known as the Six Jolly 
Tars. 



BALCONY GETTING OPERA MONEY 

The balcony is the part of the house 
which has been getting money for the Chi. 
cago Opera Company, that section of the 
theatre being jammed at all performances. 

This is believed to be due to the fact 
that the management carried on a vigor- 
ous advertising campaign during the early 
fall, for which it was severely criticized 
by some persons who said grand opera 
should n6t be treated as a circus. The 
results, however, are now proving the wis- 
dom, of the measures, adopted. 



LITTLE THEATRE COMPANY SCORE 

Maurice Browne's Little Theatre Com- 
pany, which began the current season as 
an itinerant organization, has returned, 
but now as oceupant of the Central Music 
Hall, where it is presenting George Ber- 
nard Shaw's "Candida," and "very hand- 
somely" according to the local reviews. 



CHICAGO TO SEE PAGEANT 

Chicago, Dec. 1. — Arrangements are be- 
ing made to bring the Rosemary Pageant 
to this city after the New Year. It is 
intended to bring the entire spectacle as 
it "was shown in New York, with all the 
supernumeraries and twelve of the prin- 
cipals. 

VELASCO TO LEASE PARK " 

Messrs. Velasco Brothers will establish 
their Spanish players as a permanent or- 
ganization at the Park Theatre and have 
begun negotiations for the tenancy of that 
building on a basis which will not affect 
the present management of the theatre 
but which will enable them to continue 
the presentation of Spanish reviews by 
Valverde. 

"The Land of Joy" has proved its popu- 
larity and will remain at the theatre in- 
definitely. 

ACTORS ORGANIZE AERO CLUB 

The Croton Aero Club has just been 
organized by the actors' colony in Harmon 
and Croton, N. Y. Its president is Edgar 
Selwyn and among its charter members 
are Margaret Massarene, James Forbes, 
Irvin S. Cobb, Crosby Gaige, Edward J. 
Bowes, Fred Howe, Allan Dawn, Salisbury 
Field and Sophie Irene Loeb. 

A complete aviation field with hangars 
and a clubhouse are included in the plans 
of the club. A ferry between Peekskill 
and Garrison may also be established. 

GAIETY CAFE CLOSES 

The Gaiety Cafe, for years patronized 
by actors and theatre managers, has closed 
to give way to a new cigar store. The 
cafe, owned by Frank Garrity at 1549 
B'way, was leased to him by George M. 
Cohan ten years ago when the latter was 
interested in the Gaiety theatre. Garrity 
is giving notice to bis many theatrical 
friends that he win shortly open another 
place on Broadway. 

HENDERSON TO GIVE COMEDIES 

Alfred E. Henderson has been made the 
producer of plays for the Verdi Club and 
has arranged for the Henderson Players 
to appear in one act comedies. The first 
is the "Incompatibles" by Horace Holley 
and "A Flower of Teddo" by Victor Mapes. 
The first performance will be at the club 
Friday afternoon beginning at two 
thirty, the entire proceeds to go to the 
Red Cross. 



"PALS FIRST" HALTS 

Louisville, Dec. 1. — The tour of "Pals 
First," in which William Courtney and 
Thomas Wise are starring, came to a tem- 
porary halt after the performance here to- 
night. The company may resume its tour 
Christmas week. 



BOLM BALLET QUITS "MISS 1917" 

"Falling Leaves," the Adolf Bolm bal- 
let, has ceased to be a part of the "Miss 
1917" show at the Century, having closed 
after the performance last Saturday night. 



December 5, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



13 



STOCK 




START SUIT 

OVER STOCK 

DRAMA 



DARCY & WOLFORD COMPLAIN 

A lawsuit which will be watched with 
interest by stock managers all over the 
country was instituted last week by 
Darcy & Wolford, play brokers, against the 
Bluebird Films, Inc. The stock firm asks 
for an injunction and accounting on the 
ground that a picture recently released 
conflicts in title with one of their plays. 

The picture in question is "The Savage," 
released Nov. 19. Ruth Clifford is starred. 
Darcy & Wolford released about a month 
ago a play bearing the same name, by 
Hutchinson Boyd, which has been a great 
favorite among stock managers all over 
the country. 

If the play firm wins the suit, the Blue- 
bird people will be forced to withdraw or 
re-title the film, and also pay in damages 
a. percentage of the profits it has already 
made. 

The identity of titles will practically 
ruin the play as a stock attraction, in 
the opinion of the plaintiffs. It will be 
easy for a picture house to book the film 
during the same week in which the play 
is being presented by tbe local stock com- 
pany. The public, thinking the two at- 
tractions are tbe same, will in most cases 
prefer the less expensive version. Conse- 
quently, the owners claim that they can- 
not release the play as long as the film is 
in existence. 

Arnold Wolford, general manager of the 
complaining firm, claims that he notified 
the company as soon as he heard of the 
film, giving them plenty of time to change 
the title before paper was printed. 

When the case will be decided is not 
known, as there are many affidavits and 
papers to be gone over before a hearing 
is held. The outcome will be in the na- 
ture of a test case, and will consequently 
be of extreme significance to the stock 
world. 



SOMERVILLE LIKES RURAL PLAY 

Somkrvillk, Mass., Dec. 3. — "Our New 
Minister" is the offering for this week by 
the Somerville Theatre Players, who are 
scoring another success. Arthur Howard 
in the title role does capital work. Adelyn 
Bushnell as Nance doesn't have much to 
do, but does it well, while John Dugan as 
Darius created a storm of laughter. Ruth 
Fielding as Skeezicks is seen in the first 
boy character in which she has appeared 
here, and pleases quite as easily as she 
does in her other roles. John M. Kline 
as the bard-fisted Obadiah gets himself 
thoroughly disliked by his excellent inter- 
pretation of the role. John Gordon, Bran- 
don Evans, Elbert Benson, Rose Gordon 
and Grace Fox also contribute in no small 
way towards the genuine excellence of the 
performance. In act two a number of 
specialties are introduced. ' Arthur Ritchie, 
the director, looked after the production, 
and bis painstaking careful direction is 
noticeable throughout Next week "The 
Yellow Ticket" 



SUGAR GIVEN TO LEADING LADY 

Lynn, Mass., Dec 3. — Alice Bentley, 
leading lady of the players at the Lynn 
Theatre, was recently the recipient of a 
large bouquet of roses and chrysanthe- 
mums, to which was attached a package 
containing two pounds of sugar. It was 
a gift from members of a Lynn Girls' Club. 



"GOING STRAIGHT" RELEASED 

"Going Straight" a drama by Edward 
E. Rose, which has played out of Chicago, 
has just, been acquired by Darcy & Wol- 
ford, and is ready for stock release. 



SHOW OUSTS OMAHA STOCK 

Omaha, Dec. 1. — The Brandies Play- 
ers were again ousted tonight by a road 
show when Frederick V. Bowers began a 
three day stay in "His Bridal Night." 
The stock returns Sunday. 



LIES ENTERS PICTURES 

Herman Lieb, well known in stock, and 
half-owner of the Lieb & Harris Stock 
Company, which recently closed a. success- 
ful season at the Wilson Avenue Theatre, 
Chicago, is in pictures. He is appearing 
in the Metro film "Daybreak," in which 
Kmily Stevens is the star. 



BROWN TAKING ARMORY'S PLACE 

Northampton, Mass., Nov. 27. — Bay 
Brown is playing a two weeks' engagement 
with the Northampton Players, taking the 
place of Jack Armory, who was obliged 
to undergo a surgical operation at the 
Dickenson Hospital. 



KEITH PLAYERS SIGN DAVIDGE 

Union Hill, N. J., Dec. 3. — William 
Davidge has signed with the Keith Players, 
at the Hudson Theatre, as assistant to 
Stage Director Edwin H. Curtis. 



LE DUC SPECIALLY ENGAGED 

Northampton, Mass., Dec. 3. — Teddy 
Le Due was especially engaged for this 
week's production by tbe Northampton 
Players of "Quincy Adam Sawyer," which 
opened last night 



HOLL1NGSWORTH IS SIGNED 

Nobthampton, Mass., Dec. 1. — Harry 
Holllngsworth has signed with the North- 
ampton Players, as leading man. He 
makes his first appearance next Monday 
in "Hlt-the-Trail Holliday." 



HAZEL DEAN IS A FAVORITE 

Elmiba, N. Y., Dec. 3. — Hazel Dean, 
the new member of the Mae Desmond 
Stock, at the Mozart Theatre, haa estab- 
lished herself as a favorite with the 
patrons. 



ACTOR MADE BATTALION BUGLER 
Camp Bowdc, Tex., Dec. 1.— Carl 
Thomas, the comedian of the Thomas 
Brothers Dramatic Company, who is now 
with the Second Texas Field Artillery, has 
been appointed Battalion Bugler and will 
be transferred to headquarters. 



SHOW BOAT PUT UP FOR WHITER 

Point Pleasant, W. Va., Dec. 1 — 
Princess Show Boat has been brought here 
by its owners, Darnold and Kinster, and 
taken to Winter quarters, where it is un- 
dergoing repairs and painting. 



MUSICAL BELLS TOUR D* AUTOS 

Roanoke, Tex., Dec. 1. — Manager Bell, 
of the Musical Bells Tent Theatre, has 
added three new automobiles to his outfit 
and the show is now enabled to make quick 
jumps overland. The show will stay South 
for tbe Winter and will work its way 
North in the Spring. 



HICKEY MANAGES ROAD SHOW 

Salem, Mass., Dec. 3.— E. T. Hickey 
has left his position as treasurer of the 
Empire Theatre and gone on the road to 
manage a musical show. 



EMPIRE PLAYERS GET. FLETCHER 

Patebson. N. J., Dec. 1.— Percy Mel- 
don, stage director of the Empire Players, 
has appointed Victor Fletcher assistant 
director and stage manager. 



NEW PLAY GETS 

TRY-OUT IN 

LAWRENCE 



"APRON STRINGS" IS SEEN 



Lawrence, Mass., Dec. 3. — The Emer- 
son Players here will present on Dec. 10, 
for the first time on any stage, the new 
play by Eleanor Gates and Evelyn Green- 
leaf Sutherland, entitled "Apron Strings." 
Minnie Dupree, who has been in retire- 
ment for several years, will return to en- 
act the leading role. 

This performance i will be the first regu- 
lar "first night" held in Lawrence for some 
years, and considerable excitement has 
been aroused among drama lovers here on 
that account The return of Miss Dupree, 
always a stock favorite, is also the cause 
of much interest 

The two authors of "Apron Strings" 
both won fame some years ago by their 
successes, "The Poor Little Rich Girl," by 
Miss Gates, and "The Boad to Yesterday," 
by Miss Sutherland. Hitherto they had 
not been heard of to any great extent 
Their collaboration is expected to prove 
very interesting. 

Howard Brooks and Marie Curtis will 
be in the company, which began rehearsals 
several weeks ago. 

Should the play be a success it will 
undoubtedly reach Broadway in the near 
future, as several important managers have 
signified their intention to witness its pre- 
miere. 



EMERSON PLAYERS GIVE BALL 
Lawrence, Mass., Dec. 3. — The Emer- 
son Players give no performance tonight, 
and the Colonial will be dark, as all of the 
members of the company are engaged in 
running a military ball at the Armory, the . 
proceeds of which go to the benefit of the 
Lawrence boys in France. Two special 
features of the ball will be a Geo. M. 
Cohan revue and the dancing girls from 
"The Child of Judea," which was produced 
last Easter at the Colonial. There is a 
large advance ticket sale, and the affair 
promises to be a hummer. "Two Queens" 
will be given at the Colonial by the Play- 
ers tomorrow. 



MINNEAPOLIS STOCK CLOSES 

Minneapolis, Minn., Nov. 27. — Tbe 
Modern Players, at the Shubert Theatre, 
under the management of Charles A. Nig- 
germeyer. closed the season last Saturday 
night. The theatre, which has for several 
years been a successful stock house, has 
not been doing good business for weeks 
and it has been decided to change the 
policy to motion pictures. It will open 
as a movie house next Sunday. 



BRAMAN MAY NOT RECOVER 

Tebbe Haute, Ind., Nov. 28. — C. L. 
"Bud" Braman, the leading man, and 
George W. Mahare, the comedian and 
stage director, continues seriously ill, and 
while little hopes are entertained for 
Braman's recovery, Mahare has shown 
marked improvement 



EMMA BUNTING STOCK RESUMES 

San Antonio, Tex., Dec. 1. — The Em- 
ma Bunting Stock Company has resumed 
at the Grand Opera House after a week's 
absence on account of the bookings of three 
prominent road shows. 



HUDSON HAS "COMMON CLAY" 
The B. F. Keith Hudson Theatre play- 
ers this week are presenting "Common' 
Clay," with a east comprising Natalie 
Perry, Joseph Lawrence, Aldrich Bowker, 
Betty Brown, Dorothy Shoemaker, Stuart 
Wilson, Stuart Robbina, Jack Roseleigh, 
Claire Duane, Ted Brackett, William 
Davidge, Jack Armstrong, and Jessie 
Pringle. The engagement in "Common 
Clay" of Miss Dorothy Shoemaker will 
mark her first appearance aa a member 
of this company. Other new members to 
make their debut with the company are 
Natalie Perry and Stewart Wilson. The 
show is playing to good business and the 
present company cannot be surpassed. 

HAVE PARCEL POST NIGHTS 

Jamestown, N. Y., Dec. 3. — The man- 
agement of the Pauline MacLean Stock 
Company at Samuels' Opera House has 
designated Monday night of each week as 
"Parcel Post Night" All packages de- 
posited during the day in a box in the 
lobby, intended for the players, will be 
passed over the footlights to those to whom 
addressed. Each package as received by a 
player is opened in full view of the audi- 
ence. 



NEW PLAY IS GIVEN 
"A Young Girl's Romance," a new play 
just released by Darcey & Wolford, had 
its premiere in Brooklyn Monday at the 
Grand. The Cecil Spooner company gave 
it. 



AUGER BROTHERS END SEASON 

Missouri Valley, to., Dec. 1. — Tbe 
Auger Brothers Dramatic Company has 
closed a successful season under canvas 
and the outfit has been shipped here to 
be stored for the Winter. Harrison Auger, 
one of the owners, has enlisted in the 0th 
Nebraska Regiment Band, which is com- 
posed largely of troupers and which is 
under tbe direction of Robert Webb, a 
nephew of Steward OIlie Webb of the 
Ringling Brothers Circus. 



AURIOL LEE JOINS STOCK 
PnTSBUBOH, Pa., Dec. 3. — Aurlol Lee 
closed her engagement with "Pals First" 
at Louisville, and opened tonight aa a 
member of the stock company at the Pitt 
Theatre, playing the leading role in "The 
Man Who Stayed at Home." She replaces 
Flora Sheffield, with the Pitt company. 



"PLAYTHINGS" IS POPULAR 

"Playthings," the new play by Sidney 
Toler, which was recently released for 
stock use by the Century Play Company, 
has been used by Billy Woods, Union 
Hill; Empire Players, Pater son; Crown, 
Chicago; Lowell Players, Lowell, Mass.; 
Mozart, Elmira, N. Y. ; Hyperion, New 
Haven, and Hathaway, Brockton. 



LEWIS PLAYERS DOING WELL 

Chester, Pa., Dec. 1. — The Jack X. 
Lewis players reported good business for 
Thanksgiving, playing "The Old Home- 
stead." 

They are in their thirteenth week, and 
business is said to be as good as on the 
opening date. "St. Elmo" is the next at- 
traction. 



DIRECTOR STEELE RECOVERING 

Lawrence, Mass., Dec. 3. — Bernard 
Steele, producing manager of the Emerson 
Players, is rapidly recovering from injuries 
received recently, and will soon be on the 
job attending to his regular duties. 



BRYANT'S SHOW BOAT CLOSES 

Chicago, Dec. 1. — Bryant's new show 
boat has closed the season and Manager 
Billy Byrant is in town. He has about 
decided to depart from bis custom of tak- 
ing out a repertoire show for tbe Winter. 
Florence Bryant will play stock till the 
show boat opens in the Spring. 



PATRONS CHOOSE STRAND PLAYS 

Hoboken, N. J., Dec. 1. — Manager W. 
C. Vassar, of the Strand Players, has 
inaugurated the plan of letting his patrons 
decide what plays they want It is work- 
ing out splendidly, capacity business being 
the rule. 



14 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



December 5, 1917 



MELODY 




J. H. REMICK OUT OF 

COMPOSERS' SOCIETY 



Detroit Publisher Resigns From Organ* 
ization Formed to Collect Perform- 
ing Rights Fees 

Jerome H. Remick, the Detroit music 
publisher, head of Jerome H. Remick & 
Co., has filed his resignation as a mem- 
ber of the Society of Authors, Composers 
and Publishers, the organization formed 
several years ago to collect a performing 
rights fee from cabarets, restaurants, mo- 
tion picture theatres and other amuse- 
ment resorts where copyrighted music is 
performed. 

In addition to being a member of the 
organization, the Remick house also was 
represented on the board of directors of 
the organization. 

The Society of Authors, Composers and 
Publishers, patterned after the French or- 
ganization, have in the face of strong 
legal opposition won their right to collect 
a fee from theatre and resort owners and 
last year collected over $78,000 for its 
members. The society, therefore, in spite 
of new opposition from motion picture 
theatre owners, was believed to be well 
on its way to success and the resignation 
of the Remick concern came as consider- 
able of a shock to other publishers. To 
the board of directors,, however, the receipt 
of the resignation was not unexpected, as 
for some time it was known that Mr. 
Remick was wavering and considering 
withdrawing from the society. 

Motion picture theatre proprietors in the 
Middle and far West are making a strong 
fight against publishers who are members 
of the organization and are barring their 
publications from the picture theatres. 

As Remick is more familiar with condi- 
tions in that section than in the East, 
this may have had something to do with 
his decision to withdraw. 

Another reason advanced among pub- 
lishers, is that according to trade reports, 
the Remick catalogue is not strong with 
hits at present and the permission to 
play his publications without payment of 
a fee may give the catalogue more pub- 
licity. 

At the New York offices of the Remick 
concern with the exception of the state- 
ment that the resignation speaks for it- 
self, no information regarding it was 
forthcoming. 



"ARE YOU FROM HEAVEN" SCORES 

The first publication of the new firm of 
Gilbert A Friedland, Inc., "Are You From 
Heaven?" a ballad by L. Wolfe Gilbert 
and Anatol Friedland, has rapidly estab- 
lished itself. Its introduction was made 
by Gilbert and Friedland themselves, just 
three weks ago at Keith's, Washington, 
D. C, before an audience of which Presi- 
dent Wilson was an appreciative member. 
They then brought it into the Palace, New 
York, and from there its fame spread 
surely and quickly. It la now being heard 
wherever songs are sung. 'Are You From 
Heaven?" is one of the most beautiful 
songs these noted writers have ever pro- 
duced. 



"TROOPER FLYNN" SCORES A HIT 

"Trooper Flynn," is the title of what 
looks like the next big comedy song hit. 
Ed. Morton was so enthusiastic after he 
heard it for the first time that he put it 
on the following night and sang six or 
seven verses to it. He says that it is one 
of the best numbers he has ever used. 

M. Witmark & Sons are the publishers 
of the new number. 



BAKE BERNARD IN NEW YORK 

Mike Bernard, the pianist and composer, 
who now makes his home in San Fran- 
cisco, is spending a abort vacation in New 
York. Mike is contemplating a short 
tour in vaudeville before returning to 
California. 



CHINESE NOVELTY SONG SCORES 

M. Witmark & Sons, the publishers 
of Walter Donaldson's catchy Chinese 
song, "Yock-a-Hilo Town," received a wire 
from Sullivan and Mason this week in 
which they announced the big success they 
achieved with the song as the closing 
number of their act. 

"It is a great song," they said, and judg- 
ing from the way it is going, it will bind 
over the top this season. 

RE1LLY SINGS THE "YANK" SONG 

Ragtime Reilly, the U. S. sailor, who 
was one of the first to start "Over There" 
on its road to popularity, is again appear- 
ing in vaudeville and has selected another 
number from the William Jerome cata- 
logue as his feat ure song. 

It is called "When the Yanks Come 
Marching Home" and with it he is scor- 
ing a great success. 



GIVES ROYALTIES TO SOLDIERS 

Happy Mack, author of the new song 
"I Didn't Raise My Boy to be a Slacker," 
has made arrangements to give his royal- 
ties to the soldiers. In looking about for 
the best means to contribute his bit for 
the boys at the front, he is to turn over 
all the earnings from the song to the Bun 
Tobaco Fund. 



MEYERS WRITES ANOTHER HIT 

George Meyers, whose name appears up- 
on scores of the big selling song success 
has a new song which within a few weeks 
has met with such success that it is al- 
ready in the hit class. 

It is called "Homeward Bound," and is 
being successfully featured by scores of 
vaudeville singers. 

Leo Feist is the publisher. 

BELLE BAKER SINGS NEW SONG 

At the Colonial Theatre this week, Belle 
Baker is singing the new Gilbert & Fried- 
land song, "Are You From Heaven T" and 
scoring one of the big hits of her career. 

The song which is the first number id- 
sued by the new Gilbert & Friedland 
Publishing Co., has started out like a 
genuine success. 



NEW PATRIOTIC SONG READY 

"When Uncle Sam Gets Ready" is the 
title of a new patriotic song released this 
week by O. W. Lane, of Gloucester,. Mass. 
The song is well written and will make 
an effective closing number. 

"STRUTTERS BALL" FEATURED 

Bill Bailey and Lynn Cowan, in a new 
act which . they are presenting at the 
Riverside Theatre this week, are making 
a feature of "Strutters Ball." They are 
using the. number to close their act and 
it carries them over to a big finish. 

SILVER ON WAY EAST 

Max Silver, of the Gus Edwards Music 
Pub. Co., has been spending the past month 
on the Western coast and is now on the 
way East While in San Francisco he ap- 
pointed E. S. Florentine Pacific coast man- 
ager for the Edwards company. 



MAY NAUDAIN SINGS NEW SONG 

May Naudain, the musical comedy star 
introduced the new Gilbert & Friedland 
song, "Are You From Heaven?" at the 
Majestic Theatre in Milwaukee last week, 
where it scored a great success. 

"MOTHER" A HIT FOR DAVIS 

Bobby Davis, with the vaudeville act, 
"Rubeville," is featuring the Harry Von 
Tilzer song, "Just as Your Mother Was," 
and wired that it is scoring a hit for him 
at every performance. 

McKINLEY IS SELLING AGENT 

The McKinley Music Co. has acquired 
the selling agency for the Snyder Music 
Co. song 'Tm Hitting the .Trail for Nor- 
mandy." 



HUMOROUS WAR SONGS 
UNDER GOVT. BAN 

Federal Board of Censors to Bar Alleged 

Funny Songs Reflecting Upon 

Soldiers and Sailors 

The Federal Board of Censors in taking 
up the question of barring all motion pic- 
tures of war horrors, or photoplays with 
warlike scenarios have gone a step farther 
and taken up the matter of the alleged 
humorous song involving mention of sol- 
diers or seamen savoring of poor taste. 

All songs of this nature are to be thrown 
overboard in the theatres and the Board 
of Censors has greatly increased in vigi- 
lance in matters of this nature. 

Stage comedians devoid of good taste 
who rigged up songs and jokes regarding 
military life as soon as this country be- 
came involved in war are now under fire. 
Before many soldiers and sailors began 
attending the theatres poorly conceived 
entertainment of this sort was endured 
by audiences, but recently theatre man- 
agers hare been perceiving that humor 
that treats of a state of war, even if it 
be in the shape of a song, must be made 
of more manly stuff. 

Complaints from theatregoers regard- 
ing atrocious jokes and badly conceived 
songs that give offense to any man in uni- 
form have been received by the authorities 
and in future all will be watched closely. 

Within the past two months with the 
theatres thronged with soldiers from the 
nearby camps, managers have made con- 
siderable effort to rid their entertain- 
ments of military blunders in song and 
jest, but it has not yet been fully accom- 
plished. 

BAZAARS WANT FREE MUSIC 

Music publishers are being besieged 
these days by innumerable requests for 
free copies of music. These requests come 
from scores of organizations who Hajhi that 
they wish the music to sell at fairs, ba- 
zaars and other entertainments to be 
given for the benefit of the soldiers. 

While publishers are anxious to con- 
tribute in every way possible for the 
benefit of the soldiers, the requests are 
so frequent and from so many sources 
that they are being looked upon with sus- 
picion and the taking of the matter up 
officially is being considered. 

All of the large publishers have during 
the past month given away a vast amount 
of music and the expose of one of the 
big benefits for the army which netted 
thousands of dollars for the promoters of 
the affair and scarcely nothing for the. 
soldiers has set music men to thinking. 

Sheet music has long been looked upon 
by promotors of charitable affairs as an 
excellent article. of merchandise for music 
publishers are generally easy to approach 
and popular songs are always easy sellers. 

A few of the older publishers are not 
so easy to obtain a music contribution 
from, however, remembering a big affair 
given a number of years ago at the old 
Gilsey House for the benefit of the San 
Francisco earthquake sufferers. 

Benefits were comparatively infrequent 
in those days and the music publishers, 
who were industriously solicited contrib- 
uted most liberally of all their reigning 
popular song and instrumental successes. 

A big drop in local music sales occurred 
shortly afterward and publishers seeking 
the cause were astounded to find that 
thousands of the' copies which they had 
given to be sold at the benefit had been 
turned over to a big department store 
which had purchased the entire lot at a 
penny a copy. 



EDWARDS ARRANGING TOUR 

Gus Edwards, the songwriter and music 
publisher, is arranging a tour in vaude- 
ville as a single. He is to do a character 
singing act introducing a number of his 
own songs. 



MINSTRELS SING SONG HIT ' 

Dumonfs Minstrels continue their his- 
toric way. In. Philadelphia and the present 
season bids fair to eclipse any of their 
previous, ones. « Their present program 
is filled with good songs and includes no 
less than four of the latest hits of the 
M. Witmark^& Sons catalogue. Three 
are by Jimmy Monaco, who is now with 
this house and who has in them written 
some of his finest melodies. They are 
'Tm Going to Follow the Boys," sung by 
Bennie Franklin; "The Dream of a Sol- 
dier Boy," rendered by Fred Jordan; and 
"After a Thousand Years," the beautiful 
Oriental ballad which is sung by Oscar 
Smith. .'■ 

The fourth Witmark number on the bill 
is Walter Donaldson's delightful Chinese 
song, "Yock-a-Hilo Town," which Burke 
and Walsh put over in fine shape. 

H. W. PETRIE IS MISSING 

H. W. Petrie, the Chicago musician and 
composer, writer of the famous "Asleep 
in the Deep," is missing from his home 
and the federal officers are looking for 
him. It is alleged that Petrie departed 
from Chicago in company with one of his 
young lady pupils and in consequence, a 
charge of violating the Mann Act has 
been lodged against him. 

ARTHUR LAMB HAS NEW SHOW 

Arthur Lamb, the songwriter and author 
of musical comedies is in New York after 
a year in Chicago. Mr. Lamb brought 
with him the book and lyrics of a new 
musical play entitled, "Girl of My Heart," 
of which he has written both book and 
lyrics. Jules Chauvent is the composer 
and the piece is to be produced early in 
January by Terry J. Kelly. 

ERNEST BREURER DRAFTED 
Ernest Breurer, a songwriter connected 
with the - Maurice - Richmond staff, writer 
of "There's a Vacant Chair in Every 
Home To-night "has. been drafted for the 
National a Ar my «A3' will report for train- 
ing this week. ' 

Breurer also wrote sometime ago the 
song,. "When the War Breaks Out in 

Mexico, I'm Off for Montreal." 

.• ■ .-.< .. .:u- ■■ 

PUBLISHERS IN VAUDEVILLE 

McCarthy. & Fisher, the songwriters and 
music publishers, are presenting their 
vaudeville act in the local theatres. They 
are singing a number of their songs includ- 
ing the hit," "They Go Wild, Simply Wild 
Over Me," as well as two new numbers 
which will.be. released in the near future. 



RAY SHERWOOD DRAFTED 

. Ray Sherwood, who wrote the patriotic 
verse for the 'Forster song bit, "Oh! John- 
ny Oh!" which ran, "Go! Johnny Go! 
Why Do You Lag?" has been drafted for 
the Federal Army and will report at Camp 
Upton on Thursday of this week. 

NEW SONG SCORES HIT 

"Give Me the Right to Love You," the 
new Harry Von Tilzer song hit, is scoring 
a hit of great proportions in the new 
vaudeville act of the Courtney Sisters. 

LEWIS GOES TO CHICAGO 

Eddie Lewis, formerly with the Shapiro, 
Bernstein Co., is now with the Joe Mor- 
ris Co., and has been sent to Chicago to 
join the Morris professional department 
in that city. 



RAY WALKER ENLISTS 

Ray Walker, the pianist and composer, 
connected with the New York office of 
Forster, Inc., has enlisted in the 8th 
Coast Defense of the N. Y. Guard. 



HITTER HAS RECOVERED 

Maurice Ritter, manager of the New 
York office of Forster, Inc., is back at 
his desk again- after a week's illness. 



December 5, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



15 




TRACE HOLDERS 
OF AMERICAN 

STOCK 

COURT RULES ON POINT 

A determined effort to trace the own- 
ership of all stock of the American Bur- 
lesque Association, not only at the present 
time, but extending 1 back almost a year 
was undertakes last week'ny House, Gross 
and Vorhaus, the" attorneys for Hyde & 
Behman in the legal actions they have 
brought against the Columbia Amusement 
Corporation and the American Burlesque 
Association over the old Empire Circuit. 

The facts surrounding the acquisition of 
any of this stock, how much was paid for 
it and the names of the persons from whom 
it was obtained, are all expected to be of 
much importance when the action comes to 
trial in the Federal Court,'' as Hyde & 
Behman maintain that the American is 
owned by the Colombia. 

The effort on the part of the Hyde & 
Behman attorneys was in the form of an 
application, made to Judge Mayer, of the 
Federal Court, asking that he rule on 
whether or not they should be permitted to 
ask each one of the directors of the two 
circuits certain specified questions, among 
which were three relating to the transfer 
last spring of several hundred shares of 
American Burlesque Association stock, 
totaling over $100,000 in value. After 
considering the proposition the Court de- 
cided that they had a right to ask who 
got it, bnt that they did not have the right 
to ask how much they got or what was 
paid for it 

This decision, while it grants only part 
of the application made, by, .the Hyde & 
i Behman attorneys, does, however,'' open the 
way for a thorough tracing of the stock. 
Under it the directors, of the . American 
most tell who are its'' present stockholders 
and whether any of them hold stock as 
the assignee of the, Columbia Amusement 
Corporation. If so, (Bey' ~wUl then be 
asked tbe number of shares held by each 
and tbe date of such " assignment The 
name of each intervening assignee will 
also be asked if it is found that there were 
such. t^OBfwa 

These three questions were . only part 
of an amended series of 125 to be pre- 
sented to the directors of 'Ac Columbia and 
of eighty-eight to be presented for answers 
to the directors of the American. 

As soon as they have been answered, the 
preliminary work of the suit will have 
been about completed, and the case will, it 
is expected, be then shortly moved for 
trial. A stipulated time -for the answer- 
ing of tbe interrogatories has been fixed 
by the court. 



WASHINGTON STOCK DELAYED 

Washington, Dec. 1. — The opening of 
the stock company scheduled to go into 
the Lyceum Theatre under the manage- 
ment of Reich & Gaites, of New York, baa 
been indefinitely delayed, although it is 
hoped to open Christmas week. The delay 
is dne, it is said, to the fact that the pres- 
ent occupant of the house desires to book 
several cantonments before getting ont, 
and will not relinquish the theatre until 
his list of engagements is completed. 



STAR HAS FIGHT PICTURES 

Manager Joyce, of the Star Theatre, 
Brooklyn, has secured the original O'Dowd 
and McCoy fight pictures, and is showing 
them for the first time on any stage this 
week. The pictures are an added feature 
with the "Pacemakers." 



GIVE PARTY FOR BURTON 

A big Thanksgiving party was given 
to Joe Burton after the show last Thurs- 
day night at the Summit Cafe, near B. F. 
Kahn'a "Follies" at which house Burton 
and his company were playing. Seven 
large turkeys and everything good that 
goes with them were on the tables. Among 
those present were Mr. and Mrs. Ben 
Kahn, Mr. and Mrs. Joe Burton, William, 
Abe and Herbert Minsky, Mr. and Mrs. 
Ned Alvord, Harry Harrigan, Arthnr Put- 
nam, Jim McCaulley, Fay Shirley, Rose 
Clifton, Ethel Devanx, Nellie Barns, May 
Franklin, Grace Mayers, Lillian Martin, 
Rose Clarke, Josephine Raymond, Ruth 
Srine, Dasey Smith, Clara Catein, Ruth 
Harman, Helen Andrews, May Reynolds, 
Press Kenmore, Ray Francis, Dora Parks, 
Bell Robinson, Ada Violet, Otto Kremm, 
Jack Taylor, Hugh Rogers, Ed. Stewart, 
Tom Steveson, Cliff Welsh, Jim Draper, 
Ed. Cramer, Robt Page, Leo Schmide and 
Joe Williams. 



GOLDEN CROOKS EAT TURKEY 

Albany, N. Y., Nov. 29. — One of the 
best Thanksgiving Day dinners ever par- 
taken by members of a road organization 
was enjoyed by members of "The Golden 
Crook" company, playing the Empire, here. 
After a capacity matinee the following 
members sat down to a specially ordered 
dinner at the Farnum Hotel: Manager 
Louis Oberwarth, Frank Hunter, Estelle 
Wilmot, Jack (Sharp) Gillette, May 
Adams, Ethel Davenport, Ed. Scarth, Jos. 
Ryan, Fritzi Moore, Beatrice Gibson, 
Catherine Doyle and Ed. Sign Daly, agent 
of the company. 



ATTENTION 

The burlesque department of 
the New York Clipper i> the best 
and most reliable published. A 
•pedal effort is being made to 
make the Christmas issue unusu- 
ally noteworthy. We wish you to 
be represented. Send your copy- 
in now. Forma are being closed 
daily. The number will be out the 
19th. 

Don't ba among the missing. 



FALLS HOUSE TO STAY OPEN 

Niagara Faixs, N. Y., Dec. 3. — The In- 
ternational Theatre, this city, which was 
to close this week with the "Innocent 
Maids," will remain open for tbe balance 
of the season, playing American Circuit at- 
tractions Friday and Saturday. 

H. C. Carroll, manager and lessee of the 
house, who was called for the National 
Army, it is now reported will not leave 
for camp until the last of April or early 
in May, 



COOK AND SAVO BOOKED 

Cook and Savo were booked in the lay- 
off week of the "Sporting Widows," play- 
ing Keeney's, Newark, the first half of the 
week and Keeney's, Brooklyn, the last half. 
They also played- the Star and Gayety, 
Brooklyn, the following Sunday. Their 
act was the laughing hit of the two bouses 
Sunday, and with a few minor changes 
will be good on any vaudeville bill. 



MURPHY TO JOIN ELKS 

Frank "Rags" Murphy will be initi- 
ated into the Elks when he plays Scran ton 
this week. 



MINER'S TO CELEBRATE 

Next week will be Anniversary Week at 
Miner's Bronx, with Harry Hastings' Big 
Show as the attraction. George Miner has 
arranged for something special each night 
Monday will be Bronx Athletic Club 
Night; Tuesday, War Song Writers; 
Wednesday, Old Fashion Country Store: 
Thursday, amateurs; Friday, star wrestl- 
ing bouts, and Saturday, Surprise Night 

In addition to the above, Miner will of- 
fer a big vaudeville act as an extra feature. 



STOCK HOUSE 

WHEEL PLAN 

ST1LLALIVE 

POSSIBLE TOWNS NAMED 



Chicago, Dec. 4. — Talk regarding a cir- 
cuit of honses to play stock burlesque con- 
tinues to be heard here, although no 
definite plan seems to have been put 
into operation as yet to get the thing 
started. Everyone seems to believe there 
would be money in the venture, but nobody 
apparently wants to go ahead with it. 

James James, of Akron, Ohio, was in 
this city recently and is reported to have 
been greatly in favor of the project He 
has a house in the Ohio city where he is 
reported to be making money. 

As outlined, the plan includes his house 
as one of the spokes in the circuit and it 
might be used as the starting point Other 
companies are also operating in Mil- 
waukee, Detroit, Indianapolis, Pittsburgh 
and Baltimore, with another one shortly 
to be opened in Washington. 

With these as a nucleus, companies 
might then be established in Cincinnati, 
Cleveland, Toledo and Chicago, all to- 
gether forming a small circuit Mention 
of the Imperial, now running in St Louis. 
has also been made, as a good stop off 
between Chicago and Kansas City should 
it be possible to get a company going in 
the latter town. It would break the long 
jump, it is pointed ont 



MARGERY ADAMS MARRIED 

Trenton, N. J., Nov. 25. — Margery 
Budgick, treasurer of the Grand Theatre 
in this city, was married tonight to Lieut. 
Emil J. Lehman,. of the 310th Infantry, 
Camp Dix, Wrightstown, after a short 
courtship. 

Miss Budgick, whose stage name was 
Margery Adams, was well known in bnr- 
lesque circles until last season, when she 
retired from the footlights and returned 
to her home in this city on account of the 
death of her father. Two years ago she 
was a principal with Sam Howe's Big. 
Show. Last year she was a member of 
the Lyceum Stock Company of Washing- 
ton, D. C. 



LEDERER A DUNN SIGNED 

Lew Lederer and Charles Dunn, who 
closed with "Hello Girls" in Yonkers, have 
been signed by Ben Kahn to open with 
the Union Square Stock Company at the 
Union Square Monday, Dec. 17. 

Dunn and Lederer will replace Billy 
Spencer and Nat Young. Kabn will sign 
up his people hereafter for two trips 
around his circuit, except when he has an 
exceptionally strong drawing card, which 
he wishes to retain for a longer period. 

Dunn and Lederer were booked through 
the Roehm & Richards office. 



DIEHL PREPARING ACT 

Dan Delhi, of Sim Williams' "Girls 
From Joyland," is preparing a new single 
act, which he will offer in vaudeville at 
the close of his burlesque season. 



ELLA TAVOLATO REPLACED 

Ethel De Bean opened with the Joe 
Burton company Monday at Ben Kahn'a 
"Follies" as soubrette, replacing Ella 
Tavolato. 



PUTNAM REPLACES WEST 

Arthur Putnam joined the Joe Burton 
Stock Company as straight man at the 
Union Square last Friday, replacing Joe 
West 



SOLVES RAILROAD DELAYS 

Phil Wolf, manager of the "Bowery 
Burlesquers," has devised an idea by 
which he hopes to reduce tbe chances of 
losing a matinee and perhaps tbe night 
performance on sleeper jumps in tbe West, 
in case the Government should further 
cripple the railroads. 

Hereafter Wolf will check all his the- 
atre trunks and wardrobe trunks on the 
same train his company travels on, or, if 
possible, an earlier train. The scenery, 
props and hotel trunks will be loaded in 
tbe company baggage car. 

In case this latter car should miss the 
train or be dropped off, the company will 
still hare its costumes and will be able 
to give a performance with house scenery. 



MYRTLE CHERRY WELL AGAIN 

Philadelphia, Pa^ Nov. 30. — Myrtle 
Cherry, late prima donna of the "French 
Frolics," who underwent an operation on 
her throat several weeks ago in this city, 
is now entirely well and her voice ia aa 
good as when she appeared in band con- 
certs throughout the South last summer. 
Miss Cherry has accepted contracts to ap- 
pear in vaudeville for a few weeks in this 
city, doing the "single" she offered over 
tbe Western Vaudeville Circuit last 
winter. 



CHAS. VAN OSTEN IMPROVED 
Wavebly, N. Y„ Nov. 29.— Chas. Van 
Osten, of the team of Clark and Van Oaten, 
late of the "Mischief Makers," who re- 
turned to his borne here a few weeks ago 
to regain his health, has been improving 
rapidly. He will probably be back in har- 
ness around the first of the year. 



"B'WAY BELLES" ENTERTAINED 
William S. Stroud, owner of the Savoy 
Theatre at Hamilton, Ontario, entertained 
the principals of tbe "Broadway Belles" 
for dinner at Lnchow*s Monday night of 
last week. The show was playing tbe 
Olympic at the time. 



HOWIE LEAVES MINER'S 

Frank Howie, stage manager of Miner's 
Bronx Theatre, New York, left that boose 
last week and is now at Loew*s Seventh 
Avenue house in the same capacity. He 
had been is Miner's employ for over 
twenty-five years. 



TILTON IS REPLACED 
Marie Sparrow replaced Tilton with the 
Behman Show at Hurtig & Seamon's The- 
atre last week. Miss Sparrow is a "find" 
of Jack Singer's, and is doing a clever 
character singing and talking act. 



HATTIE KEITH TO MARRY 

Hattie Keith, private secretary to James 
B. "Blotch" Cooper, is to be married on 
March 31 next to Charles Epstein, a non- 
professional, according to an announce- 
ment made last Saturday. 

COOPER GOING TO HEALTH FARM 

James E. Cooper, the burlesque man- 
ager, is arranging to go to Jack Cooper's 
Health Farm, Stamford, Conn. He ex- 
pects to get there in a couple of weeks. 



BURLESQUE STOCK DOING WELL 

Milwaukee, Nov. 29. — The Eddie B. 
Collins Stock Burlesque Company ia play- 
ing an eight weeks' engagement at tbe 
Empress Theatre to good business. 

ORPHEUM GETS $1,300 

Pathison, N. J., Nov. 30. — The two 
Thanksgiving Day performances at the Or- 
pheum, tbe burlesque house here, brought 
$1,300 to the box office. 



Burlesque News continued on Pages 27 and 29 



GIRLS GIVEN PARTY 

A beefsteak party was given in honor of 
Mona Raymond and Vera Rose of the 
"Hello Girls" at Palmer's, in Brooklyn, 
last Thursday night 



16 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



December 5, 1917 



At 
B. F. Keith's 



This Week December 3 



CONNIE CRAVEN 



Palace 
Theatre 



« 



With Wm. B. Friedlander's, Inc., 
new production 

The Reckless Eve 



FAUGH - A - BALLAH 



Words by ED ROSE 



"CLEAR THE WAY" 



Music by ABE OLMAN 



RESTRICTED FOR BLANCHE RING 

In OLIVER MOROSCOS PRODUCTION 



"WHAT NEXT" 

FORSTER MUSIC PUBLISHER, Inc. 



146 W. 45th St., New York City, N. Y. 
MAURICE HITTER, Mgr. 



Grand Opera House, Chicago, 111. 
"EZ." KEOUGH, Mgr. 



512 Pantages Theatre Bldg., San Francisco. Calif. 
JACK LA FOLLETTE, Mgr. 




FOOTLIGHT 



F A. V O R I X 



LA 
BERGERE 

end Pesing D 0[S 

ART IN PORCELAIN 
AND MARBLE 


BILLY 
B.VAN 

Memmmtm 

KLAW * ERLANGER 


PAUL 

GORDON 

and ■ 
AME 

RICA 

Offering a Cycle of 
Surprises 

Direction 
WM. S. HENNESSY 


My Success Your Success 

FRANK 
DOBSON 

Booked Solid 
MAX. E. HAYES 


ELIZABETH 

M. 

MURRAY 


NAN 
HALPERIN 


Management 
E. F. Albtt 


Dir. Alf. T. Wihmn 




ed. a 

DERKIN 

AND HIS 

Dog and Monkey 
Pantomime Novelty 

Dirrctim 
THOMAS FITZPATRICK 


BERT 
BAKER&CO. 

m 

' 'Prevarication ' ' 

Dir. HARRY FITZGERALD 


FLORENCE 

RAYFIELD 

In VemdtwOU 
Dir. LOUIS PINCUS 


THE 

FAYNES 

THE ARTISTS WTTH A 
SUPREME OFFERING 

Dir. JACK FLYNN 


PAUL 
PEREIRA 

And hie fmmimt 

String Quartette 

Dir. MAX B. HAYES 


AMANDA 
GREY 

AND BOYS 

Direction 
.. HOSE AND CURTIS 



December 5, 1917 ■ 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



17 



M 



RS. HERMAN BECKER has presented 
her husband with a baby girl. 



Daxras Brothers' Palace date has been 
switched from this week to May 6. 

Dippy Diers, of the Hippodrome show, 
won a turkey in a raffle Wednesday morn- 
ing- 

H. S. Drago, of New~Yorkr3 scouting 
Ohio to find a house suitable for bur- 
lesque. 

Grant Churchill will take out a new 
turn on the Orpheum Circuit called "Not 
Guilty." 

Lynn Overman has been laid up in his 
apartments at the Hotel Flanders with a 
severe cold. 



William Whitton, the 'old-time circus 
man, is ill at his home in Akron, O., with 
rheumatism. 



Conroy and O'Donnell have just been 
booked for ten weeks on Loew time by 
Joe Michaels. 



Frederick Phillips is now helping occupy 
the offices of Jack Goldberg in the Put- 
nam Building. 

Charles Kellogg opens in a new mono- 
log at Proctor's Theatre, Newark, tomor- 
row (Thursday). 

Hazen Vaughn, nephew of Bay Myers, 
of the Orpheum office, has reached the 
trenches in France. 



Tan Landry, formerly of Landry Broth- 
ers, will soon enter vaudeville in a single, 
playing Loew time. 

"Billy" Sheeny, manager of the DeKalb 
Theatre, Brooklyn, is the father of a baby 
girl, his second child. _ 

Homer B. Mason, of the team of Mason 
and Keeler, has been in the hospital for 
the past three weeks. ~ :T 

Red Saunders, of the Orpheum Booking 
Department, spent Thanksgiving Day In 
Chicago with his folks. 

Elda Furry (Mrs. De Wolfe Hopper) 
spent the Thanksgiving holidays with her 
parents in Altoona, Pa. 

Iden Payne is directing the reheasals 
of Ethel Barrymore and company* in "The 
Lady of the Camellias." 

Jack La Follette has been placed in 
charge of the Coast professional office of 
the Forster Mnsic Company. 

Ralph Comlin, of Lawrence Goldle's of- 
fice, has joined the theatrical company 
formed in the 22nd regiment. 

Mrs. Ned Waybura, who was operated 
upon for appendicitis last week, is re- 
ported to be rapidly improving. 

Adolph Bohm, of the "Miss 1917" Com- 
pany, is directing rehearsals of a new 

Russian dancing act for vaudeville. 

Howard Greenley is designing the scen- 
ery for WiUiam Faversham'e forthcom- 
ing revival of "Lord and Lady Algy." 

Dorothy Megrew, of "The Boomerang" 
company, is to be married this month to a 
wealthy lumberman of the far West. 

A. L. Jacobs, the theatrical attorney 
and first-nighter, is recovering from the 
effects of a serious surgical operation. 



Jack Mandel, agent in the Putnam 
Building, is back in his office, after having 
been ill for ten days with rheumatism. 



Joseph Tiscorina, advertising agent of 
the Hudson Theatre, Union HiH^ is a 
happy father once more. This time a 
girl. 




Marta Wittkowaka, well known on the 
operatic stage, was married to Arlinton 
H. Mallery of Syracuse, at Sayre, Pa., last 
week. 



The Temple Four replaced E. Harry 
Adler, who took sick, at the Folly Thea- 
tre, Brooklyn, on a minute's notice last 
week. 



Allan Doone opened what seems to be 
a successful season at the Alrazjir Theatre 
in San Francisco in a series of Irish 
dramas. 



Rufus Greenlee will enter vaudeville in 
partnership with Elvia Williams, his late 
partner, Thad Drayton, having been 
drafted. 



John Swicke, formerly with the Gold- 
wyn Pictures Corporation, has joined the 
Naval Reserve and is now seen about in 
uniform. 



Donald and Clark have left the Pen- 
nington Review to join Phil Bush's act, 
now in rehearsal, called "The Midnight 
Review." 



Jesse Wenck, assistant treasurer at the 
Knickerbocker Theatre, has joined the 
National Army. He left for Camp Upton 
last Monday. 

Ralph Carney-Spost, with the vaude- 
ville act "On the Edge of Things," is the 
father of a baby boy born last week in 
Providence, R. I. : 



Joe Woods, of Lawrence Goldie's office, 
has enlisted in the company being formed 
by theatrical people for the 22nd regi- 
ment of engineers. 

Sevilanita, the Spanish dancer at the 
Palais Royal, introduced two new dances 
in "Venus on Broadway" at that resort 
last Monday night. 

Ray Myers and Frank Vincent, of the 
Orpheum Booking office, have joined the 
company being formed of theatrical people 
by the 22nd regiment. 

Frank Otto will appear in one of the 
leading roles in "Going Up," Cohan and 
Harris's new musical play, when that 
show reaches Broadway. 

George Lovett opened at the Orpheum 
Theatre, Salt Lake City, last week in place 
of Mercedes, and was immediately routed 
over the Orpheum Circuit. 

Robert Harrison, now playing In "Mis- 
ter Antonio," has enlisted in the Quarter- 
master's Department of the Army and is 
awaiting a call to service. 

Carney Christie is playing the title role 
in "Very Good .Eddie," now touring the 
South. Harry Hoyt and Myrtle Bordine 
are also with the company. 

Billy White, in Cincinnati for Feist, is 
wearing a gold medal which he won in 
Chicago last week in a singing contest. 
"Over There" won out for him. 



Frank A. Keeney, the theatre manager, 
has organized the Frank A. Keeney Pic- 
tures Corporation, and has engaged Cath- 
erine Calvert as one of the stars. 



Frank Tours, the English director, has 
been engaged to direct the orchestra for 
the Shubert production of "Over the Top," 
which opened last Saturday evening. 

S. Fradkin, the violinist, will begin a 
vaudeville tour over the Orpheum Circuit 
some time this month. He will be as- 
sisted by Mile. Knight-Tell, soprano. 

Walter Hubbell, who played the part of 
Aquila in "A Royal Slave" for ten years, 
is now playing with the John E. Kellard 
Company in repertoire, through Canada. 



Lee Pape, a Philadelphia newspaperman, 
is the author of "The Tinkleman, which 
is to be produced at the Cohan and Harris 
Theatre during the Christmas holidays. 

Grace K. Emmett, who has been in re- 
tirement for the past seventeen years, 
will appear in vaudeville again. Her act 
is being finished by James C. Madison. 

Adolph Bolm is negotiating with the 
management of the Coliseum, London, 
Eng., for a production of his ballet, "Fall- 
ing Leaves," at that house, next Summer. 

Dorothea Carothers, a stock actress, 
was married Thanksgiving night at the 
Unitarian Church, Cincinnati, to T. H. C 
Allen, wealthy Pittsburgh manufacturer. 

Marguerite Farrell is wearing in her 
vaudeville act an old-fashioned hoop skirt 
which she values highly. She has had it 
insured for $500 against loss by theft or 
fire. 



Ed. Nickerson, formerly of Quigg and 
Nickerson, and Frank Berry, of Berry 
and Berry, have formed a partnership and 
are now playing the Southern U. B. O. 
time. 



Robert Harrison, who plays Joe, the 
partner of the' hurdy-gurdy man in Otis 
Skinner's "Mister Antonio," and Mildred 
-Leech were married last week .at Wauke- 
gan, 111. 

E. Lyall Swcte, the London stage di- 
rector who staged "Chu Chin Chow" at 
the Manhattan Opera House, has decided 
to remain here and become an independent 
producer. 

William Gibson denies he married any- 
body at Salt*" Lake City recently, but ad- 
mits that he is going to produce and star 
in the vaudeville playlet "The Futuristic 
East Lynn." 

Fay Aarons, formerly secretary to Max 
Lewis, in the Times Building, is now re- 
placing Dorothy Bobbins in the office of 
Max Hayea and Lewis and Gordon in the 
Palace Building. 

Ned McCrea, who has been with the 
Hagenback- Wallace Circus for the past 
four seasons, has entered vaudeville and 
opened at the Strand Theatre, Racine, 
Wis., last week. 



Mique O'Brien has returned to Terre 
Haute, Ind., from Gamp Shelby, Hatties- 
burg, Miss., where he has been doing spe- 
cial war write-ups, and resumed his work 
as dramatic critic. 



Naio and Naio returned to Racine, Wis., 
last week, and played the Strand Theatre, 
after closing a successful season on the 
W. V. M. A. time. They will open soon 
for Alf. T. Wilton. 



Marguerite Patti, one of the desert 
dancers in "Chu Chin Chow," is to be 
married on Saturday to Vincent Yardum, 
president of the 1918 class of the N. Y. 
University Law School. 



Emms Cams is considering doing a mu- 
sical show next Summer after the comple- 
tion of her vaudeville route. If she de- 
cides in the affirmative, a part will be 
reserved for Larry Comer. 

Grant Mitchell, playing in "The Tailor 
Made Man," will be entertained tomorrow 
(Thursday) afternoon at the annual ba- 
zaar of the Professional Woman's League, 
to be held at their club rooms. 



Patricola, now playing on Western 
time, will come East in the near future. 
A route is being arranged for her, accord- 
ing to rumor, and it is probable she will 
be seen on U. B. O. time in January. 



June Rogexa, a professional skater of 
New York and Chicago, while doing some 
figure skating with her partner, Jack 
Davis, on the ice rink of the Waldorf- 
Astoria, fell and painfully injured herself 
last week. 



S. L. Rothapfel, managing director of 
the Rjalto Theatre, delivered an address 
last Sunday night to the Forum of Ascen- 
sion Memorial Church. The title was 
"The Theatre and Church Should Work 
Together." 



Sam Freed, who for the last three sea- 
sons was with La Tena'a Wild Atii™*! 
Show, - was married in Augusta, Me., last 
week to Regina Stella Lambert, a pro- 
fessional. Jack and Clara Sampson stood 
up with them. 



WiUiam Norris, of the "Maytime" com- 
pany, at the Shubert Theatre, is planning 
to give three special matinee performances 
during February at one of the Shubert 
houses, the net proceeds of which will be 
given to charity. 



Will Deming, with "Parlor, Bedroom 
and Bath," had a lively Thanksgiving In 
Cincinnati. He gathered together a lot 
of old friends made while he was with 
the old Pike Stock Company, and enjoyed 
a feast — which he prepared himself! 

Helen Hayes, the seventeen-year-old 
actress who is playing the title role in 
Klaw and Erlanger and George C. Tyler's 
"Pollyanna" production, has captured the 
critics of the San Francisco papers, who 
are loud in their praise of her work. 



Edna Young's automobile, which was 
being driven by her chauffeur, last week 
crashed into a pillar of the elevated rail- 
road at Two Hundred and Twenty-first 
street, injuring three. All were attended 
by Dr. Gibbons of St. Lawrence Hospital. 



Robert Warwick, who has been at the 
Officers' Training Corps at Plattsburg, N. 
Y., returned to New York last week, hav- 
ing been commissioned a captain. He 
will remain, in this city until Dec. 15, 
when he will report at Camp Dix, in New 
Jersey. 



Win. Russell Meyers has completed the 
following vaudeville acts: "Saved by 
Thunder," for John and Mae Burke; "An 
HI Wind," for the Syipbonas; "Willie 
Wurk" (monologue), for AL Manville, and 
"Songs, Stories and Recitations," for 
LiUy Barry. 



Charles Weigle, manager of the Alham- 
bra Theatre, Cincinnati, helped stimulate 
bis business in these lean days last week 
by running special war pictures sponsored 
by a Cincinnati newspaper. He gave 20 
per cent, of the gross to the soldiers' 
Christmas fund. 



Jack Royal, manager of Keith's Hippo- 
drome, Cleveland, made a flying trip to 
Cincinnati last week to take a few hours' 
rest after his strenuous experiences with 
striking musicians and stage hands. He 
formerly was manager of the Keith the- 
atre in Cincinnati. 



C. Wilbur Levering has taken his Naval 
Quartette out of vaudeville and placed it 
with the "Rainbow Girl," which opened 
at the Forest Theatre, Philadelphia, on 
Monday of this week. Harry McMann, 
Barton Crawford, Fred Martell and Wil- 
bur Levering are the members. 



Slmone de Beryl, a Parisian singer and 
dancer, will open on U. B. O. time in 
about a month, under the direction of 
Jack Henry. Mile, de Beryl has just ar- 
rived from Paris. In her act, which will 
be a single, she will give some ballet 
dancing as well as French character songs. 



18 



fWNEW YORK CLIPPER 



December 5, 1917 



"WTff! 



IT'S A GREAT COMPLIMENT 



to have the well known PRIMA DONNA 





II 'jiuaMV. 



xingr one of our song*, but when she sings two, ifs an occasion tor unusual rejoicing. Read this telegram:— 



Mr. Julius Witmark. 47th St. and B'way, N. Y. Brooklyn, Dec. 1 st. 1917. 

SOMEWHERE IN FRANCE IS THE LILY A POSITIVE SENSATION FOR ME. A GREAT COMPANION 
SONG FOR MY OLD STANDBY, THERE'S A LONG, LONG TRAIL. CONGRATULATIONS ON ANOTHER 
SWEEPING SUCCESS. DOROTHY JARDON. 



MISS JARDON so honored us last week while playing at the ORPHEUM THEATRE, Brooklyn, when she added 
to her repertoire, with the greatest kind of success, our big war song hit 



SOMEWHERE IN FRANCE 



Her beautiful voice, clear enunciation and diction brought out every note of JOE HOWARD'S STIRRING MELODY 
and PHILANDER JOHNSON'S WONDERFUL LYRIC, making of the combination one of the most artistic 
renditions of song ever heard on the vaudeville or any other stage; the other song is; 



THERE'S A LONG LONG TRAIL 



with which she is today identified from coast to coast, having been the first of the big artists to introduce this great 
international song success in America and which she says will live and she will sing forever. If you want a treat, 
hear her sing these two songs at Keith's Riverside, New York, week of December 10th. 

Professional crpies and orchestrations in all keys .... 



IN/1 



CHICAGO 
Sch.-rer Bullw'-ng 
"TOM UUlGLiY 



BOSTON 
213 Trem.^rt St. 



JACK LAHEY 



PROVIDENCE. R. I. 

IS Belknap St. 



>. CROWLEY 



PHILADELPHIA 
35 South 9th St. 



ED. EDWARDS 



Uptown Prof. Rooms, AL. COOK, Manager 

1562 Broadway. NEXT TO PALACE THEATRE 
BALTIMORE i SAN FRANCISCO! ST. PAUL, MINN. 

New Reilly Hotel Pantages Building I R. 158 Bremer Arcade 

F. HARRISON i AL. BROWNE ".WM.'-B. WESSEL 



The Blackstone Quartette 



J. E. Keller 


Thoi. South Earl McKinnoy 


J. W. Coleman 


lit Bui 


2nd Baa* lit Tenor 
IN VAUDEVILLE 


lad Tenor and Dir. 



MARGIE 



GALE 



ADDIS & STEWART 

A Few Songs and a Little Nonsense 
IN VAUDEVILLE 



Study in Mid-Air — Playing U. B. O. 
PETE MACK, Eastern Representative C W, NELSON, Western Representative 

♦JACK ATKINS 



THE CENSUS TAKER 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



DNA DREON 

Band-Box Girl — N. V. A. — Dainty-Song-Story-Oddity 
Week Dec. 3, Rialto Theatre, Chicago, HI. 



SNOOKSIE TAYLOR 

Sunbeam of Song — In Vaudeville 



Assisted by MILT. ARNSMAN 



Direction, MR. FRANK EVANS 



DANCING DALES 

Vaudeville's Pre-eminent Exemplars of Dancing Oddities. 

SheFard^S oxt 

FOLLIES OF VAUDEVILLE 
Agents Joe Page Smith and Gene Hughe*. 



December 5, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



19 



•THE DAUGHTER" 



*>** 



Theatre — Fob's Jamaica^ ._„„. 
Style— Playlet. ^ ,*} 

Time — Tioenty-tiBO minutes. 

Setting — Kitchen, full stage. 

This act is a long q 8Sfra^Snr affair in- 
troducing four characters, a mother who 
is of the hypocritical type, a father made 
up to represent a "tad" as seen in bur- 
lesque shows, a daughter stenographer, 
and her sweetheart in evening clothes. 
He wants to marry her. 

The story concerns the earnings of the 
daughter, who supports the household, 
and a brother, Jim, who left the fire- 
side six years previous. The mother, 
though, has implicit faith as to his re- 
turn with worldly goods. 

The father is the household drudge and 
the low comedy relief of the act. - He 
has saved $200, which he is going to 
give to his daughter so that she may 
marry her sweetheart. He plans that 
the house is to be b rotes' up and lie and 
the mother are going to the poorhouse 
for the remainder of their lives. 

The sweetheart, however, breaks in as 
the father talks about going to the poor- 
house and hands the girl a deed to a 
bouse in which the four of them ■ can 
live' comfortably. A whistle blows just 
then and a letter is brought into the 
act from the son, asking for ten dollars, 
as the curtain descends. ^ 

There is more emotion than motion in 
the sketch and that makes the twenty-' 
two minutes a draggy affair even for a 
small time act The turn lacks class and 
speed. S. I*. H. 

CLARK AND WOOD 

Theatre — Loew's Orpheum. 

Styles — Singing, talking and piano. 

Time— Twelve minute*. 

Setting— In one. 

Clark and Wood, two women dressed 
in pretty costumes, open their act with 
a song, in the middle of which they are 
interrupted by a stage hand who tells 
them to leave the stage. B a it after Miss 
Wood fixes it up with him, :they go on 
with the song which was pat over welL 
Bliss Wood then plays a solo on the 
piano, followed by- Miss Claxk rendering 
a song very poorly. " *T»ey^hg' a selec- 
tion in double arrangement, with Miss 
Wood at the piano.. After, some talk 
that was rather slow '"in getting over 
they finished the act with a war selection. 
The act should get some new and in- 
. teresting talking material, when it would 
be a fair one for small time. M. I* 



NEW ACTS 

(Csntaued from Fags t) 



MILLS AND MOULTON 

Theatre — Ridgewood. 

Style — Comedy. 

Time — Twenty minutes. 

Setting'— Street. 

It seems that the lady of the act is 
trying to save her brother, who is a 
counterfeiter, from jail, by getting back 
the bogus bill he gave to a restaurant 
keeper. They make an appointment and 
the passwords by which they are to 
know each other are "Chrysanthemum" 
and "Heliotrope." His attempts to pro- 
nounce the words get many laughs, as 
does the fact that she makes him give 
her all the twenty-dollar bills be hat. 

Mills and Moulton have an out and 
out comedy act of the first water, and 
should find no trouble getting bookings. 

S. K. 



ARTHUR AND GRACE TE RRY 

Theatre — Oreepoint. 

Style — Cotoboy. 

Time — TMrteen minutev^pt^»-'- 

Setting— One. ■ ' i^-- 

Arthur Terry has the appearance of 
being a real cowboy, amtgj&ttth his lariat 
and talk, amuses the audience. 

The lariat he uses is very long, but 
he handles it with much ease. Grace 
Terry assists him in doing .Jus stunts. 
They offer a number of rope dances, in 
which they show their ability to handle 
lariats. 

The act is a fairly good one, but, with 
the material they use they can hope 
for nothing better than where they are 
at present. M. L. 



PAUL AND PAULINE 

Theatre — Ridgewood. 

Style — Gymnastic. 

Time — Eight minutes. 

Setting— Special w» four. 

Paul and Pauline have a fast snappy 
turn. 

Paul starts things off with the old 
lifting stunt, and follows with a few 
one-arm pull-ups, meanwhile keeping up 
a running stream of chatter with Paul- 
ine, who changes from street to gym- 
nasium clothes, and both go through two 
or three stunts. Pauline next balances 
herself along the rings, while Paul sus- 
pends himself by her hands. Then, 
hanging by his feet he holds her sus- 
pended from bis teeth, meanwhile swing- 
ing ont over the audience. They keep up 
a line of patter all through the turn, 
which makes a classy opener. S. K. 



GILETTE— - < .<»**• 

Theatre — Greenpoint. 

Style — Mystifying esoapes. 

Time — Nine minutes. 

Setting — Full stage. Special drop. 

Gilette has as good an act as his 
namesake has razors. Aa an illusionist 
he held the audience spellbound. 

He opens with one cage built inside of 
the other from which escape seems im- 
possible without detection. Nevertheless, 
after being locked inside of the inner cage 
and after the curtains are drawn, 
Presto ! Gilette comes running down 
through the aisle. 

It is needless to describe his other bits. 
Suffice it to say, they are all without a 
flaw. His closing stunt is being locked 
into a glass tank on one aide of the stage, 
escaping and reappearing in another tank 
filled with water on the other side. 

Gilette should have someone beside 
liiinim ir, however, to make the announce- 
ments of his bits aa be does it very 
poorly. L. R. G. 



FOUR ORTONS 

Theatre— Proctor's 125*fc 8t. 
Style— Wire act. 
Time — Ten minutes. 
Setting— Full stage. 

The Four Ortons, composed of two 
men and two women, make a. very neat 
appearance and do some very fast and 
effective work on the wire. 

They follow along the standard line 
of wire performers, but make their work 
very acceptable by the _ exceptional 
amount' of ginger put into it, this being 
especially applicable to the little Japa- 
nese girl. 

The Four Ortons have an act which 
' can bring any bill to a successful and 
fast close. H. L- 



GRACE FISHER AND CO. 

Theatre — Proctor's Fifth Avenue. 
Style — Binging. 
Time— Eighteen minutes. 
Setting — In one. 

Miss Fisher's appearance and clever- 
ness in putting over songs should bring 
this act good bookings. 

She opens with a love song, followed 
by an Irish melody, and accompanied on 
the piano by a man. In rendering her 
routine, she shows to best advantage in 
singing her last number. 

The man did two numbers at the piano 
while Miss Fisher changed ber gowns, 
which were very attractive. 

The act should make the bigger houses 
very easily. M. I*. 

STEWART AND DOWNING 

Theatre— Eighty-first Bt. 

Style — Posing. 

Time — Eight minutes. 

Setting — Full stage. 

Three girls make up this act, in which 
they do a series of poses representing 
different well-known works of marble 
statuary. 

The subjects are: Portals of the Past; 
The Parting; The Defense of the Flag; 
Apollo, the Slave Merchant; Joan of 
Arc; At the Winning Post; The Archer 
and the Discus Thrower. 

Although the offering is very much 
along standard lines, it is well pre- 
sented. M. L. 



SYLPHONIC QUINTETTE 

Theatre— Proctor's 58«» Bt. 
Style — Xylophonists. 
Time — Ten minutes. 
Setting — In one. 

The Sylphonic Quintette, a man and 
four girls, are adept xylophonists. The 
numbers rendered are well played and 
they deserve a bit of praise for the man- 
ner in which they work. 

They use three xylophones, the man 
and two girls working on one, and the 
others being used by the two girls. A 
popular song starts off their routine. 
They then play a classical selection, af- 
ter which they conclude their turn with 
a medley of popular numbers. 

The Quintette possess considerable 
personality, particularly the girls. They 
seem to enjoy their work and put a lot 
of ginger into an ordinary xylophone 
routine. M. I* 



ANITA DIAZ'S MONKEYS 

Theatre— Proctor's 56th Bt. 
Style — Trained monkeys. 
Time—Thirteen minutes. 
Setting— Special. 

The monkeyB in this act are pat 
through all sorts of tricks, including, bal- 
ancing on balls, rolling over, somer- 
saults, dancing and acrobatic stunts. 
One, called Sussie, spells her name with 
the aid of lettered blocks which she 
places on a small, table. Another, called 
Bed, does some stunts on the Roman 
rings, while two others go up and down 
a flight of st airs on their front paws. 
After doing'YTOutfnrof tricks, three of 
them bring the act to a close by balanc- 
ing barrels on their feet in the same 
manner aa. Japa-do. , 

The act* fflrnKhes an' excellent nov- 
elty, and the monkeys are very well 
trained. It is of big time calibre and 
could score a hitvOn practically. any bill. 

M. L. 



NASH AND O'DONNELL 

Theatre — Oreenpoint. 

Style— Skit. 

Time — Eighteen minutes. 

Setting— Special. 

This is a very good vehicle, in which 
the husband comes home in the early 
hours of the morning and tries to sneak 
into his house without being seen by 
friend wife. But, as luck ia against 
him, he is caught. 

After some talk, which ia very funny, 
a song is rendered by the man, who has 
a good . baritone voice. They make-up 

' only after the husband tells of his good 
fortune in selling his gold mine and 
presents his wife with a check of large 
denomination. 

The setting represents a lady's bou- 
doir. The act is a good one and should 
find being booked an easy matter. 

M. L. 



BETTY HALL AND CO. 

Theatre — Notional (Try-outs). 
Style — Binging and dancing. 
Time — Eighteen minutes. 
Setting— In one. 

Betty Hall and the Dixie Four, com- 
posed of colored Pickanninies, made a 
nit with their routine of songs and 
dances. 

Miss Hall sings a few selections in 
which the picks give ber valuable assist- 
ance. Then come some songs and 
dances by the four assistants that are 
deserving of a lot of praise, aa the quar- 
tette are hard and good workers. 

The act is well dressed, with a change 
for each number. 

The act is entitled to a good spot on 
the three-a-day time on merit 

M.L. 



NANTHEY AND BARABAN 

Theatre-T.EvMy-/irgt Bt. 
Style- — Dancing and singing. 
Time — Twelve minutes. 
Setting— Full stage. 

These performers do a very clever danc- 
ing act, In which they are assisted by 
Florence Flynn at the piano. 

The dances consist of four numbers, 
all of the ball-room. type. The act is 
well dressed and the dances finely exe- 
cuted. Miss Flynn sings a few selec- 
tions that were well put over. 

The pair are above the average of 
dancing acts. M. L. 



"COMMODORE TOM" 

Theatre — National 

Style — Trained pony. 

Time — Eight minutes. 

Setting— Full stage. 

Commodore Tom is the name of a 
horse, who is billed as "the horse 
with the human mind." It can truth- 
fully be said that Commodore Tom dis- 
plays remarkable horse sense. 

He is put through his stunts by a 
trainer, although he is a wonderfully 
well trained horse. After doing an un- 
usual routine, he answers questions 
asked by members of the audience, the 
replies being given by hoof beats. 

He then shows his ability to dlstin- 
quish one color from the other, by pick- 
ing out those asked far. He closes with 
a popular song played on balls. 

M. i^ 



GEORGE & MARIE BROWN 

Theatre— Proctor's 125th Bt. 
Style — Nut comedy and singing. 
Time— Thirteen minute*. 
Setting — In one. 

This offering begins with a song by 
Miss Brown, who has a very sweet and 
charming voice. Before starting their 
nnt comedy talk, the man lets the audi- 
ence know that he is going to tell a lot 
of old jokes, saying after each that that 
is one of them. The way they put over 
their comedy won the approval of the 
audience. 

He makes a good foil for his partner 
and helps to accentuate some of the best 
material. It is a good act and, in time, 
should find its way Into big time bouses. 

M. L. 



"AN HEIR FOR A NIGHT" 

Theatre — Loew's Notional. 
Style— Girl act. 
Time — Twenty-two minutes. 
Setting— Fall stage. 

"An Heir for a Night" is billed aa a 
bridal bouquet presenting six beautiful 
girls and three principals. 

The act contains all the qualities of 
being a big-time offering. The comedian 
uses some good and timely material, and 
the other two principals put over their 
song and dance numbers well. The 
chorus makes several changes in cos- 
tume, the folly one, in which the girls 
represent dice, cards, women, song, wine 
and gayety, being especially attractive. 
The act should prove a winner. 

M. C 



FISHER AND GILMORE 

Theatre— National 

Style— Binging, talking and piano. 

Time-— Ten minutes. 

Setting — In one 

This team starts their act with a 
song by Fisher, accompanied on the 
piano by Miss Gilmore. This gives the 
offering a good beginning. 

They then go into some nut talk that 
was old, but won the approval of the 
audience by the way they put it over. 
They finish with Fisher rendering a 
medley of popular songs with Miss GO. 
more assisting him at the piano. 
It is a good tnm and should 
booking an easy matter. M. h. 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



December 5, 1917 



HITS 



HARRY VI 



Harry Von Tilzer wants his theatrical pals to know that his Twenty-fifth Anniversary as - 
Song writers may come and song writers may go, but Harry still remains at the top. A-. 
songs and you will quickly realize why he has lasted, so long and why so many acts ar< 
are terrific hits. Why not for you ? 



The greatest Descriptive Ballad in \, ears 

A bigger hit than "Someone 

More Lonesome" 



Lillian . 
Big Corned) 



m 



OUR 






TO NT 



Lyric by EDI 

Elizabeth Vj 
Riot wi;- 



Adele Rowi 
Com: 

LISTER 
KNOCKIK 



KNITTIM 

Lyric by Bil 



With the most wonderful punch poem 

ever written. Beautiful Duet and 

Quartette arrangement. 



A Ballad That Will Never Die 

THERE'S SOMEONE MORE 

LONESOME THAN YOU 



Our New Pa: 
Hit. Wait 

IT'S AH 
TO THE 



M II 



GIRL I LEF 

Lyric by V* 



HARRY VON TILZER MUS 



BEN BORNSTEIN 

Prof. Mgr. 



222 West 46th Str 

CHICAGO OFFICE: 143 North Dearborn St 



December 5, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



21 



HITS 



mooser of popular songs looks like it is going to be the most successful of his career. 
:e most of the ^ongs that are written today, then carefully go over the Harry Von Tilzer 
na his songs. Always a year ahead of the rest in ideas. Every one of the songs below 



aine s 

h Song Hit 



ELF 



MORAN 



Song 




T THE 

CLUB 



tic Ballad 
i Grow. 



BEHIND 

RAINOR 



The Courtney Sisters say this song is 

bigger for them than "You Made 

Me Love You" was 

GIVE " 

THERI 

OLO 
YOU 



y BEN BARD and ABE CLATT 

Great Double Version for boy and girl. 
Also Beautiful Obi igato by Ed: Smalle. 



Another '§ Last Night Was the End of the World" 

LOVE WILL FIND THE WAY 

the best 12-8 balSad on the market 



PUBLISHING COMPANY 



t, New York City 

Chicago. MURRAY BLOOM, Manager 



MEYER COHEN 

Bus. Mgr. 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



December 5, 1917 



"I WISH YOU ALL THE LUCK 
IN THE WORLD" 

A war song with a real story. It's brand new 

^AN OLD HORSE THAT 
KNOWS HIS WAY HOME" 

Just hitting his stride. Bet on him 

"OVER THE PHONE" 

Another "Oh Johnny!" Grab it quick. 
Greatest double song published 

"MISSOURI WALTZ" 

(HUSH-A-BYE MA BABY) 

Sensation of a decade 

FORSTER MUSIC PUBUSHER INC. 

NEW YORK OFFICE ^ CHICAGO OFFICE * SAN FRANCISCO OFFICE 

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Maurice Ritter, MgR. 



"EZ'Keough Mgh* JacrLaRlletteMigr. 



i^;j:t:xi:i 



BILLY 



ESMER 



CLIFTON & CORNWELL 

SONGS AND DANCES OF YESTERDAY AND TODAY CLEVER COMEDY 

Direction Rose and Curtis In Vaudeville 



35c Pays 

for FUNNVBONE NO. 6, containing an un- 
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SSo. each. FTONTBOirE FTTnT.THTrrWQ 
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JACK 



NICK 



EDWARDS and GEORGE 



Two Italians in a Day Off 

Direction Jack Potsdam 



BILLY 



FRANKIE 



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IN MELODY AND SONG— Direction JACK POTSDAM 



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OUINVJ Wnll tnD OR.&..NAL ACTS .•_. .. r,CS TO ORDER 

PERFORMERS ROBT. H.Wen7<ENJ433 Broadway, N. Y. 



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f Season 1QIT1918 \ 
f USEFUL INFORMATION g 

/or /Xe 
| THEATRICAL PROFESSION ~l 

PublMird by §/, 

. CLIPPER- |»l! 

■ 604 Broad< 



INVALUABLE 

TO PERFORMERS 

AND ALL OTHERS 

INTERESTED 

IN THE 
THEATRICAL 
. BUSINESS 



IN ADDITION TO A 

COMPLETE DIARY FOR 
THE SEASON 

it contains the names and addresses 
of Managers, Vaudeville and Dra- 
matic Agents in New York. 
Chicago. Boston, Philadelphia, 
Pittsburgh. San Francisco, Can- 
ada; Music Publishers; Theat- 
rical Clubs and Societies; Moving 
Picture Finns, and other informa- 
tion. 

U FREE TO 
H CLIPPER READERS 

Send 10 cents in stamps to cover 
cost of mailing, etc. accompanied 
by the coupon cut from the NEW 
YORK CUPPER. 



ts in 



n ■ — "" 

wr out 

and Bead this Coupon and U 

stamp* far a copy of 

The Clipper Date Book 

AND bed BOOK 
(For IStr-lfU) 

To THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 

Nav York 



December 5, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



23 



Routes Most Reach This Office Not Later 
. Than Saturday 

DRAMATIC AND MUSICAL 

Adams, Maude — His Majesty's, Montreal, 

•■Art and Opportunity" — Cort, N. Y 1 indef. 
Anelln. Margaret — Uttle Theatre, Phlla, tn- 

• Broadway After Dark" — Elkadea, la., 0: 

Nolga, 8 : Elgin, 7 ; Arlington, 8 ; Elma, 9 ; 

Alleson, 10 ; Cedar Falls, 11, 
"Blind Yonth" — Republic, indef. 
"Business Before Pleasure" — Eltinge, New 

York, indef. . 
"Barrie Plays"— Hollis. Boston. 8-22. 
'•Boomerang/' — Garrick, Phlla, indef. 
"Cbeer Up — Hippodrome, Indef. 
"Come Ont of the Kitchen" — Powers, Chi- 
cago, Indef. 
"Cnu Chin Chow" — Manhattan O. H, indef. 
"Country Cousin" — Gaiety, N. T., indef. 
"Cure for Cnrables" — Majestic, Boston, Indef. 
"Doing Our Bit" — Winter Garden, N. Y, 

Indef. 
"De Luxe Annie" — Wilbur, Boston, indef. 
"Everj-woman" — Norfolk. v«_ 6-6 : Newport 

News, 7 : Petersburg, 8 ; Lynchburg, 10 ; 

Cbarlottevllle, 11. • 

"Eyes of Youth" — Marine Elliott's Theatre, 

indef. 
"Eileen" (Joe Weber, mgr.) — Washington, 

D. C 3-8. 
"Flame, The" — Tacoma, Wash., 5; Portland, 

Ore., 6-7-8. _ 

"Flora Bella" (E. Ely, mgr.) — Kearney, 

Nebr, 6: Grand Island, 6: York, 7; 

Lincoln. 8. 
"Gypsy Trail, The" — Plymouth, N. Y., Indef. 
"Grass Widow" — Liberty, N. Y, Indef. 
"Gay Lord Quex" — 48th St., N. Y, 8-8. 
"Girl from Broadway, The" (Clyde Anderson, 

mgr.) — Racine, wis., 6; Jamesville, 6; 

Madison. 7: Milwaukee. 10-11-12. 
"Hans and Frita"— Charleston, W, Va, S; 

Falrmount, 6 ; Clarksburg. 7 ; Oakland, 8 ; 
Cumberland, Md, 10 ; Altoona, Pa., 11. 
"Have a Heart" (H. W. Savage, mgr.) — 
(East) — Savanab, Ga., 5: Augusta, 6; 
Athens, 7 : Macon, 8 ; Albany, 10 ; Mont- 
gomery, Ala.. 11. 
"Have a Heart" (West) — Illinois Theatre, 

Chicago, 3-22. 
"Hamilton" — Blackatone, Chicago, indef. 
"Here Comes the Bride" — Colonial, Chicago. 

Indef. 
"Hltchy-Koo" (Hitchcock & Goetx, mgrs.) — 

44th 8treet N. Y, 8-8. 
"Her Regiment" — Broadhurst, N. Y., 8-8. 
"Johnny Get Your Gun" — Cort, Chicago, in- 
def. 
"Jack o' Lantern" — Globe, N. Y.. 'indef. 
"King. The" — Cohan's, N. Y, Indef. 
John E. Kellard Co., Begina, Sask, 6 ; Saska- 
toon, 6-7-8 ; Moosejaw. 10-11. 
"Lombardl, Ltd." — Morosco, N. Y„ indef. 
"Leave It to Jane" — Longacre Theatre, in- 
def. 
."Land of Joy" — Park, N. Y-, indef. 
-L' Elevation" — Playhouse, N. Y., 3-8. 
Lauder, Harry — Shubert Boston, 3-8. 
"Miss 1917"— Century, N. Y., Indef. 
"Music Master" — Colonial, Boston, 3-8. 
Mack. Andrew — Rochester, N. Y, 6; Scran- 
ton, Pa., 7; Wllkes-Barre, 8. 
"Madame Sand" — Criterion, N. Y., indef. 
"Mayttme" — Shubert Theatre, indef. 
"Man Who Came Back" — Princess, Chicago, 

indef. 
"Masquerader, The" (R. W. Tolly)— Booth. 

N. Y., indef. 
"Montana" — Valentine, Nebr., 6 : Bassett, 6 ; 
Long Pine, 7; Newport, 8; AInsworth. 10; 
Stuart, 11. 
Mantell, Bobt Co. — Cincinnati, O., 17-22. 
"Melting of Molly" — Plymouth, Boston, in- 
def. 
"Nothing But the Truth" — Adelphi, Phlla, 

Indef. 
"Naughty Wife. The" — Harris, N. Y., indef. 
"One Girl's Experience" (B)— Alton. 111., 6; 
Plrtsfleld. 6: Mt. Sterling, 7; Griggsvllle, 
8 ; Qulncy. 9 ; Macomb, 10 ; Arlington, 11. 
"Oh, Boy" — Casino, N. Y„ Indef. 
"Only Girl" — Woodstock, Ont., 6; Chatam, 
6 ; Stratford 7 ; Brentford, 8 ; Hamilton, 
10, 11. 
"Odds and Ends"— Bijou, N. Y., indef. 
"Over the Top" — 48th St. Roof, N. Y., indef. 
W. B. Patton (Frank B. Smith, mgr.) — 
MaryTllle, Mo.. 6 ; Shenandoah, la., 6 ; 
Red Oak, 7 : Griswold, 10 ; Perry, 11. 
"Pollyanna 1, — Broad, Phlla.. indef. 
"Peter Ibbetson"— Lyric. Phils., indef. 
"Passing Show of 1917" — Garrick, Chicago, 

indef. 
"Polly With a Past"— Belaseo. N. Y, indef. 
"Pom-Pom," with Mitel Hajos (H. W. Sar- 
age) — Salt Lake City, Utah. 6-8: Columbia 
Theatre, San Francisco, Cal, 10-29. 
"Pipes o' Pan" — Hudson Theatre, N. Y, In- 
def. 
"Pals First" — Syracuse, N. Y., 6-6; Roches- 
ter, 7-8; Geneva, 10; Corning, 11. 
"Riviera Girl" — New Amsterdam, N. Y„ In- 
def. 
"Rambler Rose" (Chas. Frohman, mgr.) — 
Baltimore, Md.. 3-8; Stamford, Conn.. 10; 
New Haven. 11-12; Hartford. 18-16. 
"Rainbow Girl"— The Forest, Phlla., 8-16. 
Skinner, Otis (Chas. Frohmsn, mgr.) — De- 
troit, Mich., 3-8 ; Columbus, O, 10-12 ; 
Zanesvllle, 13; Parkersbnrg, W. Va, 14; 
Wheeling, 15. 
"Seventeen''— Stuart Walker Co. — Playhouse, 

Chicago. 3-15. 
"Successful Calamity" (A) — Studebaker, Chi- 
cago, 3-8. 
Trail of the Lonesome Pine" — Unlontown, 
Pa- 5; Donors, 6; Waynesbnrg, 7; 
Wheeling, W. Va., 8; Marietta, O, 10; 
.Huntington. W. Va., 11. 
"Tailor Made Man"— Cohan & Harris, Indef. 
"Tiger Hose"— Lyceum, N. Y.. indef. 
Turn to the Eight" — Tremont Theatre, Boa- 
ton, 8-21. 
"Three Bears"— Empire, N. Y, Indef. 



ROUTE LIST 



"Dncle Tom's Cabin" (Win. Kibble) — Owa- 
tonna. Minn., 5 : Albert Lee. 6 : Austin, 7 ; 
Waterloo, la.. 8-9; Iowa Falls, 10; Mar- 
sballtown, 11. 

"Upstairs and Down" — Park So.. Boston, 
Mass. Indef. 

"Very Good Eddie" — Dallas, Tex., 8-9. 

"Very Idea, The" (Messrs. Shubert, mgrs.) — 
Astor.-New York City. 3-15. 

"What's Your Husband Doing?" — 39th St., 
N. Y., indef. 

"Wanderer, The" — Boston Opera House, Boa- 
- ton, Indef.. 

Wilson, AL H. — Mobile, Ala., 5; Bermlng- 
nam, 6-7 ; Gadsden, 8 ; Chattanooga. Tenn.. 
10; Knoxville, 11. 

Washington Sq. Players — Comedy, N. Y., in- 
def. 

"Why Marry"— Cohan's Grand, Chicago, In- 
def. 

"What Next" — Olympic Chicago, indef. 

"You're In Love" — Chestnut St. O. H., Phlla., 
indef. 



STOCK 

Auditorium Players — Maiden, Mass., indef. 
Alcazar Players — San Francisco, indef. 
Austin, Mildred, Musical Comedy (Star) — 

Louisville, Ky., indef. 
Aborn Opera Co. — Pittsburgh, Pa., indef. 
Alhambra Players — Albambra Theatre, York, 

Pa., indef. 
Baker Stock Co. — Portland, Ore., Indef. 
Bunting, Emma, Stock Company — Grand 

Opera House, San Antonio, Tex., indef. 
Bishop Players — Oakland, CaL, indef. 
Blaine's, James, Players — Saskatoon, Can, 

indef. 
Burnes, Melville — Northampton. Mass., indef. 
Bradley 4 Earl Stock Co. — Strand, San An- 
tonio, Tex., indef. 
Cooper Balrd Co. — Zanesvllle, O., indef. 
Crown Theatre Stock Co. (T. W. Rowland, 

Sr.) — Chicago, Indef. 
Cutter Stock Co. — Delhi, N. Y.. week 8. 
Chicago Stock Co. (C. H. Rosskam, mgr.) — 

Bath, Me., week 3. 
Dominion Players — Winnipeg, Manitoba, Can, 

Indef. 
Dwigbt Albert, Players (G. A. Martin, mgr.) 
K. and K. Opera House, Pittsburgh, Pa, 
indef. 
Dainty, Bessie, Players (I. E. Earle, mgr.) — 

Orpheum Theatre, Waco, Tex, Index. 
Dubinsky Bros. — St. Joseph. Mo, indef. 
Dublnsky Bros. — Kansas City, indef. 
Enterprise Btock Company (Norman Hllyard, 

mgr.l — Chicago, indef. 
Earl Stock (Larry Powers, mgr.) — Sharps- 

borg. Pa, indef. 
Emerson Players — Lawrence, Mass, indef. 
Elltch Stock Co. - (Elltch Gardens) — Denver, 

Colo, indef. 
Elbert A- Getcbell Stock — Des Moines, la, 

indef. 
Earle, Ira, Stock — Waco, Tex., indef. 
Fielder, Frank, Stock— Elmlra, N. Y, indef. 
Fifth Ave. Stock — Fifth Ave, Brooklyn, in- 
def. 
Gordinler Bros. Stock — Ft Dodge, la, indef. 
Grand Theatre Stock Co. — Tulsa. Okla, indef. 
Glaser, Vaughn, Stock — Detroit, Mich, indef. 
Holmes, W. Hedge — Troy, N. Y, indef. 
Howard, George, Stock Co. — Vancouver, 

B. C, Can,, indef. 
Hippodrome Stock Co. — Hippodrome, Oak- 
land, Cal., indef. 
Jewett, Henry, Players — Copley, Boston, In- 
def. 
Kenyon Stock Co. (Forty L. Bott, mgr.) — 

Kenyon, Pittsburgh, indef. 
Knickerbocker Players — Philadelphia, Indef. 
Katies, Harry, Stock — Salem, Mass, indef. 
Krueger, M. P. — Wllkes-Barre. Pa, indef. 
Lakeside Musical Comedy Co. — Denver, Colo, 

Indef. 
Lieb, Harris, Stock Co. — Wilson, Chicago, in- 
def. 
Lewis, Jack X, Stock (W. W. Richards, mgr.) 

—Chester, Pa, indef. 
Liberty Players — Strand, San Diego, Cal. 
Lillem, Ed. Clark. Stock — Chester. Pa, lnaaf. 
Levy, Bobt — Lafayette. N. Y, indef. 
Levy, Bobt — Washington, D. C„ Indef. 
Miller * Ball Stock Co. — Stenbenville, O, 

indef. 
Moses A- Johnson Stock — Paterson, N. J, 

indef. 
Mac Lean. Pauline. Stock (W. W. Richards, 
mgr.) — Samuel's Theatre, J am est •wn, 
N. Y, Indef. 
Modern Players — Pabst Milwaukee. Wis, in- 
def. 
Marcus Musical Stock Co. — New Bedford. 

Mass, Indef. 
Morosco Stock — Los Angeles, indef. 
Mills, E. C. — Oklahoma, Okla, indef. 
Marks Bros. Stock Co. 
Niggemeyer, C. A. — Minneapolis, Minn., Indef. 
Orpheum Players (Geo. Bbey, mgr.) — Oak- 
land, CaL 
Orpheum Stock Co. — Orpheum, Newark. N. J, 

Indef. 
Oliver, Otis, Players — El Paso, Tex, indef. 
Oliver. Otis, Players (Otis Oliver, mgr.) — 

Wichita. Kan, indef. 
O'Neill, Wm. — Manchester. N. H.. Indef. 
O'Hara-Warren-Hathaways — Brockton, indef. 
O'Connell. J. F. Stock— Halifax, N. S, indef. 
Poll 8 lock — Bridgeport, Conn, Indef. 
Poll Stock — New Haven, Conn., indef. 
Packard-Jay — Jersey City, N. J„ Indef. 
Pbelan, E. V. — Lynn, Mass, indef. 
8hannon Stock Co. — Mt Sterling, Ky, 8-8. 
Shubert Stock — St Paul. Mian, indef. 
Somerrille Theatre Players — SomerrtUe. 

Mass, Indef. 
Spooner, Cecil, Btock— Grand Opera House, 

. Brooklyn, indef. 
Sites-Emerson Co. — Lowell, Mass., Indef. 
Sites-Emerson Co. — Haverhill, Mass, Indef, 
Van Dike * Baton Stock (F. Mack, mgr.) — 
Joplin, Mo, lndef. 



Vollman, E. H., Stock — Stockton, Cal, Indef. 

Vollman— Salt Lake City, Utah, indef. 

Williams, Ed. Stock — Kokomo, indef. 

Wilkes' Players — Seattle. Wash.. Indef. 

Wilson, Tom — Lyric, Butler, Ind. 

Wallace, Morgan, Stock — Slonx City, la, in- 
def. - 

Wlllard. Fred, Stock — White Plains. N. Y, 
Indef. 

INTERNATIONAL CIRCUIT 

Attractions for the Weak of December 9. 

"After Office Hours" — Columbus. 

"Bringing Up Father" — Buffalo. 

"Buster Brown" — Baltimore. 

"Come Back to Erin" — Orpheum, Phlla. 

"Elans and Frits" — Cleveland. 

"Honolulu Lou" — Indianapolis. 

Katxenjammer Kids — Kansas City. 

"Lure of the City"— Imperial, Chicago. 

"Mutt and Jen"' — National, Chicago. 

"Millionaire's Son and the Shop Girl" — 

Rochester. 
"Marriage Question, The" — St. Louis. 
"Newiyweds Grown-Up Baby"— Walnut, 

Phlla. 
"One Girl's Experience" — Detroit 
"Pretty Baby" — Pittsburgh. 
"Peg O' My Heart" — Louisville. 
"Story of the Rosary" — Worcester. 
"Turn Back the Hours" — Milwaukee. 
"Thurston" — Peoria, 9-10-11-12. 
"Which One 8hall I Marry" — Paterson, 18- 

14-15. 
"Wizard of Wlseland" — Utlca, 10-11-12; 

Syracuse, 13-14-15. 



BURLESQUE 
Columbia Wheel 

AI Reeves — Star and Garter, Chicago, 8-8; 

Gaiety, Detroit 10-1 B.- 
Ben Welch — Corinthian. Rochester, 3-8; Bea- 
table, Syracuse, 10-12 ; Lnmherg, Utlca, 18- 
15. 
Best Show in Town — Casino, Boston, 8-8; 

Columbia. New York, 10-16. _ „ __. 
Bowerys— People's, Philadelphia, 8-8; Palace, 

Baltimore, 10-16. ._ 

Burlesque Revue — Palace, Baltimore, 8-8: 

Gayety, Washington, 10-15. _ „ 

Burlesque Wonder Show — Gayety, Washing- 
ton. 8-8 ; Gayety. Pittsburg, 10-15. 
Bon Tons — Orpheum, Paterson, 8-8 : Majestic. 
Jersey City, 10-15. _ _ __ ^_ 

Behman Show — Empire. Brooklyn, 8-8; Park, 

Bridgeport 18-15. _ „_ 

Broadway Frolics — Gayety, Kansas City, 8-8; 

Gayety, St Louis, 10-15. «,___. 

Bostonlans — Casino, Brooklyn, 8-8; Empire, 

Newark, N. J, 10-15. 
Follies of the Day — Grand, Hartford, Conn, 

3-8: Jacque's, Waterbury. Conn, 10-16. 
Golden Crooks — Empire. Albany, N. Y„ 8-8: 

Gayety, Boston, 10-16. 
Hello American — Gayety. Detroit 8-8: Gay- 
ety, Toronto, Ont, 10-15. 
Harry Hastings— Cohen's, Newbnrg, N. Y„ 8- 
5; Cohen's Pougbkeepate, 6-8; Miner's 
Bronx, New York, 10-15. 
Hip, Hip, Hoorah — Empire, Newark, 8-8; 

Casino, Philadelphia, 10-15. 
Howe, Sam — Colonial. Providence, 8-8; 

Casino, Boston. 10-15. 
Irwin's Big Show— Open, 3-8; Orpheum, 

Paterson, 10-15. 
Liberty Girls — Jacques, Waterbury, Conn, 8- 
8 ; Cohan's, Newbnrg. N. Y, *10-12 : Co- 
han's, Pongbkeepsle, 13-15. 
Majestic — Columbia, Chicago, 8-8; Berchell. 

Des Moines. la., 9-14. 
Merry Rounders — Lyric, Dayton, 0, 8^8: 

Olympic, Cincinnati. 10-15 
Million 8 Dolls— Gayety. Omaha. Neb, 2-7; 

Gayety, Kansas City. 10-15. 
Mollle Williams — Hnrtlg 4 Seamon's. New 
York, 3-8; open 10-15; Orpheum, Paterson, 
17-22. 
Marlon's, Dave — Olympic, Cincinnati, 8-8; 

Star and Garter, Chicago, 10-15. 
Maids of America — Btar. Cleveland, 3-8; Em- 
pire, Toledo, O, 10-15. 
Ob. Girl — Casino. Philadelphia, 8-8; Hnrtlg 

A Seamon's, New York, 10-16. 
Puss Puss — Gayety, Buffalo, 3-8; Corinthian. 

Rochester, 10-16. 
Roseland Girls — Berchell, Des Moines, la, 26- 

29; Gayety, Omaha, Neb, 10-18. 
Rose Sydell's — Gayety, Montreal, Can, 8-8; 

Empire, Albany, 10-15. 
Step Lively — Miner's Bronx, New York, 8-8; 

Empire, Brooklyn. 10-15. 
Star and Garter — Gayety, Boston, 8-8 ; Grand, 

Hartford, Conn., 10-16. 
Sporting \vidows — Majestic. Jersey City, 8-8; 

People's. Philadelphia, 10-15. 
Social Maids — Empire, Toledo, O, 8-8; Ly- 
ric, Dsyton, O, 10-15. 
Sight Seers — Gayety, Toronto, Ont, 8-8 ; Gay- 
ety. Buffalo, 10-15. 
Sam 81dman — Gayety, St Louis, 3-8; Colum- 
bia. Chicago. 10-15. 
Spiegal's Review — Gayety, Pittsburgh, 8-8; 

Star, Cleveland, 10-10. 
Some Show — Park, Bridgeport. Conn,, 6-8: 

Colonial, Providence. 10-15. 
Twentieth Century Maids — Bas table, Syra- 
cuse. 8-6: Lumbers, Utlca, 6-8; Gayety, 
Montreal. 10-15. 
Watson's Beef Trust — Columbia, New York, 
8-8; Casino, Brooklyn, 10-16, 

American Wheel 

American — Gayety, Milwaukee, 8-8; Gayety. 

Minneapolis, 10-15. 
Army and Navy Girls — Holyoke. Mass.. 8-6: 

Springfield, 0-8 ; Ho ward, Boston, 10-18. 



Aviators — Empire, Chicago, 3-8 : Ft Wayne, 

Ind, 9 ; Majestic, Indianapolis, 10 15. 
Auto Girls — Empire, Hoboken, N. J, 8-8; 

Star, Brooklyn, 10-15. 
Broadway Belles— Gayety. Philadelphia, 3-8; 

Majestic, Scranton. 10-15. 
Biff, Blng, Bang — Empire, Cleveland, O, 8-8; 

Erie, Pa, 10-11 ; Ashtabula, Q, 12 ; 

Youngstown, 18-15. 
Cabaret Girls — New Bedford. Maes, 8-6; 

Worcester. 6-8 ; Olympic. New York, 10-15. 
Charming Widows — Gayety. Brooklyn. 8-8; 

Warburton. Yonkers, N. Y, 10-12; Hudson, 

Schenectady, 18-15. 
Darlings of Paris — Standard, St Louis. 8-8; 

Engtewood, Chicago, 10-15. 
FoUlea of Pleasure — Howard, Boston. 8-8; 

New Bedford, 10-12 ; Worcester, 13-15. 

Forty Thieves — Penn Circuit 8-8: Grand, 
Trenton, 12-16. 

French Frolics — Olympic, New York. 8-8; 
Gayety, Philadelphia. 10-15. 

Gay Morning Glories — Gayety, Minneapolis. 

5-8: Star. St Paul. 10-16. 
Grown Up Babies— Open 8-8; Lyceum, 

Columbus, 10-15. 
Girls from Follies— Btar, St. Paul, 3-8; Ly- 
ceum, Dnlntb, 9; open 10-10; Century, 

Kansas City, 17-22. 
Girls from Joy land — Gayety, Chicago, 8-8; 

Gayety, Milwaukee. 10-16. 
Girls from Happyland — Victoria. Pittsburgh, 

8-8; Penn Circuit, 10-15. 
Hello Girls — Warburton, Yonkers. N. Y„ 8- 

6 : Hudson, 8chenectady, 6-8 ; Holyoke, 

Mass.. 10-12; Springfield. 13-15. 
Innocent Maids— Garden, Buffalo, 3-8; Btar, 

Toronto, Ont, 10-15. 
Jolly Girls— Gayety, Baltimore, 8-8; Troca- 

dero. Philadelphia. 10-16. 
Lid Lifters— Majestic Indianapolis. -84: 

Terre Haute, Ind., 9 ; open 10-15 ; Lyceum, 

Commons, 17-22. 
Lady Buccaneers — Youngstown, 6-8; Victoria, 

Pittsburgh, 10-15. 
Mischief Makers— Niagara Falls, 6-8 ; Garden. 

Buffalo, 10-16. ' """"""• 

Military Maids — Court, Wheeling, W. Va, 8- 

5 ; Grand, Akron, 0, 6-8 ; Empire, Cleve- 
land, 10-15. 
Monte Carlo Girls — Majestic, Bcranton, Pe_ 

8-8; Bingbamton. N. Y, 10-11; Oswego! 

12 : Niagara Falls. 18-15. _weweaw, 

Mlle-a-Mlnute Girls — Trocadero. Philadelphia. 

3-8; South Bethlehem, 10; Easton, ll ; 

Wilkesbarre, 12-16. «"■,**, 

Orientals — Layoff, 8-8 ; Century. Kansas City-, 

10-15. 
Pacemakers — Star, Brooklyn, 8-8; Oayety. 

Brooklyn, 10-16. «—»■«*. 

Pat White's — Lyceum, Columbus, 8-8 : Court 

Wheeling. W. Va, 10-12; Grand, Akron! 

O., 18-15. 

Parisian Flirts — Grand, Trenton, N. J, 6-8: 

Gayety. Baltimore. 10-16. ' 

Review of 1918 — Wilkesbarre. 5-8; Empire, 

Hoboken. N. J, 10-15. ." - 

Record Breakers — Bavoy. Hamilton. Ont- 8- 

8: Cadillac, Detroit 10-16. '.V.Sr«. ."" 

Social Follies — Stsr, Toronto, Ont, 8-8: 

Savoy, Hamilton, Ont, 10-16. 

8o ch e lcSss, ,e !oa6 l :' 1 " ,,,c • betroit - M: Gwt7 - 

Speedway oirii — Engiewood, Chicago. 8-8: 
Empire, Chicago, 10-15. ^^ 

Tempters — Century. Kansas City. 8-8: 
dard, St. Louis, 10-15. 



PENN CIRCUIT 

Monday— Newcastle. Pa. 
Tuesday — Johnstown, Pa, 
Wednesday— Altoona, Pa. 
Thursday— HarrUborg, Pa. 
Friday.— York. Pa, 
Saturday — Reading. Pa. 

CIRCUS AND WILD WEST 

Shipp at Feltus— En route through South 
America. Address us at Rlvadavla SIS 
Buenos Aires, Argentina. ^^ 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Adams. James — Floating Theatre. Elizabeth 
City. N. c, Indef. 

Daniel, B. A, Magician, Bntte, Mont, »-T. 

Mysterious Smith Co. (A. P. Smith, mar. V— 
Welbrvllle. UtahL 5-6 ; Malad City. it. IS- 
IS; Coalville. Utah. 14-15. "*•«"■■«"■ 

Rlcton's Show — Roachdale, Ind, 8-8. 

TABLOIDS 
Army and Navy Girls — Henryetta, Okla, 8-8. 
Hale, Jessie, Cb. — Taloga, Okla, 8-8. 
"Lord and Vernon Gem" — Little Bock, Ark, 

indef. 
"Lyon's American Maids" — Falrmount W. 

Va, 2-8. 
Taborin Girls — Moondsvllle, W. Va, 8-8. 
Russell's Comedians — Salisbury, N. C, 8-8. 

MINSTRELS 

De Rue Bros.' Minstrels — Frederick, Md, »; 
Waynesboro, Pa, 6; Chamkerasurc. Tt 
Hagerstown, Md, 8. ' 

Fields, AL G, Minstrels — Greenwood. Mlaau 

5; Greenville. 8: Vlcksburg. 7; Nstcheev 
8; Jackson, 9-10; Grenada, 17. 




24 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



December 5, 1917 






i!iiiii!i!i!!i!iiuiUiii:iiii!!U[!niMiii:«iminiiiiiiaEDonaiiDiiiiiiiui 
imoiimiiiuTiiiUimiL'uj^nEuni 



The Christmas Issue of 

The New York Clipper 

(The Oldest Theatrical Publication In America) 

will be issued December 19th 

A display announcement in this 
number will be read by managers, 
agents and producers the country over 

Everyone interested in the show business is interested 
in The Clipper. Thafs why Clipper advertising pays! 

It is not a question of "Can you afford to be 
in itr but "Can you afford not to be in it?" 

Send your copy in now! •■..;_ 

Last form closes Dec. 15th 




I i 

I 1 
s i 



December 5, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



25 



U. & O. 

NEW YORK CITT. 

Piltce — Doraldlno — Herman and Shirley — Amca 
and Wlntbrop — Seargent Rheno — Rockwell & Wood 
—Lady Duff- Gordon — Lambert ft Ball. 

Colonial — Emmett, De Voy * Co. — Randall ft 
Myers — Belle Baker — Jennie Middle ton — Althoe ft 
Heed — Lemalre ft Gallagber. 

Alhambrs— Farber Oirla — Manklehl Troupe — 
Cbia. Grapesrtn ft Co. — McMahon, Diamond * 
ChappeUe — Browning & Denny — McDevltt, Kelly ft 
Lode* 

Boyal— Lelgbtner ft Alexander— Sam Bernard — 
Lydell * Hlggins — Floreus Tempest — Ward * Col- 
len. 

Riverside— Bennett * Bicbarda — Three Jahna. 

BROOKLYN. 
Boshwiok — Doree's Celebrities — Harry Carroll — 
Juno Salmo— Boatock'i Biding School— Point ft Plx 
— Brendel ft Bert — Bert ft Harry Gordon — Fronds 
ft Boas. 

Orpheam — Valeska Snratt — Dorothy Toy — Bailey 

c cowu — Fantasia — Darru Bros. — Eddie Dowling. 

BUFFALO, N. T. 

Sbea'a — Guiran ft Newell — William ft Margaret 

Catty — France* Dougherty — Tudor Cameron — Pariah 

ft Pern. 

BALTIMORE, US. 
Maryland — Kenny ft Hollls — Venlta Oould — Sea- 
bury ft Shaw — The Llttlejohns — The Dottona — Bee- 
ale Clayton ft Co. 

BOSTON, MASS. 
Keith's — Alfred Bergen — Helen Trlx ft Slater — 
Joe Boganny Tronpe — Lockett ft Brown — Indiana 
Tronpe — Booney ft Bent — "On tbe High Seaa" — 
Cole. Bnasell & Davis. 

CLEVELAND. OHIO. 
Keith's — Ferry — Luclle Cavanaogb ft Co. — John 
ft Winnie Hennlnga — La France ft Kennedy — 
"Ideal"— Dorothy Begal ft Co. 

COLUMBUS, OHIO. 
Keith's— Flo Irwin ft Co.— Violet McMillan- 
Three Chnma — Lydla Barry — Wartenbnrg Bros. — 
Clark ft Verdi — Clark'a Hawailana. 
CTNCTNNATI, OHIO. 
Keith's — Joe Jacfeson — Beatrice Herford — "Danc- 
ing Girl of Delhi"— Hugh Herbert ft Co. — Whiting 

ft Bert. 

DETBOIT, laTCH. 

Keith's — "Fotoristic Hevoe" — Olga Boris — Man- 
rice Bnrkhardt — Walter Weems — Crawford ft Brod- 
erick— Joe E. Bernard ft Co. — Potter ft Hartwell. 
DAYTON, OHIO. 
Keith's — DeLeon ft Davis — Nolan ft Nolan — Mr. 
ft Mrs. Connolly — Watson Sisters— Holmes & Buch- 
anan — Evelyn Neeblt &-Co. 

ERIE , PA. 
Colonial— Dickinson ft Deagon — Three KervUlea — 
"Dream Garden" — Strength Bros. — "Ragtime Din- 
ing Car." 

GRAND RAPIDS, MICH. 
Empress — Merlon's Dogs — Walter C. Kelly — 
"Married ria wireless" — Lazar ft Dale. 

HAHTLTOK, CAN. 

-Elinore Williams — Borne ft 



VAUDEVILLE BILLS 

For M<sssti W®®Ss, 



Keith's — Gene Green- 
Cox — Hanlon ft Clifton. 

INDIANAPOLIS, IbTD. 
Grand— Lee Koblmar ft Co. — W1U J. Ward ft 
Girls— Fleck's Mnlea — Lew Hawkins — Moore ft 
Whitehead — Hamilton A Barnes. 

LOUISVILLE, KT, 
Keith's— Lack La Vier— Hamilton ft Barnes— 
. Win. Caxton ft' Co. — Santos ft Hayes — Beeman ft 
Anderson — Valletta's Leopards. 

MONTREAL, CAN. 
Orphenm — Dooley ft Sales — Renee Florlgny— 
Fisher, Hawley ft Co. — Nat Nazarre ft Co. 
PBOVTDENCT. E. I. 
Keith's— Frank Dobsoo— Edith Clifford — Mee- 
han's Dogs — Catherine Crawford ft Girls — Kramer 
ft Kent — Caltea Broa. — Evelyn ft Dolly — Eddy Dno 
— Dugan ft Raymond — "Corner Store" — Harry Tigb 

ft Co. 

PITTSBURGH, PA. 
Keith's— Sallle Fisher ft Co.— Dolly Connolly ft 
Co. — Santos ft Hayes. 

PHILADELPHIA. PA. 
Keith's — Maleta Boneoni — Six American Dancers 
— Dooley & Nelson — Hsrry L. Mason — Burns ft Fa- 
brito — Street Urchin — Howard's Animals — Hooper 

ft Mtrtory. 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 
Temple— Gygi & Vedle— "Cranberries"— Mr. ft 
Mrs. George Wilde— Sylvia Clark — Abbott ft White 
—Lew Dockstader — Alfred Demanby ft Co. — Joa. N. 
Barnard ft Co. 

TORONTO, CAN. 
Shea's — LeRoy Talma ft Boato — Morris & Camp- 
beli— Benny A Wooden — O'Neal ft Walmaley— Bert 
Melrose— "Rising Generation"— McClore ft Dolly— 
"Models De Lnxe." 

TOLEDO, OHIO. 
Keith's — Gautler's Toy Shop — Ballen & Hunter — 
Gladys Hanson — Moore ft Gerald. 

WASHINGTON. D. O. 
Keith's— Mr. ft Mrs. Jlmmlc Barry — Francis 
Kennedy — Misses Campbell — Brenck'a Models — Panl 
Dickey ft Co. 

WILMINGTON, SEX. 

Garriek— Bernlvici Broa. — Ford ft Haugbton. 
YOUNQBTOWN, OHIO. 

Keith's — Sam Mann ft Co.— Joyce, West ft Senna 
—Edna Showalter— "Sports in Alpa"— Kerslake's 
Plga— Fox ft Ward. 

ORPHEUM CIRCUIT 

CHICAGO, ILL. 

Majeetio— Adelaide ft Hughes— win M. Blanche 
— Creasy ft Dayne — Winston's Seals — Walter Brow- 
er — James ft Marlon Harklns — Bensee A Balrd — 
Jack La Vier — Vardon ft Perry — "FlTe of Clubs." 

Palaoe — Eddie Leonard A Co. — Leona La Mar — 
"In tbe Dark"— Fern ft Davie — Jack Alfred ft Co. 
—Joe Towle — Van ft Belle — Mabel Russell ft Co. — 
The Jordan Slaters. 



CAXOARY, CAN. 

Orphenm — Avon Comedy Four — Harry Green ft 
Co.— Holt ft Bosedale— The Gaudsmldts— Tyler ft 
St. Claire — Bert Swor — Anna Chandler. 
DES MOINES, IA. 

Orphenm— Gertrude Hoffman ft Co. — Fern, Blge- 
low ft Meenan — Lillian Fitagerald ft Co. — Norwood 
ft ITall — Col. Diamond ft Granddaughters — Kltner, 
Hawskaley ft McClay. 

DULUTH, MINN. 

Orpheam — Alan Brooks ft Co. — Dnnbar'a Mary- 
land Singers — alack & Earl — Clara Howard — King 
ft Harrey— Fire Nelsons — Stan Stanley ft Co. . 
• . DENVER, COLO. 

Orpheam — Eddie Foy Co. — Brooson Baldwin — 

Llbonati— Leacb Slaters— Jack ft Cora Williams — 
Betty Bond — "Act Beautiful." 

KANSAS CITT. MO. 
Orpheum — Merck's Jnngle Players — "The Night 
Boat" — Moore ft Haager— Leo Beera— Rae Samuels 
—Six Musical Nosaea — Boyard Company. 
LOS ANGELES, CAX. 
Orphenm — Jean Adair ft Co. — S. ft E. Koona — 
Roland Travera — Harold Dnkaoe ft Co. — Tower ft 
Darrell — Avellng ft Lloyd — Trlxie Frtganxa ft Co. — 
McCarty ft Faye. 

LINCOLN. NEB. 
Orphenm — Edw. Bandbox Revue— Georgia Earle 
ft Co. — Al Herman — Juggling Nelson — Santly ft 
Norton— Gallagber ft Martin — Brodlan ft Silver- 
man. 

MINNEAPOLIS, MINN. 
Orphenm — Toots Paka ft Hawailana — Mack ft 
Walker — Charles Howard ft Co. — Elaa Rnegger ft 
Co. — Spencer ft Williams — Imperial Dno — Mrs. Gene . 

Hughes ft Co. 

MILWAUKEE, WIS. 
Ornhstun — Elizabeth M. Murray — Albertlna Raech 
ft Ballet — Jessie Bnsley ft Co.— Bert Flttglbboo — 
Mullen ft Coogan — Burns ft Kisser — Tbe Flying 
Weavers — Mang ft Snyder. 

MEMPHIS, TENN. 
Orphenm — Morgan Dancers — May Navdain — James 
Watts ft Co. — Hnfford ft Chain — Bennett Slaters — 
Scarproff ft Yorvsin- — Simmons ft Bradley. 
HEW ORLEANS, LA. 
Orpheum— "America First" — Al Shayne — "The 
Headllnera" — Boerre ft King — La Neen ft Cross — 
Leipzig — Apdale'a Animals. 

OAKLAND. Batt 
Orphenm — Emily Ann Wellman ft Co.— Bart, 
Johnston ft Co. — Mr. ft Mrs. Melborne — Raymond 
Wllbert — Golet, Harrla ft Morey — Bert Hngbea Co. 
— Allen ft Francis. 

OMAHA, NEB. 
Orphenm — Emma Caros & Larry Comer — William 
Ebbs ft Co.— Edward Esmond ft Co.— Etankle Heath 
ft Co. — Conne ft Alberta — Frank Hartley — Princess 
Kalama ft Co. 

PORTLAND, ORE. 
Orphenm — Fancnon A Marco — Montgomery ft 
Perry — Rita Boland — Robbie Gordone — Jas. H. Col- 
len — Ioleen Slaters — Clande ft Fannie Usher. 
8T. LOUIS, MO. 
Orpheam — Bva Taoguay — Sarah Padden ft Co. — 
Collins & Hart — Lovenberg Sisters ft Co. — Neary 
Brothers — Era Taylor ft Co. — Charles Oleott — Al- 
fed La tell ft Co. 

SACRAMENTO, STOCKTON AND FRESNO, CAL. 
Orphenm — Nan Halperln — Sophie Tucker ft Co. — 
Frank Westphal — Bert Baker ft Co.— Cooper ft 
Rlcardo — Skating Bear — Lloyd ft Brlrt. 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 
Orphenm — Harriet Bempel ft Co. — Winona Win- 
ters — Willie Weston — Rath Broa. — "Tennessee 
Ten" — Williams ft Wolfna — Hazel Moran — Four 
Husbands. ^ 

ST. PAUL, MINN. 
Orphenm — Poor Marx Broa. — Bessie Remple ft 
Co. — Comfort ft King — Kerr ft Ensign— Selma 
Braatz — David Sapirstein. « 

SEATTLE, WASH. 
Orphenm— Scotch Lads ft Lassies— "For Pity's. 
Sake"— Edwin George— The Lerolos— Herbert's 
Dogs — Herbert Clifton— J. ft B. Morton. 

salt lake crrr, utah. 

Orphenm — "Submarine F T" — Milo — Nina Payne 
ft CO. — Arthur Havel Co. — Hughes Mnaicsl Trio — 
Delro— Louis Hart, 

VANCOUVER, CAM. 

Orpheam — Mclntyre ft Heath — Travera ft Douglas 
— Rae E. Ball — Alexander 'Kids — Sylvester ft Vance 
— Bee Ho Gray Co. — Three Stewart Sisters. 
WINNIPEG, OAK. 

Orpheam— Joe. Howard Co. — Frank Crnmlt — 
Kanazawa Japs — Bice ft Werner — Connelli ft 
Craven — Isabel D'Armand Co. — Le Grolls. 

L.OEW CIRCUIT 

HEW TORE CITY. 

American (First Half) — Lltt ft Nolan— Frear. 
Baggett ft Frear — Buzzell ft Parker — "A Real 
Pal" — Sadie Sherman — Bobbe ft Nelson, (Last 
Half) — Robinson . ft Dnvey — California Orange 
Packers — Mabel Harper ft Co. — DePace Opera Co. 
— Mande Tiffany — Dorothv Burton ft Co. 

Boulevard (First Half) — Gold ft Seal — Octavo — 
John ft Mae Bnrke— Cook ft Stevens — Bob Tip ft 
Co. (Last Half) — Cooper ft Lacey — Clark ft Wood 
— "What Really Happened" — Weber ft Elliott — 
Great San tell. 

Avenne B (First Halt) — DeLIsle ft Johnson — 
Lloyd ft Whltehouse — Mnrry Livlngston^-Helene 
Trio. (Last Half) — Vincent A Maxlne — Hall ft 
O'Brien— Harriett Marlotte ft Co. — Adrian — Glid- 
ing O'Mearas. 

Lincoln Square (First Half)— Wm. Morris— 
Hlckey ft Cooper — Mande Tiffany — Ryan ft Rich- 
Held — Chase ft LaTonr — Hall ft Gulldon. (Last 



Half) — The Yaltoe — Jeanette Chllds — Herman ft 
Henley— Lottie Williams ft Co.— Al Fields ft Co.— 
The A r leys. 

Delancey Street (First Half)— Murphy ft Barry 
— Marina ft West — DeRenxo ft LaDue— Jeanette 
Chllds— Klnkald Kilties— Herbert ft Dennis. (Last 
Half) — Iaabelle Slaters — Frear, Raggett ft Frear — 
Loney Nase — John ft Mae Bnrke — Cook ft Stevens 
— Woolford'a Dogs. 

Greoley Square (First Half) — Iaabelle Slaters — 
Don Fnlano — Herman ft Henley— "Apple Blossom 
Time" — Andy Rice — Six Stylish 8teppers. (Last 
Half)— Gold ft Seal— Nelson Slaters— "The Job"— 
George Bosener — Asakl Dno. 

National (First Half)— The Rkatelles— Clsrk ft 
Wood — "What Happened to Ruth" — Oonroy ft 
O'Donnell — Woolford'a Doga. (Last Half) — 
Kramer ft Crass — Dale ft Bnrcb — Miner A Green — 
Elinore ft Carleton — Exposition Jubilee Four. 

Orphenm (First Halt) — Asakl Doo— Nelson Sla- 
ters — Francis ft Kennedy — Tbomaa Potter Donne — 
"Tbe Bight Man" — Dale ft Bnrcb— The Yaltoe. 
(Last Half) — Murphy ft Barry — Marino A West — 
"Apple Blossom Time" — Lew Cooper ft Co. — 
Knight ft Sawtelle — Laurie Ordway — Stephana 
Sisters. 

Victoria (First Half) — Flying Keelers — Grace 
DeWIntera — Conrad ft Jeanne— Al Fields ft Co. 
(Last Half)— Leddy ft Leddy — Octavo— Frances ft 
Kennedy — "A Real Pal" — Bobbe ft Nelson — Sim's 
Songbirds. 

BROOKLYN. 

Bijou (First Half) — Cooper ft Lacey — C. ft M. 
Cleveland — "Mollycoddle" — Lew Cooper ft Co. — 
Kramer ft Cross. (Last Half) — Wm. Morris — Lltt 
ft Nolan — Grace DeWIntera — "The Bight Man" — 
Herbert ft Dennis — Six Stylish Steppers. 

De-Kaib (First Half) — The Zenaroe— Miller ft 
Green — Mabel Harper ft Co. — O'Brien Havel ft Co. 
— George Bosener — Sim's Songbirds. (Last Half) 
— Bob Tip ft Co.— Mel Eastman — BnzxeU ft Parker 
— "Expansion" — Conroy ft O'Donnell — Klnkaid 
Kilties. 

Warwick (First Half)— Hall ft O'Brien— "Ex- 
pansion" — Vincent ft Maxlne — Adrian. (Laat 
Half) — Murphy ft Klein — Marlon — Pleas ft Rector. 

Fulton (First Half) — Howard Sisters— Mel East- 
man — Dorothy Burton ft Co. — Laurie Ordway — 
Exposition Jubilee Four. (Last Half)— Flying 
Keelers— C. ft M. Clevelsnd— O'Brien ft Havel- 
Andy Bice — Don Fnlano. 

Palace (First Half) — Gliding O'Mearas — "The 
Job" — Howard's Bear's. (Last Half)— Billy 
Swede Hall ft Co. — Demarest ft Doll. 
BOSTOM, MASS. 

St, James (First Hslf) — Bennington ft Scott — 
El Cota— "Mimic World." (Laat Half)— Pepplno 
ft Perry — Nick Verge — "Mimic World." 

Orphenm (First Half) — Chsdwlck ft Taylor — 
Ryan ft Joyce — Three Morlarity Sisters — Charles 
A Sadie McDonald— Lane ft Smith. (Last Halt) — 
Pless ft Bator— Bsyleootoo — Bswles & Von Kauf- 
man — Ferguson ft Sunderland — Raskin's Russians. 
BALTIMORE, MJ>. 

Hippodrome (First Half) — Henry A Adelaide — 
Lang 4 Green — Lee Walton ft Henry — "Lulu's 
Friend"— "Daisy Bareonrt" — Seven Royal Hussars. 
FALL RIVER, MASS. 

Bijou (First Half)— Bowley ft Tintoo— Roy Con- 
Ion — Ratvles ft Von Kaufman — Pleas ft Rector. 
(Last Half) — Cbadwtck ft Taylor— Three Morlarity 
Sisters — C. ft S. McDonald — Ryan ft Joyce. 
NEWARK, M. 7. 

Majestic (First Half )— Robinson ft Denny— Buz- 
sell ft Parker— Billy Swede Hall ft Co.— Weber 
ft Elliott — The Arleys. (Last Half)— Howard sis- 
ters— Sad!* Sherman — Tbe Skatelles — Dow ft Dale 
— Thomas Potter Dunn — Ryan A Richfield^ 
NEW BOCH aTasnasa S. T. 

Loew's (First Half) — Murphy ft Klein. (Last 
Hslf) — Helen Moratl — Howard's Bears. 
PROVIDENCE, R. I. 

Emery (First Half)— Manning ft Hall— Nick 
Verga — Mlddleton ft Spellmeyer — Raskin's Rus- 
sians. (Last Half) — Morton ft Clark — Pepplno ft 
Perry — Charles Deland ft Co. 

SPRINGFIELD, MASS. 

Broadway (First Half )— Ellisbeth Mayne — Wil- 
liams A Mitchell — Elinore A Carleton — Jim Jor- 
dan. (Last Half— Bawley ft Tinton— Manning ft 
Hall — Mlddleton ft Spellmeyer — Lane ft Smith — 
Three Romans. 

TORONTO, CAM. 

Yonge Street (First Half)— Avondaa — Rose 
Berry — Iahikawa Japs — American Minstrel Maids 
— Friend ft Downing — The Randalls. 

POU CIRCUIT 

BRIDGEPORT. CONN. 

Poll (First Half) — Grace Haxzard — Carlisle ft 
Roma — Great Lester — "Wedding Shells." (Last 
Half)— Greenlee ft Williams — Cordett. Shepard ft 
Dunn. 

Plaza (First Half)— Deforest Oirla— Duqesne 
Comedy Four — Tony — Marriott Tronpe. (Laat Half) 
— Great Johnson — Newell ft Moat — Somers ft Morse. 
HARTFORD, CONN. 

Palace (First Half)— Greenlee ft Williams— 
Elizabeth Cutty— "TJneeda Girla"— Belleclalre Broa. 
(Laat Half) — Wblppel Houston & Co. — Great Les- 
ter — Marritt Tronpe. 

Foil (First Half)— Lnln Sutton ft Co.— Zelaya— 
GarclnettI Broa. (Laat Half) — "Too Many Sweet- 
hearts." 

NEW HAVES, CONN. 

Bijon (First Half)- -Newell ft Most— Somers ft 
Morse — "Dsnces D'Art." (Last Hslf)— Caesar 
Rlvoli — Duqneane Comedy Four — Garcinsettl Broe- 
SCRANTON, PA. 

Poll (First Half)— Elrey Slaters— Gllmore ft Le- 
moyne — Frsnkie Carpenter ft Co. — John Gelger — 
"Maaqneraders." (Last Hslf) — White Steppers — 
Abbott ft Mills — Petreths Sextette — Murphy. Van 

ft Kenyon— Palfrey, Han ft Brown. 



SPRINGFIELD. MASS. 

Palace (First Half)— Bud ft Jesa Gray— LUntta 
— Wblppel. Houston A Co. — Barnes ft SBSsb bsSsSj — 
Caesar Rlvoli. (Laat Half)— Fensrlek Girls— Onilo 
ft Ross— Grsce Hazard— "In the Trenches"— Fred 
Allen— Yarietee De Dance. 

WORCESTER, MASS. 
Plaaa .(First Half)— Fenwtck Oirla— Guild ft 

S'T?r H rl rt *,*?"£— " lB t3w Trenches.' (Lsst 
Half)— Tony— Lnln Sutton ft Co.— "Cneeda Girls." 
Poll (Firet Half)— Mayo A Tally— "Varietee Ds 
Dance. (Last Half)— Elisabeth Cutty— Barnes ft 
Robinson— BeUe Claire Bros. ■ ^ 

wirnsraT, conn. 

Poll (First Halt)— Corbett. Bbepard ft Dunn— 
f/*,l, An «»— "Too Many Sweethearts." (Laat 
Half)— Bad ft Jess Gray— LHIette — Zelaya— Mayo 
ft Tally— Kitty Francis ft Co. 



E. PA 

xrlfmPZ.* J?*)P~ WnUe 8«»PPere— Abbott ft 
Wh lte— Petrietrs Sextette— Murphy, Van ft Ken- 
yon— Palfrey. Hall ft Brows. (Last Half )— Elrey 
Slaters— Gllmore ft Le Moyne — Frankie Carpenter 
ft Co — John Gelger— "Maaqneraders." 

PANTAGES CIRCUIT 
BUTTE. MONT. 
Pantages' (Fire Days)— Wilson's Lions— Burke 
Tuobey A Co. — Eros Antonio Trio— Lewis A Lake 
— GrindeU ft Esther. 

CALOABY. CAM. 

Pantagaa'— Rosalind— Tbe Langdona— Jsrvia ft 
Harrison— Tony ft George— Florens—Dlxls Harris 
— Variety Four. 

DENVER. COLO. 
„ Pantagea'— Lacy, Shannon ft Davis— Trevlrt'a 
Dogs— Five Sallys— Willie Solsr— "Winter Garden 
Revue"— Three Mori Bros.— Hsrry McCoy. 
EDMONTON, CAN. 
Psatagss'— Lottie Mayer ft Diving Girls— Bea- 
trice McKenzle— Brooks A Powers? "Lota ft 

Lota" — Johnny Singer ft Dolls. 

GREAT FALLS, MONT. 
Pantagaa*— "Bride Shop"— Flo ft OUle Waltera 

—Senator Francis Murphy— Jsck Kennedy ft Co. 

Rodrlgues. ■»■»•»■ 

K1NBAB CITY, MO. 
. ,£»"*«*-••■— Norlne Coffey— DeMlchelle Bros.— 
Miss America"— "Girl from Starland"— Cheater 
Gruber — "Everyman'a Slater." 

LOS ANGELES, n ar 
Faatacea'— Willard— "Dream of the Orient"— 
Hoey ft Lee— "All Wrong"— The Voungers— 
Clsude Coleman. 

MINNEAPOLIS, MINN. 
Pantagaa'— Ward, Bell ft Ward— Owen ft Moot* 

—Song and Dance Berne — Hampton ft Shrincr— 
Gruber'a Animals. 

OAKLAND, CAL. 
Pantscea'— Buehla Pearl— Equestrian Lion— Wil- 
son Bros. — "Fireside Revere" — Parsons ft Irwin 

Lord ft Fuller. 

OGDEN, UTAH. 
Pastajtes' (Three Daya)— "Boo Voyage" — Jeasls 
A Dollle Miller— The Cromwells— Brady ft Mahoney 
— "Saint and Sinner." 

PORTLAND, OBE. 
Pantagaa*— "Hong Kong Mysteries"— Frank Bosh 
— "Bevne de Vogue" — Msrtyn ft Florence — Mc- 
Dermott ft Wallace. 

SEATTLE, WASH. 
Pantagaa' — "Courtroom Girls" — Channeey Mon- 
roe ft Co — Jackson ft Wahl— Marie Lavarre — HIB 
ft Ackerman — Barns ft Lynn. 

SPOKANE, WASH. 
Fsntsges' — George Primrose Minstrels — Jan Bo- 
blnl— Barton ft Hill— "Well, Well, WeU" — Mari- 
etta's Marionettes — Alice Hamilton. 

BAM DIEGO, CAL, 
Pantagaa'— Jotla- Curtis — Four Hollowaya— Cook 
ft Lorenx— Van Cello — Goldberg ft Wayne— Great 
Lind. 

SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH. 
Pantagaa' — Georgia Howard — "Count and the 
Maid" — Four Earls — Tom Edwsrds ft Co. — Alleen 
Stanley — Silber ft North. 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 
Pantagaa'— Byan ft Biggs — Rlgoletto Bros. — Ash 
ft Shaw — Larson ft Wilson — Slz Serenaders. 
TACOMA, WASH. 
Pantagss'— "Honey Bees"— Maurice Samuels ft 
Co.— West ft Hale — Traasneld Slaters — Mile. 
Thereae ft Co. 

VANCOUVER. CAM. 

Fastages' — Tbe Donate— Bysl ft Early — Bill 

Prultt— "Cycle of Mirth"— Nayoon's Birds— Van 
ft Carrie Avery. 

VICTORIA. CAM. 
Pantagaa' — Four Readings — Mnmford ft Thomp- 
son — Herbert Brooka-7-ZIra'a Leopards — Jos. K. 
Watson — Johnson-Dean Bevne. 

WINNIPEG, CAM. 
Paatagea'— Mlnetti ft Sldeill— Musical Koehne— 
The Frescotta — Wllkina ft WUkina — "Bachelor 
Dinner." 

W. V. ZVX* A. 

AURORA. ILL. 
Fox (Lsst Half)— Roy ft Arthur— Medlin. Watts 
ft Towns — Finders Keepers — Crelghton, Belmont ft 
Crelgbton— Page, Hack ft Mack. 

AMACOMTJA, MOMT. 
Bluebird (Dee. 8)— Violet ft Charles— RUsbey ft 
Genevs — Dolly Bennett ft Young — Cliff Desn Play- 
ers — Znhs ft Dennis — Swain's Cockatoos. (Dee. 
12) — Sweeney ft Newton — Aleva Dno — Adanae Trio 
— "Wireless Girl' — Kelly. Wilder ft Co.— La viae 

Trio. 

BTTTTE. MOMT. 

People's Hippodrome (Dec. 9-M) — Sweeney ft 
Newton — Aleva Dno — Adanae Trio — "Wireless 
Girt"— Kelly, Wilder ft Co.— Lavine Trio. (Dee. 
{Continued on page 36.) 



26 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



December 5, 1917 



THE BIGGEST DRAWING CARD IN BURLESQUE TO-DAY 

. "SLIDING" 

BILLY WATSON 

MY LONG TERM CONTRACT EXPIRES AT THE CLOSE OF PRESENT SEASON 

OH! MY LIBERTY BOND 



o»»o»»»o»oo.»oo »0 0000 00000< 



jttt nmiin»»»»inmv»tnmmmn »m»; wt9t t99»9 ' »»» » »v»v» v ww »»»»iii»»» » »»f»t»im> ig nnMm 

I STARS OF BURLESQUE 

< *»<»>> 00 00000000 9 00 >»0»0»»»»«0»0»»0«0«000»t00>» <>•>♦•♦♦»« 0»0»00»»»000»00»0000»»000»*)OOOCOOOO«00>0»0«)00' 



BILLIE DAVIES 



PRIMA DONNA 



INNOCENT MAIDS 




Bert Bertrand 



Principal Comedian 



Lady Buccaneers 



AFTER FIRST PERFORMANCE SIGNED WITH 
JOHN G JERMON FOR A TERM OF FIVE YEARS 

CLIFF 1 BRAG DON 

PRINCIPAL COMEDIAN 91.000.000 DOLLS. 
THEY SAY I'M THE SPEEDIEST IN BURLESQUE. 



MILDRED HOWELL 



WINSOME SOUBRETTE 



JACK REID'S RECORD BREAKERS 



McINTYRE AND SHEAHAN 

THE TALKING ACT THKY AU TAIJCINO ABOUT 
With MoUW William*' Ova Show 



BROADWAY FROLICS 



HARRY HARRIGAN 

ONLY IRISHMAN IN BURLESQUE AS PRINCIPAL HEBREW COMEDIAN 

BACK WITH JOB BURTON'S STOCK COMPANY KAHJTS FOLLIES 

KATHERINE PAGE 

Prima Denaa Hurtif * I— —ft Big Bnrleaqne Wonder Shaw 

CORKSCREW SC0TTIE FRIEDELL 

With 91,000,000 Delia 



Don 



R0MINE and FULLER 



Connie 



OF CAHILL B ROMTNB 

(V.ud»vUl.) 



OF "CHARMING WIDOWS" 

(Burlesque) 



LILLIAN FRANKLIN 

SOPRANO 
Voice — Cam* Wardrobe — Girla from Joyland 




LEW LEDERER 

Dutch Comedian 
At Liberty after Dae. 1 — Gayety, Brooklyn, N. Y., Thia Weak 




R0SC0E AILS 



Principal Comedian 



Irwin's Majesties 



CHAS. E. LEWIS 



SINGING AND DANCING JUVENILE 
With Barney GararaTa "SOME SHOW" 



GLADYS SEARS ^^ 

S£ DARLEY «•■> BO VIS ^±k 

PRIMA DONNA . CHARACTERS 

STAR and GARTER SHOW 

SARAH HYATT 

PRIMA DONNA moots carlo oirls 

FRANKIE LA BRACK 



SOUBRETTE 



With STAR ana GARTER SHOW 



WESTON— SYMONDS 



JOE 

MAIDS C F WEJ A 



ALFARRETTA 

SECOND SEASON 



Ingenue, Now With JOE BURTON'S Borleaque Stock Company 

BEN lOUOTS FOLLIES THIS WEEK 

HARRY PETERSON 

Singing Straight with Sam Lery'a Charming Widowa. Fifth 



SID G O L D 

2nd Seaaoa with Baa Walah. Bigger Hit Than E™r. VaudVrOI* Nest I 



December 5, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



27 



BURLESQUE NEWS 

(Continued from paga IS and on a) 



SAM LEVEY HAS 
SHOW THAT SHOULD 

GET THE MONEY 

: Sam Levey's "CHarming Widows," at 
the Star last week, was as good an enter- 
tainment as has been seen at the old Jay 
street bouse in several weeks, 
j With plenty of comedy in the many bits 
and scenes, a good cast of principals, a 
.pretty, shapely lot of well-gowned chorus 
girls, nicely arranged numbers, catchy 
music and pretty scenery, it is a good 
show, and above all it has a feature in 
Kyra that is alone worth more than the 
price paid for the entire show. She is an 
artist of rare ability. 

Eddie Dale and Meyer Harris share the 
comedy honors, Dale doing "Dutch," while 
Harris portrays a Potash and Perlmutter 
character, which he handles very well. He 
works easily and gets much fun. oat of his 
lines. He also assists greatly in working 
op the numbers. He and Dale work well 
together. 

Harry Peterson is one of those talkative 
straights who works up his every situa- 
'tion with the comedians in clever style. 
He has a fine voice for both talking and 
singing, and puts over his numbers with 
a "punch." He dresses well and is a cork- 
ing good straight. In fact, he is one of 
the best on the circuit. 

Earl Hall is another "straight," but 
hasn't much to do. What he does he takes 
care of nicely, several character bits prov- 
ing his ability. 

Connie Fuller is in three or four scenes 
in which she proves herself a very valu- 
able woman. She works well with the 
comedians, assisting greatly in humoring 
the funny situations. 

Ada Lnm plays the leads and has a 
number of funny scenes. 

Gussie White is the soubrette, but 
hasn't very much to do. She wears some 
pretty dresses, puts plenty of ginger into 
her numbers and makes herself generally 
useful. 

Rena Vivienne is too serious a person 
for burlesque. 

A runaway is used to big advantage by 
the chorus in most of the numbers, which 
won many encores. 

A novelty musical spectacle in three 
parts was offered and nicely done by the 
entire company. 

"Beauties of Broadway," offered by 
Peterson and the chorus, with each girl 
representing types in and out of show 
business was well received. 

Kyra is programmed as "The Beautiful 
Poem of Motion." She is a finished artist 
who offers a series of four artistic dances 
in an especially gorgeous setting of four 
scenes in which she is surrounded by 
flower girls. The act is highly novel and 
picturesque. 

Her first offering, "Cupid Darts," was 
followed by "Dance of the Ancient Egypt" 
"Burmese Temple 'Festal Dance" was next 
and "Reincarnation" was her last. Her 
every movement was grace, and her won- 
derful control of her arms and hands is 
most pleasing. Not a suggestive action or 
motion is offered throughout the entire 
set. Kyra has one of the largest, costliest 
and most gorgeous acts ever seen in bur- 
lesque, and it is a credit to the show and 
the circuit 

Levey has a good show; with everything 
that is demanded by the present day bur- 
lesque patron. It should be a money- 
retter. SID. 



CHANGES IN "HELLO GIRLS" 

Owing to several changes in the "Hello 
Girls" Company on the American Circuit 
at Yonkers this week, the show win be 
reviewed at the Olympic, when it plays 
there. 



MONA RAYMOND GIVES NOTICE 

On account of Hi-health, Mona Raymond 
has handed in her notice to close with 
"Hello Girls," at the GOmore, Spring- 
field, Mass., Saturday of next week. 



BILLY WATSON'S 
BEEF TRUST COMPANY 
IS A GOOD SHOW 

Billy Watson and his "Beef Trust" 
opened at the Columbia Monday afternoon 
to a crowded house, and offered an enter- 
tainment filled with healthy, vigorous fun, 
which was received warmly by the big 
crowd that gave every evidence of enjoy- 
ing each minute of the show. 

Watson has a fine cast and a good look- 
ing chorus of twenty girls, who, despite 
being plump, got around in a lively 
fashion. They sing well, and are cos- 
tumed with good taste. The scenery is 
bright in colors and attractive. 

The book, which is from the pen of 
Harry Montague, proved to be a decidedly 
clever farce. The first part is called "A 
New Arrival"' and the second "The Bash- 
ful Venus." 

On the shoulders of Watson, who has a 
true sense of humor, falls the comedy. As 
an eccentric kid in the first part he is 
particularly funny, gaining no end of 
laughs in his many scenes. As Phillip, 
in the second part, he again stands out 
in his well known German character. 

Tony Kennedy handles the "straight" in 
the first part nicely, while he portrays the 
part of a wealthy bachelor in the second 
half fittingly. 

Lew Reynolds, while not seen much in 
the first act has more to do in the last 
half. He plays two separate and distinct 
characters with ease. 

Carl Meeker proves himself a corking 
good dancing juvenile, and handled him- 
self well in his numbers, bits and scenes. 

Harry Montague, as the uncle, in the 
first part, does exceedingly well He hasn't 
muc\ however, in the second act. 

A real clever woman has Watson in 
Beatrice Harlowe, his leading comedienne. 
She can put a character song over about 
as well as anyone on the stage today. 

Miss Harlowe has a way of putting her 
numbers over with a "punch." She also 
works well opposite Watson, reading her 
lines with vim and plenty of action. Her 
costumes are also beautiful, and she looks 
well in her white tights. 

Kathryn Pearl Is another good woman, 
who shines whenever she is on the stage, 
working well and reading her lines most 
satisfactorily. Miss Pearl has her share 
of numbers, which she puts over nicely, at 
the same time displaying a very pleasing 
personality. Her gowns are pretty and de- 
signed with care. 

Helen and Frances Russell are the other 
principal women, who take care of their 
parts nicely. 

Many funny situations were worked up 
in the piano scene with Watson, Ken- 
nedy and Misses Harlowe and Pearl. 
Equally as funny was the dinner scene in 
which all the principals participated. This 
is a very humorous portion of the show, 
and the audience seemed to want more of 

**• 

Miss Harlowe offered a fine specialty of 
two songs and war stories which went 
over big. Miss Pearl's number, "When 
Grandma Was a Girl," was generously ap- 
plauded. 

The Misses Russell do an act, offering 
two numbers, which was well received. 

Madeline Webb, one of the chorus girls, 
leads a number for several encores. 

The model scene just before the close of 
the show is well staged. 

The "Bashful Venus" proved to be 
Kathryn Pearl, whose shapely figure easily 
took the prize of the judges. 

Watson has a show with many more 
laughs than the usual burlesque show. 
His comedy is clean and wholesome. He 
has an all around good show and one well 
worth seeing. Sid. 



HART SIGNS FISHER ACT 

Harry Fisher and his Eight Cyelin? 
Models, who were placed with "The Hello 
Girls," at the Star, two weeks ago as an 
added attraction, have been engaged by 
Harry Hart for the balance of the season. 



STARS OF BURLESQUE 



5°5 BARKERS i£ ,DA 



SIM WILLIAMS* "CBtLS FROM JOYLAND" 



ADELE ANDERSON 

PRIMA DONNA FRED IRWIN'S MC SHOW 

MAY PENMAN 

INGENUE AND A GREAT SUCCESS IN QUARTETTE— LIBERTY GIRLS 



TOOTS 



KEMP SISTERS 



TWO OF THE RECORD BREAKERS 



WITH JACK MID lllfHT 



Principal CetBadirm CTkaa. BWW. Spsssslwa- CM. 


*J. B. CUISJIMIINJGHA1VI 


JUVENILE STRAIGHT CHAS. BAKER'S * 

-BARITONE SOLOIST- GAY MORNING GLORIES 


VIDA SOPOTO 


PRIMA DONNA WITH WATSON'S ORIENTALS 


FRANKIE BURKE) 


COON SHOUTER INGENUE FRENCH FROLICS 


NORMA BARRY 


That LsVatr Littl . htwms MJDIob Dollar DaJb 


RUTH BARBOUR 


Soma Soubratta With Fred Irwin's Big Show 



CHARLIE RAYMOND 



Burlngu'1 Ptasalar Straight With Dava Marloa'a Owa Show 



MUSICAL COMEDY MANAGERS ^.^SRJ"" 

PRODUCER COMEDIAN WITH SCRIPTS 

Fifteen years' experience in Royalty Musical Comedy. Played parts in over 60. Staged 
over 40. Recently Staged, launched and Developed several successful Musical Comedy Reper- 
toire Companies, playing such Shows as Madam Sherry, Broken Idol, Red Widow, Three 
Twins. Have plenty of Scripts, including typewritten parts. Reference New York Agencies. 
Address Mosicai. Coussy Psooocxs, New York Clipper. 1604 Broadway, New York City. 



Gladys Mark Co. Wants At Once 

Agent and character woman. Wardrobe, ability, sobriety, essential. Address 
with all particulars, J. E. BALFOUR, Amherst, N. S., week December 10; 
Calais, Maine, week December 17. 



LEON McREYNOLDS 

A No. 1 Versatile Actor, invites offers for one bill weekly; permanent stock; high 
class repertory playing cities. At liberty after Dec. 8. Address LEON 
McR EYNOLDS, care Dr. C. G. Baker. 414 East Douglas, Wichita, Kana. 

WANTED 
The Chase-Lister Theatre Co. 

Wants Two Young General Business People, Man and Woman, who can do 
specialties, and are willing to do a general line of parts. State age, height, weight 
and salary, and send photos. Write full particulars to SCOTTSBLTJPP, NEB. 



Musical Comedy People Wanted 

I want people In an lines for high class tabloid musical comedies. Comedian producer, prima 
donna tor college girl with A No. 1 voioe capable of handling real music. Light comedian, sister 
team Union Piano player. One of the above to pot on hlgb class musical comedy numbers. Chorus 
girls, mediums, with voices. Bebearuls Dec. 10th; open Dec. 2Jth. Don't misrepresent or I win 
close yon first rehearsal. Most send photos. No attention paid to letters nnless you give age, height, 
weight, experience, and positively lowest salary. Tour salary must be In keeping with the times. 
HAXVEY XOBUZBEAV, afeadvUla, Pens., Baa Ho. 226. 



28 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



December S, 1917 



»«•»< 



KATE PULLMAN 



FEATWmm WITH BOSS SYDELL-3 LONDON 



DELLA CLARKE and LEWIS WILL 



aB»B V . 

Witk 



ADC. 



IATTH 



i "WW U Sea T- Cay 



30UB1ETTI 

Tka CM wfttkaMSa 



BILLY HARRIS 

THE VERSATILE STRAIGHT GIRLS FROM THE FOLLIES 

"SMILING" NELLIE WATSON 

/Vi/fy Soabrette 

WITH DAVE MARION'S OWN 3HOW-A REAL SHOW 

FLORENCE, TANNER 

1W CM Witk tW TiTf-- Vafaa, WKk attk Caataxy llilll Danactkaa Ihbb and Rlekaxaa 

HELEN ANDREWS 



SOUBRETTE 



FRED IRWIN'S BIG SHOW 



ETHEL RAY 

SOUBRETTE 



THE BLUE 
SINGER 

HIP.HIP HOORAY GIRLS 



NIMI 



Soabratte villi Army ud Navvy Girt* 



JIM 



I «»m"t atop aaqr •■.•w— I 

Itcea It ■*!•■ 



Irlsb C.-c41« wltk Amy 
aai Nawjr Carta Ca. 



PEARL 



PRIMA DONNA 



IOADWAY 



DIKE THOMAS 



THX DARK WIGHT SPOT 



BROADWAY BELLES 



■« CLINTON and COOK ™u 



FRHIA DONNA SPIEGEL REVIEW 



INGENUE 



TW Girt witk PUuof PanonalHr— Wltk SOCIAL MAIDS 

•JULIETTE BELMONT 

" Jnli-tt^" Gypay IMhM hag—— 

■ai lln JACOBS —J JEBMON NTH CRNTUBY MAIDS 

KITTIE GLASCO 

h(WM of "Hallo Aawria" 



MABEL HOWARD 



SOUBRETTE 



INNOCENT MAIDS 



SPEED— SPEED SPEED 



SPORTING WIDOWS 



LUCILLE AMES 



Witk rimailtty mad Ability 

JACK REID'S RECORD BREAKERS— SEASON OF 1917-18 



GEO. E. 



STRAIGHT 



»< 1V1 AY JANE 

SOUBRETTE 



Whk 



A WINNER IN THE RACE 



I 



CLAUDIA KERWIN 



PRIMA DONNA 



ARMY AND NAVY GIRLS 



PRIMROSE SEMON 

Taw ftiirina Gai Famtmv*. with "Hallo Ab«W 



Maid 



Ina 



With Hnrtic A Sauui'i "HaO* 



CALIFORNIA TRIO 



HARRY BART 



BEN JOSS 
Son*— Dress ami Cla»» with Splej«l Ravoa 



JIM HALL 



Chas. VAN OSTEN and CLARK Auralla 



COMEDIAN 



MISCHIEF MAKERS 



VERA RANSDALE 

Jack Smear*. Varmalila "FawT ' from tka Co*at Witk Broadway FraUa. 



HARRY HARVEY 



'Our Habraw Friend" 



TkiaSaaM* witk 



Laat acaaon principal comedian "Vary G »»a. 
Tail ia tka Srat tiaw I haTa ever baaa is ahaw iraaiaeaa. 

HARRY COLEMAN 



AMBARR (bumpsey) ALI 

Laifk witk HoDm WOIiaaaa' On Shaw 



DOC DORMAN 

RUBE: KOIVIIC MERRY ROUNDERS 

GRACE PALMER 

PRIMA DONNA DIRECTION JACOBS AND JERMON 

JACK FAY 



STRAIGHT MAN DE LUXE 



Social FaUnaS THAT TALL FELLOW 



ELLIOTT and DOLLS 



(JOHNNY) 



(BABA MARION am* TESS DE COSTA) 



ANNETTE WALKER 



(MLLE. ADELAIDE) 



VIOLINIST 



HAKKY HASTINGS' BIG SHOW 



acme — Straight 



'Dartinca of Paris" 



JIMMY CONNORS 

BACK Of BURLESQUE MANAGEMENT BARNEY GERARD 



December 5, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



29 



BURLESQUE NEWS 

(Continued from paxfr* 15 and 27) 



Danny Goodman, ex-burlesque agent, is 
now a member of Company O., 499th In- 
fantry, stationed at Gamp Merritt, 
Tenafly, N. J. 



Billy Wandas, who is new to burlesque, 
is winning success with the Harry Steppe 
Company of Ben Kahn's Follies Show, as 
character man. His work was noticeable 
at the Follies last week. 



Matt Kolb writes from Kansas City that 
Matt, Jr., now two months old, is getting 
along great and is going to be a regular 
comedian. He is a mascot of the show. 
Matt, St., claims. 

Lou Sawyer, manager of the "Burlesque 
Review," has a fine loose leaf statement 
pocket book, to be used by traveling man- 
agers. It is the most complete of any so 
far gotten up. 



Frank Miller has received many an- 
swers to his "ad" in the Cuppeb last 
week, and is busy filling orders for color- 
ing photos in oil. His work is high class 
and is just the thing for lobby display. 
Miller is located at the Casino, Brooklyn. 



Joe Opp, who is responsible for the 
"Honeyland" scene in the "Bon Tons" 
show, which is one of the big hits of the 
show, with Lester Allen and John Barry 
working the comedy, has several more 
big ones ready for next season. 

Walt Leslie, manager of the Casino, 
Philadelphia, was in town last week at 
a meeting of the Philadelphia Casino 
Company, in the Columbia Theatre Build- 
ing, New York. He reports good business 
at the Casino. 



A vast improvement was noticed in the 
chorus of the "Broadway Belles" last week 
at the Olympic. Oppenheimer now has a 
chorus that will easily compare with the 
best on the circuit, in looks, work and 
dancing. 



Don M. Clark, one of burlesque's best 
straight men and producers, is responsible 
for tile big collection in aid of the To- 
bacco Fund at the Empire, Brooklyn, last 
week. 

Clark delivered an appealing and forc- 
ible speech at each performance during 
the week, which was followed by the girls 
of the show passing through the audience 
taking up the collection. 

Clark was also tendered several theatre 
parties during the Empire engagement. 



Maurice Cain has a corking good one- 
sheet which he is circulating exploiting 
the success of his "Hello America" Com- 
pany, with Lewis and Dody and Primrose 
Semon. Three large half-tone cuts of his 
stars accompanied with fac-simile copies 
of various house managers' letters, highly 
complimenting Hurtig and Seamon and 
Cain on the wonderful show they- have 
make up the sheet. It's a good piece of 
advertising and is bound to attract at- 
tention for inside work. 

VEJ-f VCT 51 * c E A N D 
C 1* V E. 1 PICTURE SETTINGS 

BEATTVOJfT VELVET SCENERY STUDIOS, 1007 
Colombia Theater Bldr., 4"tb St. and Broadway, 
JJew York CSty. 



HARRY MONTAGUE 

AUTHOR— PRODUCER AND STAGE MANAGER, WITH 

BILLY WATSON'S 



PRODUCING HARRY MONTAGUE'S 

ORIGINAL BURLESQUES 

"A NEW ARRIVAL" and the "BASHFUL VENUS" 

Week Dec. 3 — Columbia (Broadway), New York City 
Week Dec. 10— Casino, Brooklyn, N. Y. Week Dec. 24 — Casino (Xmas), Philadelphia, Pa. 

Week Dec. 17— Empire, Newark, N. J. Week Dec. 31— Miner's (Bronx), New York City 

HOLIDAY GREETINGS and SUCCESS TO ALL 

HARRY MONTAGUE 



KYRA 




AL BRUCE 

PRODUCTS AND COMEDIAN 
INNOCENT MAIDS CO. 



COLUMBIA CLOTHES SHOP, Inc. 

THE FOTTB THINGS YOU WART. STYLE 
FABRIC, COMFORT AND ECONOMY IN 
YOUR SUIT AND OVERCOAT. WE 
SPECIALIZE TO THE PROFESSION. 

COLUMBIA THEATRE BLDG. 
47th St. and Tta At*. 



TEL. Bryant 4404 



NEW YORK 



WM. F. (Billy) HARMS 

EMFIRE THEATRE, 

Hebekea, N. J. 
fM*nber •* T. B. C) 

AT LIBERTY 

EUGENE LA RUE 

High-Class Stock Director and 
Character* 

351 Crown Street ' New Haven, Conn. 



Wanted Stock Burlesque People at All Times 

Principal people and good chorus girls. Salary $18, and everything furnished. 
Stock house to run all year around, located in New York City. Address all 
communications to JOE BURTON, National Winter Garden, Second Ave. ana 
Houston St, New York. 



ALAMAC THEATRICAL HOTEL 

JOS. T. WE13MAN. fcg B eW _ - . «- 

Northwest Corner 14th and Chestnut St*., St Louis, Mo. 

Theatrical Hostelry, Caie and Cabaret 

Union Help (Member N. V. A. and Burlesque Club) Bert Bet on the. Cbeeat 



MEYERS «•* SELTZER, Pr.ari. 4er. Where all Show Peaple meet. 

•yiTI CCCC I_Ia r VT r 17I Beet Horn. Cookiae m T.wa. 

ZiClOaL O mTIKJ 1 HJ-i Muiic Every Evening. 

PHILADELPHIA P ,y •»■ ■ Visit. 



LOUIS MARATSKEY 

HUDSON. N. YVS LEADING JEW-ELER TO THE PROTEBMOM 



STARS OF BURLESQUE 



AT LIBERTY 

MYRTLE CHERRY 



PRIMA DONNA 



(Formerly MYRTLE ZIMMERMAN) 

Room 6, 1604 Broadway, New York 



PRIMA DONNA 

Ability and Wardrobe Direction ROEHM * RICHARDS 



Doing Irish With Pacemakers 



Tad With the Voice 



ARTHUR PUTNAM 

Straight— with JOE BURTON STOCK CO. Thb> Week, Fouiee Theatre 

MAE O'LOUGHLIN 

Featured with 6 Diving Girls With Hip-Hip-Hooray Girls 

anna sawye:r 

INGENUE— BEN KAHN'S UNION SQ. CO. 

poppy «june: 

SOUBRETTE HIP-HIP-HOORAY GIRLS 

HELEN VREELAND 

Ingenue Prima Donna With Geo. Betfrage's Hip-Hip-Hooray Girls 



30 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



December 5, 1917 



I IJPMIXED BOOKING 



. YOU CAN BOOK DIRECT BY 
ADDRESSING S. K. HODGDON, 

Booking Manager of the UNITED 

OFFICES 

B. F. ICostfa's PakM Thaaire 
mew yorx cmr 



GEO. PRIMROSE, Jr. 



AND 



MOLLOY BROS. 

poetry or hotion in vaudeville 



WILSON & WHITMAN 

In Cla*»y Songs end Planologne 
Direction, MARK LEVY 



CEO. 



HATTIE B. 



STAMPERS and JAMES 



FMtorin! Th«r Jam Band 

In Dusky Cabaret Entertainers 



FRANK 



FLORENCE 



MONTGOMERY & McCLAIN 

in Budget of tSj— EatftUd 

"From Broadway to Dixie" 



Stailni. Duclnf and Comedy 



Two Spadal Drupe a* One 



McMAHON SISTERS 

Exponents of Real Harmony 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



JACK NINA 

BEDFORD and GARDINER 

Dances, Songs and Stories 



BOOKED SOLID 



ALEXANDER W SWAIN 

Oil Painting Surprise 

LOEW TIME Direction— HARRY PINCUS 



BURTON «» JONES 

In "KINDLING" 

FLAYING UNITED TIME Dir., ROSE and CURTIS 



WILLIAM FOX CIRCUIT 

. wv : " OF THEATRES 
WILLIAM FOX. President 

Executive Office., 130 West 4€th SL, New York ,• 

JACK W. LOEB t ; 



EDGAR ALLEN 



PwtOMl mtsjsrvsejws with artiste from 12 to •, or by 



VIRGINIA! KING 

The Girl with tie Velvet Voice, in Unique Presentation of Yo Old* Songi 
Direction of CHARLES FITZPATRICK In VanoWula 



THE BUCKLEYS 

Original Transformations and Novelty Balancing 



BERT 



VERA 



MORRISSEY 



Comedy Songs — Eccentric Dances 



DIRECTION 
MANDEL AND ROSE 



GEO. KATHLEEN 

HINKEL and 1VIAE 

"Catcltlng a Cap" 

Direction— MANDEL A ROSE 



VERA 



HARRY 



LAING and GREEN 



PLAYTNO 
LOEW TIME 



Old Character Song Revue direction 

IN VAUDEVILLE charles j. fttzpatrick 



ED. F. REYNARD 



Bl ANC A 



faa 



ULLE. SIANCA 
ED. P. 



REYNARD 

at -mmroMM thk coukt- 



HAVE YOU SEEN 



WEBER and ELLIOTT 

A Unique Bland of Mirth and Malady 

DIRECTION IRVING COOPER 



JAMES 



WILLIAM 



GREEN and PUGH 

Two Boys From Dixie 

In Three Shad** Blacker Than Black. 

HYMAN SCMAiSSSnN BOOKED SOLID 



Eastern Repreeaatettni 
MORRIS A FEU. 



GEO. 

CHOOS 

"reseats 



EDDIEVOOT 



IN "THE BRIDE SHOP" 

Booked Solid Until 
July 22, 1918 



December 5, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



31 




WARWICK 

Out Half) 

Leddy and Leddy, two men, in their 
bumpty-bump and acrobatic act, started 
the ball rolling. They opened with a song 
that contained a little funny talk and then 
went into their real act. The bumpty- 
bumps, slides and {alls of the man in ex- 
treme comedy make-up, and the half and 
fall twister standing front somersaults, 
were the feature stunts of the act. But 
there were many other feats which claimed 
attention, and there was much applause 
during the progress of the act and at its 
finish. They scored a hit of good propor- 
tions. 

Helen Morati sang three popular songs 
and a number of the patriotic order, the 
latter being given as an encore. Miss 
Morati has a voice of more than ordinary 
carrying power and, while at times it vi- 
brates to excess, it is none the less pleas- 
ing to the ear. She articulates distinctly 
and puts her songs over with a bang. A 
good sized hit was her portion. 

Rawson and Clare, man and woman, in 
their juvenile sketch, were well liked. Their 
three songs were well put over and their 
comedy talk won laughs. 

Frank Farron, with his monologue, 
scored the big hit of the bill. His three 
songs were well liked, but it was bis talk 
that captured the audience. His material 
is "good, and when he got well into his 
work he kept 'em langhing steadily. 

Cbong and Moy, Chinese man and 
woman, closed the bill. The woman sang 
alone and did not succeed very well as 
she could not keep on the key. The best 
part of the act followed, and was devoted 
to dancing, two numbers being of the mod- 
ern cabaret style. The finish waa a cake 
walk. As dancers this pair of Orientals are 
really clever. In fact, so readily have they 
adapted themselves to the American style 
of dancing that it is difficult at times to 
realize that they are Chinese. They scored' 
a hit 

"The Hungry Heart." with Pauline 
Frederick, was the feature film, and "The 
Pullman Bride" waa the comedy picture. 

B. W. 



DeKALB 

(La.tHalO 

The Conlee Sisters opened the show with 
a song and patter turn. 

The larger of the girls is a clever co- 
medienne, and, with a more sensible selec- 
tion of song numbers, the turn would go 
mnch better. 

Hinkel and Mea followed in a skit about 
"Mister Carr" and "Carry A. Lott" that 
pleased. The deep bass singing of the man 
was a feature of the act. The girl might 
speak her lines more distinctly to good ad- 
vantage. 

Alice Hanson, a comedienne of the "nut" 
type, was on next. She has a pleasing per- 
sonality and lots of good comedy talent. 
With a better opening song, however, she 
would be an even greater hit. The playing 
of her assistant pleased the audience. 

The number four position was filled by 
Dorothy Burton in a sketch called "The 
Real Thing." The story concerns a crook 
who Is going straight, but is being hounded 
by the police. A detective follows hia wife 
home, and tries to trap him, but ia out- 
witted by the little woman, who gets back 
at him in his own game. The work of 
the woman in the turn was excellent. 

Tommy Hayden, the English comedian, 
followed in song and patter concerning his 
wife, and things in general. His wife then 
came out on the stage and played the vio- 
lin while he changed for his baseball bit 
which went over very big. His dancing 
earned him a good round of applause. He 
should eut out using the "silly ass" gag " n 
often. 

The fonr Martells in a bicycle riding act 
closed the vaudeville portion of the bill. 
All the work ia done by the man and one 
of the women. Their acrobatics, while on 
wheels, went over big. The show was 
closed by "The Hungry Heart," a feature 
film starring Pauline Frederick. S. K. 



AUDUBON 

.. (Las* Half) 

After the overture, Marguerite and 
Hanle was the "dumb" act that opened 
the bill. ' 

Grace Edmond followed with a few 
numbers that were nothing to brag about. 
The aame applies to the manner in which 
she handles them. Her turn received only 
fair applause, even though she appealed 
to the audience with a patriotic recita- 
tion as a finish. 

Arthur Dickens and Company, in a 
sketch, presented some really funny sit- 
uations. The comedy ia good, but the 
lines could stand reconstructing. The 
solid red effect in lights could also be 
improved upon in the first half by using 
an electric dome. It would make a much 
prettier effect. The act received generous 
applause. 

A Christie comedy, "Nearly a Bigamist," 
split the bill. The situations were very 
similar to the ones in the preceding sketch. 

The Six International Tourists followed. 
The comedy is distributed among a Jew, 
Italian, Irishman, bum actor, tramp and 
nance. The bit between the Jew and 
the Italian looked the best and was re- 
ceived the best of all by the audience. 
The bit where the Jew is introduced to 
the audience as an Indian and speaks in 
his native tongue (Jewish) got away with 
a great hand. 

Bert Hanlon, with his chatter and BongB, 
drew a generous round of applause. He 
should cut out the imitations of Nor- 
worth, Geo. M. Cohan and Eddie Foy. He 
does them fairly well but they have been 
worked to death. In two different puces 
also, he uses the word "damn." It didn't 
draw a snicker, ia uncalled for and sounds 
bad. The Olive number is good but too 
long. 

McWaters and Tyson, in the closing 
spot, received a generous round of ap- 
plause upon their entrance. If Anna Held 
were to hear the girl's impersonation of 
herself she would go mad. The Marie 
Dressier number is good. The man might 
also cut out the yodeling. The act pleased. 

A four-minute speaker and "Treasure 
Island," a feature picture, closed the show. 
The picture was well liked by young and 
old, especially the kiddies. L. B. G. 

HARLEM OPERA HOUSE 

(Last Hall) 

The Brittons, xylophone players, opened 
the show, and although they played well, 
offered nothing new. 

Murray and Love, a man and woman 
team, the man in eccentric make-up, gave 
some dull talk which didn't get them by. 
Tbelr songs warmed up the house a bit, 
and they closed to a good laugh over a 
burlesque Hula dance. In which the man 
wears a skirt made in whisk brooms. 

Joseph Byron Totten and Company, who 
followed, are reviewed under New Acts. 

Lou Holtz, a blackface comedian of a 
different sort, was the bit of the show. 
He opened with talk and followed with 
several parodies, which got over, in splen- 
did shape. He was recalled several times. 

Whipple, Huston and Company, in their 
fantastic turn called "Shoes," are re- 
viewed under New Acts. 

They were followed by the usual Fri- 
day surprise act, this time the Cameron 
Sisters, who did only two dances and fell 
utterly flat. Scarcely a hand rewarded 
their appearance. 

Hawthorne and Anthony, in Italian and 
straight make-up, followed with a dia- 
logue in one which has not much novelty, 
but which the house seemed to like. They 
closed with a horn duet, the straight 
making trumpet tones with a curtain rod. 

McLellan and Carson closed the show 
with a prettily arranged and cleverly pre- 
sented skating act, which they do in a 
special set. They dress in modified Pier- 
rot and Pierrette costumes, the girl mak- 
ing three changes. They close with a 
neck whirl which is extremely well done. 

P. K. 



SHOW PRINTERS, 

LITHOGRAPHERS, 

ENGRAVERS 



National 



PRINTING a 
.ENGRAVING 



SPECIAL DESIGNS 
FOR EVERY LINE 



ENGRAVERS new york^£P^ 1CAG o OF AMUSEMENT 

ST. LOUIS ^. 

WHICH OF THESE CATALOGUES SHALL WE SEND YOU 

THES IHIC'AL CATALOGUE. Nil t-1 ill Dumal ■.: , H.--)i,»rii.'W. blot ► >riiilr»>|lr, Cnmrat. rlt. 
f am P4IAI, QtlUE ril K.ii ri/ A.htton a.itt,». Hares, Mot' , rii''nmr..Mor K- Ant6- HorsfSnow v. >tc. 
M«i;ir CATALOGUE at H^r.i.lic. f*">A, R .' JJl^q. S^ir.Uij.'.sm. Maij.i . Haml Cull. 'etc, 
MINSTREL C»TALOGUE o' VSli.tr . anit-.CotnrocI Wmilrr! and Colored Musical Ccmrtl, of all \jntl\ 
MUSICAL COMEDY CAtALOUltE »t Ojrrai an.: ¥ uni.il Sttilos W'll.h and »lthnut Mir. ; . 

VSENIERK PLA1S CATALOGUE <>l P.l[i«r lor .Wr>U rn t'r a.-Tas, ■ ;•<"' On'r:a Mz->\* i>' Tent ShoW» 
C1RNIVAL CATALOGUE ol Printing, lor Featuring ;carnit.ik. Street Fairs and lite r»rnts 
CIRCUS and WILD WEST CATALOGUE ot Cornplilr llnr or h.iniKntnr up t» tlalr Pap^r. ; 

CATALOGUE OF DATES. Pries- Hills. Stork Letter's. Banner*. I, or and Blot i Work, etc .! 

FOLDERS OF NON ROYALTY PLAYS viith Comple'le Lines el Paper! All the olrl laumtes. 
COMMERCIAL CATALOGUE o< Posters and Cut Oiiis ol Commercial Orvigns. 





MENZELl'S 



CONSERVATOIRE 

DE CHOREGRAPHIE 

CLASSIQUE 

22 East 16th Stnot 

Phono, Stayvaaant 3334 

New York 



GEORGE 



CHARLES 



LANE & SiVIITH 

Singing, Dancing and Comedy Direction, MARK LEVY 



W. OLATHE MILLER & CO. 



••ON THE EDGE OF* THINGS' 

Br HOMER MILES 

The Little Act with the Big Pancb. 

DIRECTION-SAM BAERWITZ. 



N. V. A. 



PATSY BENNETT 

Songs andComedy 

Direction — MANDEL & ROSE 



MAZIE EA/AIMS 

and her 

BANJO BOYS 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



PLAYS 



FDR STOCK, RETOtTIURE. AMATEUR COMPANIES 

LARGEST ASSORTMENT IN THE WORLD. Bosks far 
amassment, Negro Plays, Piper, Scenery, Mrs. Jartay's 
Works. Catalonc Frcel Frccl Freal 

SAMUEL FRENCH, U West Sttk St, New York 



THEATRICAL and CHARACTER COSTUMES 

5.000 matnttau. TWt tor Salomon. Aaj Pontn KaUaa. 
Mllitarf uS NtnL N» arte too anil or las iflflrnlt 



UNIFORMS 

RUSSELL UNIFORM CO., 1SOO Broadway, N. Y. (Cot. 48th St.) 



32 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



December 5, 1917 



« BLAND & CO. en» 



Australia's Greatest 
Illusionists 

Booked Solid U. B. O. 

DIRECTION— TREAT MATHEWS 



HERBERT 



M<LPRED 



HODGE and LOWELL 

••Object Matrimony" 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



JOHN C. 



CARRIE 



MANNING & BURKE 



Co«Wy Siagiac TmOaag Act in On» 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



ALEX 



KRAMER and CROSS 

Advanced Exponents of Physical Culture 

Direction— IRVING COOPER 



M ATTIE CHO ATE & CO. 

ta "OUTCLASSED" 

Coaady Pl»y 1 . t la Vaodarflla 



MEL EASTMAN 

"The Original Elongated Entertainer" 



THE ORIGINAL AMERICAN GIRL — 

PRINCESS WHITE DEER 

Only Dancing Iw»^;»« Girl and Company of Indian Brave* 
Diroctio n, WILLIAM MORRIS AND PAT CASEY 



IRVING 



BILLT 



SELIG & ALLMAN 

Twi VaraatS* Eatartaiaara m Pattar aad So n* D ii a Ul u a IBaalal 4k 



LEO & EDNA MILLER 



K. V. A. 



Songs — Patter — Chatter 

Dilution, Cbaa. X Fltxpatrick 



ETHEL ALBERTINI 

a— t»t«€i toy fcfANNE SrVlITH 

Of VAUDEVILLE 



JOESPIELMANN 
lit Ta 



JOE RUDDY 



RUBE MELODY FOUR 

Singing, Talking and Comedy 



EDDIE McCOMBS 



tndTaaor 
FRED NERRET 



JACK 



HELEN 



ROWLES & GILMAN 



A Little Bit of Everything 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



george HICKMAN BROS. •*««■ 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



ComeJy, Trip]* Bars and Knockabouts 
DIRECTION— CHAS. BORNHAUPT 



U. B . O. TIKI 



(Gcorflc and Idabell) 
SURPRISING CLOWNS Dfoectioa, ALF. T. WR.TON 

BICKNELL 



Th. "MODEL BAKER" 



Dir„ HUGHES &. SMITH 



COMEDY JUGGLERS. 



Direction ALF. T. WILTON 



1 DEFY COMPETITION- 

LITTLE JERRY 

Tb» Binwt Uttla Saw at VaodavOa 



Tk« Moraine After mi After. ' 



la VaoaavflW 



THE OVANDOS 

Wbirf wind XylophonUu Booked Solid D ir. , HARRY SHEA 



Frank 



Eldria 



FISHER & GILMORE 



la "A BatUol 



Direction Mark Le»y 



CLIFFORD. SADE AND FRANK 



SINGING AND DANCING 



IN VAUDEVIIXI 



BELLE ONRA 

THE AERIAL GIRL In Vaudeville 

SOMETHING NEW IN THE AIR 

THE WHITE TRIO 

NOVELTY GYMNASTIC— IN VAUDEVILLE 

MAE HARRINGTON 



"PLAN OLOGUEFETE" 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



HARRY 

Comedy, Acrobatic, Aeriausts. 



AND 



LA VINA 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



TANEAN BROS, playing^ a ^time 



December 5, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



33 




im aaaat to await! astaaajaj aatt to knn tht> wvompi ilalliarj 
tMa lut, a POSTAL CARD Boat b. aaat raniiaaibai tta to tsa-w 
, al|T I it with your full aana aad true aeUraaa to wttlci. tha lattar at to 
i» at bulla— » fallowed by tho tender should bo m m ti n ned. 
Fleaua iiiaaitwiti tbs data (or numbr) ml ate CUPPER la which tis> 



of tho Utter. tslstctltad 



It 



at far 



GENTLEMEN 



Anderson. Saniocd 
• Barkbertft. W. C 
Herbert 



Byrnes, John r. 
Bemad. Frank 

BlKtt. SuskII 
BOTiEJ. C 

Barker, Hforr L. 
BrsrJJry. Geo. 
Churchill, Berton 



Catalano, L. 
Csrr. Henry 



Affiaorot. LUj 
Arm. Qui. D.. 

Mix 
Bern, Frank* 
BtDey. Hit. 0. 

E 

BIlIKJ, Jae 

Courtney. At 
Oollbaoo. Alice 



Carroll, T. J. 
Clarke, Then. J. 
Cedy. Fred M. 
Chapman. Perry 
Deaiy. Dillon M. 
Dome. Allen 
De Loog. Wlnfleld 

P. 
Dreber. Bfflj 
Eaersrjn, Jack 
EUesbee Prod. 

Co. 
Pox a Msro 

PoltOD, Js*. C. 



Coortot. Mar- 
guerite 
Corlae. turn ud 

Thomas 
Christie, Mm. 



Fax a Cur 

FultOO, JU. C 

Gallagher, Ed P. 
Gardner, Grant 
Gold. Irrinf 
Ooj Brat. Min- 
strels 
GDlard, L. V. 
Gibney, Wa. 
Hamlin, Bop) 
Howard, Gene 
Harrey, Leon 
Hyde, Clifford 
Henderson. Kraal 



HunUe?, J. H. 
Home. John 
Hall. Beld 
Jodd, Wfl. 
Jewell A Pendic- 
le 
Klefer. Join 
Klter. Hal 
Lancaster. John 
Leahy, Bock 
Lonertan. W. E. 
Lawler, Jaa. 
Lancaster. John 
Lewis. Ctss. L. 



LADIES 



Dopont, Irma 
Earte. Julia 
Emerson, Grayee 
C. 



Ebert, Adele 
Earle. Louisa 
Pay. Anna E. 
PtllUSUU, Minnie 

Pay. Billy 
Gardiner, Lena 
Hartley, Pis 
Jaekson, Enid 
Kearney. Jean P. 



Kramer, Alary 
Kieran. Dorothy 
Kinsley. Anna 
LcJgbtoo, Bulb 
Uoyd, Beats 
Itarston, Mae 
Mudre, EVa 
MoretU. Helen 
Mayo, Vlrlan 



Leapold, Walter 
Lyons, Eddie 
Lester. Tim 
afokelke. Ed. 
Milton. B. H. 
MacMurin, Prank 
Mener. Henry 
Mack a Deane 
Marshall. Ceo. 0. 
0-OraneU. Jas. 
Orton. Norman 
Owens. Jos. N. 
Kalney. B. A. 
Robertson. ffiUani 



^ewtcn. Miss 
Norton, Jas.. Mrs. 
Poynterv Benlah 
Prior, Grace M. 



Silrer, Evelyn 

Swsyne, Marion 
Srott. Carrie 
Stanley. Florence 



Royster. Harry L. 
Bernard. Ed P. 
Sharrocks. The 
Stewart. Cal 
Testa. Henry 
TerrUI, Guy 
Vinson. Bobble 
WUlLuns, Harold 
Wharles, Chss. 
Walek. Ezra C 
Wilcoi. Erlsu 
Williams. Harold 
Tate*. Percy 



Troutman. Jean 
Thompson. E. F. 
Worth. Muriel 
Wilson, Margaret 

a 

Willis. May 
Walker. Adele 
Williams. Erelyn 
Wayne. Kathryn 



ENGAGED FOR "GENERAL POST" 

William Courtenay and Thomas A. Wise 
have been engaged by Charles Dillingham 
to play the leading roles in "General Post." 
Olive Tell, Cynthia Brooks, Cecil Fletcher, 
Wigney Perclval and James Kearney are 
also in the company. 



VIOLET A MAKES DEBUT 

Violeta, the new Spanish dancer, made 
her American debut at the Park Theatre 
last Friday night when she introduced for 
the first time here three new dances, "Sil- 
verias,'* "Pot Ponrri" and "Citanillo," in 
"The Land of Joy," in which she will be 
a permanent feature. 



RECEIVER FOR SHOW APPOINTED 

Harold A. Kunatler has been appointed 
receiver of the assets and effects of the 
National Allie Amusement Corporation, 
consisting of costumes, uniforms, etc., used 
in the production of "When Johnny Comes 
Marching Home." 

MARIE C AHILL'S BROTHER DIES 

Richard Cahill, brother of Marie Cahill, 
died suddenly last Thursday evening at 
the Hotel Algonquin, aged forty-five years. 
Heart disease was the cause of his death. 
Mr. Cahill had taken dinner with his sis- 
ter and her husband and was stricken on 
his return to his apartment. Miss Cahill 
is the sole survivor. 



BRAMHALL TO REOPEN 

Butler Davenport will re-open the Bram- 
hall Playhouse next Saturday night with 
"The Silent Assertion," a play of which 
he is the author and in which he will play 
the chief role. His assisting company will 
include Margaret Campbell, Catherine Cal- 
houn, Emily Stavers and Paul Doucet. 



TO BUILD EAST SIDE THEATRE 

A $50,000 theatre is to be erected at 
Clinton and Attorney streets, near the 
Williamsburg Bridge, by the Blindermand 
and Cohen Amusement Company, which 
has leased the land for twenty-one years 
with the privilege of buying it. 



PLAYERS ENGAGED THIS WEaEK 



Eva Le Gallienne, George W. Howard, 
Florine Arnold, Lumsden Hare, George 
Fitzgerald, Mrs. Edmund Gurney, Grace 
Ade, Philip Leigh, Malcolm Morley, Joseph 
McManus, Herbert Belmore, Douglas 
Fame, Charles Chappell and Victor La- 
Salle, by William Faversham for "Lord 
and Lady Algy." 



Mary Neweombe, by Edgar MacGregor 
for "Sick Abed." 



Yvonne Sbelton, by Floreuz Ziegfeld, Jr., 
until December, 1918. 



Leonard Mudie and Mary Hampton, by 
Charles Frohman, Inc., for "The Lady of 
the Camellias." 



Ethel Remey, by Smith & Golden for 
"Turn to the Right." 

Alma Belwin, by A. H. Woods for "Ma- 
ry's Ankle." 



DEATHS OF THE WEEK 



1 



JAMES ARTHUR ESL.OW. formerly gen- 
eral manager of the Universal Film Co. for 
the New England States, died November 27 
at Grand Rapids, Mich. 

JOE ARMENNO, an old time acrobat, who 
was well known about thirty years ago, died 
as a result of a broken neck, which he got 
while trying to do a triple somersault 
in a saloon in San Francisco. 

ERNEST alber, trainer and owner of 
Alber's Bears, died last week In bis room In 
the Hotel Normandle. this city. Alber made 
his first appearance in America, with his 
troupe of bears, at the New York Hippo- 
drome, coming here from Germany where he 
had been connected with the Hagenbeck 
Menagerie for a number of years. In the 
United States he had appeared with various 
circuses, in vaudeville and In Summer parks. 
He waa about forty-five years of ace. 

WILLIAM M. MORTON, who for two dec- 
ades managed Miner's Theatre, now the 
Newark, died last week at his home in 



Newark at the age of seventy years. He 
began his career as a boy at Barnum's 
Museum later Joining the Eighth New York 
Militia In the Civil war, where he rose from 
private to Lieutenant Colonel, being with 
the Fortieth New Tork Infantry part of the 
time. After the war he was third Assistant 
Postmaster General under President Grant 
and President Hayes. Later, he resumed 
his theatrical career and, among other 
activities managed the tours of Mr. and 
Mrs. Barney Williams. After quitting the 
theatrical game he became Police Commis- 
sioner and was later connected with the 
Board of Public Works. 

CHARLES A. CARROLL died last week 
In New Tork, after an Illness of two years. 
Mr. Carroll was last seen in an important 
role In "Omar, the Tentmaker." He was 
forty-seven years old, and had been on the 
stage for thirty years, under various man- 
agements. Burial took place Monday at 
Evergreen Cemetery, under the auspices of 
the Actors' Fund. 



JUST OUT! 

LATEST and GREATEST 

THE NEW 
McNALLVS H_T -> 
BULLETIN IxO. O 

PRICE, ONE DOLLAR PER COPY 

IT CONTAINS TNE FOLLOWKG SILT-EDGE UP- 
TO-DATE COMEDY MATERIAL: 

20 Sereaaiot Mooalefecs. each one a posiUre alt. 

All Mods, including Hebrew, Irish, Dutch, Wop, 

Kid, Bube, Black and White Face. Female. Tramp 

and Slump Speech. 

14 Rearini Airs far Tarn Malts. Each act an 

applause winner. 

12 Orlaiaal Acts fer Male and Faasaie. They'll 

mike good on any hill. 

32 Sere-FIrr Parodies m all or Broadway's latest 

soog bits. Each one is full o' pep- 

2 Roof Urtlnl Trio Acts, one for two males and 

one female entitled "Taw Is Ctaauy," the other 

for three males entitled "Toes. Dick and Harry." 

These acts are 24 karat, sure-fire nits. 

2 Rattllnff Qsartetta Acts, one for four males 

entitled "Foer of 1 Kind," the other for two 

males and two females entitled "The Rlaht Way." 

Both acts are sure with humor or the Bib- 

tkklini kind. 

A New Comedy Sketch entitled "A Caasfry Maid." 

It's a scream from start to finish. 

A Gnat Tabloid Caaaaty and Blriesias. entitled 

"WcddllH Balls." It's bright, breezy and hubbies 

over with wit. 

HeMally's Many ansrtrsls. comlrtini ol 8 artlrti 

Irst-rarta with sJcJe-splituni Jokes and hot-shot 

enfl fire sees. 

Cried ■lattrtl Final* entitled "Lift la* Won." 

It keeps the audience yelling throughout the entire 

act Handreds of Crackar Jack, Cross Fin Jokes ui 

Gats which can be used for sidewalk courersatlon 

for two males and male and female. 

Besides other comedy material which is oseful to 

the Tauderllle performer. 

Remember the rrles of McHalry's Ballatln No 3 

Is aaly ana dollar per espy: or will aaai yos 

MeNally's Balletlrt No. 2 and 3 for $1.50, with 

ooonr taci fsirutea. 

WM. McNALLY 

SI EAST 18th STREET. NEW YORK 






WARDROBE PROP 
TRUNKS, SS.OO 

Big Bargain. Have been used. Also • far* 
Second Hand Innovation and Fibre Ward- 
robe Trunk a, $10 and $15. A few extra large 
Property Trunks. Alio old Taylor Trunks 
and Bal Ti unlet. 
Parlor Floor, a W. 31st St, New York Otsr 



Professional Moving Picture Camera 




0b easy payment*, a $300 
tor $150. $75 i 
weak. Tots' credit Is food, 
for fupcllfj. Atrati wutal 

L. METZ 

302 E. 23d St. 



II 



Saw Yark City. 



WHEN WILL 

MADISON'S BUDGET No. 17 

BE READY ! 

Owing to the rapid growth of my depart- 
ment for writing epeclal material, the «p- 
pearance of MADISON'S BUDGET No. 17 
baa been slightly delayed, bat It will aarelr 
be ready In a few weeka. Price aa nana], 

ONE DOLMIt. Meanwhile for S1.50 yon 
can secure the current Issue (No. 16) im- 
mediately and an advance copy of No. 17 
soon aa ready. JAKES MADISON, 1052 
Third Arenna, Hew York* 



NEW YORK THEATRES 



a. t. atnTHs 

PALACE 

Broadway A 47th St. 

Mat. Dally at 2 P. M. 

3S. 60 and lie. 
■wary Nlch t 
XB-BO-TB-tl-tl.60. 



LAST DUTF OOBDON. 
CECIL C U-MJUH OHAH, 

MORTON & GLASS, FAH- 
BEE GIEXS, HEEKAN 
TIlCBEBa, "THE SECK- 
LESS EVE," THOVATO, 
BASEAB BROS., DTJH- 
XTH'S DOGS. 



ELTINGE 



West 42nd Ht. ***%. 

BM. Matinees WM. A 
Bat. at Z.30. 



ICSINESS lEf tIE PLEASUfiE 



A aw- 



ry ateataaraa. aMaat aaa falsa 



Xaaart ■aaa—, writ, aAaJTrr wrmrAtAia 



™Ln AMjlLlliMril Mats. WeiaSat. J:lt. 

Haw *> attsjarwr-s traktart af .S aiuUal eawaaetr 
tataaaaaa, 

THE RIVIERA GIRL 

i Zalsaaa. Jkwek aa! Lyriaa ay 

aaa 9. 9. wSaawlawka. 



M0R0SC0 w^l t Jt?i.iI ,I *' s ' 

OLXTO MOKOMO'a LAUGarnra tarartATTOi 

LOMBARDI, LTD. S^fS 

BlaTtsjat atatar kit la yaara. taaas • wwaaj a 
acTaaaa. 

OtW. IB. lUIWI s.20. Mata. Wed. * ait. 2.20. 
COHAN at WAttaia PRESENT 

MR. LEO DITRICHSTEIN 

In a New Comedy 

«*THE KIISIG" 

By Caillawat da Flora asd Anna. 

raiTFRIalN B '«*7 4 44tb St. Btcsj. 8.20. 
trUILIUVn kr ttl . Wed. & 8at. 2.20. 

MRS. FISKE 

In a New Flay 

Madame Sand 

"An evening of pare delight. " — Eve, Mail. 

REPUBLIC K *Si ."» ST » 

LOU TELLEGEN 

"BLIND 1 YOUTH" 

A new slay la three acta by Willard Hack asd 

Zou Telleren. 

Klaw at atrlaaara* , 



1CAII1SON COEXT PBX8EVTB 

THE GRASS WIDOW 

A new Xualoal Comedy by fir.« waging Pollock and 
Kennold Wolf. 



"CHEER UP" 

AT THE 




a. B. 



atadby 

BTJINSIDI 



DrLUXOBAII 



usnntx 

HIPPODROME 

Saats 6 Weeks Aaead 



D17I JICfA WMt utt > St. Brenintw at 
rt r.l.rl.M .11 «a0. M.tlneca Touraday and 

mw rww saturdty tt 2.80. 

DAVTJJ BaXABOO jiatttlt 

POLLY WITH A PAST 

A Oenwdy by Owaxsr. atlaatetaa ui Oar abaaaaa 

WJPIMr Broadway A 40IM St. Erea. 

CjlWlr IXwJCj 8.20. Mara. Wed. & Sat, 2.20. 

"A complete triumph." — Herald. 

ANN MURDOCH 

la tae now eoaody 

THE THREE BEARS 

By Edward Ohlldt Oupeatar, Author of "Tha 
Clndenlla 



B' way A wStb it.. Braa. «.>«. 
Kata. Wad. * tat. Ma. 



GAIETY 

ALEXANDRA CARLISLE 

In "THE COUNTRY COUSIN" 

THE TABKINGTON-STEEET C0XEST 



LYCEUM 



Theatre, 45tU SL A Bwiy. 
Erea, at 8.20. aUttaaat 

Tbnra. A Sat. 2.20. 



DAVID BELABOO Fnaaata 
A play of tbe great Nortawnt by Willard Mick 

TIGER ROSE 



BROOKLYN HOUSES 

I Pal O natbusb A*. 

I IX*-' aavd Stata St. 

SaaaaW U Ytaa Lass 

Mat. DaBy. btassaa Ua. 

EVEKY DAT LADIES' DAT 




Caaucart Ewary 



EwaakkB 



STAR 



J A T. WE AH TO LTO w W. 
aUTTJTEE DAILY. 
Talarahoaei ataia lta*. 



THIS WEEK 

THE PACEMAKERS 

Bast Waak— "AlTrO OIRiS." 

EVERY BWDAT TWO BIS COBOEXTB— TWO) 

10— piATTTBI VATTDEVItLE SVajTBIBBS— 18 



34 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



December 5, 1917 



HARRY 



DAN 



DUNCAN and HOLT 

"A§k IVfe Something" 

Direction— HARRY WEBER, Inc. 



JOE 



NAT 



In Th«tr Maakal CtmtAi Skit EatMaa 

••Ttie New Hotel Clerk" 



SOLID U. B. O. 



DIRECTION BERNARD BURKE 



//'//*//>/" 






MARK 



JACK 



Batehelor, Lebcul and Mitchell 

Comedy Singing and Talking in One 



Nat DeLoach & Co, 



10 Colored People 

Fact Singing, Dancing bb 



ROSE & CURTIS 

EASTERN REPT. 



BEEHLER & JACOBS 

WESTERN REFT. 



JOHN GEIGER and His Talking Violin 

ROOKED SOLD 



WILBUR, VENTRILOQUIST, PRESENTING 

LYMARTELLE 

Doing Walking , Dummy and Dancing Doll Charactars. 
Rig NoWty Boakad Solid 



CECIL 



JAMES 



MOORE & MARTIN 

Singing, Talking and Comedy — Colored Comedian* 
Direct;.. JACK SHEA IN VAUDEVILLE 



#>***" >« tt A 



HENRY L DIXEY, Jr. 

SB. ... «'. ... 



In "The Surgeon" 



In VandoriU* 



WHIRLWIND HAGANS 

Fashion Plate Steppers 



LoawaTb 



Direction. MARK LEVY 



GANGLERS DOGS 



Direction— BILLY GRADY 



BETH 



ED 



CHALLISS and LAMBERT 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



MARIE DREAMS 

The Girl with the Wonderful Voice 

Playing U. B. O. Direction. ROSE and CURTIS 



CLIFFORD NELSON AND JANE CASTLE 

FUrhf Lmi OtluI* L ata ef Tatmaa" I 



ALVIN and KENNEY 

Origiaal — Closing — Snow with 9 Miantaa of Continual Laughtar 



B^ «c EDDLE 

MURPHY & KLEIN 

DIRECTION IRVING COOPER 

joe WOLFE & EVANS madge 



A Nifty Splatter of Song* i 



ImVuinflk 



— HICKEY & COOPER 

Mirlb, Melody and Song Playing Loew*a Timo 



Billle 
In VandariH. 



JOS. BELMONT & CO. 

IN VAUDEVILLE 

ESMERALDA 

WHIRLWIND XYLOPHOKPT 

BARNEY WILLIAMS 

In Vaudeville'. Biggest Langning Sneeaa* — "Hunting" 

FLETCHER. LEVEE and FLETCHER 

Stegta* Haratear. Tatldaa- aad Cu mi «j at VuAerlUe 

DEMAREST & DOLL 

Tha Man, tha Girl and the Piano 



BOOKED SOLID 



m VAUDEVILLE 



adelmde B00THBY & EVERDEAN chaw* 

NoraltySongaandTraTaaty. Playing UJ.O. Bad OtplnnBi Qwit Eait: J. C.P« 



THE HONEYMOONERS 

With Jama* Kennedy Playing U. B. O. Timo Direction, Pat. Caaay 



SI 



VICTORIA. 



-JEIMKS aird ALLEN 



JUST IN TOWN TO SEE SIGHTS 



BOOKED SOLID LOEW CIRCUIT 



ARTHUR 



BESSIE 



THE ARTHUR L. GUY TRIO 

rtfcw Than- Uaam* daily m Black ana Tan, AD Makntat FaUy PiatoU a a 



GEORGALIS TRIO 

Sharp Snooting Act Din, FRANK WOLF, Pkua. 



SAM J, 

CURTIS and GILBERT 

Dir. Rom ck 



"LYRICA!" 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



December 5, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



35 



"THE MOLLY CODDLE" 

Theatre — Lock's DeUmcey St. 

Style— Bkit. 

Time — Twelve minutes. 

Setting — Full stage. 

Charles Bickford and Doris Loraine 
present a comedy skit, "The Molly Cod- 
dle," which is a little out of the ordi- 
nary. 

It tells the story of a wife who wishes 
to keep her husband in the habit of obey- 
ing her commands: So, on his arriving 
borne from a long business trip, he is 
informed by his wife that she is going 
ont and that he will have to stay at 
home and take care of the flat. He 
tries' to object but is overruled by his 
wife, who goes out to keep her appoint- 
ment. 

A storm then breaks and the wife har- 
ries home only to find that the door la 
locked and that she is going to be kept 
ont by her husband. She goes through 
the flat upstairs and appears on the fire- 
escape but finds the window has been 
locked. Finally she breaks the window 
and comes in, only to be made to get 
down on her knees and beg the forgive- 
ness of her husband and promise that 
she will take all orders from him here- 
after. 
The act was well liked. M. L. 



NEW ACTS 

(Continued from Pages I and If) 



JOSH WHITBY 

Theatre — Greenpoint. 
Style — Violin. 
Tim* — Ten minutes. 
Setting — One. 

Josh Whitby, in a rube outfit, gives 
various imitations upon a violin, the or- 
gan number being the best of the lot. 

Why he dresses as a rube is hard to 
say. His comedy, if it can be called 
comedy, is slow and old and didn't even 
bring a snicker. 

In way of diversity he played the vio- 
lin with a bottle, then a steel rod, an 
imitation washboard and finally brought 
forth a slipper and used that to bow 
with. 

An early spot on small time bills, the 
way bis act looks now, is the best place 
for Josh. L. R. G. 



ELLA WALTON 

Theatre — National. 

Style — Sinking. 

Time — Ten minutes. 

Setting — In one. 

Ella Walton, in presenting her offer- 
ing of song, possesses but few qualifica- 
tions that are deserving of praise. But, 
as many acts of this sort get over, so 
may she. 

She is very neat and attractive and 
has a personality that makes you take 
a liking to her. Her repertoire consists 
of four songs none of which, however. 
was well put over. 



JOSEPHINE LEMHARD 

Theatre — Greenpoint. 
Style — Singing. 
Time — Eight minutes. 
Setting — One. 

Josephine Lombard makes her en- 
trance in kid dresses and, from the time 
of her entrance to her final bow, is just 
a pretty little bundle of ginger. 

After her kid number she does a 
Scotch bit, singing "It's Nice to Get 
Cp in the Morning, but If s Better to 
Stay in Bed." Her portrayal is remark- 
ably weH done. 

She then does an Italian number and 
then an Irish bit. Josephine should go 
great over the big time. L. R. G. 



BYRON AND NELSON 

Theatre — Greenpoint. 
Style — Talk and tonga. 
Time — Eleven minutes. 
Setting— One. 

A lot of talk about self-rising yeast 
cake and a sons (the last number cannot 
be called a song) take np 11 perfectly 
good minutes. 

The man plays a cross between a 
nance and a "nut." Let's call it the 
latter. 

Aa the act stands it can look for noth- 
ing else but small time. L. R. G. 



WHIPPLE, HUSTON & CO. 

Theatre — Harlem Opera House. 

Style — Novelty playlet. 

Time — Eighteen minutes. 

Setting — Special. 

The playlet presented by this com- 
pany .entitled "Shoes" has novelty in 
abundance, and might go if speeded up 
a bit. Many inessentials should be cut, 
notably the stuttering of the comedian, 
which slows up the action and does not 
get a laugh. 

A spectacular Oriental setting, filled 
with trick effects, forma the background. 
The man enters with a song to the effect 
that the shoe business is a soft job, 
whereupon the woman, in search of 
shoes, enters. Here an allegory, half in 
song and half in dialogue, ensues. The 
shoes on sale represent various desirable 
things, such as success, wealth, etc. Only 
the pair called happiness is not for sale. 
The woman wants only these shoes, so 
she steals them. She returns, however, 
and offers to share her happiness with 
the man. 

The leading man does not sing at all 
well, although his acting is not bad. The 
woman has a poor voice and an unat- 
tractive manner of speaking, and the 
comedian, as remarked, is superfluous. 
Lots of the lines, particularly those re- 
lating to the beauty of the female ankle, 
should be cut, aa they are old stuff and 
out of place- in such an act. The sketch 
needs lota of revision, but it might be 
made into something. P. K. 



ISABELLE SISTERS 
Theatre — Loew'a Orpheum. 
Style — Musical. 
Time — Eight minutes. 
Setting — One. 

The Isabelle Sisters are presenting an 
exceptionally good sister act with a 
clever routine, capably handled. 

They play their numbers on stringed 
instruments, the opening one being well 
done on violins. One of the sisters puts 
a banjo behind her back and renders a 
popular song, which is followed by a 
Southern melody in which both take 
part. They finish their offering with a 
medley of popular songs, after which 
they do a few steps in a very graceful 
manner. 

The sisters possess personal mag- 
netism that does much towards putting 
the act over, and should find the going 
easy over the route to big time. 

M. L. 



ROBINSON AND DEWEY 

Theatre — Loew'a National (try-outa). 

Style — Singing and patter. 

Time — Fifteen minutes. 

Setting — In one. 

Robinson and Dewey, two black-face 
comedians, have the usual singing and 
comedy patter act, but possess a knack 
of putting their staff over that carried 
the house. A well rendered yodeling 
song finishes their act in fine style. 

They open with one of the men doing 
colored comedy and the other straight. 
Both have strong voices and put their 
routine of songs across in good style. 
The patter is good and earns much 
laughter. They sing numbers that are 
winners and were roundly applauded. 

The boys are clever and put their act 
over with ease. M. L. 



KELO AND WELLS 

Theatre — Loeufs National {try-out a). 

Style— Singing. 

Time — Ten minutes. 

Setting — In one. 

Kelo and Wells, man and woman, have 
good voices. that blend well. 

They open with a Southern number, 
which is followed by a popular ballad 
put across by Kelo in fine style. Miss 
Wells then sings a classical number, after 
which they both put over a rube song 
that is quite impressive. M. L. 



ARTHUR AND EARLE 

Theatre — Greenpoint. 

Style — Violin and piano playing. 

Time — Thirteen minutes. 

Setting— One. 

A girl in the orchestra had foresight 
enough to bring her knitting to pass the 
time away while watching this act, 

Both the violin and piano playing is 
mediocre. The act needs a strong injec- 
tion of P-E-P. The pianist might also 
memorize some of the selections. To 
read music on the stage looks very bad. 
Although it cannot be seen from the or- 
chestra, it Is plainly visible from the 
rest of the house. 

The violinist just walks on and off 
in ah "I Should Worry" manner. Be- 
fore the act is suitable for any time it 
needs much rearrangement and consider- 
able life injected into it L. R. G. 



JANET CHILDS 

Theatre — Greeley Square. 

Style — Character singer. 

Time — Twelve minutes. 

Setting — In one. 

Janet Cbilds possesses originality as a 
character singer, offering a routine that 
is well conceived. 

The position given her on the bill of- 
fered her a chance to tickle the audience, 
and she certainly took advantage of all 
opportunities placed in her way. 

Her first number was a straight song, 
followed by a Yiddish number which she 
put over with good effect. The third 
was an Italian selection, and then a 
Robe number, which scored immediately, 
the make-up helping some in putting the 
song across. 



"THE INTRUDER** 

Theatre — Harlem Opera House. 

Style — Singing, talking, dancing. 

Time — Eighteen minutea. 

Setting— in one. 

This torn opens with a girl making an 
announcement that her partner has not 
shown up yet, and that she will try to 
entertain the audience for a while. 

Two plants in the audience then start 
a row, telling the girl to quit stalling and 
go on with the performance, or they will 
step upon the stage and show her up. 
The girl calls their bluff, and they go 
on. They render a well-selected routine 
of old-fashioned songs and dances that 
hit the mark. M. L. 



VALLE CARLE 

Theatre — Loew's National (try-outs). 

Style — Singing. 

Time — Twelve minutea. 

Setting — In one. 

Valle Carle has a pleasing soprano 
voice for solo numbers and yodeling. 

Her first number is a patriotic war 
song and possesses considerable dash. 
She sings a popular selection for her 
second number, followed by an operatic 
number which earned applause. Her 
final one is a yodeling lullaby in which 
she scores the hit of her act. 

A glance over this repertoire is enough 
to convince any one that Valle Carle 
possesses a considerable amount of ver- 
satility. M. L. 



FABIANA SISTERS 

Theatre — Proctor'a 125th St. 
Style — Singing and violin. 
Time — Ten minutea. 
Setting— In one. 

These two women have a pleasing 
routine of songs which were popular 
about five years ago. They sing them 
welL One girl plays the violin quite 
passably, accompanying her comrade as 
she sings. 

The act has not much pep nor novelty 
and does not appeal to the noisier sec- 
tions of the audience, but it has merits 
of presentation, and should get over 
mildly. P. K. 



"BIRDS IN DREAMLAND** 

Theatre— Praetor's 23rd SI. 
Style — Trained birds. 
Time — Twelve minutea. 
Setting — Special, in three. 

Mme. Warden presents a very spec- 
tacular and interesting act with her 
exceptionally well trained birds. 

Novelty distinguishes the turn rather 
than excitement, for it is quiet through- 
out The birds dance, roll balls up hill, 
fly through burning hoops and perform 
other feats. A revolving star, on the 
points of which the birds balance, is 
one of the attractive feats. A .cleverly 
devised stunt, in which a large bird is 
supposed to alight between two flags 
and spread his wings, in imitation of the 
U. S. escutcheon, was a failure when 
reviewed, for the bird persistently stood 
sideways to the shield. It should he 
pretty and interesting when it works. 

A special drop of blue cloth, against 
which a large moon and star stand out 
in relief, furnishes the background. At 
the opening, the birds are all on the 
star and crescent, and, with the rise of 
the curtain, they sing, which gets the 
act over at once. The turn should go 
especially with audiences of cultivated 
tastes. P. K. 



JOHN NEFF AND CO. 

Theatre— Proctor'a 23rd St. 

Style—Comedy. 

Time — Fifteen minute*. 

Setting — Street drop. 

A rather dismal and pointless act is 
presented by John Neff and his company 
of four. The antiquity of their mate- 
rial, the nntimeliness of their theme and 
the carelessness of presentation combine 
to make "The Exempt Army," as they 
call it, a turn of mediocre merit. The 
five men are dressed in outlandish uni- 
forms, of all periods and stages of new- ' 
ness. 

They open with a song offstage, which 
leads the house to expect a serious mili- 
tary act. On their entrance, however, 
there is a laugh. 

They then drill in burlesque fashion 
and have some dialogue, in which they 
pull the old situation in which the fierce 
looking man, of whom all are afraid, 
suddenly speaks in a high-pitched fem- 
inine voice, whereupon he is told he be- 
longs in the Red Cross. One man then 
pulls a sob recitation about the Red 
Cross, and the five sing the chorus. 
They close with a song. P. K. 



JOHNNY ECKERT AND CO. 

Theatre — Proctor'a 125ffc 

Style — Singing and talking. 

Time — Fifteen minutea. 

Setting — Special drop. 

Johnny Eckert is a boy of about six- 
teen, with a fair voice and a good stage 
presence. He is assisted by a man and 
a girl. 

The setting represents a golf course 
and it is extremely realistic and well 
done. Johnny is dressed as a caddie, 
and the girl is learning to play golf. 
Dialogue ensues, and the man enters, 
also in golfing togs. They close with a 
song in which the man imitates a trom- 
bone. 

The act is entertaining, the talk being 
all somewhat original and none of it 
crude. It is well worked out, running 
smoothly from start to finish. 



"IMPRESSIONS OF ART" 

Theatre— Fifth Ave. 

Style— Poring. 

Time — Eight minutea. 

Setting— FuU stage. 

The act opens with a girl on a raised 
pedestal in the center of the stage, 
against a white screen background. 

The poses are flashed onto her body 
from a picture machine. Amongst the 
most prominent are "The Slave Mar- 
ket" "The Butterfly." "Peacock," "The 
Angelus.' "Sport" and "The Water 
Girl." The two final ones, "The Statue 
of Liberty" and "The Spirit of '76," re- 
ceived much applause. 

The act is a picturesque one and 
should be a good opener in neighborhood 
houses. M. L. 



36 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



December 5, 1917 



MANAGERS ATTENTION!! 



RADIUM CHEMICAL COMPANY. 



MS NOKTH CLARK STMET 



tlif •■ axaaanuj WlHi ttU **•* 1 •»"* TlrtU* ■ (raat. but 
U«ini aa «J jiaiaij aiseaaal «*a> aawla. aapealallT nifcfilli, 
tatt aaT** aaaa a ar-vat wq *-**■■ aaaj —» ! ■*■■■ In «11 af Ua 

PHI tl'.l». 

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•an MU y«aa> 

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[.wwllj, or aaaf I— aaT, I tarra Uam VM« -«J Of ax^n-a-slr^ 
■7 rtawa mat waialaa, ■■»" •*■* ' •*" • «»» " 1 «" aai i| iBlaaaaa. 
Taw* far aaaaaaa. 



4^^^^^^r^f 



WANT COMPOSER V. ONCE 



To ftrl " nw .wric 



pay for 



<rk to suit composer 



For Fjull information,. Rdc3r<?£$: 
LOUIS PASCIUT! MUSKS PUB., 179 Wash. Ave, New Roctielle, N. Y. 



Wanted for the Brooks Stock Co. 

SUPPORTING MAUDE TOMLINSON 

General business asanas, prefer one to handle stage; second woman to play some 
leads. Others write. Appearance necessary. Don't misrepresent. Join 'at once. 
Address JACK BROOKS, Bijou Theatre, Greenbay, Wisconsin. 

WANTCD-Stock Location-lmmediately 

For LOU WHITNEY and Associate PLAYERS. A recognized GUARANTEED stock organization, 
up in all late Royalty Releases — thoroughly equipped with scenery, properties, electrical effects. 
FEATURE WARDROBE. Have brass and novelty frames for lobby. 40 weeks Anderson, Ind, 
Wire, phone or write quick, Welsh A Walboura, Holland, Mich. 

WANTED 

FOR VAUDEVILLE 

Immediate Booking — Comics, straights, character men and women, sonbrettea. Ingenues, specialty people, 
pianists, Tlollnlsta, musicians of all kinds, singers, dancers. Can also place good acts Immediately. State 
all first letter, enclosing photographs. E. W. WOIT , Globe Theatre Building, Philadelphia. 

SAVANNAH & GEORGIA 



Now Splitting with 



t. New Orleans, lj>, and Cant 
Direction Harry Sham. 



at, HattJeaburg. Miss. 



Supreme Contralto— Vaudeville's Youngest Character Comedienne 

In ap-to-data srnnTaa by Harry Von Tusar and Loo Klein. Direction— SAMUEL. BAERWTTZ 



THOMAS E. 



JULIANA 



CHAPPELLE and STINNETTE 



Two Dark Spots of Harmony 

Direction — Pat Casey -Will lam Morris 



Three EDDY Sisters 

Staging — Dancing — Costume Changes 

"A STUDY IN DAINTINESS" 

b Vaudeville. Direction Chas. Wilton. 



HOWARD & LYMAN 

DANCERS THAT ARE DIFFERENT 



VAUDEVILLE BILLS 

(Continued from page 2S) 



Lorella. (Last Halt)— Pan tier Duo — Six Colonial 
Belles— Great AH Knma 4 Co. 

SIOUX CUT, IA. 

Princess (First Half) — Lo Foo Troope. (Last 
Half)— Weston Trio— Billy Small. 
12-15) — Kenny & La France — Bernard A Merrirt — 
Knlgbt, Benson A HoUoway — "Camp In the 
Rookies". — George P. Hall — Doneaettl Troupe. 
BITJ.IMGB, MONT. 

Baboook (Dec. 13)— Juggling Delude— Leonard A 
Haley — Hay A Billy Earl— Nick Santoro A Co. — 
Bert Draper — Gandell Sisters A Co. (Dec. 19-17) — 
Bice, Bell A Baldwin — Mildred Hayward — Orr A 
Hager— Minerva Courtney A Co. — Jack George Duo 
— "Vlalona of Art."- 

BLO0MTHGT0N, ILL. 

Majeatio (First Half)— Lewis A Leopold— "Toe 
Dairy Maids" — Dare Manley— Plplfax A Paulo. 
(Last Half) — Dancing Tyrrella — Valida A Brarlllian 
Nuts — The Slacker — Schoen A Walton — Thalero'a 
Circus. 

CEDAB BA1MDB, IOWA. 

Majeatio (First Half) — Jack A Kitty Dcmaco — 
Maodie Deiong— Orth A Cody — Arthur Blgby — 
Oliver A Olp— Three Bobs. (Last Half) — DeBom-g 
Sisters— Morely A McCarthy Slaters— "All Girl 

Revue." 

COUNCIL BLUFFS, IOWA. 
Nicholas (First Half) — Merle's Cockatoos — Bai- 
ley A Porter— Howard A Graff — Gns Erdman. (Last 
Half)— DeVesa, Dell A Joe— Mann A Mallory. 
CANTON, ILL. 
Princess (Last Half) — June A Irene Melva — Mr. 
A Mrs. Wm. O'Clare — Lew Hoffman — Hector A 
Pala. 

CHICAGO, ILL. 

Windsor (First Half) — "Mimic World." (Last 
Half) — Laypo A Benjamin — Hager A Goodwin — 
Marshall Montgomery A Co. — Henry A Moore. 

Avenue (First Half) — Edwards A Louise — Senna 
A Weber — Wilson A Wilson — Taber A Green — 
Novelty Clintons. 

Kedxio (First Half) — Hayatake Bros.— Wilton 
Sisters— Edale A Ramsden— Plsano A Bingham— 
Walter Baker A Co. (Last Half)— Lucille A 
Cockle — "French Soldier" — Hardy A Wilson — The 
Veterans — Boch Bros. 

'Wilson (First Half) — MeConnell A Austin — Flake 
A Fallon — Marshal] Montgomery A Co. — Backer A 
Winifred— Page, Hack A Mack. (Last Half)— 
Badle-A Ramsden— Emily Darrell A Co. — "Fas- 
cinating Fllrta," 

DULUTH, HTNN, 

New Grand (First Half) — Calvert-Tracy — Hold en 
A Harron — "After the Party" — Clover Leaf Trio — 
Avallon Troupe. (Last Half)— Bexo— Brigga A Ar- 
dunel — Marcen — Hippodrome Four. 
DTTBUairE, IOWA. 

Majestic (First Half)— "AD Girl Revue." (Last 
Half) — Wm. DeHolUa A Co.— FlBke A Fallon — 
Maodie DeLong — Al White A Co. — Charles Wilson 
— Jack A Kitty Demaeo. 

EAST 8T. LOUIS, ILL. 

Ertwr's (First Half) — Balancing Stevens — Finn A 
Finn — Harry Bose — "Flirtation." (Last Half) — 
Helen Savage A Co. — Austin A Bailey— May A 
Kllduff — Sextette DeLuxe. 

FONT DODGE, IOWA. 

Princess (First Half) — De Voy A Dayton — Frank 
Ward — "Temptation." (Last Half)— Boothby A 
Everdesn — Lawrence A Edwards — Ed A Jack 
Smith — Three Bennett Sisters. 

FORT -WILLIAM, CAB. 

Orphenm (Dec 14-15) — Calvert-Tracy— "After 
the Party" — Clover Lead Trnl — Avallon Troupe. 
GRAND FORKS. N. D, 

Grand (Last Half )— Panl Patching A Co. — Fred 
A Mae WadueH — Five Funsters. 

GREAT FALLS, KONT. 

Palace (Dec. 8-9) — Kenny A LaFrance — Bernard 
A Merrltt— Knlgbt, Benson A HoUoway — "Camp In 
the Rookies" — George F. Hall — Boonessitti Tronpe. 
(Dec. 13) — Alvares Dno — Rosalie Aaher — Walsh A 
Rand — "A Night with the Poeta" — Lew Ward- 
Shanghai Trio. 

IOWA CTTT, IOWA. 

Englert (Last Half )— Silver A DnVal— Watson A 
Little— Demareet A Collette— Two Bobs. 
JOLXET, ILL. 

Orphanm (Last Half) — Walter Baker A Co. — 
Lewis A Leopold— Whitfield A Ireland— Backer A 
Winlfrid— The Blab. 

LINCOLN, NEB. 

Lyrlo (First Half)— Demarest A Collette— Booth 
A Leander. (Last Half) — "Zlg Zag Revue." 
MASON CTTT, IOWA. 

Regent (First Half) — Colombia City Four— anas 
Vagge A Co.— Tiller Sister— Watson A Little. (Last 
Half) — Howard A Graf — Jaa. A. Dunn. 

MINNEAPOLIS, aONH. 

New Palace — Maxlme Bros. A Bobby — Lnckle A 
Tost— Will Stanton A Co. — Royal Italian Sextette 
— Markee A Montgomery. 

New Grand— Black A O'Donnell— Conway A Day 
— Arthur La Vine A Co. — Cliff Bailey Duo. 

_ HORTH YAKIMA, WASH. 
Empire (Dec. 9-10) — Chester Johnson — Fox A 
Evans— Xylo Phlends— Develln A Miner— Pearl 
Bros. A Burns — The Rlva-Laraen Troupe. (Dec. 
14-18) — Loralne A Mitchell— Leever A LeRoy — "The 
Pool Room" — Three Melody Girls — The Angelas 
Trio — Dudley Trio. 

OMAHA. NEB. 
Empress (First Hill)— Silver A Duval— Zlx Zag 
Revue. (Last Half) — Bertie Ford— DeVoy A Day- 
ton — "1917 Winter Garden Berne." 



OAKLAND, CAL. 

Hippodrome (Dec. 9-10) — Hannah A Pardner 

Five Young Americana. — McCormack A Shannon — ' 
George Evers — Aerial Bartletts — Carle A Inez. * 
(Dee. 12-13) — Artane — Garnella Duo — Foster A V 
Foster — "Ten Dark Knights" — Frlsh, Howard A I 
Toolln — Randow Trio. ■"<* 

PORTLAND, ORE. , 

Hippodrome (First Half) — Mooehan A Mcmahan 
—Cook A Hamilton— Carle A Le Claire — Gene 
Knight's Symphony Belles — Link A Robinson — 
Costa Troope. (Last Half) — The Totos — Vincent 
A Carter — Seven Variety Dancers— A medio — Bar- 
ney First — Alice Teddy A Co. 

PEORIA, ILL. 

Orphean (First Half) — Roy A Arthur — June 
Mllbs — The Slacker — Schoen A Walton — Hawaiian *- 
Serenade. (Last Half)— Plplfax A Paolo— Ed A- 
Irene Lowrey — The Dairy Maids — Jim McWllllanuy 
— Karl Emmy's Peta. 

vnnj ill. 

Orphanm (First Half) — Irving Gossler — The Cor- 
ner Store — Bemie A Baker — Two Blondys. ' (Laal 
Half)— "Six Little Wives." 

REOEH A, CAN. 

Regies (Last Half) — Dorothy DeSchelle A Co.— 
Fagg A White — Calvin A Thornton — DeKoch 
Tronpe. • 

SASKATOON, CAN. 

Empire (First Half) — Dorothy DeSchelle A Co. 
—Fagg & White — Calvin A Thornton— DeKoch 
Tronpe, 

8T. PAUL, MINN. 

New Palace (First Half)— Bexo— Brigga A 
Ardonel — Marcelle — Hippodrome Foot — Three 
Alexas. (Last Half)— Two Edwards — Marchant 

Prince. 

SUPERIOR, WIS. 

Palace (First Half)— Lew Burns A Sisters — " 
Maggie Le Clair A Co.— Kartelll— The Van Campa, ■ 
(Last Half) — Millard Bros. — w aim an A Berry — 
DeForreat Bros A Falke— Three Alexas. 
ST. LOU1B, no. 

Grand (First Half) — Alien A Allen— Coacla A? 
Verdi — Coy DeTrlckey — Jerry A Gretcben O'Meara. 
— Zemater A Smith — Neal Abel — "To Save One 
Girl" — Ward A Raymond — Stewart's Girl Revue. 

Empress (First Half)— Joele O'Meeras — Charles 
A Madelyn Dnnbar — McCormack A Wallace — Med- 
lln. Watts A Towns. (Last Half) — Zennalne A 
Zermaine — "A Hawaiian Serenade" — "Jolly, Wild 
A Co." — Sebastian Merrill A Co. 

Park (First Half)— "Merry Go Round." (Last 
Half) — Kelso Bros. — "Flirtation" — Foley A Oneal 
— Tnomaa Trio. 

Columbia — Willie Smith Saxton A Clinton — La- 
sots A Gilmore — "Tennessee Trio" — Doc Baker A 
His "Magazine Girls." 

BAN JOBE, CAL. 

Victory (Dec 9-U) — Artane— Garnella Duo- 
Foster A Foster — "Ten Dark Knights" — Frlah, 
Howard A Toolln — Randow Trio. (Dec. 12-15)— 
Fisher's Circus — Byrd A Harvey — Eastman A 
Moore — Captain Kidder A Co. — Dan Ahearn — 
"Maiy'a Day Out." 

SPOKANE, WASH. 
..Hippodrome (Dee. 9-11) — saaaaag Venules — Fol- 
lett A wicks — Marshall A Covert — Kelly Wilder 
A Co.— Jere Sanford— Three Beitals. (Dec. 12-15) 
— Violet A Charles^ — Kllsby A Geneva — Dolly Ben- 
nett A Young — Zunn A Drels — Swain's Cockatoos. 

BACBAatENTO, CAL. 

Empress (Dec. 6-11)— Fisher's Circus — Byrd A 
Harvey — Eastman A Moore — Captain Kidder A Co. 
— Dan Ahearn — "Mary's Day Oat." (Dee. 12-15) 
— Buster A Eddy — Frank A Watert — Thornton A 
Thornton — Corty Sisters — Fred Rogers — Three 
Rlanoa. 

BAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Casino (First Half) — Harry Davis— Walton A 
Brandt — Slgmnnd A Manning — George Matlson — 
Flsler A Cole — Two Carltons. (Last Half)— Flying 
LaMars — Wagner A Whiting — Grace Linden — Best 
Mortor A Kerr — Van A Yorke — Six Moorish Arabs. 
SEATTLE, WASH. 

Palace Hippodrome (Dec. 9-12) — The Totos — 
Vincent A Carter — Seven Variety Dancers — Amedlo 
'-Barney First— Alice Teddy A Co. (Dec. 13-15— 
Hicks A Hart— Two Brownies— Paul Earl— Sor- 
rento Quintette — Jones A Jones — The Brads. 

U/AUTrn Lady with a good moHeal act Must 
Ft ran I 1-1/ be able to slug and work with com- 
edian and doable Piano. Make salary low as it is 
sure. Answer, fun particulars, instruments yon 
play. Send photos, will be returned. W. E, BON- 
NELAT, General Delivery, Worcester, Mass. 



A N old-time' hunter 
" and trapper from 
northern Canada caroc 
in to see the show at 
Edmonton and said: 
"It would be more 
pleasure to shoot some 
of the actors I have 
seen than it would 
birds, after seeing the 
intelligence in 

MABEL 

NAYNON'S 
BIRDS" 

Pantagea Theatre, Vancouver, Week of Dae 1*. 




CLYDE PrULLJPS, 

Manager 



TENNEY 



A vaudeville writer of regular vaudeville act*, 
sketches and monologues. Write, wire, 'phone or 
call. Allen Spencer Tenney, 1493 Broadway, N. Y. 



December 5, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



17 




FILM MEN ARE 

SEEKING CUT 

INTAX 

MANY COMPLAINTS HEARD 



Washington, D. C. Dee. 3. — This city 
is to be the scene of a convention of all 
the motion picture exhibitors and manufac- 
turers to be held on Dec 11, 12 and 13, to 
decide the steps to be taken to alleviate 
the crisis forming from the enforcement 
of the war tax. 

Harry M. Crandall, proprietor of a large 
chain of theatres, was elected chairman 
of the committee to make the arrange- 
ments, and has selected the Hotel Har- 
rington as the headquarters for the con- 
vention. 

Crandall states that "the exhibitors all 
through the country are complaining of 
the fiwunrful effects the tax has had on 
their business. At the meeting in question 
we shall determine the course to be taken 
at the next Congress and the plan of action 
to pursue." 

As a true-hearted American citizen, it 
is bis belief that the vast power of the 
motion picture should be used to its fullest 
capacity to further the war activities of 
this country. He further states that, as 
chairman of the National War Co-Opera- 
tion Commission, he did all in his power 
to aid in the disposal of Liberty Bonds, 
and almost nightly had a different speaker 
upon food conservation in his theatres. 

"We are in the war to win, and the 
Government can rely on the picture indus- 
try to do its bit," he said. 



ANITA STWART LOSES APPEAL 

The Appellate Division of the Supreme 
Court last Friday affirmed the decision of 
the lower court granting an injunction to 
the VitagTaph Company restraining Anita 
Stewart from appearing for any other 
producer pending the suit which Miss 
Stewart has brought against the film con- 
cern in which she alleges the Vitagrapb 
Company has failed to make a proper ac- 
counting to her. 



JOE LEO IS PROMOTED 

Joe Leo, of the Fox offices, has been ap- 
pointed assistant manager of the Fox Cir- 
cuit. Leo was at one time closely asso- 
ciated with Fox in the latter" a pioneer days 
in the show business. 



CLARA YOUNG GETS ANOTHER 

Clara Kimball Young has secured the 
screen rights for "The House of Glass," 
the stage success of a few years ago. The 
part selected for her affords a rare oppor- 
tunity for emotional acting. "The Marion- 
ettes," now being completed, will be re- 
leased around the holidays, through Select. 



BLACTSTON GOING WEST 

J. Stuart Blackton is preparing to go 
West, where he will make "Wild Youth" 
at the Lasky studios. Following his de- 
parture "The 'World For Sale" will be 
translated to the screen to be released 
through Paramount some time in January. 



HAL REID WRITING TITLES 

Hal Reid, the playwright and author of 
numerous successes, is re-editing the titles 
for Wm. S. Hart as "The Two Gun Man" 
in "The Bargain," which will be shortly 
released on a state rights basis. 

CHOOSE PENNINGTON SCRIPT 

"Cavalary Alley" will be the next ve- 
hicle for Ann Pennington. It is a story 
filled with pathos, comedy and human in- 
terest. Charles Giblyn is in charge of di- 
rection. 



MARGUERITE CLARK HONORED 

Her good work, done in the last Liberty 
Loan, having been instrumental in secur- 
ing $15,000,000, Marguerite Clark has re- 
ceived a letter from Oscar Price, director 
of -publicity, praising her for her work. 
C. W. Williams, vice-president of the 
Fourth National Bank of Cincinnati, also 
versed his praises of her good work. H. 
R. Probasoo, a prominent attorney, was 
another of the many notables who compli- 
mented her. 



FORM NEW FILM COMPANY 

By means of a contract signed by both 
parties, William Christy Cabanne and 
Adolph Lnbin have become associated in 
a film enterprise. Cabanne was formerly 
one of Metro's leading directors. 

Through the contract arrangements, a 
series of pictures will be released bearing 
the title of Cabanne Super Enterprises, 
Inc. Lnbin has been an active factor in 
the recent sales campaign covering "The 
Warrior," and, at one time, was the holder 
of the Metro franchise for the Dominion 
of Canada. 



"EMPTY POCKETS" READY 

"Empty Pockets," upon which Herbert 
Brenon has been working since the com- 
pletion of "The Fall of the Romanoffs," is 
ready for release. It is his fourth pro- 
duction this year. 

The cast of the picture includes Barbara 
Castleton, Bert Lytell, Malcolm Williams, 
Ketty Galanta, Peggy Betts, Susanne 
Willa, Ben Graham, and Thornton 
Bastion. 



TRIANGLE NAMES WINNERS 

After going over approximately 50.000 
letters received in the "Neglected Wife" 
contest, founded upon Pathe's serial of 
the same name, the winners have been an- 
nounced. The first prize was $1,000, 
awarded to Mrs. Louise Detlefe. The sec- 
ond prize was $500, awarded to Miss Anne 
Gordon. Five other prizes of $100 each 
were also awarded. 

The judges of the contest were Mabel 
Herbert Urner, the author; J. A. Berst, 
and Louis Joseph Vance. 



CONVICTS SEE PETROVA 

Madame Petrova's picture, "Daughter of 
Destiny," was shown to the convicts at 
Sing Sing prison Thanksgiving evening. 

The making of a new print was neces- 
sary and Madame Petrova donated one as 
a contribution to the diversion and uplift 
of the Mutual' Welfare League. Arrange- 
ments are under way whereby the League 
will get the rest of the forthcoming Petrova 
pictures for a showing. 



SELECT HAS NEW MANAGER 

J. S. Woody has been appointed gen- 
eral manager of the Pacific Northwest ter- 
ritory for Select and has already left for 
Seattle, where he will take charge. For 
the past six months be was Chicago man- 
ager of the Triangle, which position ha 
resigned to take up his new assignment. 



ARTCRAFT DOING MAETERLINCK 

The Artcraft Company has in coarse of 
production a version of Maeterlinck's play, 
"The Blue Bird," which is being directed 
by Maurice Tonrnenr. Those appearing in 
it are not yet known. It will be released 
as a regular feature on the program. 

CLEOPATRA TO CLOSE 

"Les Mlserables," the William Fox fea- 
ture in which William Farnum is starred, 
will succeed the Theda Bara version of 
"Cleopatra" at the Lyric Theatre. 



WOODS BUYS CONTRACT 
A. H. Woods has bought a 45 per cent 
interest in "Free and Equal," an Ince 
picture. 



FILM NEWS CONDENSED 



.j 



il 



"Who's Your Neighbor" has been pro- 
hibited from showing in Los Angeles. 



Orral Humphreys has returned to the 
American Film Company after a year's 
absence. 



Gladys Leslie has started work on her 
second starring production for Vitagraph. 
It is as yet untitled. 



Wheeler Oakman, who played opposite 
Mae Murray, has been drafted for the new 
National Army. 

Norma Talmadge, having finished her 
picture "Ghosts of Yesterday," has gone 
to Atlantic City for a rest. 



Wm. S. Hart's picture, "The Bargain," 
was shown to the inmates of Sing Sing 
last week. 



George Kelson, brother of Harley Knoles, 
will assist him in making his next picture, 
"Sealed Orders." 



The name of Alice Bray's next picture 
is "Woman and Wife." It is an adapta- 
tion of "Jane Eyre." 



"Thais," the Goldwyn production of 
Anatole France's novel, in which Mary 
Garden is starred, was finished last week 
on schedule time. It is now being titled. 



Dr. Lulu Peters has protested against 
the showing of "Birth," the eugenic film, 
on the grounds that it is ruinous to public 
morals. 



George C. Bertholon has been made as- 
sistant to Aubrey M. Kennedy, Goldwyn 
director. Bertholon has been with Gold- 
wyn since its formation. 



Madame Jeanne Jomelli, the Dutch 
prima donna, visited the Triangle studios 
last week in company with her husband, 
Henry Backus. 



Fair weather has halted the departure 
of Constance Talmadge for the coast, as 
her next picture, the "Studio Girl," re- 
quires many rain scenes. 

The Vitagraph Blue Ribbon feature for 
the week of Dec. 10 will be "The Marriage 
Speculation," in which Wilfred Manning 
and Wallace McDonald are featured. Ash- 
ley Miller directed. 



The members of the Ontario Board of 
Censors visited the Goldwyn studies in 
Fort Lee last week, and watched Mae 
Marsh, Mabel Normand and others at 
work. 



The Fifth avenue costumer, J. Hickson, 
has been engaged to supervise some scenes 
in the coming Goldwyn feature, in which 
Mabel Normand is to star. His work will 
be in the way of supplying atmosphere and 
gowns. 



Margaret Allen is a recent addition to 
the American staff and the first thing she 
did was to organize a sweater club, with 
Miss Minter as president. Fifteen sweat- 
ers have been promised to be sent to the 
former American Film Employees who are 
now at Camp Lewis, American Lake, 
Washington. 



Twelve hundred soldiers and their 
friends attended the showing of "The 
Scarlet Car" and "The Wolf and His 
Mate" at the Broadway Theatre Thanks- 
giving afternoon . and night. They were 
guests of the manager, L. J. Friedlander. 



Thos. H. Ince is to build a $300,000 
studio at Culver City. 



S. L. Rothapfel was a guest of Thomas 
H. Ince at his studio in California. 



William Russell will film a new variety 
of fight in hia next picture, "In Bad." 

Geraldine Farrar's next picture, "The 
Devil Stone," will be released Dec. 17. It 
is already finished. 



The title of the Dec. 1 release of the 
King-Bee Film Corporation picture is "The 
Band Master," starring Billy West 



An expensive ball room set will be used 
in the next Margarita Fischer picture, 
"Molly Go Get "Em." 

"Rimroek Jones" will be the next Wal- 
lace Reid Picture. It is a story of the 
'Western copper mines. 

Klever Pictures' next Victor Moore com- 
edy will be released on Dec. 17. It la 
called "The Installment Plan." 



William S. Hart is back at work again, 
having recovered from his recent injuries. 
His next picture has been changed from 
the "Bloodhound" to "Dead or Alive." 



The King-Bee Film Corporation an- 
nounces the release early in January of 
a two-reel feature comedy starring Billy 
West, with the scenes laid in the Orient 



Virginia Foltz, well known Los Angeles 
clubwoman, has been engaged for an im- 
portant part in "Evidence," a forthcoming 
Triangle feature of unusual interest. 



S. L. Rothapfel returned last week from 
a three weeks' trip to the Grand Canyon 
and California. 



Harold Lockwood and Company are in 
North Conway, N. H., making exterior 
scenes for his next picture, "The Avenging 
Trail." 



Constance Talmadge, star of "Scandal," 
made a personal appearance in Greenwich, 
Conn., while her picture was being shown 
there. 



Charles Brabin -has finished his second 
picture, "Red, White and Blue Blood," 
with Bushman and Bayne in the stellar 
roles. 

George Le Gnere, now appearing In 
"Business Before Pleasure" at the Eltlnge, 
has been engaged by Herbert Brenon to 
play the role of Christopher Penny, In 
"The Passing of the Third Floor Back," 
with Sir Johnston Forbes-Robertson. 



The Triangle program for the week of 
Dec. 9 offers "Fanatics," with J. Barney 
in the leading role, supported by Olga 
Grey and Donald Fullen. "The Learnin' 
of Jim Benton," with Roy Stewart as the 
star and Fritzi Ridgeway supporting, will 
follow. 



Wallace Reid, Lasky star, will make a 
trip to New York as soon as he finishes 
the picture he is now working on. He 
will stop at all the important cities from 
Frisco to New York. Kenneth McGaffey, 
publicity man, will go with him. 



An announcement comes from the offices 
of the General Film Company, this week, 
to the effect that an O. Henry Christmas 
story has been completed. The title is 
"Whistling Dick's Christmas Stocking," a 
two-reel feature that will be released on 
Dec. 22. George Cooper and Adele De 
Garde are to be featured. 



38 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



December 5, 1917 



"MOLLY ENTANGLED" 

Paramount. 
Released November 18 by Pmrwmount. 

Cast 

M oily Shawn Vivian U mrHm 

Barney MaUme Barrinn Ford 

Bkmwn Noah Beery 

Jim Barry G. S. BpavWng 

Mr,. Barry Helen Dunbar 

O'Mara C. B. Gowland 

Mrs. O'Mara Jane Keckley 

Leary..., W. A. Carrott 

Story. — Romantic Drama of Ireland, by- 
Edith Kennedy. Directed by Bobert 
Thranby. Featuring Vivian Martin and 
Harrison Ford. 

Remarks. 

An old family feud ia the main issue of 
this story. 

Old Mr. Barry, in his will, provided 
that, should bis son not many and settle 
down in a certain time, when he dies, his 
land and property go to the (XMaras. 
Jim, the son, ia hitting the high spots and 
ia on the way to the hereafter pretty 
fast. Molly, the daughter of the black- 
smith, who ia a beneficiary of the Barry 
family, is in love with Barney Malone, 
a farmer. 

During one of his usual wild nights, Jim 
is overanxious to fill himself with wine, 
with the result that he is dangerously in- 
jured and is not expected to live till morn- 
ing. In order to save the property, a 
marriage is performed between Molly and 
Jim. 

In the meanwhile, O'Mara is making 
money by running an illegal still. IBs 
partner, Leary, who is wanted by the 
police, in order to escape them, assumes 
the role of a priest, and is forced to per- 
form the marriage, for fear of being dis- 
covered. 

It develops then that Jim will recover 
in a month, if a slight operation is per- 
formed. Molly is therefore in a precarious 
position, having already promised her 
hand to Barney. O'Mara learns of the 
mock marriage between Jim and Molly, 
and, overhearing the doctor say that any 
excitement would kill Jim, who is full of 
whiskey, starts a fight with him. 

Barney, interrupting, brings Jim home, 
and there he meets Molly, who tells him 
her heart is breaking, but she must do 
the right thing. Meanwhile, Leary has 
been . caught, and O'Mara, too, has been 
pulled in for running the still. In order 
to save himself, Lenry tells Jim of the 
mock marriage, and forces him to give him 
money. Jim, overhearing* the conversation 
of Molly and Barney, turns Leary over to 
the police, and explains that Molly is free. 
Molly, overjoyed, asks Barney when the 
priest will return to town, and all ends 
happily. The scenery in this production is 
really beautiful, and the support good. 

Box Office Value. 
Two or three days at the most. Play 
strong in Irish neighborhood. 



FEATURE FILM REPORTS | 



"DOOR BETWEEN" 

Cast. 

Heloite Croker Ruth Clifford 

Anthony Ive* Eckhart.. Monroe Salisbury 
Archibald Croker. ...George A. McDanieU 
Sir Robert W. H. Bainbridge 

Story— -Dramatic, from novel by Samual 
Merwin, produced for Bluebird by Ru- 
pert Julian, featuring Huth Clifford and 
Monroe Salisbury. 



This story deals with the eternal tri- 
angle. 

Anthony, Sir Robert and Croker meet in 
a Japanese Geisha house. Croker is 
drunk, but Anthony finally succeeds in get- 
ting him to a room, and lea-jos his story, 
wMch is that Croker's wife ran away with 
another man to study music. He is fol- 
lowing them and will kill them both, he 
says. 

Anthony is a scientist who is trying to 
get records of Chinese and Japanese music. 
Disappointed in Japan, he leaves for 
China. While sitting in his room there 
he hears a voice singing in perfect pitch. 
In his enthusiasm, he breaks through the 
door, and, after some talk, interests the 
woman who was singing in his venture. 
They make records, and also love. Sir 
Robert, who is also in the hotel, points 
out to Anthony that the woman, Heloise, 
is Croker's wife, and that Croker is in the 
city. Heloise, when told of this by Sir 
Robert, attempts to take her life, but An- 
thony prevents it. Anthony then goes to 
see Croker, who is drunk, as usual, and 
argues with him to give up his wife, as he, 
Anthony, who loves her, will also do, for 
her own good. 

Croker says he will answer in an hour, 
at the end of which time he arrives at 
Anthony's hotel, drunk, and armed with a 
Japanese knife. Anthony, in order to pre- 
vent trouble, breaks Croker's leg, who kills 
himself on the way to the hospital. 

Anthony then tries to make Heloise go 
to Paris and study for the opera, but she 
purposely misses her train. He is down- 
cast, but when she puts her head on his 
shoulder all ends happily. 

Box Office Value. 
Regular program. Play strong in family 
theatres. 



"THE JUDGMENT HOUSE" 

Paramount Feature. Six Reels. 

Relcaied November 19 by Paramount. 

Cast 

Rudyard Byng Wilfred Lucas 

Ian Stafford Conway Tearle 

Adrian Fellowes Paul Doucet 

Krool Crazy Thunder 

Jasmine Orenfel Violet Beming 

AVmah ■. Florence Deshon 

Lou -. Luciel Hamill 

Story — Dramatic Taken from the novel 
of the same name by Sir Gilbert Parker. 
Picturized and directed by J. Stuart 
Blockton. Featuring Violet . Heming, 
Wilfred Lucas and Conway Tearle. 

Bemarka. 
As a novel "The Judgment House" was 
popular; aa a picture it may not reach 
the Bame height of form. But it is certain 
to find a large number of admirers, for it 
is produced in Blockton's finished style 
and a story by Sir Gilbert Parker is sure 
of attention. 

Without question "The Judgment 
House" reads better than it acts, for the 
weakness of the leading characters, so 
marked in the picture, is not noticed in 
the book. And it is this lack of character 
of two of the central figures that prevents 
this Blackton picture from being among 
the leading feature films of the month. 

The story is based on the old familiar 
triangle — husband, wife and lover — with 
the wife innocent of actual wrong-doing, 
but a weak, vascillating creature who 
scarcely knows her own mind and is con- 
tinually wavering between the two men. 
The lover is a cad who, when he believes 
that the woman has strayed with a man 
ether than himself, tries to assume a vir- 
tue be has not, and bids her go her way. 
On the battlefield of South Africa the 
lover dies and the at-last-repentant wife 
flies to the arms of her hgsband, whose 
chief weakness is bis blind trust in 
women. 

The acting, direction and camera work 
are excellent. 

Box Office Value. 
Full run. 



"THE RAGGEDY QUEEN" 

Bluebird. Five Reds. 
Released December 3rd. 

Cast. 

Tetters Violet Mersereau 

"Crazy Anne" Grace Barton 

Hugh Tilison DonmU Baa 

Tom Brennon Robert P. Bin 

LeM Braxton Charles Slattery 

Father Andre James O'Neill 

David Grant Frank Otto 

Remarks 
"Tatters" has been taught that her 
mother was a queen, and her father a king. 
She believes she is a princess and rules the 
village in that manner. 

Braxton is a trouble maker who stirs up 
a labor mixup. 

Hugh Tilison is a wealthy mine owner. 
Brennon, his superintendent, writes him 
that the men are surly and asks for power 
to settle impending trouble. Tilison sends 
his secretary Grant, to the scene who start* 
things by whipping Braxton. The secre- 
tary then tries to settle the trouble, but 
Braxton interferes again and is whipped 
and fired by Brennon. 

"Tatters" and Grant fall in love. Brax- 
ton attacks Grant while he is fishing and 
throws him down a cliff. "Tatters" finds 
him and brings bim home. He recovers 
slowly. 

Meanwhile, Tilison is visiting the mines. 
and ia in Brennon's office when Braxton, 
to revenge himself, cuts the stakes under 
it and is going to pull it down, when 
"Tatters" spieB him and tries to stop him, 
meanwhile shouting for help. 

The men leave the office just as the build- 
ing falls. Tilison -then discovers that 
"Tatters" is his long lost daughter, and 
all ends happily. 

Box Office Value, 

Program feature. 



"TREASURE ISLAND" 

Fox Kiddie Features. 
Cast. 

Jim Hawkins Francis Carpenter 

Virginia Trelawney. .Virginia Lee Corbm 

Captain Smollett Buddy Messinger 

Long John Silver Violet Radcliffe 

Story — Adaptation of Stevenson's famous 
novel so as to be suitable for children's 
entertainments. Directed and produced 
for Wm. Fox by C. and S. A. Franklin. 

Remarks. 

This is an adaptation of the famous 
story by Stevenson, arranged in such a 
manner as to make it interesting for the 
kiddies. It does not follow the lines of 
the original story closely enough, however, 
to be of any value as a school feature. 

The story of John Silver's hunt for 
Flint's treasure, and the hunt of Squire 
Trelawney for the same is too well known 
to need repeating here. The work _ of the 
kiddies is well done, that of Francis Car- 
penter being exceptionally good. 
Box Office Value. 

Full run in neighborhood full of chil- 
dren. 



"THE WOLF AND HIS MATE" 

Cast. 

Donald Baynv Bart Iloxie. 

Steve Nolan George R. O'Dett 

Bess Nolan .Louise Lovely 

Vida Burnt Betty Schade 

Rose Nolan George French 

"Snaky" Burns Hector Dion 

Story — Western romance. Written by 

Julia -Maier. Produced by J. LeSaint 

for Bluebird Pictures, starring Louise 

Lovely and Hart Hoxle. 
Remarks. 

This is the story of a fight by two men 
over a piece of property and of the taming 
of a wild spirit by a woman. 

Bayne, "The Wolf," has been beaten by 
Nolan in their fight for the land, and 
leaves town. When he comes back Nolan 
is dead, and the property is in the hands 
of his niece. Bayne, who does not fight 
with women, tries to get the land by forc- 
ing Bess, who owns it, to marry him. 
This, however, gives her equal rights, and 
he is beaten again. 

Burns is a crook who needs Bess' little 
niece in his plans, and tries to steal her. 
He fails, however, and when he tries it 
the second time the "Wolf and Bess, who 
now understand each other better, tell the 
sheriff that Burns is the crook he has been 
looking for. All ends well. 

Louise Lovely is charming as Bess, and 
Hart Hoxie is a fine "good-bad-man." Hec- 
tor Dion makes Burns detestable and Betty 
Schade does well in a small part. George 
French makes a fine little girl. All ban- 
die their parts satisfactorily. On the 
whole, a fair neighborhood feature. 
Box Office Value. 
One day. Louise Lovely should be 
played strong. S. K. 



"THE SUDDEN GENTLEMAN" 

Triangle. Five Reels. 

Released December 2 by Triangle. 

Cast 

Garry Garrity Wm. Desmond 

Louise Evans Mary Melvor 

Count Louis Cammmetti. .Jaok Richardson 

Mrs. Bawtry Margaret ShiUtngford 

Geo. Douglas ; A. BoUingswortb 

Edward Douglas Donald Fulltn 

Mrs. Burns Alberta Lee 

Rafferty Walter Perry 

Old Miles Percy Challenger 

Story— Dramatic. Written by R. Cecil 
Smith. Scenario by Joseph Anthony 
Roach. Directed by Thos. N. Heffron.- 
Featuring William Desmond. 

Remarks. 
The story starts out well and holds in- 
terest for the first three reels. It then 
goes to pieces by the introduction of a too 
palpable attempt to have the hero com- 
promise a woman in a notorious road- 
house and thus prevent his marriage to 
the heroine. The expedient is clumsily 
thrown in and is futile, insomuch as no 
compromising situation is shown. 

The story tells of Garry Garrity, a 
young Irishman, who is brought to Amer- 
ica from his native land through the 
death of his uncle, who has made him his 
heir. Louise Evans, step -daughter of the 
deceased, and Garry soon fall in love and 
a designing count, Louis Carominetti, 
schemes to have Garry compromise Mrs. 
Hawtry by taking her to a roadhouse of 
unsavory reputation, hoping to prevent 
thereby his marriage to Louise. The 
scheme falls, Garry beats up the Count 
and all ends well for the young lovers. 
William Desmond, Jack Richardson. and 
the others do good work. 

Box Office Value. 
One day. 



"THE SECRET GAME" 

Lasky. Five Reels. 
Released December Srd by Paramount. 

Cast 

Nara-Nara Sessue Bayakawe 

Major North field Jack Bolt 

Kitty Little Florence Vidor 

Miss Lbring Mayme Kelso 

Dr. Ebell Smith Charles Ogle 

"Mrs. Barris" Raymond Batton 

Story — Melodramatic. Written by Marlon 
Fairfax. Directed by Wm. C. DeMille. 
Featuring Sessue Hayakawa. 

Remarks. 
"The Secret Game" tells a story of the 
Secret Service, in which Nara-Nara, a 
Japanese detective, works to save from 
destruction the American transports that 
are secretly carrying troops across the 
Pacific to surprise the enemy on the 
Russian front But it is Major Nortbfield, 
U. S. A., who really traps the spies after 
Nara-Nara has done much elaborate pre- 
liminary work. In the end it is also the 
Major who marries Kitty Little, who has 
been working as a spy assistant to Dr. 
Ebell Smith. 

The story starts out splendidly and holds 
interest for the first 4 reels but goes all 
to pieces in the last In this we see Nara- 
Nara, carried away by his infatuation for 
her, threaten to kill Kitty if she does not 
go back to Japan with him, presumably as 
his mistress. And in this reel we also see 
Major Nortbfield disgrace his uniform by 
first aiding this same Kitty to escape the 
fate of traitor and spy and then marry her. 
This alone kills the film's chances of suc- 
cess. 

The good direction and capital acting 
cannot counteract the effect of the story. 
Box Office Value. 

One day. 

"CHU CHIN CHOW" BREAKS 
RECORD 

The two performances of "Chu Chin 
Chow" on Thanksgiving Day at the Man- 
hattan Opera House broke the record for 
receipts at that resort since Hammerstein 
relinquished it The total receipts for the 
day were $11,201-50. 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



DR. JULIAN SIEGEL, die Theatrical Dentist 

Suit* ZM PUTNAM BUILDING. NEW YORK CITY Phone Bryant MM 

EXCEPTIONAL RATES TO THE PROFESSION 



ST. REGIS RESTAURANT 

165 WEST 47th STREET, NEW YORK 

(OPPOSITE PALACE STAGE DOOR) 



BaTs Dreadnaught 




AT SUBMARINE PRICES 

N Inch flM* M Inch pm 

JI Inch XMt 88 tech BM 

U Inch tlM 48 Inch U 

« inch nut 

WILLIAM BAL COMPANY 

145 W. 45th SL.N.Y. 4 W. 2Zd St., N.Y. 
NEW CIRCULAR NOW READY 



Mail Orders Filled Suns Day 
IS Deposit Required 



LITI'y-AR 




155^ B'LUFJb 



¥■ VSEO BY T« v \ 

ovm'.o»iA»J 



Send lor 1917 Catalogue 
C. A. TAYLOR TRUNK WORKS 

«7s «. h.iim il. ethssi 

210 W. 44ts tt. ins Vsfk 



"The Theatrical 
Route" 

Comfortable steamers leave New 
York, Pier 32, N. R., foot Canal 
St. 6.00 P.M., West 132d St. 6.30 
P.M. daily, including Sunday; also 
Sunday morning at 9.30 for Al- 
bany, Troy and the North. 

Save money 
Travel in comfort 

HUDSON NAVIGATION COMPANY 



FOR LIMITED 
TLM OKI! 

1 in 8x10 rtmXtrtlsn 12.90 

100, 4 saw 10.0Q 

H. JACOBSON 

Exptrt Theatrical PKotorra4>krr 
ta sta Are., star 49aa «.. Urn Varl 

7SR4 t r Is H. Tarr 



THEATRICAL GOODS 
Wi B . 1 A 

Tights V - Catalo,rue No. <\ 

HosieryJ 

Spangles _ 

Gold & Silver Catalogue No. J) 

Trimmings J 

Jewelry} " <»**» ■*• 

GOLD and SILVER BROCADES 
SATINS and BEADS 

Catalogues and samples upon request. 
When asking {or catalogue, please men- 
tion what goods are wanted. 

J. J. WYLE & BROS., Inc. 

(Successor to Siegman & Weil) 
18 & 20 E. 27th St. New York 



SCENERY 

Theatre* utd production* 
Vaudeville Aota Equipped 

MURRAY HILL SCENIC STUDIO 



488 ith Ave. 

Tel. Had. 84.. 4692 



bat. 28-Mtb Sts. 

Tom Creamer, star. 



Others Succeed. War Can't Tool 

STAGE TRAINING 

Draaa, Ceerasy. Vssisrtllt, Stat* Dist- 
ill aia Pasts Play TassM. Ttcaiiieal 
and Practical Comas. CtlebriUej aba 
■tailed under Mr. Alrlens; Annette Kel- 
lermsnn, Nora Birrs. Hurl Dswo. 
Joseph ganlley, Harry PUotr. Mile 
Darif. Marr Puller. Dolly Bisters, Taylor 
Holmei. Vlrlan Prcscott. Eleanor Painter 
and others Write for esUlacas mea- 
Uonlng study drslrrd. 

AJviaae Theatre School ai Arris ( 
57th St., at Broadway 

Entrance 325 W. 67th St.. Nes Tot*. 



Theatrical Profession 

ATTENTION 




WIGS 

MARY 



C L I 

BUSINESS 



INDEX 



Advertisements not exceeding; one line in 
length will be published, properly classified, is 
this index, at the rate of $10 for one year (53 
issues). A copy of The New York Clipper 
will be sent free to each advertiser while tha 
advertisement is running. 

THEATRE AND WOOD FOLDING CHAIRS. 

New and Second Hand 
Atlas Seating Co., 10 E. 43rd and 7 E. 42nd St., 

New York. 
CHEWING GUM— BALL— CANDY COATED. 
Toledo Chewing Gum Co., Factoriea Bldg.. 

Toledo, O. 

LAWYERS. 
F. L. Boyd, Attorney, 17 N. La Salle St.. 

Chicago. 
E. J. Adcr, 10 South La Salle St., Chicago, HI. 
Joseph A. O'Brien, 1402 Broadway, New York 

City. 
Edward Doyle, Attorney. 421 Merchants Ban! 

Bldg., Indianapolis, Ind. 

MUSICAL CLASSES. 
A. Brauneiss, 1012 Napier Ave., Richmond Hill. 

N. Y. 
MUSIC COMPOSED, ARRANGED. 
Chas. L. Lewis, 429 Richmond St., Cincinnati. 

Ohio. 

SCENERY AND SCENIC PAINTERS. 
Howard Tuttle. 141 Burleigh St.. Milwaukee. 

Wis. 

SCHELL'S SCENIC STUDIO 

S81-583-585 South High St.. Columbus. O. 
SCENERY FOR HIRE AND SALE. 
Amelia Grain, 819 Spring Garden St., Philadel 
phia. Pa. 

SONG BOOKS. 

Wm. W. Delaney, 117 Park Row, New York. 

STAGE LIGHT EFFECTS, LAMPS 

(Bought, Sold) 

Newton Art Works. 305 W. 15th St.. New York 

TENTS. 
J. C. Gon Co.. 10 Atwater St., Detroit, Mich 

THEATRICAL GOODS. 
Boston Regalia Co., 387 Washington St., Boa 
ton, Maas. 

THEATRICAL HARDWARE. 
Graves Hardwire Co., 47 Eliot St., Boston. 

Mass. 
A. W. Gerstner Co., 634 8th Ave., (41at St.). 
N. Y. 
THEATRICAL PICTURE FRAMES. 
Levy's, 316 to 320 West 42nd Street, New York. 
937 Bryant. 

THEATRICAL PROPERTIES. 
E. Walker. 309 W. 39th St., New York. 

TRANSFERS. 
Walton. 45S W. 33d St., N. Y.* 1179 Greeley 

VENTRILOQUIST FIGURES. 
Ben Hobson, 201 West 144th St., N. Y. C. 

VIOLINS AND SUPPLIES 
August Gemuender & Sons, 141 W. 42nd St., 

N. Y. 
John Frledrlch & Bro., Inc., 279 Fifth Ave., 
N. Y. __ 



If yon are bothered with Soar Sick Stomach. 
Heartburn, Distress After Eating, Belching of 
Wind, Big Head In the morning or other 
stomach troubles, I want yon to have a 
sample of Priest's Indigestion Powder. Sent 
free to any address. Dealers carry tha 25c. 
and $1.00 sizes, bnt I want yon to try It first 
at my expense. 

H. K. PRIEST, Ph. Q., Bangor, Me. 



PHILADELPHIA 

via New Jersey Central 

EVERY HOUR ON THE HOUR 

From Liberty St-, 7 A. M. to IB P. M." 

and at Midnight with Sleepers 

It MINUTES OF THE HOUR 

From W. 23d St. 

YOUR WATCH IS YOUR TIME TABLE 

Consult P. W. HEROY, E. P.. Agent 

1448 BROADWAY, NEW YORK 



TOUPEES, GREASE 

PAINTS, ETC 

A. M. BUCH & CO. 

lit N. Ninth St.. PUtadaJpfcla 

E. P. THAYER, Vaudeville 
Author, 2100 Broad St., Provi- 
dence, R. I. Terms for stamp. 
Interviews by appointment. 



TYPE 
ONLY 



ONE SHEETS 

Size 28 z 42, Either Flat or Upright — 
Small Amount Display Matter Only 

Black on Red or Bias Two 
Quantity. Yellow. 

100 $8.00 

200 6.00 

300 7.00 

400 8.00 

900 9.00 

1.0OO 14.00 

Owing to market conditions, all prices subject 
to change without notice. Send for pries list of 
all kinds theatrical type work. Terms: Cash with 
order. Send 10c. for route book. 

GAZETTE SHOW PRINTING COMPANY 

MATTOON, ILL.. U. S. A. 



on White. 


Colors. 


18.00 


18.00 


7.00 


8.80 


8.00 


11.00 


8.00 


11. SO 


10.00 


14.00 


15.00 


80.00 



MAGIC: 



PLAYS 

IN atAlrOSCIRXPT 



ACTS FOB SALE CHEAP. We 
Buy, Sell or Exchange used 
Apparatus. Professional Cata- 
log 10c. Parlor Trick catalog FBBE. Write or 
Call. Horomaa Kagio Co., Sts. 1, 470 8th At.. M. Y. 

~ I* i1>l«5. 00 

A YXAR 

New winners — Tried Successes. Special Pictorial 
Printing. Send stamp for catalog. BTAGEXOaX 
flay; CO., 1400 Broadway. H. T.. Sept. C. 



List or Professional and an 
stem- Plays, VsadsTfllt 

Sketches. Mooolap. Minstrel 
Dialogs, Make-op Goods, sts. 



PLAYS 



Material. aerlUttom, 
CATALOG FREE. 

FITZGEIALD PUB. CUP'I. 
Successor to Dick a nurrnJd. 20 Ann St. New Tors- 



NEARLY NEW 

Evening Gowns and Wraps 

Fall D r e s 1 , Tnxedo a«i Prince Albert Sato 

LUCY GOODMAN. 2315 S. State St.. fhicarn 



Drops and Curtains $12.50 

Painted to order, any else up to 14 by 30 ft., tn 
either Diamond Dye, 01] or Water colors. All 
k inds of SCEM EBY at lowest prices. 
flOBNTfi STUDIO. Oaltunbaa. Ohio. 



ATTENTION 



We bay and sell PLATS, 
SONGS, all kinds of good spe- 
cial materiel. Moale composing and arranging. 
B. Y. PLAY-aWHIC BTTBEAT/, STM Broadway. 

N, Y. Broken. 




TIGHTS 

Cotton Tights, tot rood quality. 
a pair 81-00. Wonted Tights. 
medium wtltht, (8.88 a pair. 
Wonted Tltbts. heaty velsbt. 
S3 00 s pair. Imported tUk 
plaited tights, lo bright led and 
golden Brown, only $2.50 a 

Pair. BtlfcnHna TUbU In all 

colon. 12.60 a pair. Hetty TS 
per cenL imported silk Ughta, 
Id brlsbt Bed only, reduced front 

86.00 to 84.oo a pair, ran 
■lent Shins to Batch tights, 
isaw price as ugbts. Orders 
ailed pmaptly. Clipper Catalog 
free on applkadao. 

BERNARD MANDL 

810-818 W. MADISON ST. CH3CAQO. TXX. 

YOU CAN RENT SCENERY 

For Try Outa, for Vaudeville Acts. 
Complete Productions 
We Supply Amateurs and Stock Com- 
panies with Everything 

MILLARD H. FIANCE CO., Scenic Studios 
S04-S08 West Wth St, New York 

r— DRS. a^IeI c . LEVY- 
TREAT THE PROFESSION'S FEET 

at Strand Theatre Bldg., 
Broadway and 47th St. 

CORNS BUNIONS CALLOUSES 
cured with A. B. C "FUT PADS" 



PAWN TICKETS BOUGHT 

CASH PAID IMMEDIATELY 

for Pawn Tickets. Diamonds, Precious 

Stones and Jewelry. Appraising free. 
Strictly confidential. Open evenings- 

FORCOTSTON'S 

1 432 Broadway, N. Y. Cor. 40th St. 



Cfcfflg^ 




?uc< t>J " TYPE PQ57ERS 

S DEARBORN 3T 



■■■■a WORLD famous saw 

Folding organS 

A BEST ON SAL! kasasj 




toe. Mearlea this papa, . 4>|3oO 

8ILH0RN BROS.cSTcaa^^K 

^nnonvrifirc' Haniial "°°' t > m>| U>b sonp or Miast bt- 

JUUgWllltli rriBUUai fori banns read my "Masaal of 
Composing ind Publlihlng." This book urrs tnd makes 
Doory. slso rlf-a niuible. bonest soviet. Price 35c. 
H. J. BAUER MUSIC CO., US Esit 34tl 51.. S. T. CUT. 

FRED -PLATE 

Trunk and Baggage Repair Shop 
388 Weat 41st Street, New York 

18 years with Taylor Trunk Works. Nee Tort agency, 
■rartaa rrsfanloeal Truss. Telephone. Bryant 8888. 

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THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



December 12, 1917 




Opyrif-hted, 1»17, by the Clipper Corporation. 



Founded by 
FRANK gUEEN, 



iau 



NEW YORK, DECEMBER 12, 1917 



VOLUME LXV— No. 4J 
Price, Ten Cent* 



V.M.P.A, GIVES 

ITS FIRST 

DINNER 

MURDOCK AND CASEY HONORED 



The first annual dinner of the Vaude- 
ville Managers' Protective- Association, 
which was attended by over two hundred 
and fifty managers from all parts of the 
country, waa held at the' Hotel Plaza on 
Sunday night. J. J. Murdock, general 
manager of the United Booking Offices, 
and Fat Casey, head of the V. M. P. A., 
were the gueste of honor. 

The dinner is said to have been the 
largest gathering of managers ever held 
in the history of vaudeville. It is 
planned to make it an annual affair. The 
officers of the association are of the opin- 
ion that, the members will be able to 
work in harmony if they are personally 
• acquainted, and this gathering was 
largely intended to bring them together 
for that purpose. 

As the banquet was held for purely 
social reasons, no business waa taken up, 
and every effort was centered, on making 
the atmosphere one of festivity ' ana 
friendship. Many of the managers there 
had never met before, but before the eve- 
ning was over, according to those in 
charge, the association was cemented to- 
gether by ties of acquaintance as well 
as of business. 

B. S. Moss, who was chairman of the 
committee which arranged the dinner, 
opened the talking with a few words, in- 
troducing Mr. Murdock. His speech was 
greeted with applause, and he waa fol- 
lowed by the other guest of honor, Pat 
Casey. .-•",...■ 

Other speakers were Gus Sun, E. C. 
Mills, Martin Beck, E. F. Albee, William 
Fox, F. F. Proctor, S. Z. Poll, Sam Scrib- 
ner, William Travers Jerome, Carl Hob- 
litzell, Marcus Loew, Maurice Goodman, 
Aaron J. Jones, Harry Davis, and John 
Ringling. All the speeches were short, no 
one talking for more than five minutes. 

The meeting broke up about two 
o'clock. Among those present were: 

George A. Murray, Alfred S. Black, 
Peter J. Tennis, Al Haynes, Harry 
Katzes, M. J. Boyle, William J. Clark, 
L. J. Delamater. C. H. Seamon, W. R. 
Bennett, J. Gillingham, J. Lubin, Carl 
Milligan, Walter Keefe, Harry Shea, Ray 
Andrews, diaries Thropp, J. A. Gault, 
Charles Denziger, M W. Schoenherr, A. 
C. Hayman, J. A. Schuchert, Ray Leason, 
O. S. Hathaway, Charles M. Howell, 
Joseph P. Breneman, Montgomery Moses. 

James E. Plunkett, J. K. Burke, R. L.. 
Gorman, J. Deiches, Emil Deiches, Nathan 
Gordon, M R. Toohey, Alton Emery, Ed- 
ward C. Clapp, Henry J. Steinberg, C 
Wesley Fraser, J. T. Jenson, S. Goldstein, 
N. Goldstein, John Keon, H. H. Feiber, 
Mort Shea, D. F. Hennesy, W. L. Dock- 
stader, Dr. Fred B. Howe, F. E. Stouder, 
Hugh Keegan. Goddie Rosenbaum, James 
H. Dalton, M. D. Gibson, Frederick Nixon- 
Nerdlinger, A. J. Shigo. 

Harry Traub, George J. Zboyovsky, M: 
Fxelhofer, Thomas Love, - Arthur- New- 
(Continued on page 4) 



MANAGERS JAM OVER "ROSARY" 

Pbovtoence, R. I., Dec. 9. — R. H. Kel- 
ler, manager of "The Rosary" company, 
which came here to play at the Emery 
Theatre, found its doors closed against 
him. The outcome is likely to be a case 
for the courts. 

The company came to Providence from 
Philadelphia, having been booked at the 
Emery for a week's engagement. In the 
meantime, however, the Emery manage- 
ment had decided to discontinue dramatic 
productions and revert to vaudeville and 
photoplays. Notice, it is claimed, was sent 
to the New York managers of the produc- 
tion two weeks ago. 

Keller admits having received notice 
of the cancellation two days before the 
company closed in Philadelphia, but points 
to an alleged clause in the booking con- 
tract, which calls for thirty days' notice 
of cancellation. This clause was ignored 
by the Emery management, he asserts, 
with the result that the company ap- 
peared here on time and sent its baggage 
to the theatre, only to have it refused 
admission. For the past week the com- 
pany has regularly reported at the theatre, 
only to be formally refused the right to 
show. Keller insists upon getting the full 
contract price. The company "will leave 
Monday afternoon for an engagement in 
Worcester. 

"We will test the case in the courts," 
he said before leaving town, "if a satis- 
factory settlement is not forthcoming." 



PLAN NEW AUTO CIRCUS 

Herbert S. Maddy, well known circus 
man, and Rhoda Royal are planning to 
put out a new anto truck circus nest sea- 
son and reap the benefit that will come 
to those shows which are able to go out 
despite the tie-up that is expected to pre- 
vail everywhere on the railroads. Maddy 
was in New York last week engineering 
the project. It is said that options have 
been secured on enough trucks for the 
purpose. 

' Royal, who was formerly an euuestrian 
director for Ringling's, has seven or eight 
elephants now playing in vaudeville and 
a considerable assortment of other animals. 



SHUBERTS DENY RUMOR 

Lee Shubert, on Monday, denied that 
there was any truth whatsoever in re- 
ports which gained considerable circula- 
tion last week, to the effect that he and 
his brother, J. J. Shubert, were to enter 
the vaudeville field in the near future. 
Despite the fact that the ten-year con- 
tract entered into between the United 
Booking Offices and his firm at the con- 
clusion of. the Advanced Vaudeville war 
expired last week, he stated that there 
was nothing to any such report. 

LOST BOOKING; GETS $200 

Mille De Leon, the "Girl in Blue," has 
recovered $200 damages in an action 
brought by her against Barrett Nephews 
and Company. Miss De Leon sued the 
firm because of its failure to deliver a 
waist she had left to be cleaned in time 
for her to fulfill a booking, in consequence 
of which she lost a two weeks* engagement. 



SLAYMAN AU HAS A SON 

Slayman Ali, manager and owner of 
the Slayman All troupe, now appearing 
at the Hippodrome, is. the proud father of 
a .hoy. The mother, Marie Ali, and the 
baby, are both doing well. The new ar- 
rival has been christened Jerome Ben Ali 
Slayman.., ... -. ,.- '.-"._ " 



MAKE NEW 

WAR TAX 

RULING 

THEATRES MUST PAY MORE 



According to a new ruling on the ad- 
mission tax in the case of benefits, handed 
down by the Internal Revenue Depart- 
ment at Washington last week, the tax 
must be collected wherever the owners or 
managers of the theatre are letting out 
the house on a percentage basis. When 
the house is rented for a flat sum the 
benefit need not collect the tax. 

This ruling, however, does not apply 
except in cases where the benefit is ac- 
tually given for some good cause, pa- 
triotic, religious, educational or some- 
thing similar. Where the benefit is for 
an organization, such as a society, the 
tax must be collected regardless of the 
renting arrangement. 

Church shows, when for the furtherance 
of some religious cause, and not for the 
benefit of any individual, are free from 
the tax. Such an entertainment, in this 
interpretation, would be taxed when the 
proceeds were for the pastor, or some 
other individual. When the benefit is 
given for the furtherance of a cause, such 
as the support of missionaries, ■ there is 
no tax on admissions. 

Likewise in school entertainments, when 
a cause is benefited, no tax is collected. 
When an individual profits, the tax is 
collected. Fraternal organizations, such 
as the Elks or Masons, must collect the 
tax when the proceeds go to their organ- 
izations. . If they are for some other and 
broader cause they need not. 
- This ruling throughout applies' to the 
entire proceeds. All profits must be given 
to the cause in order to claim exemption. 
If any individual shares in the slightest 
way in the profits, on a percentage basis, 
the tax is collectable. 

•For example, a benefit is to be given for 
the Red Cross. The services of actors 
are secured. If the actors work for a 
certain per cent of the profits, no matter 
how small that per cent may be, the tax 
must be collected. If the actors work 
for a flat sum, no tax is necessary. 

It is, therefore, perfectly legitimate for 
those giving the benefit to pay out a rea- 
sonable amount for the services of those 
working, but they are not allowed to go 
in on any sharing basis, without making 
the affair liable to the admission tax. 

Mark Eisner, Collector for the Third 
District of New York, who gave out this 
explanation, gave as an example of its 
working out certain games in the Hero 
Land Bazaar. Private individuals have 
installed paraphernalia, and are paid so 
much per day for their services. If they 
worked on a percentage of their takings, 
however, the Bazaar would be liable to 
the tax. It is stipulated that the fiat sum 
paid for services must be a reasonable 
and proper sum,- otherwise individuals 
could profit by sending in huge bDls. 



CIRCUS STARTS SUIT 

Brazil, Ind., Dec 10.— Suit has been 
filed here by the Carl Hagenbeck and the 
Great Wallace Show Co. against Mahals 
Stewart, James Stewart and Henry Tate, 
to enjoin them from starting suit for dam- 
ages in Texas for the death of Mrs. 
Stewart's daughter, who was killed while 
with the show when she fell between two 
cars of the circus train In Texas. A dam- 
age suit for $10,000 was instituted at that 
time by her mother. 

The object of the present suit by the de- 
fendants is to prevent the plaintiffs from 
suing in the State of Texas, and to cause 
the suit to be filed in Indiana. A re- 
straining order was granted tbe plaintiffs. 



CHANGES IN "WATCH YOUR STEP" 
Abe Levy, who, with Max Plohn, has 
"Watch Your Step" out on the road tola 
season, went out to Seattle last week to 
make some changes in the company, result- 
ing from a cut in the salary list to make 
it more in keeping with the present state 
of the theatrical business. 

Harry Van Fossen and Sherman and 
Uttry will be out of the company and Goff 
Phillips, Victoria Ganran and Barbier 
HoUiday will be pnt in. Tbe first two, it 
is said, first agreed to a salary reduction, 
but later changed their minds and, when 
the management could not be made . to 
change theirs, quit. 



> KEOGH SUING FOR $150,000 

The William T. Keogh Amusement 
Company has filed suit against the City 
of New York for the amount of $150,000. 

A few years ago the city intended mak- 
ing a plaza of a piece of property along- 
side tbe building now housing Loew** 
National Theatre at One Hundred and 
Forty-ninth street and Bergen avenue, 
but recently allowed the Interborough to 
build an elevated structure which entirely 
hides from view the stores that are in 
the theatre buijding. The suit is for 
damages said to have accrued from the 
loss of business owing to the structure. . 

SAM KRAUS AFTER APPOINTMENT 

Sam Kraus, manager of the Olympic 
Theatre, on Fourteenth street, has started 
in the race for the appointment as 
Deputy License Commissioner under the 
Hylan administration. It is understood 
that he has the endorsement of the Bur* 
lesque Managers Association as well aa 
of several men big in Tammany Hall, 
near which the Olympic is located. 

REYNARD TO SUE THEATRE 

Mons Reynard is preparing to start an 
action this week against Gordon's Olym- 
pia Theatre, Boston, over what he says 
was false advertising. The theatre billed 
him, Reynard saya, as appearing at that 
theatre "while the White Rats' strike waa 
in session. 



OPERA CO. CANCELS DATES 
Denver, Colo., Nov. 8. — The La Scala 
Opera Co. has been forced to cancel all 
of its dates because of the uncertainty of 
transportation. 



SUING FOR FALL 

Rose Faust, who sustained injuries) 
some time ago while attending a per- 
formance at the New York Theatre from 
a fall,- has brought suit against the 
Mostern Amusement Company to the 
amount of $10,000. J. P. Shea represents 
the plaintiff. 

"GARDEN OF ALLAH" TO CLOSE 

The "Garden of Allah," playing one- 
night stands under the management of 
Max Plohn and Abe Levy, is to close- 
Saturday at Zanesville, Ohio. It may go- 
out again after -the holidays, however. -j 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



December 12, 1917 



SHUBERTS AFTER 

NEW HOUSE IN 

PROVIDENCE 

PRACTICALLY CLOSE FOR MAJESTIC 



Providence, Dec. 9. — If negotiations 
which are practically concluded do not 
fall through at the last moment, the Ma- 
jestic Theatre, one of Providence's newest 
and largest playhouses, will this week 
come under the control of the Shubert in- 
terests and thus succeed the old Provi- 
dence Opera House, now controlled by the 
Shuberts, as the local home of their pro- 
ductions. The lease, terms of which have 
not been made public, has been drawn and 
awaits only the signatures of the parties 
interested. 

The lease of the Majestic closely follows 
announcement that the lease of the Opera 
House, which expires July, will not be 
renewed by its owners, the Fletcher Land 
Company. The latter, it is understood, 
will use the building as an annex to the 
Narragansett Hotel, which it adjoins. 

The visit of a Klaw and Erlanger agent 
to the city last week and his inspection 
of two or three theatres gave rise to a 
rumor that the latter firm was to invade 
the Shubert field here. To those on the 
inside, however, the rumor seemed one of 
the best bits of "camouflage" ever staged 
in the city. The real intent, it is hinted, 
was to throw a scare into the Shubert 
camp, with the real battleground' later re- 
vealed as Philadelphia, where the two hi' 
terests are clashing. 

The lease of the Majestic, coming so 
soon after the Klaw and Erlanger visit, 
however, indicates that the Shuberts de- 
termined not to be caught napping. They 
are now assured a fitting Providence home, 
when they are forced to move. Had the 
Klaw and Erlanger interests Been fit to 
tie up the Majestic, the former would have 
been in desperate straits and, perhaps, 
would have been forced to pay a stiff price 
for the only other suitable house in town, 
or, what is worse, would have had to build 
a new theatre, to preserve their interests 
here. 

When the lease of the Majestic was an- 
nounced, earlier in the week, it was stated 
that the theatre, which has been running 
vaudeville, would close Saturday night. 
Emery Brothers, its owners, and Manager 
Toohey denied the rumor emphatically, 
however, and retractions of the statement 
were later printed. 

Col. Felix R. Wendelschafer, local rep- 
resentative of the Shubert interests, has 
conducted the negotiations for the lease. 
He refused to state, however, when Shu- 
bert production would be first shown 
there, but intimated that the opera house 
would probably be used for the rest of the 
season. B. Goodside. lessee of the Modern 
Theatre, which the Klaw and Erlanger in- 
terests were said to be after, has denied 
that any serious negotiations were under 
way, or that the Modern would be used, 
for the present, for anything but motion 
pictures. 



"THE HAPPY TRAMP" DEAD 

When the World awoke Monday morn- 
ing it was greeted with the sorrowful 
tidings that Nat M. Wills, "The Happy 
Tramp," was dead. 

He had been tinkering with his ma- 
chine and while the "n gm* was running 
had dosed the door of the garage. His 
wife, alarmed at the long time he had 
been in the garage, sent the maid out to 
investigate. The maid returned and said 
that, although she could hear the exhaust 
of the machine inside, she had received 
no response to her knocking. TTin wife 
then went to the garage but received no 
answer to their calls. One of the neigh- 
bors was summoned who broke the door 
open. 

The lifeless body of Wills fell out at 
the feet of his wife and daughter. To 
keep the door shut it had to be locked 
and by so doing had made the garage 
air-tight. With the running of the ex- 
haust, which gradually consumed the 
oxygen, Wills had felt biiwolf being over- 
come and had tried to unlock the door 
as the key was still in his hand. 

Wills, who had been married four times, 
lived with his wife and two-year-old 
daughter, Natalie, at 2 Thirty-first street, 
Woodcliffe, overlooking the Palisades. 

At the time of his death he was play- 
ing at the Hippodrome. He made his 
first appearance at the age of two at the 
historic Ford's Opera House in Washing- 
ton. 

He was born in Fredericksburg, Va_, 
July 11, 1873. 



WANT CENSOR 

FOR B'D'WY 

PLAYS 

MOVE URGED ON MAYOR-ELECT 



MAY PLAY CIRCUS AT CAMPS 
Rhoda Royal, last season director with 
the Sells-Floto Circus, is looking over the 
booking offered by the Army Entertain- 
ment Committee, of which Marc Klaw is 
the head, with a view to sending a com- 
plete one-ring circus over the route. The 
organization is now playing on the eleventh 
floor of the Boston Store. Chicago, and, 
in addition to other attractions, has three 
elephants, sixteen horses, twelve ponies, 
forty- dogs, six monkeys and other live 
stock. Bareback riders would also be car- 
ried and a good show given. Royal prom- 
ises. 

The show, which is billed as "Rhoda 
Royal's Winter Circus," is attracting con- 
siderable attention in Chicago. The ele- 
phants and horses are daily taken up on 
the elevator to the tenth floor, which is 
as far as the lift goes. They then walk 
up the other flight to the stage, where the 
performance is given. It will be ready to 
go on the circuit after the holidays. 



B. F. REICH LOSES MOTHER 

Mrs. Anna Yon P. Reich-Hurlbnrt, 
seventy-three years of age, and at one time 
a well known concert pianist, died on 
Friday of last week at her home in this 
city. Among her acquaintances were hun- 
dreds of theatrical folk, to whom news of 
her death win come as a shock. Two sons 
survive her, Felix Reich, of the Robinson 
Amusement Corporation, of Chicago, and 
R. F. Reich, of the Edward F. Rush of- 
fices, in this city. The funeral, which was 
private, was held Sunday. 



NEWARK BILLPOSTER HELD 
Newark. N. J., Dec a— Russell Abort, 
a billposter, was arrested here this week 
charged with posting bills without a li- 
cense. The Jersey City Bill Posting Co., 
which has the posting privileges in this 
city, brought the charges. The defendant 
claimed that he had done nothing unlaw- 
ful, but was held on a charge of violating 
a city ordinance. 



LEBLANG GETS "ODDS AND. ENDS" 

Joe Leblang took over the balcony of 
"Odds and Ends" last Friday. Negotia- 
tions for the road rights of the piece are 
also under way, Leffier and Bratton being 
one of the firms which have looked the 
production over to decide whether or not 
they wanted to put it out on the one-night 
stands. 



ABORNS' SCHOOL MOVES 

The Aborn Classes for Operatic Train- 
ing, which have been occupying quarters 
at 11 East Forty-third street, have just 
leased an entire floor at 137 West Thirty- 
eighth street, where a stage and studios 
have been erected large enough to put on 
entire productions. 



GREAT EVERETT TO TOUR 

The Great Everett, who has "been lay- 
ing off for a month, will take out his 
big magic show again, opening Dec 24 
for a two-day stand at Springfield, Mass. 
He will tour the East Coast for fourteen 
weeks. 



WILSON WRITING NEXT FROLIC 
Doctor Victor Wilson, publicity director 
of the Strand Theatre, has been chosen to 
write the next Friars' Frolic, planned for 
some time shortly after the new year is 
ushered in. 



RESIGNS FROM HARRIS THEATRE 

John Ostrander has resigned his posi- 
tion as treasurer of the Harris Theatre. 
Harvey Phillips has been engaged to suc- 
ceed him. 



It has been learned during the past week 
that there is just a possibility of New 
York City having an official play censor 
under the coming administration. Forces 
of moral uplift and similar organizations 
are urging Justice Hylan, the Mayor, elect, 
to take some such radical step immedi- 
ately upon entering office. 

The proposed censor would, according to 
those who urge the idea, visit every per- 
formance on the opening night and keep 
his eyes open for anything that he — or 
she — might deem harmful. It would then 
be taken up with the other municipal de- 
partments for correction. 

The proposition is an outgrowth of the 
interest already shown by Judge Hylan 
and by District Attorney Swarm in 
Broadway productions. At first it was 
believed that the coming administration 
would merely insist on a stricter enforce- 
ment of existing ordinances, but it has 
been learned that a more stringent method 
is being urged on the coming Mayor. 

If this object should by any means be 
accomplished, it will be the first time in 
America where such a step has been taken. 
There has never been any official censor- 
ship of the drama in this country, although 
city ordinances give the police department 
power to stop' any performance which con- 
flicts with laws relating to public morality. 
In England, a play censor has been in 
office for some years, and that is the only 
country where absolute freedom is not 
allowed to the stage. Over there it has 
been the subject of much controversy. 

That agitation and opposition will result 
in the event of the appointment of such 
an officer there is little doubt. The gigan- 
tic fight which has been carried on by 
the motion picture industry will probably 
be exceeded in intensity by the opposition 
to come from theatre managers and play- 
wrights. 

The censor will work with the District 
Attorney, it is expected. The official will 
visit the shows and make a favorable or 
unfavorable report. If the show is pro- 
claimed indecent or immoral, the Grand 
Jury will investigate it, and indictments 
will follow. 

An inkling of the proposed innovation 
was given out by the District Attorney 
this week when he said that every case 
of alleged indecency in theatres would 
be instantly turned over to the Grand 
Jury. Mr. Swann and Judge Hylan have 
recently expressed in strong terms their 
disapproval of several unnamed Broadway 
shows. 

"I attended one performance in a 
Broadway theatre where fifteen girls came 
ont and danced in practically a nude con- 
dition," said the District Attorney. "Most 
of our managers try to come as close to 
the border line of decency as they can 
without ' stepping over, and, in several 
cases, they have gone much too far. Each 
one seems to be attempting to outdo 
his rivals in indency. 

TVe are going to wipe all of that out. 
I intend to have intelligent persons Bee 
every show and report to me. It will not 
be necessary for the Grand Jurors to see 
the performances. Complete reports will 
be given to them, and then the matter 
will be in their hands." 

That the ban will be on all forms of 
entertainment, even the most highly 
artistic, -where the performers are not 
completely clothed, was indicated by Mr. 
Swann, who said: 

"All the shows I have seen have been 
simply indecent, some of them posing as 
art. There may be cases of genuine art, 
but these I have not seen." 

Although it was said that the Grand 
Jury would decide on special cases, and 
would not lay down general principles, 
some idea of the standards on which their 
judgments would be based was indicated 
by the District Attorney's statement. 



SAY ACTOR TOOK LAMPS 

S. Bethlehem, Pa., Dec. 10. — Louis 
Haines, a member of the "Nothing but 
the Truth" Company which played here 
last week, waa accused by the manager 
of the company of taking three lamps and 
a cord from a dressing room, and bis trunk 
waa held by the house. On opening it 
according to the manager, E. H. Ziegen- 
fuas, the lamps and cord were found In it. 

Haines is said by Ziegenfuss to have 
found the lamps in one of the rooms and 
taken them to his own. Edward Moyer, 
property man, then refused to let Haines' 
trunk go out. That night the company left 
for Fasten, and the next day the show 
manager, 3. R. Davidson, called and de- 
manded the trunk. It was then opened 
and the contents found, Ziegenfuss says. 
The management did not prosecute. 



EVANS SUCCEEDS MILLS 

Willie Evans, a vaudeville comedian, suc- 
ceeded Nat M. Wills in his role at the 
Hippodrome on Monday. 



MINERS HOLD CELEBRATION 

The fifty-fourth anniversary of Henry 
C. Miner's entering the theatrical business 
is being celebrated this week at Miner's, 
in the Bronx and Miner's Empire, Newark. 



ADOPTS NOVEL ADVERTISING 
Faihmokt, W- Va., Dec 7. — The man- 
agement of the Hippodrome has adopted 
a clever line which it uses at the head of 
its acts, namely, "Every Theatre Ticket 
Helps Load a Gun." The Hippodrome 
plays Gus Sun tabloids and is doing good 
business. 



APPEAL "CHEATERS" CASE 

An appeal from the judgment dismissing 
the complaint of Amy Ongley, adminis- 
tratrix of the estate- of George Byron 
Ongley, against Max Marcin and A. Hat 
Woods, was entered this week. The suit 
is over the rightful ownership of the play 
"Cheating Cheaters." 



JOLSON WORKING ON NEW SHOW 

AL Jolson, having just returned from 
the Coast, is working with Harold Atte- 
ridge in the preparation of a new book for 
the next Winter Garden show. 



V. M. P. A. HOLDS DINNER 

(Continued from page 3) 

berger, Louis Ebling, John Lopez, Fred- 
erick A. Thompson, W. S. Butterfield, 
John Sinopulo, H. W. McCall, John 
Pringle, Clark Brown, John P. Harris, 
Alfred Frankenthal, Sylvan Bier, A. 
Schakman, George Metzel, A. L. Einstein, 
Anthony Geronimo, Harry E. Jones, Dr. 
Richard G. Tunison, Nate Aacher, H. 
Singer. 

Samuel Kahl, M. Heinman, Peter J. 
Schaeffer, Charles M. Olsen, C. S. Hum- 
phrey, S. K. Hodgdon, J. Koolvoord, Har- 
vey L. Watkins, Harry A. Daniels, A. L. 
Robertson, John Hopkins, Joseph M 
Schenck, Julius Steger, George A. Mc- 
Dermott, Dave- Bernstein, Nicholas 
Schenck, Mort Singer, C. F. Whitehnrst, 
Milton Hirschfield, J. Brylawski, Frank 
Keeney, Ray Owens, Paul Moss, M. D. 
Simmons, Myron Sulzburger, James H. 
Moore, Carl Lothrop, Michael Shea, Henry 
J. Carr, Pliny McNaughton. 

Fred C. Schanberger, John White, Wil- 
liam Long, J. W. Loeb, John Moran, Wil- 
liam J. Lee, J. J. Maloney, E. M. Robin- 
son, William Sleeper, Eddie Darling, P. 
G. Larsen, Walter Vincent, Jake Wells, 
P. Alanzo, Lester H. Riley, George E. 
Wallen, Sidney Wilmer, Eugene L. 
Koneke, Louis Sagal. 

Alec L. Ludvigh, Leopold Friedman, I. 
H. Stern, S. H. Meinhold, Dave Loew, Ar- 
thur Loew, Abe Sablosky, J. J- McGuirk, 
Lew Sablosky, Dave Sablosky, Tom 
Sablosky, Edwin J. Lauder, Reed A. Al- 
bee, William L. Mitchell, Harry T. Jor- 
dan, C. L. Lovenberg, Frank Vincent, Col. 
Marceau, Rudolf K. Hynicka, Herbert J. 
Mack, Thomas W. Miner, Henry C. Miner, 
John W. Miner and George Robinson 



December 12, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



MANAGERS FAIL 

TO IMPROVE 

BUSINESS 

CAN'T AGREE ON MEASURE 



After holding a meeting that was called 
with the intention of trying to devise 
some means through which the slump in 
theatrical business would rest less heav- 
ily upon the shoulders of managers, 
either bj a reduction in the salaries of 
actors, a lowering of the prices of seats, 
or some other expedient, the United Man- 
agers' Protective Association adjourned 
last week without having solved the 
problem. 

The difficulty, as reported by members 
who were present, was that the organiza- 
tion, as a body, could not come to an 
agreement, either regarding the actual 
outlook or the best way to preserve a 
fair amount of profit after the payment 
Of Pipelines. Some of the managers 
stated .that they felt sure conditions 
would take on a rosier hue after the holi- 
days were over. 

There was considerable debate, how- 
ever, regarding means to lessen the losses 
dow being experienced by attractions, 
those who have losing productions being 
anxious to take almost any step. No 
agreement could be reached though, owing 
to the fact that those managers whose 
plays are getting money would not agree 
to do anything, thereby holding back the 
others. 

Joe Leblang, the cut-rate ticket broker, 
is one of those who believes that busi- 
ness will improve after the holidays are 
over and he is accredited with being a 
pretty good judge of conditions. He 
states that the present slump is only 
psychological. 

KAHN AFTER NEWARK HOUSE 

Newark, N. J.. Dec. 8. — The Hill The- 
atre, formerly the Odeon, now being run 
by Jackie Clarke and Johnnie Mack as a 
picture house, may be taken over by Kahn 
brothers, who are running a chain of bur- 
lesque houses in New York. Being prac- 
tically a new house it has had a varied 
career and has never been in the bands 
of theatrical men. 



STRAND APPEALS NAME CASE 

An appeal from an order denying an 
application for an injunction restraining 
the Major Amusement Company from 
using the title "The Strand," has been 
entered in the courts by the Mitchel H. 
Mark Realty Corporaion. 

The realty company contends that, as 
the Major company is engaged in the op- 
erating of motion picture theatres and 
is using the trade name of "The Strand," 
it is unfairly competing with them and 
should be enjoined from using the name. 
The defendants will be permitted to use 
the name in its title where there is no 
competition between the two parties. 
That is, it will be so allowed where the 
theatres are located far enough apart as 
to overcome any suggestion of competi- 
tion. 



RED CROSS DAY 

A FROST IN 

THEATRES 

PROCEEDS VERY DISAPPOINTING 



DELANCY BARCLAY DIES 

Delancy Barclay, veteran actor, who 
made his debut in 1870, died Sunday after- 
noon at his home in New York. He had 
supported Booth and Barrett. His last 
appearance was in the character role in 
"Freckles." During the last two years he 
had been playing characters in pictures. 

Services will be held Thursday morning 
at the Campbell Funeral Church, under the 
auspices of the Actors' Fund, with inter- 
ment at Evergreen Cemetery. 



STORM PREVENTS SHOW 

Pittsburgh, Pa., Dec. 10. — There was 
no performance of "Oh Boy" tonight at 
the Alvin Theatre owing to the non-arrival 
of three baggage cars containing the 
scenery and costumes of the show, the cars 
having been lost in the snowstorm today 
somewhere between Buffalo and here. The 
members of the company arrived safely. 



BEATS AGENCY CASE 

Indianapolis, Dec. 10. — Carl W. 
Xeisse, charged with operating a theatrical 
agency without a license, was discharged 
this week, and the case was dropped. Ed- 
ward Doyle, who acted for Xeisse, showed 
that the State had no case against the 
agent. 



Although no figures are yet to be had 
as to the proceeds of last Friday's Red 
Cross Day throughout the theatres of the 
country, it was stated at the Red Cross 
headquarters that results were not up to 
what they were expected to be. 

High prices for admissions, coupled with 
a poor advertising campaign, was the 
reason given out as being the cause. The 
nearness of the holidays may also have 
had a decided effect upon the undertak- 
ing. The entire affair was run off in too 
.much of a hurry, with no organization 
also, to have brought satisfactory re- 
sults. 

The Forty-fourth Street, Thirty-ninth 
Street, Cort and Bijou theatres did not 
even raise their curtains and sent the few 
patrons to the neighboring shows. 

The Shubert theatres drew only $2,465.30 
in all. 

The managers stood the expense of ad- 
vertising, contributed their theatres, stage 
hands, actors and all, with the Red Cross 
giving very little assistance. 

JULIE OPP WON'T RETURN 

Despite rumors to the contrary, Julie 
Opp (Mrs. William Faversham) will not 
return to the stage for her husband's all- 
star cast of "Lord and Lady Algy," at 
the Broadhurst Theatre. Mrs. Faversham 
is actively engaged in the production of 
the play, but will not be seen in it. Af- 
ter Faversham's revival of "Julius Cae- 
sar," she retired from the stage, and has 
made no definite plans for the future. 



MONROE SUFFERS BREAKDOWN 
Atlantic Crrr. N. J., Dec. 7. — George 
W. Monroe, the comedian, is in a sani- 
tarium here suffering from a nervous break- 
down. 



NEW "MILLION DOLLAR DOLLS" 

A new "Million Dollar Doll" company 
will be organized to play the Northern 
time, the Southern company having met 
with enough success to warrant the or- 
ganization. 

ARRESTED FOR SUNDAY DANCE 

Minneapolis. Minn.. Nov. 7. — Anna 
Berg was arrested here last week for run- 
ning a public dance hall on Sunday, in de- 
fiance of the state blue laws. 



TELLEGEN NOW A CITIZEN 
Lou-Tellegen is now a full-fledged citi- 
zen of the United States. Two years ago 
he obtained his first papers and, last 
week, with his attorney, A. Maynard, and 
witnesses J. Kaufman and Frank A. Con- 
nor, appeared in the Federal Court and 
received his second ones. 



TO EXAMINE BRUGGEMANN 

To testify' to all that he knows of the 
affairs of the American Amusement Com- 
pany, operating the Paterson and Empire 
theatres, in Jersey City, ex-Senator 
August M. Bruggemann has been ordered 
to appear in court. The company became 
defunct a short while ago, and as he is 
an officer in the corporation, he must re- 
spond to all questions. 

Bruggemann last month had a judgment 
filed against him by August Windisch, 
which the latter recovered. The' suit had 
been brought jointly against the company 
and Bruggemann for bill-posting and ad- 
vertising. Bruggemann testified that, 
while he did have an interest in the com- 
pany, Windisch trusted the company, and 
not* himself. Windisch was granted the 
judgment, hut an attempt to collect it 
proved unsuccessful. The present action 
is brought to find out what the company 
did with its assets and money. 

SINGERS LEAVE FOR MEXICO 

Twenty prominent Grand Opera singers 
left New York last Wednesday for the 
City of Mexico, where they will play a 
season of opera at the Theatre Arbeu. 
The company included Zematello. Taccani, 
Sinagra, Oppezzo, Vigionne, Silva, Aine- 
tro, Bozzano, Bettina, Freeman, Parry 
and Carlo Nicosia, conductor. The sea- 
son, which was billed to open on Monday, 
will continue for twenty weeks, after 
which the company will make a tour of 
Cuba, Porto Rico and Venezuela. 

LEE ARTHUR DEAD 

Los Anceles. Cal., Dec. 10.— Lee Ar- 
thur, playwright, forty years of age and 
a native of Shreveport. La., has succumbed 
here from injuries received in an automo- 
bile accident about ten weeks ago. He 
had been engaged in writing scenarios, bia 
last engagement being with Balboa. The 
first play that David Warfield appeared 
in. "The Auctioneer." was written by him 
and Charles Klein. Arthur's right name 
was Kahn. 



TICKET SPECULATOR FINED 

Lawrence Russell, arrested last week as 
a ticket speculator, was fined five dollars 
in Jefferson Market Court on Wednesday. 
Detective Fellnfan. who made the arrest, 
told the Court he heard Russell trying to 
sell opera tickets to two women. 



AMUSEMENT CO. INCORPORATED 
Trenton. X. J.. Dec. 0. — The Siebert 
nnd Levy Company has been incorporated 
here for the promoting of amusement parks, 
theatres, etc. The company will have 
headquarters in the Sheen Building, At- 
lantic City, with James M. Sheen as its 
ngent. Its capitalization is $50,000. 

STORK BRINGS GIRL TO SINGER 

Washington. D. C Dec. 7. — Margue- 
rite Sylva, the well-known singer, wife of 
Capt, Bernard L. Smith. U. S. N., haa 
presented her husband with a baby girl. 



Scene at the V. M. P, A. Dinner to J. J. Murdoch and Pat Casey 




At the Speakers' Table, besides Messrs Mordock and Casey, were E. F. Albee, Martin Beck, William Fox, Gu» Son, E. C. Mills, F. F. Proctor, S. Z. Pali, Sam Scribner, 
William T raven Jeromo, Carl Hoblitzell, Marcos Loew, Maurice Goodman, Aaron J. Jones, Harry Davis and John Rm y lfng . 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



- December iJL2,v!917 




WILL CRITICISE 
AND ADVISE 
ARTISTS 

N. V. A. PLANS INNOVATION 



An innovation which is expected to be 
• boon to many a vaudevile performer 
ia shortly to be installed in the, National 
Vaudevile Artists, Inc. This will be a 
bureau of advice and criticism, and it will 
endeavor to help actors work their acts 
into shape in order- that they may get good 
bookings. 

Men who know all angles of the vaude- 
ville profession and whose experience in 
the business is of many years' duration, 
will make up the board which will be 
headed by Henry Chesterfield, secretary 
of the association. 

Under the new arrangement, the actor 
will arrange to show bis act before the 
board. They will thereupon get together 
and work out improvements, changes and 
eliminations calculated to increase its 
appeal. 

Should the material of the act be 
thoroughly hopeless, the board will give 
advice as to where new material can be 
secured. The board, while it will not 
actually rehearse a new act, will also 
give the performer benefit of its knowledge 
and experience, and do everything pos- 
sible to work the turn into something 
good. 

No charge will be exacted for this 
service. It is simply an attempt to help 
the members in a practical way. Every 
member requesting aid or advice will be 
given the utmost consideration, whether 
He is a beginner or a head liner. 

All the criticisms will be thoroughly 
constructive, as it is not the intention to 
simply tell the actor what is wrong with 
his act, but to tell him how he can im- 
prove it as well. It is the opinion of Mr. 
Chesterfield, who is sponsor for the plan, 
that no act is perfect, and that the com- 
bined imagination and experience of 
several experts can improve even ac- 
credited headline turns. 

The plan is expected to go into active 
operation shortly after the new year. It 
will be worked in combination with the 
rehearsal hall, which is to be a feature of ■ 
the new clubhouse. In this miniature the- 
atre the performers can give as, many pri- 
vate showings as are necessary to effect 
the desired improvements. 
_ The personnel of the board is to be de- 
cided upon at a' meeting sometime in the 
near future, it is announced. 



DENY U. B. O. BOOKINGS 

Both Edgar Allen and Jack Loeb last 
week denied reports to the effect that 
the Win. Fox vaudeville houses would 
shortly be booked by the United Booking 
Offices. 

"Those reports have come np before," 
■aid Allen, "but there is no more truth 
in them than there would be if someone 
stated that Metro was going to book our 
pictures," 



DUTTONS' HORSE DIES 
The Duttons, who, with their trained 
horse, were appearing at the Orpheum 
Theatre in Brooklyn, were forced to 
leave the bill after the matinee "on Thurs- 
day, last week, due to the death of their 
horse. No one replaced them. They have 
canceled all time until they can get an- 
other horse. 



BURTON WRITES NEW SKETCH 

Sidney Burton has written a new sketch 
for four people entitled "The OM Folk's 
Home," which ia in line for an early pro- 
duction: • - • . '' .' 



PALACE BILL IS CHANGED 

After the Monday matinee the bill at 
the Palace Theatre received a general 
shaking up, which resulted in moving 
Cummings and Mitchell from the third 
spot to the sixth, the changing of Dor- 
aldina from closing the snow to the 
seventh spot; the addition of The Geralds 
to the bill, substituting for Ames and 
Winthrop, who withdrew, and changing 
Hermann and Shirley to opening the show 
from the number two position. Sig. Franz 
and company, changed from opening to 
closing the bill. 



WILL MANAGE LOEW HOUSE 

Memphis, Tenn., Dec. 10. — A. B. Morris 
will shortly assume the duties of assistant 
manager of Loew's Lyceum Theatre here, 
of which Benj. M. Stainback is resident 
manager. He was formerly employed at the 
old Opera House for fourteen years, and 
later, with his associates, built the Jeffer- 
son. He recently bad charge of the des- 
tinies of East End Park 



HOUSE CHANGES POUCY 

Springfield, IU., Dec. 11.— The Chatter- 
ton Theatre, of this city, has switched its 
policy from legitimate to vaudeville and is 
to be booked on the Pantages circuit. The 
theatre will split with the Lincoln Square 
Theatre at Decatur, 111. The Chatterton 
was the only legitimate theatre in Spring- 
field. 



THE MILLERS HAVE SPLIT 
Ed. and Lou Miller, the singing duo, 
have dissolved partnership and formed 
two new acts. In company with Al. Ray- 
mond, Ed. has been booked over the Or- 
pheum Circuit and Lou, who recently 
married Alice Bradford, of the Mavim 
Revue, will present a singing act in the 
East. 



JACK HENRY IS SERGEANT 

Jack Henry, vaudeville producer, has 
been appointed first sergeant of Company 
G, 22nd Engineers, of New York, com- 
posed entirely of men in the theatrical 
profession. The company had its first 
drill and meeting last week, when fifty 
new members were mustered in. 



TWO NEW ACTS, READY 

Harvey and Sophie Everett will open 
in two weeks in a new act entitled "The 
Follies of Adam and Eve," written by 
Allen Spencer Tenney. Robertson and 
Hayes also have a new one entitled "Mr. 
Bill from Louisville," which opens Mon- 
day. 



"THE FAN" HAS NEW CAST 

Through Oily Logsdon, Dorothy Rich- 
mond has recast "The Fan" and its com- 
pany now includes Broderick OTarrel, 
Robert Beed and Marguerite Mason as 
principals. The act opened with its new 
cast last Thursday at the Folly, Brook, 
■lyn. 



MRS. CHRIS EGAN ILL 

Mrs. C. C. Egan, wife of the manager 
of Keith's Royal Theatre, is slowly re- 
covering at her home after a serious oper- 
ation. Mrs. Egan is not expected out 

until the New Year. '•■ 



RUSSELL & O'NEIL HAVE NEW ACT 
Racine, Wis., Dec 6. — Russell and 
O'Neil have a new singing, talking and 
dancing act. They have just closed on the 
Nash time, and open immediately on the 
S. & C. Circuit 



LUCY PARKER JOINS BALDWIN 

Lucy Parker has joined the Walter 
Baldwin act and is now working with it 
in Philadelphia. 

CHOOS REHEARSING NEW ACT 

George Choos -ia rehearsing a new big 
musical girl act which will soon have a. 
production. >■■ ■ . .'•■'': •'*«,' J 



GARB OF DANCER 

MODEST, SAYS 

COURT 

GERTRUDE HOFFMAN ACQUITTED 



St. Louis, Dec. 10. — Gertrude Hoffman, 
who was arrested recently on the charge 
of giving indecent performances in public, 
was acquitted yesterday by Judge Calvin 
Miller, after a trial which lasted for over 
three hours. 

Among those testifying in the dancer's 
favor were the manager of the theatre in 
which she appeared, and her husband, 
Max Hoffman. The latter testified that 
Miss Hoffman wore three layers of tights 
in the snake dance, and in the Spring 
dance, which was particularly objected to, 
she wore clothing to the knees. 

The complaints of local dramatic critics 
and censors led to the arrest. The charge 
on which she was arrested has, as a maxi- 
mum penalty, one year in jail and a fine 
of $1,000. 

Her acquittal is regarded as a consider- 
able triumph of art over prudery by well 
known artists here and elsewhere. Many 
dancers had wired Miss. Hoffman express- 
ing sympathy, and offering to help her 
cause in every way possible. 

The trial, which was attended by both 
artists and sensation seekers, was one of 
the most interesting held here in many 
months. An invitation to see the dancer 
perform was extended to the judge, but 
this was refused with a smile. Miss Hoff- 
man, on the stand, gave a lecture on the 
aesthetics of the dance,' which went far 
over the heads of the crowd, but which 
was warmly applauded by the artists 
present. 

The more advanced .persons here are of 
the opinion that the decision will stand 
as a precedent, and will wipe out for- 
ever the official prudery which baa long 
made the middle west a standing joke 
among lovers of art. 

KEITH'S TO AID SUFFERERS 

The gross receipts of the Imperial The- 
atre, St. John, will be given this week 
to the Halifax sufferers, and the running 
expenses will - be paid by A. Paul Keith 
and E. F. Albee. St. John is the nearest 
town to Halifax. The manager of the 
bouse has been counseled to make, this 
a record week, and as the advertising is 
all being paid for by the owners, an im- 
mense spread in the city has been made, 
announcing the destination of the re- 
ceipts. 



PALACE BOOKS BERNHARDT 

Mme. Sarah Bernhardt has been booked 
for the Palace Theatre, beginning next 
Monday. 

It was in this house the great French 
actress made her American vaudeville, 
debut, and it is now her intention to make 
her farewell appearances in this country 
at the same theatre. Her repertoire for 
the engagement will include acts from her 
favorite plays. 



ANOTHER NEW ACT FORMED 

June Ijames, a sister of Florence and 
Marion Tempest, is soon to play an act 
with a male partner named Edwin Meyers 
that was written by Miss Tempest some 
time ago for- her own nse, but abandoned 
when she found that contracts for her ap- 
pearance in the legitimate prevented. " 



SAUBER SIGNS ARTHUR DUNN 

Harry Sanber last, week signed up Ar- 
thur Dunn and will shortly present' him 
over the U. B. O. time in a new act now:, 
being written. It is expected that it 'will 
.be ready by .Christmas week,, and it is 
planned to carry ■ seven ' people" in hia ' act' ' 



ADELINE LOWE INJURED 

Adeline Lowe, of Adeline Lowe and 
Company, fell and suffered a deep gash in 
her throat during her acrobatic and 
trapeze performance Sunday night at the 
Star Theatre, Brooklyn. She was ' in- 
stantly rushed to a nearby hospital, as 
it was feared the injury was serious. Ex- 
amination proved that no arteries had 
been severed, however, and the patient 
was pronounced out of danger on Mon- 
day. , 

Miss Lowe, who does casting work with 
two men and a girl, lost her hold and 
fell, striking her face against one of the 
supports. This rendered her unconscious, 
and, as blood instantly began to flow, the 
audience was somewhat excited. Ac- 
cording to the doctor's statement, the 
performer will be able to go on with her 
work in' a few days. 

SOLDIERS TO ENTER VAUDE 
Corporal Arthur Fields and Private 
Leon Flatow have volunteered their 
services to tour six weeks in vaudeville, 
their salaries going to the fund of the 
Seventy- sixth Regiment of the New York 
Guard, to which they belong. They will 
play the Keith houses. The two song 
writers have been appearing in various 
war interests for the past six months. 
Before the draft law went into effect, tbey 
were on a recruiting detail. They have 
also spoken for Liberty Bonds and the 
Red Cross. 



LOEW MANAGER CHANGES 

Atlanta, Ga., Dec 4. — W. A. Petriclt, 
formerly connected with one of the Loew 
theatres in New York, ' arrived . here 
Thanksgiving Day to assum'e the man- 
agement of Loew's Grand Theatre. J. M. 
Wilson, assistant manager, who was for- 
merly in charge of the house, has been re- 
tained in his original capacity. 

DONOVANS EXPECT STORK 

Mrs. James B. Donovan, known to 
vaudeville as Marie Lee, has retired from 
the stage temporarily and will not return 
until a certain interesting event occurs. 
Meanwhile, Husband James B. is receiv- 
ing congratulations and breaking, in . an 
act with a new partner, William -Kenny. 

LAUDER GOING TO BROOKLYN 

- Harry Lauder will go to Brooklyn for 
one day next Saturday, when he^wfll give 
two "performances at "the Academy "of 
Music- -He will be accompanied by a col- 
lection of vaudeville performers, and will 
appear himself in a repertoire of his fa- 
mous singing characters. ' ( - 

CARLISLE'S GIVE. SPECIAL SHOW : 

Carlisle's Wild West,, including R. CJ 
Carlisle,' Lily Carlisle, Louise .Clay, Rosie 
Venus, Tex Cooper,' Captain Jack Smith 
and Henry Red Eagle gave a special per- 
formance, December 7, at the "Heroland" 
bazaar. 



HOLBROOK PREPARES NEW ACT 

Musical Hplbrook and Mile. Carrie will 
produce a musical novelty act next sea- 
son. They have concluded an enjoyable 
wedding trip, and are settled at their 
home in Chelsea, Mass. 



MILES WRITES LOVE SKIT 

"The Spareribs of Love" is the title of 
Homer Miles' ; latest -sketch, which is 
about ready for production. It has a cast 
of six people. . 

— '— • - " , i 

NEW ACT REHEARSING j 

Fay; Two Cooleys and Fay are rehears-; 

injr a new act by Blanche Merrill, which 

will be seen on the United time early 

■ next year. ' •„ l f ■■<■ ' 

MANAGER LOSES MOTHER/ 

- The mother of David Rosenthal, assist- 
ant manager. of the DeKalb Theatre,. .died 
last week." '• '"' ' ' '' "'^ *! * r::T 



De&mper 12, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 




PALACE 

Sig Franz and Company offer a cycling 
diversion in which there are many fam- 
iliar bits shown. La Petite Violette helps 
the picture with a nice array of straight 
cycling and Franz does several clever 
stunts on a unicycle. The opening stunt 
is a boat on wheels and then the act runs 
through a diversified routine of feats un- 
til the closing laugh-getter, which is a 
bed on wheels. 

Hermann and Shirley are in the second 
spot and offer their eccentric dancing skit 
called "The Mysterious MaBquarader," 
which did not do so well on account of 
the meaningless talk running throughout 
the act. The offering act depends on the 
eccentric dancing of George Hermann, and 
that is all there is to it. 

Roy CummingB and Ruth Mitchell are 
newcomers to this Douse, with a nifty 
little skit entitled "One Afternoon," in 
which Miss Mitchell shows a pretty fig- 
ure, sings several numbers In a dandy 
style and flashes her good looks all over 
the place. But when it came to stopping 
the show it was up to the eccentricities 
of Roy Cummings, who has proved to be 
a capital clown, introducing several new 
and original bits of down falling, sliding 
and tumbling through a drop, which must 
be banded to him as being original. Cum- 
mings is a sure-fire comer and gets his 
sonsensical songs and chatter and other 
foolishness over in fine style. The act 
is a great laugh winner and stopped the 
show long enough for them to take a 
great many bows. 

Charlie Grapewin and Anna Chance re- 
turn to play their comedy skit, "Pough- 
keepsie," which ran smoothly and proved 
a good portion of vaudeville entertain- 
ment. The act is- running faster than 
ever in its present shape and both prin- 
cipals are getting everything in Che way 
of laughter from it. 

Ernest R. Ball and Maud Lambert had 
the important position of closing the first 
part, although Lady Duff -Gordon was pro- 
grammed for it. They sang six songs as 
only they can, and Miss Lambert wore 
some beautiful wardrobe which received 
liberal comment from the audience, while 
Ernest Ball was in good voice and did 
great credit to his compositions. His 
medley won an avalanche of applause and 
the act finished in fine style. 

Lady Duff-Gordon and her resplendent 
array of wardrobe and beautiful models 
opened the second half. The act was in- 
troduced by William Gibson, who ex- 
plained its purpose and the effort to as- 
sist a French war charity. Her Ladyship 
then made a few short remarks and the 
set, entitled "Fleurette's -Dream at Per- 
ronne," was shown. 

Florenz Ames and Adelaide Winthrop 
offered their new vaudeville act called 
"Caught in the Jam," which at one time 
was seen in "Hitchi-Koo." The act is 
more fully reviewed under New Acts. 

George Rockwell and Al Wood were in 
the next to closing spot and were the 
real hit of the bill. . They were in good 
voice and their nonsensical chatter lust 
cleaned up the honors, as the audience had 
been waiting from the early part of the 
first half for a good laugh. They 
have added several new gags about knit- 
ting, the scarcity of sugar and several 
local advertisements before they get down 
to the real meat of the act. The "don't- 
make-me-lie-to-my-mother" line of talk 
was a scream and it kept up until the 
hoy* got through with their tin whistle 
and banjo stunt, which closed the act. 
However, the boys were in soft all the 
way and deserved all they could get, 
which amounted to the honors of the bill, 
and their trick rendition of "Over There" 
was well worth the price of admission. 

Dora Tdina and her players closed the 
show with a massive production showing 
four scenic settings and employing nine 
people in what the programme calls a 
T?e vne Sensational." . The act held atten- 
tion at a late hour and is reviewed more 
fully under New Acts. 8. I* H. 



SHOW REVIEWS 

(Continued on page* 8 and 34) 



RIVERSIDE 

The comedy section of the bill at this 
house received a big uplift by the addi- 
tion of James Morton, who appeared as 
an extra feature, . introducing the acts in 
his clever and humorous manner. His in- 
timate acquaintance with the various per- 
formers gave him an excellent opportun- 
ity to introduce some comedy of a de- 
cidedly personal nature which was keenly 
enjoyed. 

The Three Jahns, a clever equilibrist 
act, opened, and their fast routine of 
tricks were executed without a slip. 

Truly Shattnck and Emma O'Neil were 
on second and the comedy of Miss O'Neil 
and Miss Shattuck'a singing put the act 
over in good shape. Their offering has 
improved greatly since last season and 
now is in excellent working condition. 

Joseph Bennett and Edward Richard's 
"Dark Clouds" is a sure-fire laugh pro- 
ducer with audiences unfamiliar with 
their comedy opening, but the act has 
been seen in all the local big-time the- 
atres and in consequence the dark stage 
dramatic opening lost some of its effect. 
The boys are clever dancers, however, 
and soon got things moving along finely. 
The act, after a slow start, wound up 
with plenty applause at the finish. 

Bonita and Lew Hearn's novel offering, 
"Bits of Musical Comedy," was well re- 
ceived, due to the clever comedy bits 
furnished by Hearn and Bonita's singing. 
A new opening number which she ren- 
dered particularly well started the act off 
well. The song is a good one and could 
be advantageously moved further down. 
There have been a number of changes 
made in "The Bonfire of Old Empires." 
Marion Craig Wentworth's dramatic play- 
let, depicting the uprising of the nations 
against imperialism, since it was pre- 
sented at the Palace Theatre. Whether 
on account of some slip in stage manage- 
ment, or the introduction of a new finale 
which had not been sufficiently rehearsed, 
the act came to a sudden stop on Monday 
afternoon leaving the audience wonder- 
ing whether or not the playlet was at an 
end. Whatever the cause, it needs im- 
mediate attention, as in its present shape, 
much of the value of the sketch and the 
excellent acting of the players is lost. 

Dorothy Jardon, with a rearranged 
repertoire of songs and Clifford Hess at 
the piano, opened intermission and scored 
the substantial hit of the bill. Opening 
with "Are You from Heaven t" she next 
sang Tosti's "Good-Bye," then "Some- 
where in France Is the Lily," and ended 
with "There's a Long, Long Trail." Miss 
Jardon was never in better voice and her 
excellent vocal method and finished sing- 
ing style makes her offering a delight. 

Felix Adler's conglomeration of non- 
sense, put together solely for laugh pro- 
voking purposes, succeeded admirably. 
His material is of so pronounced a "nut" 
type that one shudders to think what 
would happen if it were delivered by one 
who did not possess his pleasing personal- 
ity and charm of manner. 

Of personality, he has an abundance, 
and a singing voice with which he could 
accomplish wonders, if he were to devote 
a year of serious study under some com- 
petent vocal teacher. This idea has prob- 
ably never occurred to Felix, but it is 
well worth the trial. Even with an un- 
trained singing voice he sings a ballad 
well and his rendition of "Alsace Lor- 
raine" scored a big hit. 

The burlesque ventriloqnial bit which 
he is using for the finish is one of the 
most amusing things seen in vaudeville 
in many months. . 

"The. World . Dancers" In their "Evolu- 
tion of the Dance* .closed and held the 
audience in well until the finish,., 

W. V. 



COLONIAL 

The program ran according to schedule. 
Belle Baker headlined for the second week, 
and scored an enormous hit. Miss Baker 
should be adopted by Father' Knicker- 
bocker, and not be permitted to leave 
Greater New York, as the vaudeville- 
going public imagines that she is one 
of its own. 

The show opened with Percy Athos and 
Greta Read in a fast rollerskating offer- 
ing, that contained many good tricks and 
whirlwind revolutions. The man is a 
marvel at jumping over chairs. The 
opening aong could be dispensed with, as 
it has no bearing on the act. They started 
the show off in good style. 

One of the best lady violinists in 
vaudeville is little Jennie Middleton. She 
possesses a wealth of beauty and surely 
knows how to put over harmony. The 
"Wild Irish Rose" number was done to 
perfection. 

Bob Matthews now has his act running 
in tip top order. The characters por- 
trayed in his new skit called "The 
Rounder of Old Broadway," in which 
Matthews is the rounder, were finely 
drawn. Each member of the cast re- 
ceived a big hand. Matthews was re- 
membered by the Colonial assemblage 
and was accorded much applause when 
the act finished. The act is ready to hold 
down an important position on any bill. 

"Softly -the agents are calling me" is 
only one of the many lines that got for 
Felix Adler laughs that followed in close 
succession. His comedy songs, witty 
sayings and cleverly conceived ventrilo- 
quist bit were heartily enjoyed and 
heavily applauded. Adler then left to 
work at the Riverside. 

Carl Randall and Ernestine Myers were 
a revelation. Their dancing is superb, 
especially the closing number, when they 
offer a satire on an Egyptian fox trot. 
Randall is a marvel in the air, and his 
partner does equally well on the floor. 
The pair are blended into one big danc- 
ing carnival. The audience surely liked 
the act, as they gave them thunderous 
applause when they bowed off. 

After intermission came Russell Mack 
and Blanche Vincent, and right from the 
start made an impression that carried 
them along at a rapid gait. Mack opened 
with an apology that his partner was 
delayed and he would entertain with a 
few eonga. Miss Vincent then appears 
and seats herself at the piano; a line of 
cross-fire talk is indulged in, the conclu- 
sion of which finds them good friends 
again. _ They then sing pop songs that 
are delivered in a manner most convinc- 
ing. Both have personalities and voices 
that are bound to carry them along to the 
topmost rung in the ladder of fame. Just 
as a suggestion to Mr. Mack, he should 
refrain from using the "er" at the end 
of the lines in his songs. The act will 
find little trouble securing booking, as 
it is a gem. 

William LeMaire and Ed. Gallagher 
were a scream from start to finish with 
their comedy "War" offering. LeMaire has 
improved greatly, and Gallagher is the 
same straight man as of yore. 

Belle Baker has added a few new songs 
to her repertoire. The Colonial seems to 
be the home of Belle Baker, as each in- 
dividual seemed to know her personally. 
Seven songs were delivered, each one a 
hit. 

A scenic novelty was introduced, with 
Katherine Dana in songs, and Philip 
Morse accompanying on the flute, while 
flower and forest scenes changed every 
few minutes. The panorama did not work 
to perfection, causing unrest on the part 
of the singer. Miss Dana possesses much 
volume,' but very little voice quality. 

J. D. 



ORPHEUM 

The Darras Brothers gave the show a 
fast start with their routine of difficult 
stunts. 

They open with a few head-to-head bal- 
ancing turns, finishing with some hand- 
springs. A trapeze is then lowered and 
one of the boys does some good stunts 
on the flying bars that were received with 
loud applause. One of the most daring 
tricks he attempts is a balancing stunt 
in which he balances in topsy-turvy 
fashion while the trapeze is in motion. 

Emily and Clara Barry, formerly of 
the team of George Felix and the Barry 
Girls, are presenting an exceptionally 
good sister act, with a routine capably 
handled. In the opening song, the girls 
introduce themselves to the audience. 
Emily then dances, while Clara plays the . 
piano. Some comedy talk, centering on . 
love, is followed by a song by Emily and 
with Clara at the piano again, after 
which Emily dances. 

Halligan and Sykes open their act with < 
a song by Halligan, after which he tells 
some gags. The curtain rises. on an of. 
flee in which Halligan tries to sell Miss 
Sykes some real estate after finding out 
that aha has $1,000 in her possession. 
Many bright and witty sayings are brought 
into the skit and are well taken care of by 
this team. TTalHgan jg a very good com- 
edian and knows now to get the most out i 
of his work. Miss Sykes assisted him 
splendidly, considering the heavy cold 
she has. 

Bailey and Cowan, two clever boys, 
open their act with a banjo and saxo- 
phone duet, scoring a big hit right from 
the start. After the duet number, Cowan 
sings a Southern melody, accompanying 
himself on the piano, while Bailey played 
the banjo. They follow this with a 
"Liberty Song" that took the house by 
surprise. Then came a 'cello and saxo- 

Cne duet, followed by a finely executed 
jo number by Bailey. They finish the 
act with a darktown jazz selection. The 
pair are good musicians and have pleas- 
ing personalities. The act is fast going 
and the numbers are well rendered. 

Emmett De Voy and company followed, 
and presented their well-plnyed sketch en- 
titled "The Call of Childhood," written 
by De Voy. The story is told of a grouchy 
father who Is always nagging hla step- 
son because his mother is bringing him 
up on the eugenic plan. The father, who 
wants his son to be a man in every re- 
spect, does not like the way bis wife is 
bringing him up. 

The grandfather then tells the boy a sto- 
ry of Hallowe'en, when the spirit of cheer 
comes from the chimney and brings happi- 
ness to all concerned. Even the father, 
who always has been a grouch, is now 
smiling, and, when a party of boys pass 
the house, they are invited In for some 
cake and fruit- The father then promises 
that he will treat the boy right, and tens 
him of the things he is going to buy for 
him. 

The Cameron 81sters have rearranged 
their act since last week, and, in addition 
to getting a new fancy drop, are wearing 
some very neat and attractive gowns. The 
best appearing one is the Red, White and 
Blue one they wear to dance the medley 
of popular songs. It gives the set a strong 
finish and runs much smoother than it did 
last week. 

Then came Eddie Dowllng. who starts 
his act with a story about the Kaiser, after- 
ward giving a recitation about two Irish- 
men that went over big. After that is 
done he gives a few opinions of the war 
in the dialect of an Englishman, French- 
man, Turk, Italian, Hebrew, Irishman, and 
American. He finishes his act with an 
impression of Harry Lander in a good 
Scotch brogue. Dowling is a gifted come- 
dian and possesses a clear voice. With 
the routine he has at present be can per- 
form at any theatre. 

Gas Edwards' Song Revne will be re- 
viewed under New Acts. M. L. 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



December 12, 1917 




AMERICAN 

Stevens and Falke started the bill Mon- 
day night with a singing and dancing 
act, opening with a scene in three, rep- 
resenting an Indian encampment, in which 
the two girls appear dressed in Indian 
costume. They each make two changes 
of dress, Miss Stevens rendering three 
songs and Miss Falke doing the same 
number of dances. They were well liked. 

Al. Litt and Harnett Nolan possess the 
two requisites necessary to success, per- 
sonality and ability. Coupled with these, 
they have good material and the audience 

Sve them hearty approval for their work. 
lbs Nolan was at the piano, and her part- 
ner sang. They opened with a duet. Litt 
followed with a song and then Miss Nolan 
sang. They finished with another duet. 
They have good voices and sing well, 
getting the most possible out of their 
songs. They intersperse their singing with 
some good comedy talk also, which was 
put over well. 

Johnson, Howard and Lizette, three men, 
present an act made up of a variety of 
bits. They appear as hoboes, and do a 
song and dance, which they follow with 
tumbling and acrobatics. They then do 
some burlesque playing on trombones, 
violin and clarinet. They are best at 
tumbling, but do a lot of slap-stick comedy 
staff, which gets la ughs . 

Tommy Hayden, assisted by his "better 
»alf," had a. slow opening, but finished 
strong. He opened with a song and dance. 
His lady assistant followed with a violin 
solo. Then came another song by Hayden 
and one by his partner,- after which he 
gave an Englishman's description of a 
game. of baseball. For a finish, Hayden 
danced again, while his partner played the 
violin. Hayden is a capital dancer, and his 
baseball talk is funny, and gets laughs. 
"A Real Pal," a comedy skit played by 
two men and a woman, proved to be a 
laugh-getter. The scene represents a 
country store which, it develops, is the 
sole business establishment in an out-of- 
the way hamlet. To this place come two 
men, one of whom is to marry the daughter 
of the owner of the country store. His 
pal, who has unwillingly accompanied him, 
"double crosses" him by winning the girl 
for himself, after telling her that his 
friend Ned is a married man. The skit 
is bright and well written. 

Sadie Sherman was on first after the 
intermission, and scored a most decided 
hit. She opened with a song which she 
followed with a recitation about an out- 
cast. Then she rendered an Italian song, 
and closed with a popular number. Miss 
Sherman is a capable performer. She 
sings her numbers with telling effect, her 
Italian song being particularly well rend- 
ered in capital dialect. She is also an 
excellent elocutionist, and recites with ex- 
pression and force. 

In "What Really Happened," David S. 
Hall has a satirical sketch a little out of 
the ordinary. It is given in three episodes, 
each of which depicts a man married less 
than a year, who, having promised his 
wife to take her to the theatre, arrives 
home at 2 A. M. in a state of intoxica- 
tion. The first episode shows the hus- 
band acting as the injured party, and his 
wife the penitent. In the second, the con- 
ditions are reversed, the wife dictating the 
terms to her husband. The third shows 
the husband penitent and the wife forgiv- 
ing. 

Hall gives an excellent characterization 
of the husband, and is ably assisted by 
Olga Worth, who, as the wife, proves her- 
self to be a very capable actress. 

George Bobbe and Eddie Nelson scored 
the big hit of the bill, and stopped the 
show, the audience not being content till 
they had responded to an encore. They 
opened with some comedy talk, which was 
followed by a song by Bobbe. Then came 
a song by Nelson and a medley by both. 

The Santas Troupe of acrobats closed 
the show and gave full satisfaction. 

E. W. 



FIFTH AVENUE 

An entertaining bill was presented the 
first half of the week, with capacity at- 
tendance at the opening show. 

Mabel Burke was on first after the 
pictures, and. scored with an illustrated 
song. N 

Charles and Anna Glocker start their 
act with baton swinging, that done by 
Charles being particularly good. It is, 
however, in the juggling of water-filled 
receptacles that the best work of this 
team is done. Charles' first effort in this 
line is done with two glasses full of 
water, each balanced on the inner side 
of a hoop fasened at either end of a 
short rope. He then swings the hoops 
around his head. He does the same with 
small vessels, holding about a pint, with 
buckets and with small tubs, each of the 
latter holding about two buckets of water. 
The work is cleverly done, and the act 
scored a hit. 

The Two Follies Sisters and Nat Le Roy 
began with a song and dance. Then 
Le Roy and one of the girls sang, and 
did a few steps, giving way to their part- 
ner in a dance. Le Roy then did a single 
dancing number, which was followed by a 
song and dance by the girls, LeRoy join- 
ing them for a finish. The girls make 
a good appearance, dance well and make 
two changes of dress. LeRoy is an ex- 
cellent dancer. 

Helen Gleason and company, the latter 
being a "'mere man," were Been in a sketch 
entitled The Submarine Attack." The 
action takes place in a commodious state- 
room of a big ocean liner, the occupants 
being a newly married couple. At the 
-rise of the curtain they are discovered 
in pajamas, each near a single bed. The 
wife has been unable to get to sleep be- 
cause of the constant ringing of bells, 
tooting of horns, etc. She begins to con- 
jure up all kinds of disaster at sea, be- 
moaning the fact that they ever made 
the trip, as she is sure the ship will be 
torpedoed. They then discover that the 
portholes are closed and fastened, and the 
stateroom door is locked. This convinces 
the wife the ship is doomed. Her husband 
tried to convince her that the thunder-like 
noise she hears is from the guns at the 
Sandy Hook proving station, and that 
the horns and bells are from passing 
ships, bnt she refuses to be quieted, and 
tells him if she dies he is to blame. This 
brings the heroic stuff from her husband, 
who is about to smash the door with a 
chair when it is opened by the purser who, 
in answer to their query about submarines, 
says the vessel has not left the wharf. 

The skit is founded on a good idea, but 
is only fairly well written. 

Henri Hubilick, with his instrumental 
playing and singing, was liked so well that 
he was forced to respond to an encore. 
Knbilick plays artistically on the several 
instruments he uses, and is the possessor 
of a baritone voice of good quality and 
great volume. He rendered one song and 
three instrumental pieces. 

Diamond and Brenan, man and woman, 
open with a song and dance, and then in- 
dulge in some comedy talk. Then fol- 
low a song by the man and more talk. 
They finish with a song and dance. The 
man is a good comedian and his partner 
makes a pleasing appearance. They re- 
ceived marked approval for their work. 

Fay, Two Coleys and Fay, in their 
black-face act, were a great big hit, and 
were also in the encore class. They 
opened with a song and comedy patter. 
One of the Fays then sings a well ar- 
ranged medley, after which the other Fay 
starts a song, in which he is interrupted 
by his partners, who dance and talk. 

Scott Gibson, "The Australian Kilt," 
with his singing and comedy talk, proved 
himself to be an able entertainer and 
scored a success. 

Derkin'a Dogs and Monkeys, an act 
which follows closely the lines of Bar- 
nold's well known dog act, closed the 
bill and pleased. E. W. 



CITY 

A good bill was offered the first three 
days of this week, and stamped with ap- 
proval by a capacity audience on Monday 
afternoon. 

Opening the show, Vandermeer, a very 
winsome little miss, does an entertaining 
wire act. Her routine consists of several 
well done tricks on the wires and was sent 
off to an appreciative exit. 

Mills and Moulton, man and woman, 
start their act with both hurrying across 
stage as though anxious to meet some one. 
After going up and down a few times, the 
woman happens to let loose the word 
chrysanthemum, which the man recognizes 
as the word that is to introduce him to the 
young lady. He answers "heliotrope," 
and they began to converse. After some 
comedy talk, which draw laughs and ap- 
plause, they go into a song, and dance off 
to well earned applause. 

Roger Gray and company, a man and 
two girls, in a diversion of mirth, talked, 
sang and danced themselves- into favor. 
They open with a trio. Gray then fol- 
lows with a song, which he talks. Then 
he and the shorter of the two girls, render 
a duet very cleverly, each winning ap- 
proval. Then they do a dance. For a 
finish the trio sang several verses about 
a vaudevile show. At the conclusion of 
each verse they burlesque the stunts. The 
act scored a big hit and responded with 
an encore. 

The Feronis, a clever dancing 'trio, pre- 
sented a well put together routine of 
dances. They open with a Spanish dance, 
followed by a waltz, in which they ac- 
company themselves on bells they carry 
in their hands. The man then plays a 
'cello solo, getting applause, which he de- 
served. One of the women does a toe 
dance, accompanying herself on the violin. 
The trio finish with some ballroom dances, 
ending -with a whirlwind, that brought out 
applause good and strong. 

Jane Stuart and company, who is none 
other than Reinie Davies, presents a song 
routine with much personality. The 
young man who accompanies her at the 
piano plays a few well rendered numbers 
while Miss Davies makes her changes. 

She starts with a song, in which she 
has her fingers all tied up with knots 
to remind her of certain things she must 
purchase on a shopping tour. Then she 
sings -a song of courtship, marriage and 
a divorce, all occurring on a trip in one 
of the elevators in the Woolworth build- 
ing. In a costume of a farmerette, and 
with personality galore, she sings of 
"Doing Her Bit" in the fields. She finishes 
with a medley of good old American war 
songs. 

"Rubeville," a rural sketch, with its 
company of ten entertaining musicians, 
kept the audience busy applauding for the 
next eighteen minutes. The act opens with 
several of the men all gathered in the 
village store exchanging; jokes, when the 
proprietor, who is also the leader of the 
village band, enters and sets them to prac- 
tising their selections. After tuning up 
their instruments, they render a song that 
was put over in as fine a manner as pos- 
sible, and received the applause of the 
house. 

A young chap, who is supposed to be an 
advance agent for a road show, then turns 
up in the village and puts up at the hotel. 
The talk that ensues between them is 
sure laugh-getting, and was appreciated 
by the audience. Buddy Singer, the vil- 
lage dude, and singer, then puts over a 
song in a clear, mellow voice. They finish 
the act with some old-time songs, and, for 
an encore, played a Jazz selection that 
brought the house down with applause. 

Amoros and Jeannette, man and woman, 
present an act made up of comedy talk 
and singing. Miss Jeannette opens with 
a song, folowed by some comedy by 
Amoros, who is a clever comedian, and 
has good material, with which he gets 
laughs. The act as a whole is mostly 
slap-stick work. M. L. 



FOLLY 

(Last Half) 

Due to the showing of "A Daughter of 
the Gods," the bill for the last half at 
the Folly has only five acts. 

After a well-played overture, the pro- 
gram was opened by LeRoy and Hart, 
a classy singing turn. They start with 
a duet, each sings a song, and they then 
close with a duet. They scored a good 
sized hit in the difficult opening position. 

In number two spot came -a comedy- 
dramatic sketch called "The Fan." The 
story deals with a young baseball player 
who has been thrown out by bis father 
because he wants to marry a girl to 
whom his father objects. He is the jinx 
of the team, and his father blames the 
girl for it. A big game is to be played, 
and the father comes to see his son. The 
boy pleads for permission to marry the 
girl, but he refuses. Finally, the boy's 
chance, to bat comes, and he is about to 
strike out, when the father tells him it's 
all right; that he can marry the girl. 
The boy lines out a homer. All ends 
happily. The acting of the comapny is 
good, that of the father being especially 
so. 

Mel Eastman, a monologist, filled spot 
number three, and scored a hit with his 
comedy gags and songs. He opens with 
a song about wanting to be a minstrel 
man, and goes into a rapid-fire line of 
gags about things in general. The ones 
about stealing the horn, and George Wash- 
ington, are real gems. He then goes into 
a dramatic recitation about a boy going 
to be hanged, and his last words to his 
mother. He had the audience fooled com- 
pletely, and when the comedy ending 
came, brought down the house. After 
this, he sang a medley ,of popular songs 
and finished with one about having to go 
home to-night. 

Amoros and Jeanette, with their nut 
comedy and singing, kept the audience in 
good humor. Jeanette opens, with "Hello, 
I've been looking for you," and puts the 
number over in fine style. Amoros then 
enters, and, with his quaint bits of busi- 
ness, got many laughs out of the audi- 
ence. His gags about American girls, 
his falls and mannerisms "got" the audi- 
ence, and kept them. After putting over 
a number of gags, he plays on a con- 
certina, and got many laughs through 
missing some of the notes. Jeanette then 
enters, having changed her costume, and 
sings. Amoros, meanwhile, puts over a 
number of burlesque magic bits and they 
close with a dance that was well done. 
This act is one of the funniest nut acts 
seen in the neighborhood for a long time 
and deserves all it -got. 

The Oxford Five closed the vaudeville 
portion of the bill with their cycling 
novelty. They play a game of basket- 
ball on wheels, and had the audience 
cheering for them, as though it were a 
real contest. The work of the blond 
member of the team is the feature of the 
act, and he scored so often that it be- 
came tiresome. The act is a departure 
from the usual . run of closing acts, and 
scored a good sized hit. 

The bill was closed by the William Fox 
super-spectacle, "A Daughter of the 
Gods," with Annette Kellermann. The 
audience stayed for it. S. K. 



FAY AGAIN PAYS SHERIFF 

In order to avoid paying a second visit 
to the Alimony Club, Francis M. Fay 
met the demands of a deputy sheriff last 
Wednesday and handed him $141.76. The 
deputy met the actor as he was coming 
out of the Casino and when he handed 
the money to the man of the law he em- 
phasized the fact that he had seen all of 
the Alimony Club he wanted to. 

TILFORD'S ACT OPENS 
"Hello, Broadway," the miniature 
musical comedy which Lou Tillford is put- 
ting out,, opened at the Lyric, Newark, 
on Monday last. 



December 12, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



DORALDINA & CO. 

Theatre — Palace. 
Style — Dancing, 
Time — Sixteen minutes. 
Setting — Special. 

Doraldina and her players program 
their act as a "Revue Sensational." The 
billing, however, but merely describes 
the act, which is divided info four dis- 
tinct parts. Doraldina is assisted by 
eight men, who assume various charac- 
ters. 

The opening scene shows a room near 
a bull-fight arena, and Doraldina enters 
to do a typical Spanish dance to some 
Rubinstein music, accompanied by the 
men, who are dressed in Mexican cos- 
tumes and playing various instruments. 
In this scene the piano should be draped 
in order to add atmosphere. 

The second scene shows an Indian en- 
campment and the men represent Red 
men, who play tom-toms and accompany 
Doraldina, who does a short series of 
steps to semi-popular Indian music 

The next scene is a peep at a Hawaiian 

' background, while the men are dressed 

in natty Hawaiian costumes and sing 

"Aloha," accompanied by the playing of 

guitars, etc. 

Doraldina then steps out in a shredded- 
wheat skirt and cuts loose in one of the 
fastest and cleanest Hawaiian dances 
ever seen. 

The act is beautifully mounted, with 
special settings, rich in color and that 
look great under the lights. The men 
assisting are capable singers and instru- 
mentalists. Doraldina herself makes a 
charming picture in her various changes 
of wardrobe and dances with a pep and 
zip which keeps the act running at top 
speed. 

As a dancing feature, the act is a nov- 
elty to be contended with on a big scale 
and worthy of big honor on the big-time 
bills when rightly placed. S. L. H. 



NEW ACTS 

(Continued an pate ZS) 



KEENE AND DEAN 

Theatre — Proctor 1 * 125th Street. 
Style 1 — Singing and dancing. 
Time — Ten minute*. • 

Setting — In one. 

Keene and Dean, a man and girl, have 
a very meritorious offering. 

Dressed in football togs, and wearing 
footballs on their feet, in the first num- 
ber, they make a lasting impression on 
the audience as they go through their 
opening song. They then go into a 
novelty dance, which is neatly and 
cleverly executed. 

A singing number follows this, after 
which an eccentric dance is rendered. 
Keene then does a soft-shoe dance, in 
which some new steps are used. They 
finish their act with a burlesque baseball 
game which had the audience laughing 
all the time. 

This act should make good in small 
time houses. M. L. 



ARTHUR AND SQUIRES 

Taeatre — Proctor'* 23d Street. 
Style — Song and donee. 
Time — Thirteen minute*. 
SettiBg— One and /u«. 

This act, consisting of a man and a 
girl, is just another combination of song, 
dance and patter. The circuits are full of 
acts of this sort. 

Working in one, and using a special 
drop of their own representing the ex- 
terior of two apartment houses, they 
open with a telephone song, put over in 
a manner that pleased. Then, going 
to full stage, tuey open their routine 
with the usual talk and follow with song 
and dance numbers. The pair are good 
dancers, with a style all their own. 

The woman of this team wears pretty 
gowns, which offset her figure. She also 
sings well. She does not possess the best 
voice in the business, but it is pleasant. 
The act is a good one on the time they 
are playing. M. K 



AMES & WINTHROP 

Theatre — Palace. 
Style — Comedy skit. 
Time — Thirteen minute*. 
Setting — Special. 

Florenz Ames and Adelaide Wintbrop 
were formerly known in vaudeville un- 
der the name of Kolb and Harland. 
They left the two-a-day to join "Hitchy- 
Koo," into which they interpolated a 
scene. 

This scene is the basis for their pres- 
ent skit. It represents the outside of 
a black and white futuristic bungalow, 
and, at the opening, a woman's skirt 
gets caught in the door. A man then 
enters on the scene and endeavors to 
extricate the woman frcm her predica- 
ment and suggests that he go and get 
ber another dress. While he is away, 
a spider appears and the woman is 
frightened out of her clothes, appearing 
in white lingerie. The man then re- 
turns with a bridal dress and they sing 
a bridal number which leads into a 
travesty on ballroom dancing. A spe- 
cial patter song arrangement of "Gungha 
Din" comes next, and then a few steps 
and the act is over. 

The skit has several excellent laugh' 
spots and, at the opening, just borders 
on suspense with several bits of comedy 
business built for laughing purposes. 
The dancing and singing is nicely han- 
dled and carried them over in good 
shape. 

"Caught In the Jam" is the name of 
the act which should not need a Houdini 
to show it how to get out into the open. 

S. L. H. 



HEIDER AND PACKER 

Theatre — Fifth Avenue. 

Style — Singing and talking. 

Time — Twelve minute*. 

Setting— Special drop. 

This team needs new stuff in the way 
of dialogue and songs to get over with 
any force. The lines are all pointless 
puns, which never get a laugh, and the 
songs are weak, one of them, a Chinese 
dialect song, being a popular favorite 
of about seven years ago. 

The man opens with a nonsense song 
and the girl then enters. Talk ensues. 
The drop represents the office of Cook's 
Tours, and the lines deal principally 
with the countries of the world. Here 
is a sample gag: "Golf was invented 
in Mexico. Haven't you heard of the 
Gulf of Mexico t" 

Both dance speedily and have great 
bodily freedom, and the man's acrobatic 
steps are especially remarkable. They 
should do more dancing and less talk- 
ing. The girl has one beautiful gown 
and one ugly one. Her voice is rather 
pleasing. If they cut the talk and let 
the man dance and the girl sing, and 
do nothing else, they could get over in 
splendid shape. P. K. 



FRED ALLEN 

Theatre — Eighty-First Street. 
Style — Juggling and comedy talk. 
Time — Seventeen minute*. 
Setting — In one. 

Appearing in one and introducing him- 
self to the audience as a juggler and 
ventriloquist who will endeavor to make 
them laugh, Fred Allen easily fulfills his 
mission. 

He has the usual routine of juggling 
acts, using balls, hats, hoops and various 
other paraphernalia, and talking all the 
time. He also introduces a comedy ven- 
triloquist stunt that was put over in a 
manner all his own and hit the right 
mark. 

Then, having the pictures, of great 
men flashed on the screen, he appears 
between each one, while the audience is 
applauding, and takes his bows. The 
act will succeed in the smaller houses. 

M. L. 



HELEN GLEASON & CO. 

Theatre — Eighty-Firtt Street. 
Style — Skit. 
Time — Ten minute*. 
Setting — Special. 

T. C. Gleason presents Helen Gleaaon 
• and company in their comedy skit, "The 
Sub-Marine Attack," written by Allen 
Lieber. The scene represents a state- 
room on board an' American steamer and 
is very well worked out. 

A young married couple, journeying 
across the ocean on their honeymoon 
trip, are about to retire for the evening 
when the bride, who is a worrysome sort, 
thinks of the submarine scare and gets 
her husband all upset by telling him 
different things that are likely to hap- 
pen to them if they are overtaken by 
one of the undersea craft. She then 
hands a telegram she received during the 
evening to her husband, and it is a warn- 
ing not to sail on that boat as it is one 
of the many picked out to be torpedoed. 

A steward who happens to be passing 
their stateroom at the time drops in on 
them to find out what all the noise is 

about, and is asked how far out they 
are. On being told that they have not 
left the pier yet, the wife falls into a 
faint. 

The idea of the skit is original, the 
comedy is good and the company gives 
a pleasing performance. M. L. 



ORNAN TERNINI 

Theatre — Oreenpoint. 

Time — Fifteen minute*. 

Style — Monologue and songs. 

Setting — One. 

This is, without exception, the worst 
act the writer has ever had the misfor- 
tune to witness. In fact, it sounds as 
though the dialogue is one of those 
"any act on our list of 400 for 10 cents 
in stamps. With each act we will fur- 
nish a complete set of make-up and in- 
structions." 

After the "comedy" he sings in a 
falsetto and baritone voice, and then has 
some lines with the leader, when "Ah 
ha!" (enter Mephisto!) Ternini 
faints. The devil, turning his back to 
the audience, throws bis cloak about him, 
and Ternini changes his wig to a la 
Marguerite, and sings a selection from 
"Faust" in a falsetto voice. 

The next and last stunt is "Carmen," 
with a super, who doesn't speak a line 
except as the devil, where he has one, as 
the Chevalier. 

The only tbing in the way of praise 
must go to Ternini's falsetto. It is im- 
possible to see how the act can make 
even the smallest of the small time. 

L. R. G. 



CONROY & O'DONNELL 

Theatre — Loeu>'» American 

Style— Skit. 

Time — Thirteen minutes. 

Setting— In one. 

"TMTLetter Carriers" is the title of 
the skit presented by these two men, 
one doing a straight and the other a 
blackface part. Their routine of talk 
is based on the parcel post mail, and is 
put over cleverly. 

The act is opened with a song by the 
straight, after which they go into some 
rapid-fire comedy talk, extracting laughs 
from the audience, especially the talk 
centred on the signing of the applica- 
tion to the "gettem club." This put* 
their offering on a firm basis. The con- 
cluding song number of the act is a 
patriotic one. 

The act is a good laugh producer and 
wen assembled. M. I- 



THE SINGING COAL-MINER 

Theatre — National (try-out). 

Style — Singing. 

Time — Fifteen minute*. 

Setting — Special in three. 

Ralph Madison, who calls himself by 
the title given above, has one of the few 
genuinely novel acts seen in vaudeville 
this season. 

But, originality and novelty do not 
alone suffice to make beadliners, and this 
is the difficulty that Ralph will prob- 
ably run up against. His routine is poor 
and his voice is only average in quality. 
He has gone to a lot of expense for his 
act, opening with a movie, which shows 
him working with other miners in the 
coal mine. This vanishes, leaving him 
before a set representing the entrance to 
the mine. He opens with a song called 
"Down in a Coal Mine," and follows with 
one about a lighthouse. Both are of the 
recitation species. He got an encore, and 
did another song. He will probably get 
booked on the sheer strength of bis idea, 
but, if be got some new songs, he might 
fare much better. P. K. 



MANTELL AND ENNEKING 

Theatre — Greenpoint. 

Style — Singing and piano. , 

Time — Fourteen minutes. 

Setting — One and two. 

_ The act reminded the writer of the 
time he had to sit through a song recital, 
only it wasn't as long. 

Mantell and Enneking are a man and 
girl, who sing high-class ballads very 
well. 

The act opens in one with both in a 
duet. They then go into two, where the 
girl sings a solo, accompanying herself 
on the piano. The man should let the 
girl have the stage alone in this num- 
ber, as he does nothing else but stand 
there and look pleasant A duet war 
very well handled and sounded very 
pretty. They close with a duet in one. 

It is a very high-class singing act and, 
in an early spot, should go well over the 
big time. L. R. G. 

FRANCES WILSON 

Theatre— Proctor"* oSth Street. 

Style Posing. * 

Time — Eight minute*. 
Setting — One. 

Frances Wilson, in her offering styled 
"Modern Mirage" presents a pretty pos- 
ing turn. 

On a raised pedestal, situated in the 
centre of a white drop, she poses, while 
a machine flashes stereotype pictures of 
various kinds onto her body. Some of 
those receiving the most applause are: 
"The Oriental Girl," "The Picture in 
the Frame," "The Flower Girl," "At the 
Fountain," "The Dancer." "Peacock," 
"Chariot Race," "Butterfly," "Blossom 
Time." "The Storm," "Joan of Arc," 
"Spirit of "76," and the "Statue of Lib- 
erty." 

This act is a good opener for small- 
time houses. ^ M. D, 



WARREN AND TEMPLETON 

Theatre — Proctor"* VZSth St. 

Style — Singing, talking, dancing. 

Time — Thirteen minute*. 

Setting — In one. 

Neatly costumed, these two boys pre- 
sent a well assembled lot of material 
in song, dance and talk. 

Their dance numbers are very good 
throughout and help greatly in enhanc- 
ing the value of the act. The song they 
put over is very impressive. The comedy 
talk is all very humorous, and, with the 
other material, blends the act together 
very nicely. 

These boys should find tjelr way Into- 
the big time houses very easy as they 
have put together an act that ii deserv- 
ing of booking. M. I* 



10 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



December -12; : -19-17 > 



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TELLEGEN SEEN IN 

"BLIND YOUTH" AT 
! REPUBLIC THEATRE 



"BUND YOUTH"— A play In four 
acta, by Wlllard Mack and Loo TeUe- 
gen. PrcJnced Monday evening, De- 
cember 3, at the Republic. 

CAST. 

Loua Selaar Paul Pom* 

Tobbj Mathewa Hark Smith 

Bobo Basel Turney 

Conny Cbandoee ....Marie Chambers 

Maurice Monnler Lou Tellegen 

Henri Howard Lanxe 

airs. Wilton .Jennie Eustace 

Harry Wilton William Conrtlelch. Jr. 

-Mora ......•• Jennie DomoDt 

Fraacea Oranser Grace Carlyle 



Lou Tellegen, actor, has been known to 
as lor some time, bat, in the roles of author 
and producing manager, he disclosed him- 
self to us for the first time on the above 
date, when he played the star part in 
"Blind Youth," a drama on which Willard 
Mack was called in to pat the finishing 
touches. . . ■• • - 

The #Mory of the play has to do chiefly 
with one Maurice Monnier, an art student. 
Maurice haa sank to the lowest level of 
dissipation because of the heartlessneaa of 
a woman, who had been his companion for 
fonr years in the Paris studios. Her treat- 
ment of him, which at first is a severe 
blow, finally proves bis redemption, for he 
U brought to see his folly in bavins; cen- 
tered his. affection on a woman of her kind. 
When he arrives at this conclusion, he re- 
turns to New York, where he meets with 
success, and later, happiness. Then he dis- 
covers that his half-brother, a headstrong 
youth, is about to marry the woman who 
came so near bringing ruin to him. 

To prevent* such a catastrophe, Maurice 
lores the vampire to his studio, intending 
to expose her to bis half-brother, but the 
woman refuses bis invitation and disap- 
pears. In the last act virtue triumphs over 
▼ice in the good old-fashioned way. 

"Blind Youth" is purely an ''actors*" 
play, written from an actor's viewpoint- 
It is theatric and conventional. There is 
no element of suspense and no effort to 
depart from the obvious. It follows the 
lines of the old style melodrama, in which 
the chief characters always "played" to 
the gallery. But, in spite of this fact, the 
acting is better than the play. 

Mr. Tellegen for the most part, gave a 
good performance. He possesses a certain 
amount of charm, and acts with much dis- 
cretion. At times, however, he permits him- 
self to lapse into the trickeries and arti- 
ficialities, learned on the foreign stage and, 
before he can hope' to win foil praise for 
his unquestioned ability be must forget his 
old schooling and confine himself to the 
methods Of the stage of today. 

Jennie Eustace, Hazel Turney, Mark 
Smith, William Conrtleigh, Jr., Grace 
Carlyle and Marie Chambers all did cap- 
able work. 

WHAT THE DAILIES SAT. 

Herald — Well receive*. 

Sun — Old-fashioned romance. 

Tribune — Acting better than play. 

American— Talky scene* retard action. 



DAVENPORT REOPENS THEATRE 

Butler Davenport has reopened the 
Little Theatre with "The Silent Witness." 
The piece was written by Davenport, pro- 
duced by him in his own theatre and the 
star is none other than Davenport. The 
piece is in fonr acts. Among those in the 
cast are Catherine Calhoun, Margaret 
Campbell and Paul Doucet. 



"DESTROYER" REHEARSALS BEGIN 

Rehearsals begin this week for Garland 
G a den's Co-Workers' production of "The 
Destroyer." The play is taken from the 
French and in its original . form enjoyed a 

run of seven months. 



TITLE CHANGED AGAIN 

Cohan and Harris have decided to call 
the latest play of Harry James Smith 
"The Teacher of Goshen Hollow." The 
piece was originally tried out under the 
title of "The Bight Angle." The piece 
opens with Mary Ryan in the stellar role ( 
in Buffalo Christmas week. 

It is. planned to bring the play into New 
York late in January. 



"Neighbors," by Zona Gale; "The Critic's 
Comedy," by Samuel Kaplan; "The Girl In 
the Cofiln," by Theodore Dreiser, and "Yam 
Cbapeb." ' a pantomime, by J. Garcia 
Pimental and Beatrice de Holtholr. pre- 
sented by tbe Washington Square Players, 
Monday nlgbt, Dec. 8, at the Comedy 
Theatre. 



"THE GYPSY TRAIL" 
DELIGHTFUL COMEDY 
AT THE PLYMOUTH 



AUSTRALIANS TO SEE "FIREFLY" 

Through their American representative, 
Jack Hughes, E. and J. Tait have ac- 
quired from Arthur Hammerstein the 
Australian rights to "The Firefly." 



WASHINGTON SQUARE 
PLAYERS SEEN IN 
INTERESTING BILL 



The Washington Square Players pre- 
sented their second bill' of the new season 
last Monday night to a representative audi- 
ence. 

Tbe program was made up of three one- 
act plays and a pantomime. 

"Neighbors," the first on the list, a 
comedy by Zona Gale, is a realistic sketch 
laid in New England. All the characters 
are poor country folk, with big families and 
big hearts, who are all willing to do their 
bit and help clothe and feed an orphan 
boy sent to Miss Carry Ellsworth by her 
city relatives. Katherine Cornell made a 
good characterization of this village spin- 
ster. Marjorie Yonnegut looked and acted 
the 15-year-old girl that Inez Abel is sup- 
posed to be, and supplied much of the 
comedy. Kate Morgan was good as a 
philosophical grandma, and Robert 
Strange and Arthur Hohl made excellent 
character bits of Ezra Williams and Peter. 

"The Critic's Comedy," by Samuel Kap- 
lan, was the second playlet. In this, there 
is a young husband and wife who is his 
senior. The latter being a dramatic 
critic and the former a lounge lizard, who 
sponges' on bis wife. Helen Westley and 
Jay Strong played the leading roles well. 

"The Girl in the Cofiln," by Theodore 
Dreiser, was the most ambitions offering, 
but gruesome. It is a tragedy of life in 
a mill town during a strike, in which the 
centre of the stage is occupied by the 
coffined corpse of a girl who has died as 
the result of what was presumably an 
illegal operation. William Magnet, a 
leader of tbe strike demands revenge. His 
comrades call for him to come and speak 
at an all-important meeting ; but he is de- 
termined to watch that night by his dead. 
Finally the chief, Ferguson, appears and 
pleads with him. Ferguson . himself has 
that night lost the woman who means most 
to him, but be is willing to stifle his- per- 
sonal grief in tbe cause of their comrades. 
Magnet conquers bis mood and gpe&.out to 
speak to the strikers. It then transpires 
that Ferguson was the dead girl's lover. 

Frederick Roland as Magnet, and 
Arthur Hohl as Ferguson, were effective. 
Marjorie Vonnegut, Kate Morgan and 
Marjorie McClintock were seen as the 
strikers. 

"Ynm Chapab," the last of tie quartet, 
was a pantomime and dancing sketch, 
which enlisted the services of the entire 
company. 

WHAT THE DAILIES SAY. 
Herald — yew biU tcins approval. 
Tribune — Most interesting biU. 
Tiroes — Ably contrasted biU. 
Sao — T«po o ffer in g s of merit. 
World— " Girl in the Coffin" interest i. 



"THE GYPSY TRAIL"— A comedy in 
three sets by Robert Hoasam. Pre- 
sented on Tuesday night, December' 4, 
at tbe Plymouth. 

OAST. 

Frank Raymond Robert Cummlngs 

Miss Janet Raymond Katherine Emmet 

John Raymond Prank Longacre 

Stiles Charles Banna 

Frances Raymond Phoebe Foster 

Edward Andrews Roland Young 

Michael Ernest Glendinnlng 

Mrs. Wlddimore Bffle Elialer 

Ellen Margaret Sams . 



Robert Housum, who will be' remem- 
bered by a few as the author of "Sylvia 
Bans Away," presented by William A. 
Brady several years ago, has in "The 
Gypsy Trail" a new piece produced 'by 
Arthur Hopkins in his own playhouse, a 
play which will be long remembered by 
many, for its freshness and humor are 
truly delightful ■ 

The little play is in three short acts, 
filled with undeniable charm and novelty, 
and with the irresistible appeal of romance 
aa its theme. 

"The Gypsy Trail" cleverly depicts the 
contrast of the conventional with the ro- 
mantic. The story deals with a roving 
adventurous youth and a girl whose sur- 
roundings have been most conventional, yet 
deep within her from childhood has lurked 
a desire for romance and adventure. 

She is loved by a conventional young 
business man, who having had it brought 
home that the only way he can win her 
is to display a romantic aide to his nature, 
engages the adventurous youth to act as 
chauffeur in a prosaic, kidnapping affair. 

Careful that his actions may arouse no 
scandal, the unromantic lover brings his 
grandmother to tbe country house which 
was the scene of tbe adventure in order 
that she might act as chaperone. With 
such care and forethought one might be- 
lieve that the plan would work out to a 
nicety, bnt as so many carefully laid plans 
go astray, this one did likewise. 

The result is a foregone conclusion, al- 
though the uncertainty lasted until nearly 
the end of the play. The girl was irre- 
sistibly drawn to tbe youth of adventure, 
and he to her, in spite of her conventional- 
ity, which in the end ruled both. 

Phoebe Foster was the girl, and she 
made the character delightful. Roland 
Young was the young man, bound by con- 
vention, yet longing to be the dashing 
lover, and Ernest Glendenning, tbe rover, 
with romance always in his blood, gave 
one of his finest performances. Miss Effie 
Ellsler, as tbe conventional young man's 
grandmother, herself possessed of wit and 
the spirit of romance, scored an individual 
hit, and Frank Longacre as the young 
brother of the girl was most natural. 

WHAT THE DAILIES SAY 
World — IAght and lively. 
Sun — Full of potent humor. 
Times— Pleasant comedy. 
Tribune — Delightful comedy. 
Herald — Pleases and putties. 



"A NIGHT IN SPAIN" OPENS 

Cocoanut Grove, atop the Century The- 
atre, was opened for the season by Dil- 
lingham and Ziegfeld last Thursday night 
with "A Night in Spain" as tbe attrac- 
tion. It is a musical show with plenty 
of melodious tunes, written by Quinito 
Valverde, dancing, pretty costumes and 
scenery. The company is beaded by Ray- 
mond Hitchcock and includes: Mario 
Marco, prima donna soprano; Luisita 
Pucbol, Amparo Sans, Carmen Lopez, An- 
tonio de Bilboa, and the Muses Doloretea 
and Maxzantinita. The Cocoanut Grove 
opens at 10.30 P. M. for- a public dancing 
and refreshments and "A Night in Spain" 
begins about midnight. 



OPENING DATES AHEAD 

"Words and Music"— Fulton, Dec 22. 
"Lord and Lady Algy"— Broadhurat, 

Dec. 22. 
"Flo-Flo" — Cort, Dec. 24. 
"The Lady of the Camellias" — Empire, 

Dec. 24. 
"Why Marry" — Astor, Dec 25. 
"Cohan Revue, 1918" — Cohan & Harris, 

Jan. l. 



Shows Closing 
"Tbe Very Idea" — Astor, Dec. 15. 
•.■Midnight Frolic"— New Amsterdam Roof, 

Dec 22. 
"Misalliance" — Washington, D. C, Dec 16. 



"OVER THE TOP* 
IS GOOD VAUDEVILLE 
SHOW IN DISGUISE 

"Over the Top" is a- good vaudeville 
show, strung together by a thread of a 
story run in to allow for the appearance 
of beautiful' Justine Johnstone. Possibly 
it has a superfluity of pretty stage settings 
for such ■ a performance and a patriotic 
final to the first- act that could hardly be 
expected to be found in tbe Palace. De- 
spite them, however, the idea that strikes 
one as they leave is that it is a good 
vaudeville show. 

The first act opens' with a tenement 
house exterior in one that serves to bring 
out Aleen Bronson and Joe Laurie, Emma 
Sharrock and Craig Campbell, all of whom 
have been seen in vaudeville. Laurie and 
Bronson run away with the scene, the for- 
mer putting over some original gaga that 
went well. Miss Johnstone appears also 
as a little girl who dreams fancifully of 
the land of frocks and frills, to which her 
tenement bouse purse has never allowed 
her admittance. 

Tbe second scene takes her to that land, 
which is presided over by Vivien Oakland, 
of the Oakland Sisters, also not unknown 
to vaudeville. She is supremly charming 
in the part. She shows tbe little dreamer 
about the place and makes her acquainted 
with Mr. Plot, in tbe person of T. Boy 
Barnes. likewise a toiler in tbe fields of 
the two-a-day. Fred and Adele Astaire, 
"big time"-' entertainers,' appear at this 
point and also- do their vaudeville dances. 
Charles Mack, for years a member of the 
team of Swor and Mack, was noticed also 
in this scene. 

After a song with Ted Loraine and the 
Oakland Sisters, down on the programme 
as scene three, Laurie and Bronson did a 
specialty entitled "At the Railroad Sta- 
tion." 

A big scene showing a score of pretty 
girls in an impersonation of some well- 
known beverage, article or utensil, was 
then unfolded, to be followed by Rolando's 
Neo-CIassical Dancers, long a vaudeville 
feature This, with a big patriotic effect, 
in which hundreds of aeroplanes are Been 
filling tbe horizon and sweeping on "Over 
the Top" ends the first part. 

The second part has five scenes, entitled 
"At tbe Theatre," "The Golden Forest," 
"Pas De Deux," "In Algeria," "The Old 
Stage Door," "The Eyes of Youth" and 
"In Chu Chin Chow's Cave" They are 
carried along by Laurie and Bronson, 
Barnes, Campbell, the Oakland Sisters, 
the Astaires and Mack. 

At their conclusion come Harry and 
Emma Sharrock, who present tbe same 
mind-reading act they bave been offering 
in vaudeville. And, like its appearance in 
the two-a-day, it proved mystifying and 
highly entertaining, even though it had 
been made part of a so-called production. 
They were put to the most severe tests by 
the audience on tbe opening night, but 
were uniformly successful. 

T. Roy Barnes has a hard time in the 
piece, his main duty, as near as could be 
ascertained, being to stall around and keep 
tbe piece going while scenes were being 
changed back-stage. 

The Astaires, always clever, did noth- 
ing to lessen their reputation as graceful 
and entertaining dancers. Judged by their 
performances both in this piece and in 
vaudeville they have a bright future ahead 
of them. 



December 12, 1917* 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



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Paul C Sweinhart, Managing Editor 

NEW YORK, DECEMBER 12, 1917 

Entered June 2s, 1879, at the Post Office at 
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his magic wand he could turn sawdust 
into a most palatable dish." 

So it was with Wills. He could get 
humor out of the most unpromising ma- 
terial. He could Bay the most unfunny 
things in a way that would make his au- 
dience laugh till it cried. 

Wills could not help being funny. He 
fairly exuded fun. lie looked funny, he 
walked funny, his every action was fun- 
ny. If he winked an eye it was funny. 
If he assumed a sorrowful appearance be 
was funny. He was, in fact, funny from 
head to feet. 

For several years Wills had not been 
seen in vaudeville, but had lost none of 
his fun-making ability and as a member 
of the Hippodrome company he had been 
making countless thousands laugh. 

And now he is gone. And with him 
goes his fake telegrams and his peculiar 
personality. Others may, and doubtless 
will attempt to copy. his work, but until 
we have the duplicate of Nat Wills we 
will not see his work duplicated. 

Nat Wills stood alone. There have 
been clever monologists, many funny co- 
medians who have made the people laugh. 
There are some of these same performers 
now and there will continue to he to the 
end of time, but there has been only one 
Nat M. Wills, nor is it likely there will 
ever be another. 



G. C. G. — Sarah Bernhardt is seventy- 
four years old. She is French. Yes, she 
did have a leg amputated. 



T. E. D. — Joseph Weber and Lew Fields 
had been partners for a quarter of a cen- 
tury when they separated. 

Z. C. G. — Billie Burke was the star of 
"The Rescuing Angel." Its New York ap- 
pearance took place at the Hudson. 



C. L. L. — It was Ann Murdock, not 
Anne Meredith, who appeared in "Excuse 
Me" during its New York run. 

C. P. W.— Ernest Truex played the title 
role in "The Good Little Devil," in which 
Mary Pickford played the blind girl. 



B. N. — There are two Sidmans, and 
both are in the show business. Burlesque. 
Write to Sid Rankin, our burlesque man. 



M. M. O. — Theodore Friebus was for 
several seasons a popular member of stock 
companies playing in and around New 
York. 



S. N. — If you want to find out the 
name of a stock company in any city why 
not read the route Hat in The Cluteb 
every week? 



Tnc CLirrzx caw si obtained wsolbuii »*d 
betail, at our agents. Daw's Steamship Agency, 
17 Green Street, Charing Cross Road, London, 
W. C, Engl a n d; Brentano-'a News Depot, 37 
Avenue de l'Opera, Paris. France; Manila, P. L; 
Gordon & Gotch, 123 Pitt; Manila Book and 
Stationery Co., 128 Escolia Street. Sydney, 
N. S. W., Australia. 



THE PASSING OF NAT WILLS 

To the average reader, the announce- 
ment in last Monday morning's papers of 
the death the day before of Nat M. 
Wills meant the loss of a friend who could 
never be replaced. The average reader 
may never have known him personally, 
may never have been nearer to him than 
the orchestra seat is to the stage, but 
still he looked upon Wills as a friend who 
had cored him of many a case of blues, 
had made him forget his sorrows and drive 
dull care away. 

Nat M. Wills was for years & unique 
figure as an entertainer. He waa unlike 
any of his contemporaries in tempera- \ 
ment and methods. He could convulse 
his audience with laughter through re- 
marks, which if said by another, would be 
most commonplace. His fuhnyisms were, 
in fact, exemplifications of "it is not so 
much what you say as how you say it." 

Some of Wills' intimates have said that 
he was born funny and could not help 
being so. However this may be, certain 
it is that he began his stage career when 
be was two years of age, having been ear- 
ned onto the stage as a baby. Before 
he was 20 he was a member of a stock 
company in Washington, D. C, and, while 
there began playing tramp character 
roles, which led to his adoption of the 
tramp character when he entered vaude- 
ville as a partner of Halpin. 

The team of Wills and Halpin became 
known the world over, and on his return 
to America, he went into farce comedy 
and was seen in "A Son of Rest," "A 
Lucky Dog," and other vehicles, in which 
be appeared with varying success. 

It waa not, however, until Wills became 
a single entertainer in vaudeville that he 
really came into his own. From the very 
first date he played, he jumped into fame. 
His humor was of a different kind than 
vaudeville audiences had been used to 
hearing. It was simple, but delivered in 
his dry, pointed way, it was irresistible 
as a laugh producer. 

His reading of fake telegrams from 
famous men all over the country was one 
of the funniest things done on the stage, 
but it became so only because it was done 
by Nat Wills. He invested it with his 
individuality, gave it expression and em- 
phasis with hut own peculiar mannerisms 
and so made the reading funny. 

In describing a famous chef, a noted 
gourmet once said, "With the touch of 



TWENTY-FIVE YEARS AGO 

Master Walter Lewis was with the 
"Soudan" company. 

Arthur C. Moreland was with "Blue 
Jean." 

"She Only Answered Ting-a-Ling" was 
published by T. B. Harms A Co. 

"After the Ball" was advertised, "Inst 
Published, Free to Professionals," by Chas. 
K. Harris. . 

MarinelU announced his opening at 
Koster and Bial's, after returning from 
Sweden. 



T. T. G. — Edwin Stevens played the same 
role in "Sweet Kitty Bellairs" (from which 
it waa taken), when it was produced by 
David Belasco. 



I. L. M.— It la hard to tell if the man 
you saw was a real Eskimo. We don't 
know of any on the stage. They can make 
np very easily. 



C. G. — Dillingham & Zeigfeld operate 
the Century Theatre jointly. Yes, he is 



♦XI7 e Special CI? ris farms Jhasue of it?* 

gfcut Ifurk Clipper 

fflill be iBsxteb Betember 19ttf 

Host Call tor tSapg— Jbrrmsi Clnur Steembtr 15tfj 



Answers to Queries j 



the same Zeigfeld who puts out the 
lies" every year. 



Tol- 



M. A. B. — Marie Doro is the wife of 
Elliott Dexter. 



R. I. — Yes, Olga Petiova now heads 
her own company. McClure Pictures Cor- 
poration. Don't know. 



D. B. W. — Franklyn Ardell was formerly 
a well-known vaudeville performer. 

P. Y. N. — So far as we know, he waa 
not related to the late Louis Aldricb. 



A. 8. F. — Franklyn Farnum is with the 
Bluebird Photoplay Company. He is a 
star. William Farnum and Dastin Far- 
num are with the William Fox Co. 



D. V. — Cecil Cunningham is divorced. 
Jean Havez. She recently appeared at 
the Palace. 



B. B. J. — Of course there are. Can't 
tell you the names of all Indians on the 
stage, but will give your letter a private 
answer with the names of those I know. 



G. B. B. — Alice Nielsen was well known 
in light opera long before she studied for 
grand opera. 

V. F. — They are brothers. Both are in 
vaudeville. Can't tell you. Your letter 
i.s very indefinite. 



B. B. — The Bnshwick Theatre, Brook- 
lyn, is operated by the Bnshwick Operat- 
ing Co. A. Paul Keith is the man you 
mean. Palace Theatre Building, New 
York. 



M. S. C. — Vivienne Segal came here from 
Philadelphia. She made her New York 
debut at the Casino. 

O. L. — "The Masked Ball" was pro- 
duced about twenty-five years ago. So 
was "The New Wing." 



D. M. E. — William Harris, the theatri- 
cal producer, is dead. He died last year. 
Yes. Joseph Brooks- died the same week. 
We don't think so. 



Rialto Rattles 



SOME PAST 

Advertisement in paper reads: "Polly 
With a Past (100 nights in New York)." 

Site's worth knowing. 



A HARD CHASE 

Sign on Broadway Theatre reads: 
"Pauline Stnrk— Until They Got Me." 
Where are the motor cops! 

TITLE FOR SONG 

Here's a new slogan for the food com- 
mission: "Food will win the war. Our 
boys can't fight Austria Hungary." 

FOR THE CAUSE 

Why doesn't the government get up-to- 
date, and install jazz bands with each regi- 
ment? That would beat the bagpipes. 

ANOTHER LAW SUIT 

We expect to to hear any moment BOW 
that Walter Hill has started a suit against 
Artcraft for producing "The Bluebird." 

OLD STUFF 

Two acts are fighting over the gag "tax 
on seats," which is about as up-to-date 
a pastime as arguing about the Civil War. 

CONSERVATION 

Billy Watson's "Beef Trust" has been 
doing poor business on Tuesdays, accord- 
ing to report, since that day has been ap- 
pointed . a "meatless day." 

NO CHANCE 

Although a new check room has been 
added to the equipment of the N. V. A. 
clubrooms, actors still have to go else- 
where to get checks cashed. 

ONLY A COINCIDENCE 

Many people nave been crowding Reisen- 
weber's to see the "Jim Jam Revue," 
thinking it was a dramatization of the 
magazine called "Jim Jam Gems." 

ANOTHER MAN*" 

For the first time in history, the audi- 
ence walked out on Felix Adbr last week. 
But. it wasn't the comedian. It was a 
pacifist orator of the same name. 



A. C. S. — George Arliss played the title 
role in the Fiske production of "The 
Devil." Edwin Stevens appeared in the 
Henry W. Savage production of that play. 
Their portrayals were totally unlike. 

D. E. — 1. It is difficult to draw compari- 
sons between singers of the past and those 
of today. Adelina Patti, Campanini, 
and Brignoli were all considered great in 
their day. Of all the singers of the past 
and present, Jenny Land probably stands 
out pre-eminent of all time. Certainly 
she received greater homage in the United . 
States than any singer who ever appeared 
here. 2. Frieda Hempel is a German. 



IT MUST BE SO 

Joan Sawyer is billed as a "death de- 
fying dancer" by the management of the 
six day race. We know many whose danw 
ing ought to earn them that billing. 

HIGH UP 

The Garrick Theatre, in Chicago, has 
established a "runway," similar to the 
Winter Garden's here. The girls' salaries 
will now be changed to overhead expenses, 
probably. 



WELL NAMED 

The show in which Blanche Ring appears 
is said to have required the actress to 
wear tights one week. The next week, it 
is said, they were cut out. And the show 
is called, "What Next?" 

WRONG PLAY 

The lyceum bureau which booked "The 
Old Homestead" for an army cantonment 
is about as logical as the man who would 
give free tickets to the deaf and dumb 
asylums for symphony concerts. 

BOOM IN BUSINESS 

Since the district attorney sent out his 
denunciation of an unnamed show on 
Broadway in which nude chorus girls ap- 
peared, little has been heard of the bad 
business wail. Everybody is trying to find 
that show. 



OPERATING COMPANY FORMED 

Tbecton. Dec. 8. — The Metropolitan 
Amusement Company was incorporated 
here yesterday for the purpose of operating 
theatres, music halls and other places of 
amusement. Charles A. Cogan is the agent 
of the company, which was capitalized at 
$100,000. The Incorporators are William 
Roray, Francis J. Smith and Charles A. 
Cogan. The offices are at 509 Federal 
Street. Camden. 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



December 12, 1917 



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THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



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14 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



December 12, 1917 




LORNA ELLIOTT 

TO HEAD NEW 

BAYONNE CO. 

WILL OPEN CHRISTMAS DAY 



B axon if E, N. J., Dec 10. — James Cor- 
mican, formerly a popular member oC the 
Lorna Elliott Stock Company, is returning 
to Bayonne at the head of his own com- 
pany, which will be known as the Cormi- 
can Flayers. Last week contracts were 
signed by which the Strand Theatre goes 
under his sole management on Dec 24. The 
opening will take place Christmas after- 
noon. 

Actor-Manager Cormican has surround- 
ed hlm«»lf with a company of capable, 
players, first and foremost of which is 
Lorna Fflliott, conceded to be the most 
popular stags favorite this city has ever 
known, who returns as leading lady. 

Robert Leaner, another local favorite, 
will alternate the leading male roles with 
Cormican. 

Mary IjMJM Malloy, new here, bnt well 
known in Jersey City, comes as ingenue. 

The Strand,' 'formerly the Broadway, 
has been thoroughly overhauled and re- 
modeled at ■ cost of $25,000. A balcony, 
seating 500, has been pot In, bringing the 
seating capacity op to 1,000. A large 
lobby has rtnlaeed the former small one, ' 
and the house has been repainted and re- 
furbished from top to bottom. 

A long list of Broadway successes has 
been second. "Boning Stones" win be 
the opening, bill, and this will be followed 
by "Cheating Cheaters," "Captain Kidd, 
Jr.," "Hit the Trail Holliday" and other 
equally popular scripts. 

Matinees will be given Monday, Wednes- 
day and Saturday with prices ranging from 
15 to 25 cents. The night prices win be 
20, 30 and 50 cents. Rehearsals begin 
next Tuesday. 

It is three years since Bayonne has had 
a stock company, and it is safe to predict 
a hearty welcome for Lorna Elliott and 
the Cormican Players. 



ACTORS MAKE BALL A SUCCESS 

Lawrence, Mass., Dec & — The Mili- 
tary Ball given in the State Armory, 
under the auspices of the Emerson Play- 
ers last Monday evening, the proceeds of 
which go to the "boys" at the front, was 
a phenomenal success. As soon as the 
door was opened the crowd began to come 
in droves, and in a short time the hall was 
filled to overflowing, and it became neces- 
sary to obtain another hall for those who 
could not get in the Armory. The Armory 
was tastefully decorated with bunting and 
electric lights and the boxes around the 
sides were filled as well as the remaining 
floor so that after the entertainment was 
over it was next to impossible to get space 
enough for dancing. The program was : 
International dances by Irene Crocket and 
Flora McLean ; Minnie Dupree ; Dancing 
Flower Girls from "The Child of Judea" ; 
Dick Barry, of the Emerson Players' sec- 
ond act of Cohan's Revue, by Emerson 
Players, with dancing from 10 p. m. to 1 
a. m. The great success of the affair was 
due to the personal efforts of J. W. 
Sehaake. business manager, and Bernard 
Steele, producing manager of the Emerson 
Players, together with the entire staff of 
the Colonial Theatre, assisted by the 
company. Music was furnished by A. F. 
M. .Military Band, Bernhardt Meyer, di- 
rector. "Apron Strings" will be the at- 
traction next week, followed by "The Har- 
vest Moon," "In Old Kentucky," "Little 
Johnny Jones." 



SPOONERS CJVE SDC NEW PLAYS 

The Cecil Spooner Stock Co. at the 
Grand Opera House, Brooklyn, holds the 
unique distinction of having produced four 
new plays so far this season with two 
more new ones in preparation for produc- 
tion between now and New Tears. The 
new plays already successfully launched 
are : "My Irish Cinderella," "How to Hold 
a Husband," "A Wife for a Day," and 
"The Girl Who Came Back." On the 
week before Christmas, "When a Woman 
Loves" will be presented, and on New 
Year's week "The Unkissed Bride." a new 
farce by Chaa. E. Blaney, will be given. 
Two of these plays may be seen on Broad- 
way some time In January. .Aside from 
the new plays, this excellent company has 
presented such bills as "The Heart of We- 
tona," "Little Peggy O'Moore," "On Trial." 
"Sinners," "The Cinderella Man" and "It 
Pays to Advertise." Good business pre- 
vails. 



HOLLINGSWORTH JOINS PLAYERS 

Nobthaicetos, Mass., Dec 6. — Harry 
HoDingsworth, the new leading man of 
the Northampton Players at the Acad- 
emy of Music, made his first appearance 
last Monday in the title role in "Hit-the- 
Trail Holliday," and Aline McDermott, 
leading woman, on the same date rejoined 
the company after a short rest, and they 
were heartily received. Win. H. MaUone, 
who was especially engaged for the pro- 
duction, gava a good account of himself. 

POU TO HAVE MUSICAL STOCK 

Washington, D. 0, Dec. 10.— At Poli's 
Theatre ah Christmas eve a musical stock 
wfll be installed, the opening bill being the 
familiar piece "The Candy Shop." The 
company was selected by James Thatcher 
last week, and includes Jack Squire, who 
was with "Very Good, Eddie," last season ; 
Eiiae Bartlett, wno recently closed with 
Poll in Bridgeport; Ralph McGowah, 
brother of Jack, the latter until recently 
a member of Ziegfeld Follies. Charles 
Sinclair wfll be the director. 



BLANEY HOUSE TO HAVE STOCK 

Baltimobe, Md., Dec 10. — Blaney's 
Colonial Theatre is to become the home 
of a first-class stock company under the 
direction of Charles and Harry Clay 
Blaney. No definite date has been set for 
the opening, bnt it will be tile latter part 
of January. A company of capable play- 
ers, including a well-known leading man 
and woman, wfll begin rehearsals about 
Christmas time, and the opening play wfll 
be one of the latest of those released for 
stock. 



REGAN TO HAVE DENVER STOCK 

Dnm, Col., Dec 10. — Walter Regan, 
the Western stock actor, has arranged to 
open a stock company of his own in this 
city the latter part of April, to continue 
throughout the summer. Regan is one of 
the biggest stage favorites in the West, 
and his name has great drawing power 
here. Mabel Carruthers, at present play- 
ing with Lon TeUegen in "Blind Youth," 
will be leading woman of the Regan com- 
pany. 



AUTO HITS MRS. BLANEY 
Mrs. Harry Clay Blaney was run down 
by an automobile last week on Eighth ave- 
nue. New York, and seriously bruised. No 
bones were broken, bnt she received a se- 
vere nervous shock. Mrs. Blaney was 
taken to her home, where she has since 
been confined to her bed under the core 
of her physician. Her recovery has been 
slow because of her nervous condition. 



JOINS CUTTER STOCK 
Cortland. X. Y_ Dec. 10. — Ann Jor- 
dan has joined the Cntter Stock Company 
showing here. She plays second leads. 



ALCAZAR TO HAVE STOCK AGAIN 
Saw Francisco, Dec. 10. — Stock win 
reopen at the Alcazar Theatre on Christ- 
mas Day with "It Pays to Advertise" as 
the opening bill. 



LOUIS GRANAT 
TO OPEN NEW 

COMPANY 

PICKS WEST NEW YORK 



West New Yobk, N. J., Dec 10.— The 
Comet Theatre, recently built at this 
place, has been leased by Louis M. Granat, 
who has arranged with Michael KaUesser 
and tbe Great Henri to locate here with a 
permanent stock company, which win be 
in the nature of a producing house for 
this firm, and which, if their present 
plans are carried out, wfll- eventually be 
the headquarters of a stock circuit. - 

KaUesser and Henri will start out with 
two companies, the first of which will be 
the Washington ' Stock Players, with 
which they will open the Comet on Mon- 
day, Dec Z4. "Her Mother's Warning" 
will be the opening bill. This company 
win remain here for a fortnight, the play 
selected for the second week being "A 
Chance Every Girl Takes." 

W ith these two plays and two others, 
"What Might Have Been" and "A Million- 
aire for a Day," the Washington Stock 
Players, headed by the Great Henri, will 
start on the road on Jan. 7, playing one 
or two towns in New Jersey and then 
jumping to Pennsylvania, which State 
they will tour for the rest of the season, 
probably adding a few Ohio towns to its 
itinerary. 

On the same date that this company 
takes to the road the firm will bring their 
second company to the Comet, where they 
wiU play standard successes, as well as 
new play's which have never before been 
staged, as they intend to make it a. try- 
out house. 

George Smitbfield has been engaged as 
general stage director, and all productions 
wfll ' be made, under his personal super- 
vision.^ 

The Great Henri wfll feature his roller 
skating act, either presenting it between 
acts or, whenever possible, working it into 
the play. For this company Francis 
Keeley has been engaged as leading man, 
while Constance and Bianoa Robinson will 
alternate tbe l«<«n g lady roles. Other 
principals who have been engaged are Mrs. 
Robinson, Peter Barra, Frank Sherlock, 
Frank Martin, Robert Hyde and Charles 
Ludwig. 

Popular prices wfll prevail at' the 
Comet, with two matinees a week— 
Wednesdays and Saturdays. 

Manager Granat was formerly well 
known in vaudeville as a whistler. 



SOMERVILLE STOCK GETS HOWARD 
Soiceevuxe, Mass., Dec 7. — Arthur C. 
Howard has opened as leading man of the 
Somervflie Theatre Stock Company here. 
He recently closed under the management 
of Henry Mfller, and was seen also in the 
title role of "The Man Who Stayed at 
Home." 



"MIXED BLONDES" GET JEWETT 

Eric Jewett, son of Henry Jewett, well 
known in stock, is with Joe Driscoll's 
"Mixed Blondes," which opened last week 
in Plainfield, N.'J. The act is headed by 
Grace St. Clair. It played the Academy of 
Music, Jersey City, the first half of this 
week. 



CAZENEUVE SIGNS LEADING MAN 
Montreal. Can., Dec 10. — Paul Caze- 
neuve has signed M. J. G. Briggs as lead- 
ing man of the stock company with which 
he wfll open Christmas week at the Em- 
pire, with "Rich Man, Poor Man" as the 
bilL 



LORD- VERNON CO. BREAKS RECORD 

Little Rock, Ark., Dec 7. — The Lord 
A Vernon Musical Comedy Co. during its 
eleventh week at the Gem Theatre, here, 
broke all records both on the week and 
on a single day. The house was opened 
on a Labor Day several years ago, and 
has always done big business, but it re- 
mained for the first musical stock com- 
pany that has ever played the town to 
break all. .admission records on their 
eleventh week. The Lord A Vernon Num- 
ber Two Show is rapidly being signed up 
and will open at the Kempner Theatre. 
Dec 24, bnt will open oat of town on the 
17th. Mr. Lord has signed np Billy Jack- 
son to handle the producing and Lea. D. 
Poe as musical director. He has also 
signed up Willard and Leighton, a team 
that was with him all last season, for 
parts and specialties. Both the Gem and 
Kempner companies will have fifteen peo- 
ple, including a musical director and 
scenic artist. 



SOMERVILLE LDCES MORTON PLAY 

Somebtilix, . Mass., Dec 6. — Michael 
Morton's stirring play "The. -Yellow 
Ticket" is the current offering of the 
Somerville Players, and the press and pub- 
lic have given the production the stamp 
of approval „. 

The players do good work. Adelyn 
Bushnell gives a splendid performance as 
Myria Varenka. Arthur Howard is seen 
at his beat aa Julian Rolph. Brandon 
Evans is giving a clean-cut portrayal of 
Baron Audrey. It is his best work of tbe 
season. John M Kline, in the difficult 
role of Monsieur Ziubatoff, once again is 
proving what a capable actor "he is, and 
John Gordon, Grace Fox, Rose Gordon, 
John Dngan and Elbert Benson an lend 
good aid. The play was staged under the 
able direction of Arthur Richie, who has 
done his work well. 



PACKARD CLOSES ONE CO. 

Jkbsct City, Dec lO.-^-Jay Packard 
closed his stock house here, the Strand, 
this evening. The reason given was that 
he wished to devote all his time to his re- 
cently acquired theatre in Newark, the 
Orpheum, which has been doing excellent 
business. 



CALLAHAN COMPANY CLOSES 

Mason, 111., Dec 6. — The Callahan Dra- 
matic Company, under canvas, has closed 
and the outfit has been shipped here for the 
Winter. Owners Callahan and Corbin are 
planning an entire new outfit for next sea- 
son, opening May 10 at Chatsworth, 111. 



POWELL SIGN5 ALMA CLARK 
Alma Clark, well known in stock, has 
joined an ingenue lead for Holton PoweU's 
"Broadway After Dark" company, touring 
Iowa and the Northwest under the manage- 
ment of A H. McAdams. v 



STOCK CO. REVIVES "ROMANCE" 

Los Asofj.es. Ca]., Dec 6. — The Mo- 
rosco Stock Company is giving a revival 
of "Romance," with Bertha Mann in the 
role made famous by Doris Keane in New 
York and for more than two and one-half 
years in London. 



COLONIAL STOCK GETS RTNALDO 

Bruce Rinaldo has been engaged as di- 
rector, and Helene - del Mar as leading 
lady of the Colonial Stock Co., after clos- 
ing a season of twenty-nine weeks with 
The Original Williams Stock Co. 



LEAVES STOCK FOR VAUDEVILLE 

Vancouver, B. C, Dec 6. — The Sisters 
Russell, Trio and Margaret have left the 
Gary Stock Company to join the "Cycle 
of Mirth" company now touring the Pan- 
lages Circuit. . 



Stock and Repertoire Continued on Page 29 



HART SIGNS PERCY -HASWELL 

Percy Haswell, the stock actress, has 
signed with -Joseph- Hart to appear in 
vaudeville under his management. 



December 12, .1917 



THE NEW YOIK CLIPPER 



15 




EVELYN STEVENS 
THREATENS TO 

SUE KAHN 

WANTS A SEASON'S SALARY 



Erelyn Stevens, through her attorneys. 
House, Grossman & Vorhaus, has notified 
Ben Kahn that she will bring suit against 
him for a season's salary. 

Miss Stevens is prima donna of the 
Onion Square Stock Company, but will 
close at the National Winter Garden 
Saturday, having received a two weeks* 
notice to close on that date. 

It seems that Miss Stevens, through her 
lawyers, claims that she was given a sea- 
son contract by Kahn, and that he has no 
right to cancel her before the season is 
over, as the contract did not contain any 
two weeks' clause. — 

In reply, Kahn states that be did not 
give Miss Stevens a contract, and that 
he has never given any of his performers 
contracts. When he engages bis people, 
he states, he keeps them as long as they 
are of value to his companies and houses. 
He cites many cases where he has re- 
tained performers for a long period. 
Frank Mackey was with him for over a 
year until be resigned to take George P. 
Murphy's place with Barney Gerard's 
"Follies of the Day." Bert Weston left 
him to go with "Blutch" Cooper last sea- 
son only after a year's engagement Billy 
"Grogan" Spencer has been with him for 
over thirty weeks, and retires from the 
cast Saturday night for a three weeks' 
vacation. He returns again Jan. 7. Mae 
Leavett and Bessie Rosa closed several 
weeks ago, after being with his company 
over a year. None had contracts, he 
states. Miss Stevens was with the com- 
pany five weeks. 



BURLESQUERS FORM DONKEY CLUB 

Detroit. Dec. 10. — The burlesque boys 
have formed the Donkey Club here, the 
chief aim of which is to aid burlesque 
boys at the front. The officers are: 
George Daly, president; Sid Johnson, vice- 
president; Harry Dames secretary and 
treasurer; Al Fitzgerald, major: Wm. 
Cillins, sergeant-at-arms ; William Gilbert, 
chaplain. Theatrical profession carrying 
honorary cards: Harry Morrison, agent of 
"Some Babies" ; Arthur Phillips, manager 
"Some Babies" ; Morris Cain, manager 
"Hello, America"; Henry Wolf, agent, 
"Hello, America" : < George Clark and 
Chas. Fagan, "Military Maids"; Mat 
Kolb. "Darlings of Paris": Max Fields. 
Dave Peysor and Eddie Healy. "Tempt- 
ers": Jos. A. McCoy, "Orientals"; Fred 
Benden and Tom Roberson, "Girls From 
the Follies"; Durry. Stanhope. Feankel 
and Pickett (The Big Four), Rube Ben- 
net. Lew Butlar, Watson. Berlin & Sny- 
der Co., Harry Welch, Joe Dolan, Billy 
Carleton, Hugh Bernard, Harry Kolb and 
Fred Stanley, of "The American" ; George 
W. Brower, John P. Burke, Billy Gill ert 
Bob Barker and Joe Woodman, of the 
"Girls From Joyland." There are twenty 
members of the club at Camp Custer, ten 
at Camp Grant, eleven at Waco, Tex., 
six at Richmond, Va.. five at Camp Sher- 
man, three at Camp Taylor and eight with 
the American expedition in France. These 
boys receive tobacco and dainties each 
week. 



A. B. C. SHOWS CHANGE HOUSE 
Toledo. Ohio, Dec. 10. — Through ar- 
rangement with Hurtig & Seamon, the 
American Burlesque Circuit is booking 
their shows at the Palace, this city, on 
Sundays. Strouss & Franklyn's "Lady 
Buccaneers" was the first show to play 
here last Sunday. The shows usually 
play a few one-nighters from here into 
Columbus. 



LEVEY BUILDS THEATRE 

Detboit, Dec. lO.-^-Sam Levey, owner 
of the Cadillac Theatre, here, which plays 
American Burlesque Attractions. has 
launched an $800,000 building and theatre 
enterprise, in connection with Lou Sam- 
lisky, a real estate mtn, and they are now 
building the Lincoln Square Theatre, 
which will seat 2,000 people. It has al- 
ready been leased for fifteen years as a 
motion picture house. It will be ready 
around April. 



FINDS LOST SISTER 

Chick Bricroont, straight man of the 
Harry Steppe show, at the Follies The- 
atre, located his sister last week, after a 
search of several years, when he read a 
note in The Cuppei to the effect that 
Pauline Bricmont and Henry Huber had 
been married recently at Hutchinson, 
Kan. Mr. and Mrs. Huber are members 
of a one-nighter playing through the Mid- 
dle West 



McNAMARA SUCCEEDS 

Cleveland, Ohio, Dec. 10. — Jack Mc- 
Namara took charge of the Empire in this 
city last week, relieving Phil Isaacs, who 
has been manager of the house the past 
two seasons. McNamara is one of the 
best known men in burlesque. He has 
been manager and agent for Barney Ger- 
ard's shows the past nine years. He re- 
cently resigned as manager for "Some 
Show.'' 



GIRLS AID SOLDIERS 

Springfield, Mass., Dec. 6. — The mem- 
bers of the "Cabaret Girls," at their clos- 
ing performance at the Gilmore, made an 
appeal to the audience in behalf of the 
fund which is being raised by the local 
telephone girls to bring home for Christ- 
mas the Springfield boys who are stationed 
at Camp Gordon. The fund was increased 
by $91 through the efforts of the bur- 
lesquers. 



BURLESQUERS ACT FOR SOLDIERS 

Springfield, Mass.. Dec. 11. — Dot 
T.eighton. Sidney Berlin and Tom Me- 
Kenna, of the "Follies of Pleasure" com- 
pany were among the performers who en- 
tertained at the dinner given by the Home 
City Council, Knights of Columbus, to 
two hundred soldiers of the Coast Artil- 
lery stationed at the TJ. S. Armory here. 



NEW "BIFF, BING, BANG" OPENS 
Cleveland. Ohio, Dec. 10. — The new 
"Biff, Bing. Bang" show went on tonight 
at the Empire, and gives promise of being 
a good show. ' 

Joe Rose closed with the company last 
Light. The comedy is now in the bands 
of Bob Nugent' and Exnil Casper, who are 
giving a good account of themselves. 



COLUMBIA DECLARES DIVIDENDS 
At the regular quarterly meeting of the 
Columbia Amusement Company, held last 
Thursday, at the Columbia headquarters 
in New York, dividends were declared for 
the various companies controlled by the 
Columbia. It is 'stated that the dividends 
were the largest ever declared. 



WATSON BREAKS RECORD 

Washington, D. C, Dec 10. — It is 
claimed that "Sliding" Billy Watson 
■broke all burlesque records for this city 
last week at the Gayety. Watson, who is 
oue of the strongest drawing cards in bur- 
lesque, was well liked here. 



LEVEY, HERK, BEATTY, HERE 

Sam Levey, owner of the Cadillac The- 
atre, Detroit and of the "Charming 
Widows" : I. M. Herk, burlesque mag- 
nate, of Chicago, and F. Thomas Beatty. 
of Chicago, were visitors in New York last 
week. 



CENSOR BOARD 

WILL STOP 

STEALING 

MANAGERS PROTECT MATERIAL 



In order to protect material and bits 
from being stolen, a censorship commit- 
tee will be appointed by the Mutual Bur- 
lesque Managers' Association, which will 
investigate all charges and enforce its 
regulations. 

This was decided at a meeting held 
Thursday night in the Columbia Theatre 
Building. Tbe committee will work in- 
dependently of the American Burlesque 
Circuit censor committee, and will be 
under instructions from the Managers' 
Association. 

All managers will submit their books to 
the committee not later than July of each 
year. At this time they will be adjusted 
so that there is no conflict the endeavor 
being to have.no two shows alike. When 
there is a duplication of material every 
effort will be made to find the rightful 
owner. 

Arrangements will also be made to pre- 
vent performers leaving circuit shows and 
going into stock companies and there using 
material belonging to their former em- 
ployers. 

Protection of burlesque material is a 
rather difficult task, it is claimed by a 
well known producer, for practically all 
tbe scenes and bits now in use are ex- 
ceedingly old and have been used by near- 
ly all managers. New material is scarce, 
and that is about the only sort which 
could reasonably be protected. 

It is said that one bit, which has been 
used by several shows this season, has 
been traced back to Harry Williams, who 
used it seventy years ago. It will be diffi- 
cult to determine 'who has the ex-jlugive 
right to this and similar bits. 

At the meeting these were present : 
James E. Cooper, I. M. Heck, Charles 
Franklyn, Barney Gerard. Charles Baker, 
Teddy Symonds, F. Thomas Beatty. 
Henry Dixon, Harry Strouss, T. W. Dink- 
ins, Frank Damsel and Maurice Jacobs. 



MANAGER BUYS DINNER 

Greenville, Texas, Dec. 10. — The mem- 
bers of "The Thoroughbred Girls," playing 
here last week were treated to a Thanks- 
giving dinner by their manager, Charles 
Wells. Speeches were made by all the 
members, each congratulating the man- 
ager on the success of his tour, which is 
now in its fifteenth week, without having 
had a single lay-off. 



MARTELL GOES HUNTING 
Barnecat, N. J„ Dec. 8. — Harry Mar- 
tell, one of the principal stockholders in 
the Empire and Casino Theatres and other 
burlesque enterprises, is spending a few 
days at his country borne in Manahawken 
on a bunting trip. He brought home 
seventy-six ducks yesterday for one day's 
shooting. 



FRANKIE BURKE LOSES FATHER 

Oakland, Cal.. Dec. 7. — A. P. Scbmitz 
of this city died at his home here. Mr. 
Schmitz was the father of Frankie Burke, 
ingenue of the "French Follies," playing 
this week at tbe Gayety, Philadelphia. 



UNION SQ. TO LOSE TWO 

Bessie Carrett, ingenue, and Evelyn 
Stevens, prima donna of the Union Square 
Stock Company, win close with tbe show 
Saturday night at the National Winter 
Garden. 



HASTINGS SHOW AIDS SOLDIERS 
WATEBDUnv, Conn., Dec. 11. — Twelve 

acts appeared at the Jacques Theatre last 
Sunday for the benefit of the soldier boys 
of this city, located at Camp Devens, 
Ayres, Mass., who were to return to their 
homes for Thanksgiving dinner. Enough 
money had to be raised to pay the trans- 
portation of 400 or more from the camp to 
this city and back. The acts were all 
made up from the Harry Hastings Big 
Show company. 



KITTY FORSYTHE TO MARRY 

Ritialo. X. Y« Dec. 11.— Kitty For- 
sythe will close with the "Sight Seers" 
this week at the Gayety, and will be re- 
placed tomorrow by Charlotte Worth. 
Miss Forsvthe is to be married shortly to 
a non-proirssional. 



KYRA CLOSES WITH "WIDOWS" 

Kyra. the Egyptian dancer, closed last 
Saturday night with "The Charming 
Widows'* at the Gayety, Brooklyn. She 
has signed for the balance of the season 
with the "race Makers." 



BEATTY SIGNS THE DALYS 

Thomas Beatty. owner of the "French 
Frolics." while in New York last week 
signed Eddie and Lena Daly for two more 
years. He also signed Ruth Hastings and 
Frankie Burke for one more year after 
this season. 



DR. SUSS'S FORD STOLEN 

A Ford automobile, belonging to Dr. 
Suss, was stolen from in front Of the 
Olympic Theatre last Monday night Al- 
though detectives are on tbe search, no 
traces of it have yet been found. 



ROSS QUITS ORIENTALS 

Chicago. Dec. 10. — Cecil Ross has 
closed with Watson'a "Oriental Burlesqu- 
ers" and arrived here this week. She is 
reported to have joined one of the local 
touring girl acts. 



NOLA REGNOLD LEAVES KAHN 

Frances Cornell, iate of the Rose Sydell 
Company, replaced Nola Regnold as prima 
donna of the Ben Kahn Stock Company, 
headed by Harry Steppe, Monday, at the 
Follies Theatre. 



MONA RAYMOND TO STAY 

Mona Raymond has decided to remain 
with tbe "Hello Girls" as prima ' donna, 
recalling tbe notice she had gives to take 
effect this week, in Springfield. 



JEAN POLLOCK TO CLOSE 

Philadelphia, Pa., Dec. 11.- 
Pollock will close with the "Sporting 
Widows" at the People's, this city, Satur- 
day night 



FLORENCE FOY LOSES BABY 

The fourteen - months - old daughter of 
Florence Foy, of the "French Frolics" 
company, died at her home in Buffalo, 
Dec. 4. 



RUTH HASTINGS WITH "FROLICS" 

Ruth Hastings is the new prima donna 
with "The French Frolics," she baring 
joined in place of Myrtle Cherry, who was 

in. 



DOLLY FIELDS SIGNED 

DoUy Fields, soubrette of tbe Harry 
Steppe Follies Show, has signed with 
James E. Cooper for next season. 



MAE SHERIDAN CLOSES 

Mae Sheridan closed as prima donna of 
the Mollie Williams' Show at Hurtig & 
Seamon's last Saturday night. 



Burlesque News continued on Page 27 



CASPER SUCEEDS ROSE 

Emil "Jazz" Casper has succeeded Joe 
Rose as principal comedian with the "Biff, 
Bing, Bang" show. 



16 



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LA 
BERGERE 

and Posing Dogs 



ART IN PORCELAIN 
AND MARBLE 



BILLY 
B.VAN 
<§> 

Management 
KLAW & ERLANGER 



PAUL 

GORDON 

and 
AME 

RICA 

Offering a Cycle of 
Surprises 

Direction 
WM. S. HENNESSY 



ed. a 

DERKIN 

AND HIS • 

Dog and Monkey 
Pantomime Novelty 

Direction 
THOMAS FITZPATR1CK 



BERT 
BAKER&CO. 

in 

"Prevarication" 

Dir. HARRY FITZGERALD 



FLORENCE 

RAYFIELD 

In Vaudeville 



Dir. LOUIS PINCUS 



Are you securing consecutive bookings? If not, let us write 

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WE WRITE, PRODUCE and STAGE ACTS, 
SKETCHES, TABLOIDS, Etc 

Can secure time for Acts of Merit. 
Call, Write or Telephone. . 

MANNY ICHNER 

Suite 201, Gaiety Theatre BIdg., 1547 Broadway, New York 

Telephone 7745 Bryant 



ALVIN and KENNEY 

Original Clewing Show with 9 Minutes of Continual Laughter 

DIRECTION-FRANK DONNELLY 

SHEFARD *& OXX 

FOLLIES OF VAUDEVILLE 
Representatives, Jo Page Smith and Gene Hughes. PLAYING U. B. O. 



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A vaudeville writer of regular vaudeville acts, 
sketches and monologues. Write, wire, 'phone or 
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My Success Your Success 

FRANK 
DOBSON 

Booked Solid 
MAX E. HAYES 



THE 
FAYNES 

THE ARTISTS WITH A 
SUPREME OFFERING 

Dir. JACK FLYNN 



ELIZABETH 

M. 
MURRAY 



Dir. Alf. T. Wilton 



NAN 
HALPERIN 



Management 
E. F. Albee 



PAUL 
PEREIRA 

And his famous 
String Quartette 



Dir. MAX E. HAYES 



AMANDA 
GREY 

AND BOYS 



Direction 
ROSE AND CURTIS 



Throat irritation may 
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usin& as a ^ar^le in 
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LISTERINE 

The Safe Antiseptic 



EDWARD 



LOUIS 



Z. HUNTER and DE GODFREY 

Blackface cmaiBaaa fas theb- novelty act, "Without Cm." 
Usinr their original winter scene in a limousine touring car to SWtahl the story. A l a u g hin g 

DIRECTION, JACK FLYNN. UTS. O. 



hit so different. Watch us. 



GEORGE and PAUL HICKMAN 

IN VAUDEVILLE. Direction— ROSE & CURTES •--"/• * ;• 



vDecetriber 13^1507 



T$KE NEW- YORK CLIPPER 



17 



DR. OSCAR M. LEISER DEAD 
Dr. Oscar M. Leiser, known throughout 
the theatrical world, died of heart failure 
at the Lambs Club last week while dis- 
cussing with bis -friends his plans to go 
to Europe to take his place as a captain 
with the army. Several days prior to 
his death a dinner was tendered to him 
by bis brother members. A member of 
the Lambs for fourteen years, he was 
forty-three years of age. 

Funeral services were conducted Mon- 
day morning at the Temple Emmanuel. 
The services were conducted - by Dr. A. 
Silverman. A brief address was delivered 
by Augustus Thomas. 

BELASCO'S DOG WINS PRIZE 

Philadelphia, Dec. 10. — A feature of- 
the annual dog show of the Kensington 
Kennel Clnb was a special prize offered 
for canines owned by actors. David Be- 
lasco's Llewellyn setter, "Challenge," uaed 
in the first act of "The Boomerang," won 
the prize, which was a silver cup. The dog 
was entered by Harry S. Alward. Other 
theatrical folk who made entries were: 
Julia 8anderson, May' Yokes, Margaret 
Sinclair, George M. Ashby and William 
M. Robb. 



FORM NO. 2 "MAYT1ME" CO. 
A second company of "Maytime" has 
been organized, with John Charles Thomas 
in the lead, and will open in Washington, 
D. C, December 24, going from there to 
Chicago. The cast, -aside from Thomas, 
will include John T. Murray, Carolyn 
Thompson, Jeanette Methven, Arthur 
Geary, Edna Temple, Arthur McKenna, 
Maude Allen, Oyis Sheridan, Elizabeth 
Goodall, Isabel Vernon, Grace Daniel, 
Florence Fox, Herbert Salinger, George 
Harcourt, Owen Hervey. 

TRENTON GETS NEW PARK 

Trenton, N. J., Dec. 10. — Silvan Lake, 
situated between Trenton and Burlington, 
will have the largest all-year recreation 
park in New Jersey. During the Winter 
the park will have ice-boating and skating, 
while everything that goes toward Sum- 
mer recreation will be in progress during 
the Summer months. The Silvan Lake 
Company, capitalized at $100,000, will 
have offices in the Mechanic Building, 
Trenton: 



FRAWLEY LEAVES FOR JAPAN 

I. Daniel Frawley, accompanied by 
Katherine Brown Decker, left New York 
last Friday, their ultimate destination 
being China and Japan. They will go to 
San Francisco, where Frawley will engage 
three other players, sailing from thence to 
the Orient by way of Honolulu. Frawley 
returned only a few : weeks ago from a 
tour of the Far East. 



HATCH LEAVES "ARABIAN NIGHTS" 

William Riley Hatch has withdrawn from 
the "Arabian Nights" Company, which 
plans to open at the Punch and Jury 
Theatre. After four weeks' rehearsal he 
is said to have become dissatisfied with 
the terms of his contract and also with 
the part allotted him. He ia at present 
working on a motion picture at the Fam- 
ous Players studio, in support of Billie 
Burke. 



NEW SPANISH PLAYS COMING 

Quinto Valverde, composer of "The. Land 
of Joy," left New York last week for 
Havana, where he will produce a new 
Spanish operetta and a revue. . Both pro- 
ductions are under the management of 
Velaseb Brothers, who brought "The Land 
of Joy" to New York and, should they' 
prove a success, will be brought to New 
York in the near future. 



WAYBURN STAGING "FROLIC" 
F. Ziegfeld, Jr., announces . that Ned 
Way burn, his general -stage director, is 
staging the hew Ziegfeld Midnight Frolic, 
now in rehearsal. 



SET STAGE CHILDREN'S FESTIVAL 

The annual Christmas festival given 

under the auspices of the Stage Children's' 

Fund, will take place Sunday, December 

•30, at the Thirty-ninth Street Theatre; ~ *' 



ACTORS TO HAVE REAL XMAS , 
In order that the actors in "Turn to 
the Right" might come to New York for; 
their Christmas dinner, John L. Golden 
and Winchel . Smith have changed the 
date on. which the show is to open in 
Philadelphia, making it the night of the 
twenty-fifth instead of Christmas Eve, 
and cutting out the extra matinee. 
- The company was booked to open at 
the Garrick, following directly upon its 
Boston engagement. Although the house 
had been practically sold out for the two 
performances, Samuel F. Nixon, manager 
of the house, consented to make the 
change. 

MUCK PLAYS ANTHEM TWICE 

At the Boston Symphony Orchestra 
concert but Thursday night, at the 
Academy of Music, Brooklyn, Dr. Karl 
Muck, its conductor, was forced by the 
large audience to play "The Star-Spangled 
Banner" twice. At its first rendition the 
applause continued for several minutes, 
most of those present remaining standing. 
As there was no let-up to the plaudits, 
Dr. Muck gave the signal for its second 
rendering, at the conclusion of which 
every one seemed satisfied and sat down. 



ALIMONY DEFAULT STOPS SHOW 
Boston, Dec. 11. — There was no per- 
formance of "De Luxe Annie" but night 
at the Wilbur Theatre due to the arrest 
of Thurlow Bergen for non-payment of 
alimony. He was arrested after the mati- 
nee yesterday, and as Manager Arthur 
Hammerstein was unable to replace him at 
such short notice the house was dark in 
the evening. Bergen's place in the cast 
was taken tonight by Ernest Anderson 
and the performance was given as usual. 



DORIS KEANE BUYS LONDON HOME 

London, Eng., Dec. 8. — Doris Kearne, 
still appearing in "Romance" at the Lyric 
Theatre,' has purchased a house in this 
city and the management of the theatre 
has presented, her with an antique Queen 
Anne silver service for her new home. 
Miss Keane is now looking forward to the 
1,000th London performance of "Ro- 
mance," which will take place in March. 



PLAY AT PITT BREAKS RECORD 

PnTBBTTBQH, Pa., Dec. 10. — Tonight 
"The Man Who Stayed at Home" begins 
at the Pitt Theatre its tenth week, mak- 
ing a record in Pittsburgh for consecutive 
performances of a play. Business is big, 
and while it wag the original intention to 
close the show the Saturday night before 
Christmas, it will not close before Febru- 
ary 1, and probably not then if good busi- 
ness continues. 



HOPP SUES ADLER AND DIMOV 
Julius Hopp has begun an action 
against Jacob P. Adler and Osip Dimov 
for damages for "alleged violation of his 
rights as author of "The World Aflame," 
a play which he claims to have submitted 
to Adler two months ago, and which is 
now being presented in Yiddish at the 
Grand .Theatre without' his consent. 



CANADA TO SEE "OH BOY" 

Montbeax, Can., Dec. 10.— "Oh Boy" 
has been' added to the list of American 
plays to be produced in Canada by the 
United Producing Company and will be 
given an early showing. This concern 
has at this time companies playing "The 
Isle of Dreams" and "The Brat," both of 
which are successful. 



AMUSEMENT CO. CHARTERED 

Trenton, N. J., Dec. 1L— The New Jer- 
sey Fair and Bazaar Co. was chartered in 
the office of the Secretary of State yester- 
day. The new concern will promote and 
operate various forms of amusement, the 
first being a skating rink, -which - will be 
opened about the first of the new. year. 



.COMPOSER GETS SILVER PASS 

. Quinito Valverde, the Spanish composer 
of "A Night in Spain," was presented but 
Friday -night by Messrs. Dillingham and 
Ziegfeld with a silver pass, good for ad- 
mission to Cocoanut Grove any time. 




NEW CABARET LAW EXPECTED 
TO DO AWAY WITH DANCING 

: — ►> 

Although City Law Department Has Decided Pastime Cannot 

Be Bridled, Board of Aldermen Adopt 

Prohibitory Measure 

Although the city law department 
handed down an opinion two weeks ago 
to the effect that the city could not pro- 
hibit dancing and entertainment in caba- 
rets, the council this week has adopted 
an ordinance making these prohibitions, 
and is expected to pass it at once. 

This is contrary to the expectations and 
hopes of the Brewers' Association here, 
which believed that the previous opinion, 
given by Leon Hornstein, would stand. 
The law, aa it will now be passed, pro- 
vides that vocal and instrumental music 
can be given, but no dancing will be al- 
lowed by the patrons in any place where 
alcohol is sold. ' 

This was declared invalid by the law 
department, on the ground that the city 
could not prohibit entertainment. It was 
said, however, that the same results might 
be legally obtained by prohibiting the sale 



of alcohol in places where dancing 
allowed. 

It is expected that the law will be 
evaded in some cases by having the dance 
hall and the cafe disconnected. If this 
were done, drinks could be sold and danc- 
ing could go on in practically the same 
ways. Whether the new ordinance will 
find a way to prevent this is a matter of 
'.much speculation here. 

Chief of Police Schuettler said regard- 
ing the ordinance: 

"When you divorce dancing from drink- 
ing you nave gone 90 per cent, of the 
distance toward eradicating cabaret evils." 

Alderman Bowler remarked that there 
would be no use for jazz bands when the 
dancing was taken away. 

It is probable that the cabaret prop- 
rietors here will fight the legality of the 
new ordinance, which practically puts 
them out of business. 



DIVER SENT TO HOSPITAL 

A girl diver known as Ihrmark. recent- 
ly with Sam Duvries' diving girls act, 
was rushed to the Passavant Hospital 
Monday, after being found in her room 
on the North side of the city in an un- 
conscious condition and suffering with a 
broken arm. It was learned that she was 
stricken with a fainting spell, and is be- 
lieved to have sustained the broken arm 
in the fall. She was later discharged from 
the Institution. 



HELLO GIRLS AT BENEFIT 
Several hundred of the audience that 
attended the Red Cross Benefit at the Ma- 
jestic Theatre last Friday morning were 
telephone operators, the Chicago Tele- 
phone Company having given out tickets 
to all their "plug muses" that could be 
spared for the morning performances. 



BARKER TO PUT OUT TABS 

Bobby Barker, late second comedian of 
Sim Williams' "Girls From Joyland" on 
the American Wheel, closed with same in 
Detroit, and has puns laid to put on sev- 
eral tabloids around Chicago. 

Owing to the sudden illness of Witty 
Devere, who replaced Barker during the 
show's date at the Gayety here last week, 
Barker jumped into the part for a few 
performances, Devere returning to the cast 
Thursday night 



CHARLIE PLOWS ENLISTS 

Charlie Plows, formerly partner ia a 
vaudeville act with Harry Santley. »»w 
assistant to Frank Q. Doyle in the West- 
ern office of the Marcus Loew Circuit, has 
wiHit»ii in the Quartermaster Carps sta- 
tioned in this city. 



GAYETY DRAWING BETTER 
Business at the Gayety Theatre, as 
South State street (American Wheel) has 
been improving of bite, the presence »f 
more of the fair sex being a ■•tabu 
feature. 



SPINGOLD BUYS OUT McKOWAN 

Harry Spingold has taken over the 
James McKowan vaudeville agency in the 
Majestic' Theatre Building, and will run 
it during the termination of the war. 

McKowan is now a First Lieutenant in 
the army and could not see his way clear 
to keep his business in shape. 



THOREK GETS DEER HEAD 

Dr. Max Thorek, of the American Ho* 
pital, was honored last week when be re 
ceived a beautifully mounted deer hea/ 
as a gift from Eugene Mosher, Chief of 
Police, of Marquette, Mich. 



HARRIS STAGES NEW REVUE 

Will J. Harris has staged another, new 
revue at the States Restaurant called 
'"The Santa Clans Girl," in which the 
principals include Iva Hider, who re- 
hearsed a Jazz band act for a week re- 
cently; Valerie Beck, Paul Rahn, Beth 
Stanley and Nick Lang. 



TOM HUGHES A VISITOR 

Tommy Hughes, of the New Yerk fores 
of the Shapiro-Bernstein Music Company, 
visited the city last week on a tour •( 
the "S-B Circuit" 



JOINS WOOLFOLK ACT 

Lillian Mutchler joined Boyle Wool- 
folk's "Twentieth Century Whirl" act last 
week, replacing Eileen Arndt in the in- 
genue role. 



DOROTHY pVERMIRE BACK 

After several weeks of engagements in 
St. Louis, Dorothy Overmire, a favorite 
singer among the local cabarets, has re- 
turned to the city and is filling a return 
engagement at Lawlor's Blue Bell Inn. 



HERE'S A NEW FRIEND 
The wife of Al. Friend (Friend and 
Downing) presented him with a baby girl 
at Philadelphia last week. Gloria Lillian 
is her name. 



BLOW THEATRE SAFES 

The safes in the' Windsor and Plaza 
theatres, both located on the North side of 
the city, were blown by thieves Sunday 
night, with a total loss of about $800 and 
damage to property of around $3,000. 



FORM NEW BLACKFACE ACT 

Leigh and Coulter put on a new com- 
edy blackface double turn at the Empress 
last week. ^^^^^^___ 

■ SISTER ACT BOOKED 

The athletic act presented by the Ben- 
nett Sisters baa been given a route over 
the W. V. M. A. time. 



ADAMS HAS NEW ACT 

Rex Adams will shortly open on the 
Association time in a new act called 
"After the BsB." 



REARRANGE BICYCLE ACT 

McConneH and Austin have rearranged 
their trick bicycle act. 



18 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



December 12, 1917 



B.F. Keith's Cirenit of Theatres 

A. PAUL KEITH. Pmidnt E. P. ALBEE, Vlce-Pres. * Go. Mar. . 

UNITED BOOKING 
OFFICES 

YOU CAN BOOK DIRECT BY 
ADDRESSING S. K. HODGDON, 
Booking Manager of the UNITED 

OFFICES 

B. F. Keith's Palace Theatre Building 

NEW YORK CITY 


WILLIAM FOX CIRCUIT 

OF THEATRES 
WILLIAM FOX, President 

Executive Office*, 130 West 46th St, New York 
JACK W. LOEB 

General Bfa«Ml Manager 

EDGAR AM .EN 

Manager 

Personal interview, with artists from 12 to 6, or by appointment- 


GEO. PRIMROSE, Jr. 

AND 

MOLLOY BROS. 

POETRY OF MOTION IN VAUDEVILLE 


THE BUCKLEYS 

Original Transformations and Novelty Balancing 


CEO. HATTTEB. 

STAMPERS and JAMES 

Featuring Their Jaxx Band 

In Dusky Cabaret Entertainers 


BERT VERA. 

MORRISSEY 

Comedy Songs — Eccentric Dances mandel e and N rose 


FRANK FLORENCE 

MONTGOMERY & McCLAIN 

In Budget of NoBMBM Entitled 

"From Broadway to Dixie" 

SincJar, B— fcg ami Comedy Two Special Drop* in One 


GEO. KATHLEEN 

HINKEL land IVf AE 

^ "Catching a Car' 

Direction— MANDEL 9c. ROSE 


McMAHON SISTERS 

Exponents of Real Harmony 

IN VAUDEVILLE 


VERA HARRY 

LAING and GREEN 

playing Old Character Song Revue direction 

LOEW TIME m VAUDEVILLE CHARLES J. FTTZPATfUCK 


HAZEL M U L L'ER 

The Phenomenal Baritone Singer 

ALF. WILTON PLAYING U. B. O. TIME 


ED. F. REYNARD Presents 

ut.t.«. 

BIANCA 

In a Curies of Dramatic 
Danes Poems. 


MI .I.E. BIANCA Presents 

REYNARD 

The VentriloquU Comedian, 
In "BEFORE THE COURT" 


ALEXANDER W SWAIN 

Oil Painting Surprise 

LOEW TIME Direction— HARRY PINCUS 


HAVE YOU SEEN 

WEBER and ELLIOTT 

A Unique Blend of Mirth and Melody 

DIRECTION IRVING COOPER 


BURTON and JONES 

In "KINDLING" 

PLAYING UNITED TIME Dir., ROSE and CURTIS 


JAMES WILLIAM 

GREEN and F* U G H 

Two Boys From Dixie 

In Three Shades Blacker Than Black. 
Western Representative: nnnircn emm Eastern Representative: 
HYMAN SCHALLMANN HOWntH BrUUll MORRIS A FEU. 


GEORGE CHARLES 

LANE & SMITH 

Singing, Dancing and Comedy Direction, MARK LEVY 


PATSY BENNETT 

Songs and Comedy 

Direction— MANDEL ft ROSE 


W. OLATHE MILLER & CO. 

In 

"ON THE EDGE OF THINGS" 

. . Br HOMER MILES 

. . The Li trie Act with the But Punch 
DrRECTION-iAM BAERWTTZ. - N. V. A,' 


MAZIE EVANS 

and her 

BANJO BOYS 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



December 12, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



19 





MILLIONS SING THE 

NATIONAL ANTHEM 

First Country-Wide Patriotic Song Serv- 

ice Held cm Sunday When "Star 

Spangled Banner" Was Sana; 

At four o'clock on Sunday afternoon, 
millions of men, women and children 
joined in singing "The Star Spangled Ban- 
ner." It was the country's first patriotic 
song service, and the anthem was heard 
in churches, synagogues, cathedrals, social 
settlements, hospitals, penitentiaries, the- 
atres, moving picture houses, schools and 
homes. 

Dr. P. P. Claxton, United States Com- 
missioner of Education, requested officers 
and ' teachers of ' all public and private 
schools of the country to lend their in- 
fluence and assistance to the project and 
they responded with such enthusiasm that 
the nation wide service is to be repeated 
in the near future when an effort to make 
it even more popular will be made. 

The movement was set on foot by the 
National Council of Women representing 
7,000,000 members, which held a conven- 
tion at Washington last' week. The dele- 
gates are planning some way in which the 
entire country can be welded together 
into a monster choir, which at some stated 
hour will sing in unison, not only the 
National anthem, but other patriotic 
songs, as well. 

The plan has met with so much en- 
couragement, that the only thing neces- 
sary to put the idea into immediate exe- 
cution, is the discovery of a simple way 
in which to inform the entire people and 
to arrange the correct time in each lo- 
cality so that the service will be given 
at the same moment the entire country 
over. Co-operating with the National 
Council of Women are the War and Navy 
Departments and many other Women's 
organizations. 



"LORRAINE" SCORES QUICKLY 

"Lorraine," the new McCarthy-Fisher 
Co. ballad is enjoying the distraction of 
scoring one of the quickest hits on record. 

Although but a few weeks old, it has 
been taken up by scores of the best known 
singers who are featuring it in the big 
time vaudeville theatres, where, it ia be- 
ing received with an enthusiasm rarely 
equalled. Its lyric is beautiful and is set 
to a melody that is really charming. It 
is being sung in nearly every big time 
theater in New York this week. 



STAR SINGS WITMARK SONGS 

Dorothy Jardon, the vaudeville and 
light opera star, is singing at the River- 
side Theatre this week, two Witmark 
songs. When this talented singer intro- 
duces a number it means two things, first 
of all, that it is a good song and secondly, 
that it stands an excellent chance of be- 
coming a big success. 

The two numbers from the Witmark 
catalogue which Miss Jardon is singing 
at present are, "There's a Long, Long 
Trail," and the new Joe Howard number 
"Somewhere In Franca ia the Lily." 

Both these numbers are scoring a won- 
derful success, and are contributing in no 
small way to the sensational hit that Miss 

Jardon is scoring on her latest vaudeville 
tour. 

When not filling engagements, Miss 
Jardon has been devoting her spare time 
singing to the boys at the various camps. 
The inspiration she got from these visits 
helped her to make an eloquent plea at 
the Orpheum in behalf of the Red Cross. 
After her speech, equipped with a fire 
bucket, she passed among the audience, 
and in this manner collected a substantial 
sum at each performance. As a compli- 
ment to this gifted artist, Louis Reinhardt 
and his orchestra quietly played "Some- 
where In France is the Lily" throughout 
the proceeding. The audience, alive to 
the situation, began humming the song 
and refrain which had to be repeated at 
least a dozen times. The applause was 
bo great, and the audience so insistent, 
that Miss Jardon was obliged to sing the 
song all over again, this time from the 
auditorium instead of from the stage. 

FORSTER HAS IRISH SONG HIT 

Blanche Ring, who is scoring one of the 
big hits of her car eer in the new Morosco 
musical play "What Next," has a new 
Irish song which according to critics bids 
fair to rival in popularity, her famous 
"Bedelia." 

The new number is called "Faugh-A- 
Ballah," the Gaelic for "clear the way," 
and the clever lyric is set to an Irish 
melody which, when rendered by Miss Ring, 
is said to be well nigh irresistible. 

Forster, the Chicago publisher, issues 
the number. 



AUTHORS' SOCIETY 

IS NOT TO DISBAND 



Recent Resignations to Have No Effect 

Upon Policy of Organisation — Big 

Revenue Guaranteed 

The many rumors set afoot last week 
concerning the possibility of the disband- 
ing of the American Society of Authors, 
Composers and Publishers, on account of 
the resignation of some of its members 
have been effectually killed by the or- 
ganisation's board of directors who are 
holding meetings weekly. 

In spite of the fact tliat there has been 
filed the resignation of some of the sc- 
eiety*B members, the organization, ac- 
cording to the reports of its officials, is 
in a more prosperous condition than ever 
before. There are on its books, contracts 
from hotels, restaurants, cabarets, etc., 
amounting to over (86,000, and additional 
agreements to pay the fees decided upon 
by the organization are coming in dady. 

Considering^ the comparatively short 
time the society has been in existence in 
America, and the great amount of oppo- 
sition it has had to overcome, its found- 
ers are unanimous in declaring that its 
success is assured. 

They point to the record of the French 
organization, after which the American 
society was patterned, which the year prior 
to the breaking out of the war collected 
over $3,000,000 for its members, and state 
that if such an amount can, be collected 
in a small country, the amount which will 
eventually be obtained in America will be 
at least ten times as great. 

NEW MUSIC CO. FORMED 

The Brosseau Music Corporation is the 
latest addition to the ranks of New York 
music publishers and the new corporation 
has opened offices at No. 146 W. 46th 
street. 

Y. O. Brosseau is president of the com- 
pany which has released as its first pub- 
lication a new ballad entitled "The Love 
that I Feel for You." The new song 
which is melodious and well written, is 
being introduced by a number of well- 
known singers. 



BILLY IS LITTLEST WRITER 
Little Billy, of the Friars Club, enjoys 
the distinction of being America's littlest 
songwriter. He stands exactly 42 inches 
in his stocking feet and carries about one 
pound weight tat each Inch. 

He has several popular songs to his 
credit, among them being the ballad "I 
Want to be There With You." He also 
has a successful instrumental number 
called "Pinkie," which is being featured 
by many of the Broadway Theatre and 
hotel orchestras. 



VON TILZER MANAGER RETURNS 

Ben Bornstein, professional manager of 
the Harry Von Tilzer Music Publishing 
Co., who has been in Chicago for the past 
three weeks ia expected back in New 
York on Saturday. Murray Bloom will 
remain in the West in charge of the Von 
Tilzer offices and will be assisted by Irwin 
R. Schmidt. 



RICHMOND SONG FEATURED 

Gertrude Oogert, now in vaudeville, ia 
meeting with much success singing the 
new Richmond song, "There's a Vacant 
Chair in Every Home To-night." 

This talented young singer is making 
the song the feature- number of her act 
and is singing it to numerous encores at 
every performance. 



ARMY EXCUSES SONGWRITER 
Hyman Cohen, the Chicago songwriter, 
who for five weeks was with the National 
Army at Rockford, HI., has been excused 
from service due to defective eyesight. 

While in training, Cohen composed sev- 
eral army songs which are being sung in 
a number of the camps. 

TRIANGLE TO OPEN IN CHICAGO 

The Triangle Mnele Pub. Co. is planning 
.to open an office in Chicago, which will 
be under the management of Milton Weil. 
The Triangle Co. for a short period had 
a' branch in the Strand Theatre building 
in New York. 



"WEDDING BELLS" FEATURED 

Harry Tighe, who showed his new act 
to the patrons of the Riverside Theatre 
last week, introduced George Meyers' naw 
song "In the Land of Wedding Bells," and 
the clever number scored the big hit of 
his offering. 



GERARD IS WRITING AGAIN 

Richard Gerard, writer of "Sweet Ade- 
line," who has been out of the songwriting 
business for several years, is again com- 
posing jingles and has several new songi 
which he is submitting to publishers. 

ABE OLMAN HAS ENLISTED 

Abe Olman, the Chicago songwriter and 
composer, a member of the staff of Fors- 
ter, Inc., has enlisted in the National 
Army. 



COWAN ON FIFTEENTH TRIP 

Ruby Cowan is now making his fifteenth 
western trip for the Broadway Music 
Corporation. He writes that there is a 
strong demand for the four big winners 
which his firm is exploiting. They are, 
"Sweet Emalina My Gal," "Give Me the 
Moonlight," "Give Me the Girl and Leave 
the Rest to Me," "You Never Can be Too 
Sure About the Girls," and "I May be 
Gone for a Long, Long, Time." 

"OVER THERE" AT THE GARDEN 

"Over There" was prominently featured 
at Madison Square Garden last week, 
where the annual six day bicycle rave 
drew record breaking crowds. 

The song, in spite of the fact that it 
has been heard an innumerable number 
of times in all the theatres and places 
of amusement where crowds congregate, 
has lost none of its popularity, and every 
time it was sung was cheered to the echo. 

HARRIS WINS AT NEWARK 

At a war song contest held in Newark, 
Charles K. Harris' song "Break the News 
to Mother," won first prize against a large 
field of competitors. 

This famous song hit of nearly twenty 
years ago has yet to meet its first defeat 
in competition. 

MILLEGRAM HAS NEW SONG 
The Carl Mfllegram Publishing Co., Inc., 

has just released a new high class ballad 

entitled "Laddie O* Mine," by Gordon 

Johnston and Sheppard Krams. 
Francis, Day k. Hunter have purchased 

the English rights 'to the number. 



HEADUNERS SING NEW SONG 

A few of the headlinera that are sing- 
ing the new Gilbert & Friedlander, Inc., 
song "Are You From Heaven?" this week 
include Belle Baker at the Colonial. 
Dorothy Jardon at the Riverside, and 
May Naudain at the Columbia Theatre, 
St. Louis. 

The names of these prominent artists, 
together with those of nurny others who 
are now using the song are a guarantee 
of its excellence and the efficacy of this, 
the first Gilbert & Friedland, Inc., publi- 
cation. 

They also have in preparation several 
new novelty numbers outside of their 
current catalogue which includes "100 to 
1 You're From Dixie," and "Chimes of 
Normandy." 

COMEDY SONG SCORES 

The new , Kendis • Brockman novelty 
song "We're ' Going to Hang the Kaiser 
Under the Linden Tree," is one of the 
few of the novelty patriotic songs which 
is scoring a success. 

It embraces an idea that is new, a com- 
bination of comedy and patriotism, and 
the scores of singers that are introducing 
it are meeting with pronounced success 
with it. 

It is by the "two James boys," Kendis 
and Brockman, who in the new number 
have a song which is already on the high 
road to success. 



BREUER GIVEN A DINNER 

Ernest Breuer, the songwriter, who was 
drafted for the National Army last week 
and is now at Yaphank, was tendered a 
farewell dinner by Maurice Richmond at 
the Charles Restaurant on Thursday 
evening. 

A score or more of Mr. Breuer's friends 
attended and the affair was a merry one. 
After the dinner Mr. Breuer was presented 
with a silver wrist watch and after a 
short musical program on which a num- 
ber of Mr. Breuer's compositions had a 
prominent place, dancing was enjoyed un- 
til an early, hour in the morning. 

MAE MARVIN SINGS NEW HIT 

Mae Marvin, the dainty little soubrette 
whose dramatic ability Wfali her vocal 
gifts, is making good everywhere with 
M. Witmark & Sons' new war ballad, 
"Somewhere In France is the Lily." This 
number has been pronounced by many to 
be Joe Howard's greatest song. 

She has met with significant success 
with the number and for the past tea 
weeks the newspapers in the towns and 
cities where she has appeared have men- 
tioned her clever rendition of lb 

NEW WRITER FOR "FROLIC 

F. Ziegfeld, Jr., has commissioned Leslie 
Stuart, composer of the famous "Floro- 
dora," and Dave Stamper to write the 
music for the new Ziegfeld "Midnight 
Folic," now in rehearsal atop the Jtaw 
Amsterdam Theatre. 

This is Stuart's first work for the 
Frolic and he is said to have written •on* 
attractive melodies. 



NEW SONG IN CENTURY SHOW 

A new song number has been introduced 
in the Century Theatre production, "Miss 
1017," entitled "Oh, You Beautiful Baby." 
It preceded the appearance of Miss BSaia 
Janis and is sung by Cecil Lean, with 
groups of girls representing girls in dif- 
ferent periods of their Uvea. 

GOODWIN IS PROF. MCR. 

Joe Goodwin has been appointed pro- 
fessional manager of the music house of 
Shapiro, Bernstein & Co. 

SALO DE WOLF WITH RICHMOND 

Salo De Wolf, the pianist, is now con- 
nected with the Maurice Richmond Magic 
Co. 



i# 



Yii£ tiiw 



K "CLIPPER 



December lZ,-*-19I7! 



r? 



* •'*- .-.VY*. 



WILL 




Australia's Greatest 
** Illusionists ' 

Booked Solid U. B. O. 

DIRECTION— TREAT MATHEWS 



HERBERT 



MILDRED 



HODGE and LOWELL 

jFTtVSj jf -1 ««Ot>lect Matrimony'* 

"•*"*•. * IN VAUDEVILLE 



JOHN C 



CARRIE 




Comedy Sin ring TaDdna; Act in One 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



SAM 



ALEX 



KRAMER and CROSS 

.. Advanced Exponents of Physical Culture 

Direction — IRVING COOPER ... ? " 



MATTIE CHOATE & CO. 

* "OUTCLASSED* 

Comedy Playlet . . In Vaudeville 



MEL EASTMAN 

The Original Elongated Entertainer" 



THE ORIGINAL AMERICAN GIRL 

PRINCESS WHITE DEER 

Only Dancing Indian Girl and Company of Indian Braves 
Direction, WILLIAM MORRIS AND PAT CASEY 



MARGIE 



GALE 



A D D I S & ST E WA R T 

... .A Few Songs and a Little Nonsense 
: IN VAUDEVILLE : 



LEO & EDNA MILLER 



SongSr— Patter-TTrClutfter 



Ffc^r: A. 



■■■■1 Direction, Chas. S. Fitxpatrick 



ETHEL ALBERTINI 

^—toted t>y MANNE SIV1IXH 

IN VAUDEVILLE " 



JOESPIELMANN 
1st Tenor .-%. 



JOE RUDDY 



RUBE MELODY FOUR 



Singing, Talking and Comedy 



EDDIE McCOMBS 



FRED NERRET 



JACK 



HELEN 



ROWLES & OILMAN 

A Little Bit of Everything 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



Study in Mid-Air— Playin, U. B. O. 
PETE MACK, Eastern Representative C. W. NELSON, Western 



.... Comedy, Triple Ban and Knockabout* 
DIRECTION-CHAS. BORNHAUFT . \ • ■ ii 



U. B. O. TIME 



■ (George and I dab ell) 
SURPRISING CLOWNS ' Direction, ALF. T. WILTON 

DANCING DALES 

: VandemDe's Pre-eminent Exemplars of Dancing Oddities. 



COMEDY JUGGLERS 


Direction ALF. T. 


WILTON 


"1 DEFY COMPETITION" 




LITTLE 


JERRY 


- 


The Bl«eeat Little Singer fa Vaudeville 





CLIFF X. GREEN 

"The Morning After and After" 



In VandeyiHe 



THE O VAN DOS 

Whirlwind Xylopboni.ts Booked Solid Dir. , HARRY SHEA 



Frank 



Eldrie 



FISHER [& GILMORE 



In "A Bashful Romeo"— 



Direction Mark Levy 



SINGING AND DANCING 



CLIFFORD, BADE AND FRANK 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



THE AERIAL GIRL 



In Vaudeville 



SOMETHING NEW IN THE AIR 



THE WHITE TRIO 



NOVELTY GYMNASTIC-IN VAUDEVILLE 



M AE HARRINGTON 

-• - -..-.- '••.,—.;. -WvVciUD^rTLLE 



"PIANOLOGUEFETE" 



HARRY 



AND 



Comedy, Acrobatic, AeriaKsta. 



-— T- ....I.. .!.! Jill! 

LA VINA •«- 

ICE 

IN VAUDEVILLE 





Direction, Nat Sobel. . 

• PLAYING U. B. 0. TIME 



Dee&ib^- lZ^WW^ 



TW^^fiW Y^HftK CLIPPER 



21 



ARNA ARMSTRONG opened in a new act 
• at Union Hill Monday. '- "'** " ""*' 

Edgar Berger, the talking contortioniat, 
is rehearsing a new act. 

Charles Hopkiik hag joined Cliff Eaton's 
Revue, touring Pennsylvania. 

Charlie Boss is very ill in the Fair Oak 
Sanitarium, at Summit, N. J.. : 

Kimberly and Arnold will open in a 
new act at the Royal, Dee. 24. 

Franlrie Fay is rehearsing in a new 
production; "That Girl of Mine." 

Hamilton and Barnes have in prepara- 
tion a new act by James C. Madison. 

Hence Seeley Boudcault has dismissed 
her guardian by order of. the. Surrogate's 



Hairy Weberf of Weber and Wilson, 
been drafted, and went to Yaphank 



Christie MacDonald was added to the 
Palace bill last-Friday morning in aid of 
the Red Cross. ~_. ... r- 



' Marie Wallace joined Norworth and 
Shannon's "Odds and Ends" at the Bijou 
Theatre last week. 



ABOUT YOU! AND YOU!! AND YOU!!! 



. ._ ■Charlotte Walker sails for England this 
month "to appear in the London produc- 
tion' O* The. Wolf." 

Hyman Adler is -rehearsing a new 

sketch in which be will soon appear under 

Joseph Hart's direction." - "" 

.' % *"-"» J ^^^^~ • 

^ Fay Heller, formerly .of Shapiro, Bern- . 
.stein and Company, is "doing her bit" on 

Exemption Board No-. 115. - - - -- 

Connors and Connors presented their 
comedy acrobatic act last Sunday at the 
Strand Theatre, Racine, Wis. " - • - 

Pearl Clark, now Mrs. M. H. . Hughes, 
underwent a delicate operation in the 
New York Hospital last week. 

Mrs. Bell, of the Bell Family, is re- 
quested to communicate at once with Ed- 
ward W- Orrin, City of Mexico. 

Charles Brown, early 'in' the .season 
ahead of "Dew Drop Ian," now has be- 
come pilot; for "Her Soldier Boy." 

... Lotriae Groody is to have a leading role 
" bi;^Toot Toot," the new Henry W. Sav- 
"age production now in rehearsal. 

■ Mercedes, "who did an act in vaudeville, 
\ baa* retired from the stage and is now liv- 
'. ing with bis wife in Los Angeles. 

Mrs. .Sidney Baiter has retired from 
the vaudeville stage and has become mil-. 
liner at 260 West Fifty-fourth street 



.Wallace Ham,, formerly -wrUr. Oliver. 
■ Morosco, is- now' -out ahead. of 'Tailor, 
Bedroom and Bath" for- A.-' H." Woods. - 

\r./3i ■*•"' Driaeot^ the singer, has "received" 
a conuoission in the army and is now 
' Division Song Leader at Camp Lee, Va. 

: Beatrice Lambert opened at Montreal 
.•Monday, playing U. B. O. time. She will 
work toward New York early in the year. 
, -t" ... *■ ■-"._ .—. — ■ — *• - ■ * 

. Billy .Newkirk and- the Homer Slaters 
have just been routed oVer" United time 
by "Jules Delrnar. They open this week 

Edgar L. Storer, Cincinnati singer, has 
enlisted in the United States Signal 
Corps and has gone to Fort Wood, NT Y. 

Katharine i Lord has been appointed 
Eastern representative of the Chicago 
Little- Theatre, with headquarters is New 
York. 



Mitchell Leichtner is now booking the 
. Kelly-Burns circuit of houses from the 
Ackerman and Harris offices, San Fran- 
cisco. 

George B. Newland, dramatic editor of 
the Post, Cincinnati, proudly announces 
the arrival of a son at his home in Ar- 
cadia. ■ 

Lee Johnstone, of "The Million Dollar 
Doll" Company, rejoined the east of that 
company after a week's absence due to 

illness, ■ * 

Ned Hastings, manager of B. F. Keith's, 
Cincinnati, is putting -on a big spectacle 
play for -the Rotary Club, of which he is 
vice-president. ' ' - - - 

Robert McClellan, leading man in the . 
"Love .6' Mike" Company, married Louise 
Wilmer of Middletown, Ohio, in Newport, 
■ Ky., last week. — ----_- 

" ! ' 

Max Elaer, Jr., formerly press represen- 
tative for Mar Rabinoff, has been made a 
first lieutenant at the Plattsburg Officers' 
Training School. - ■ ' 

Freddy Schang, who formerly was ahead 
of the Ballet Russe, has -gone to North 
Dakota, to pilot the tour of Mischa El- 
man, the violinist. 



Princess Zuleika, lady hynotist," has re- 
covered from the illngaa which kept her 
off her route for a month, and will con- 
tinue her tour on U. B. O. time starting 
Monday. 



James C Lane, formerly with the of- 
fice fores of' Billie Burke, has now joined 
.the staff of Jack Norworth's "Odds and 



Richard Lloyd closes with Harvey D. 
Orr's "Million Dollar Dolls" Eastern Com- 
pany Saturday. He has been with the 
company all season. 

Emily Frances Hooper and Frank Mar- 
bury have succeeded Dorothy Dickson and 
Carl Heisen as the exhibition feature 
dancers in "Oh, Boy!" 

Elsie Janis was one of the auctioneers 
at the sale yesterday, Dec. 11, in the 
Fruit Trade Building, for the benefit of 
the Italian war sufferers. 



Clifton Crawford has left the "Her Sol- 
dier Boy" Company and returned to New 
York to take- up a new role. Charles 
Erwin has taken his place. 

Gail Kene returned to New York last 
-week after an absence of eight months 
in Santa Barbara, Cal ., where she has 
been working for the Mutual Film Co. 



'.-.. L. J.- Fountain, manager of the Los 
Angeles Hippodrome, has been selected, to 

. represent Ackerman - and Harris in some 
new enterprises, as yet unnamed. 

Cleves Kinkead, author of "Common 
Clay," now First Lieutenant of Infantry 
stationed at' Fort Harrison, Ind., was in 
New York .last week in uniform. .-; 

Hazel Marshall has rejoined "The Mil- 
lion Dollar Doll" Company at Grafton, W. 
Va., having remained over at Charleston 
to get rid of an aggravating cold. 

• E. L. Bernaya,' who, despite intimations 
.from the.Fpx offices,. has been doing the 
special publicity work for "Cleopatra," is 
trying, to. gain admittance to Plattsburg. 

-' Leo" - Ditrichstein, starring in "The 
King" at the Cohan Theatre, made a 
statement last week disclaiming loyalty 
to all countries but the United States. 



Sydney Bodenheunei, formerly assist- • 

tent to Walter Kingsley of the Palace, 1 

.came home from Plattsburg last Saturday | 

and will spend a ten-day furlough here. ] 

. Alberto Bach man, the French violinist, 

has been appointed by Manager S. L. \ 
Rothapiel, of the Rialto, as concert mas- 

ter for the sixty-piece orchestra which I 

will be installed at the Rivoli when it , 
opens. 



Hoyer and Wheelock, doing a new act 
called "Luck," written for them . by 
Thomas B. Herbertand, opened at Phila- 
delphia Monday. It is handled by Lee 
Muckenfuss. 



Elizabeth Jordan, formerly literary ad- 
viser to Harper and Brothers, the maga- 
zine publishers, will become editorial di- 
rector of the Goldwyn Corporation on 
Jan. 2. 1919. 



Helen McNulta, private secretary to 
Charles Burt, received word last week 
that her. brother, John, who went - to 
France' as a member of the 165th, had 
been wounded. 



Al Weber and Emmy Barbier, in "The 

New Mode 1 ," have .been booked ahead un- 
til . April' 29 and will play a return en- 
gagement at Poli's Springfield Theatre, 
Christmas week. 



Saul Brilant, now stationed at Camp . 
Upton, was one of the performers at the 
benefit given by some of the men from 
the camp last Sunday at the Hippodrome 
for the camp fund. 

Mrs. Edwin Mocsary, wife of the treas- 
urer of' the Rialto and new Rivoli The- 
atres, has been removed from Miss Al- 
son's Sanitarium, where she underwent 
a serious operation. 

Otto Ear Bartek, the ballet master, has 
paid a judgment of $18130 to L. B. Tread- 
well which was filed against him for pro- 
fessional services rendered a few years 
ago by the plaintiff. 



George Hayes spent last week in New 
York City on leave of absence from the 
Overseas Training Company at the Uni- 
versity of Toronto, where be has been for 
the hist six months. 



Charles King, of Brice and King, now 
appearing in "Miss 1917" at the Century, 
has enlisted as yeoman in the United 
States Navy and expects to be called to 
the colors immediately. 

Evelyn Cavanaugh, of the team of 
Dore and Cavanaugh, now in Cohan and 
Harris' "Going Up," was taken sick at 
Philadelphia last Saturday and rushed to 
a New York Hospital. 

Irene Fen wick left the hospital last 
Sunday" Dec. 9, for her home, where she 
- will- rest - up a bit before starting' to re- 
hearse for the all-star production of 
"Lord and Lady Algy.** 



Willie E deist on, vaudeville manager, 

left for Europe last Thursday to. transact 

business with Sachs, 'the London producer. 

' He will probably be away several months. 

Howard McNabb and Company made a 
special trip from Chicago to present their 
musical comedy act at the -Strand The- 
atre, Racine, Wis., on Thanksgiving Day. 

The Bijou Comedy -Four '(Harry B. 
Ford, Al Meyers, Toby Rogers and • Jack ' 
Gould) will appear at several entertain- 
ments for Christmas funds and .for the 
soldiers: On Doc. 17 they play for 'mem- 
bers of Engine .Company" No^. 3 of the-*' 
MBS <Mp Tii* Deuai tnitait. ' ™ - 



Albert H. Hogan, assistant treasurer of 
the Manhattan Opera House, .was the 
guest of honor at a supper at that the- 
atre last Friday night as he joined the 
National' Army the next day,. . < 

Peter Van DerMeer, an. old-time violin- 
1st, is playing in* the streets of Kansas 
City, and ■ working his way to Chicago 
and New York, where he hopes, to find 
an opportunity in some orchestra. ' •' I 
•* ■ ' i 

Dagmar Godowsky, daughter of Lto- 
. pold Godowsky, the pianist, win make her 
stage 'debut Saturday night, Dec 22, an 
William Faversham'e revival of "Lord 
and. Lady Algy" at the Broadhuxst The- 
atre. . 



*" C J. Wacker, builder of a new the- 
atre in Terre Haute, Ind., has agreed to ■ 
have the theatre ready by May 1. Should : 
be fail to do so, he must pay a penalty ; 
at so much per day until the house is ' 
finished. 



Margot Kelly has contracted to appear 

under the direction of James P. Sinoott J 
during the remainder of her stay in 

America. She will be seen shortly in a . 

one-act pantomime arranged and produced { 

by Sinnott. j 

Whitford Kane has taken a company to ■ 
Lynn, Mass., where he is this week rehears- 
ing a new comedy which he will produce : 
for the first timelnext week. Lillian Jagoe, - 
Edward Phelan 'and Gareth Hughes are 
in the company. 

Yorska, the Franco-American actress, 
last week gave an out of town production 
of "The Heart of France," a patriotic 
French war playlet, with herself in the 
leading role. The act will be seen in 
New York later. • ' . 



Will Deshon, manager of the Hunting- 
ton Theatre, Huntington, W. Va., is iS, . 
having been stricken with paralysis. , He 
was formerly located at Fairmont. He ia ; 
a brother of Frank Deshon, formerly a ' 
prominent comic opera star. 

Norman Trevor has been selected and j 
is now posing for the memorial which 
Princess Patricia of Connaught will erect 
in either Montreal or Quebec in honor of 
the brave Canadian Regiment which bore 
her name — tie famous "Princess Pata." 



William Burr, last seen here with 
Daphne Hope in the musical skft "A 
Lady, a Lover and a Lamp," has been in- 
, valided out of the British army after 
many months' service. The couple have 
returned to America and will re-enter 
vaudeville here. 



sBssari 



iU 



Cyril Ring, manager of "So Long 
Letty," says that Oliver Morosco is now 
negotiating with his sister, Julie Ring, to 
join his forces in a new play. Four Rings 
now work for Morosco — Blanche Ring in 
"What Nextt", her sister, .Frances Ring, 
in "TJpsteirs and -Down"; their brother 
Cyril and his." wife* Charlotte Greenwood 
Ring, star 6T "Bo Long -Letty" 



Major G. A Gagg, general secretary- ' 
treasurer of the Hagenbeck-Wallace Cir- 
cus, who underwent a surgical operation 
at Indianapolis, Ind., two weeks age, has • 
returned to bis home in Terre Haute. He 
reports the operation successful and that 
he is himself again. 

David E. Sasseen, a theatrical publicity 
man, after being out of the game for 
three years, r is back He has been en- ' 
gaged as press representative of the Ma- -, 
jestic Theatre, Brooklyn, succeeding Rich- • 
aid Webster, who has been." elected Regis- I 
ter o/* Kings County. • L "*j&- 

E. A Schiller, general manager of the ' 
Loew -Southern circuit' of theatres, has 
moved -his. offices, in the Grand Theatre, 
Atlanta, Ga., to 'the second floor of the 
theatre building. There a whole floor win . 

' be devoted to the booking of tjse Southern 
houses and a staff of assistants employed. , 

: to assist in 'the work. ■- . ' .' 

, Vo text Bend) ley, who has' been doing 
i he press work for Wm. A, Brady, resigned 
bis" position last week and went to Wash- 
ington., where he has obtained a Govern- • ' 
ment appointment. David Wallace, who 
'gave up the position to go to Plattsburg, 
where he won an appointment" aa a first 
.lieutenant, is fining in the gap for two • 
'weeks while off duty" in the dry. 

Richard Mansfield, Jr, son of the fam- 
ous actor, has enlisted in the British 
Army for service in France and win sail 
for the "other side" immediately. Young ! 
Mansfield made his professional stage ' 
debut several -weeks ago at' the Pitt The- 
atre, Pittsburgh. In "The Man Who 
Stayed at Home."- flUing a Vacancy , caused 
~oy flmess and soaring a decided success. ! i 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 




THE CRASHING, SMASHING, TERRIFIC, 

PHENOMENAL BALL/ 

To use any milder '■'■word's in expressing our opinion of this wonderful masterpie 

insult to the-intelligence of the vaudeville artists v 



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Words by 
ALFRED BRYAN 

•Writer ot'iom Of Arc'* 



Moderato 



LORRAINE 

(My Beautiful Alsace Lorraine) 



Music by 
PRED FISHER 

Composer or"Pej o'S&j Ho»ri 




Be - side a camp •fire gleam- ing, A gren- a . dier was dream- ing, 

He dreamt thai ho was stray -log a . mong tie child -ren play ing, 



His 
And 




thoughts wentbacfc a -gain to oth-er 
of - ten kissed his moth-ers tears a 



years 
way, 



Night shad-ows found him , 
But ah, the a - wak-ingl 




and as they gath-ered a -round him, ten-der-ly he mur-mured through his tears. 
is sad hear t it was break- ing. how he wished that he could dream for aye. _ 




Lor-ralne, 



Lor ralne, My bean-tl - ful Al-sace Lor- ralnc,. 




Copyright 1917 by M? Car thy & Fither Inc. 
.148 W.4St* St.KY.City 
UUrariioaitCetyTitM Stnrti Ml JUgtt* Rtttrrtil 



Ll_ 



m 



Boston, 218 Tremont St. Jimmie McHugh. 
Detroit, Hotel Ste. Claire. Will Collins. 
Minneapolis. V. L. McReavy. ] Loeb Arcade. 
Philadelphia, Sam Gold. 247 No. 8th St. 



McCarthy & 



ADDRESS ALL MAIL TO 
NEW YORK OFFICE 



148 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 




ENSATIONAL, STUPENDOUS, GIGANTIC, 
> HIT OF ALL TIMES 

| would be an injustice to the author and composer of "LORRAINE" and an 
j) have heard and are singing this mammoth song 




In my heart for - ev - er to re- main,. 



I see your Yil-lage stee-pie,_ Your 




quaint old fash-loned peo-ple, _ And I would -lot care If I could be there a- gain, — tor- 




Heart of France. 



part of France, Some -day when 




all Of my wor-rles are through, _ I'm com-ing to you; Lor-ralne, Lor- raine, 



*r~n m 




wel-come me home once a- gain. To live and die In my Al-sace Lor raine. 




Tl ^ 
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FISHER, INC. 

'est 45th Street, NEW YORK 



JACK MILLS, Professional Manage 
GEO. A. FRIEDMAN, General Manager 



24: 



TffrE NJBW YORK CLIPPER 



HARRY 



DUNCAN and 



DAN 



«Ask Me Something" 

Direction— HARRY WEBER, Inc. 



JOE 



NAT 



In Their Musical Comedy Skit Entitled 

«XHe New Hotel Clerk 



•» 



BOOKED SOLID U. B. O. 



DIRECTION BERNARD BURKE 



The B lackstone Q uartette 



4-E.KeU^ 



Thoi. Smith 



EariMcKinney 

1st Tenor' 
IN VAUDEVILLE 



J. W. Coleman 

aid Tmoc md Dh-. 



SAMMY 



MARIE 



JACK 



Batehelor, Lebcul and 

" Comedy Singing and Talking in One 



Nat DeLoaclt & Co. 



10 Colored People 

Fast Singing," Dancing and Cu esa ay 



ROSE & CURTIS BEEHLER & JACOBS 

EASTERN REFT. WESTERN REPT. 

JOHN GEIGER and His Talking Violin 

BOOKED SOLID " - 



WILBUR, VENTRILOQUIST, PRESENTING 



Doing Walking, Dummy and Dancing Dell Character*. 
Big Novelty— Booked Solid •*.; 



CECIL 



JAMES 



MOORE & MARTIN 

■ Singing, Talking and Comedy — Colored Comedians 
Direction JACK SHEA IN VAUDEVILLE 



■_ ... ■.- ^« 



BETH 



~~l ^"um: 



CHALLISS and LAMBERT 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



MARIE DREAMS 



The Girl with the Wonderful Voice 



Playing U. B. O. 



Direction, ROSE and CURTIS 



CLIFFORD NELSON AND JANE CASTLE 

Playing Losw Circuit— Late o/ "Katlnka" in Son* and Jut- Direction Tona'Jeoee,- 

SNOOKSIE TATLOR 

-" -" "" : Snnnfiam of Song— In Vaudeville ._.;- -.f.V.- - .- 
; ' ; ELSIE , "i ,■ 1 ; \ EDDIE 

DIRECTION IRVING COOHER 

joe WOLFE & EVANS madge 

A Nifty Splatter of Song* and Chatter In Vaudeville 






& 



** 



& 



Si* 



AND 



'*> 



A 



#*ii tff 



WHIRLWIND HAGANS 



Lm»'j Time 



Fashion Plate Steppers 



Direcaon, MARK LEVY 



u 




t: 




Direction— BILLY GRADY 



« HICKEY & COOPER — 

Mirth, Melody and Song ■ Playing Loew*a Time In Vaudeville 



JOS. BELMONT & CO. 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



E S IV* E R A L E> A 



WHIRLWIND XYLOPHONIST 



BARNEY WILLIAMS 

In Vaudeville's Biggest Laughing Success — •Hunting" 



Ted 



Martin 



FLETCHER, LEVEE and FLETCHER 

Slnginj, Harmony, Talking; and Comedy in Vaudeville .» 



DEMAREST & DOLL 

The Man, the Girl and the Piano 



BOOKED SOLID 



IN VAUDEVILLE ' 



Adelaide B00THBY & EVERDE AN chamb 

Novelty Songs and Travesty. Playing U.B.O. and Orpheum Circuit Easts J. C. Peebles 

fTHE I^NE^IVIOONEM 



With James Kennedy Playing U. B. O. Time 



--■- 



Direction, Pat. Casey : 



ARTHUR 



BESSIE 



GEORGE j . 1*' ...., 

THE ARTHUR L. GUY TRIjljft 

- " ~rJros *nrifig TnairDniqne -Co m e dy in Blacjr and T^^.Au^Matsrtss rni^Prefectsd i .: , . .-.- 



' ' < ^' " ' <" 



Sharp Shooting Act ._ . . Dir^ FRANK WOLF, Phila. 



Booked Solid 



SAM J. 



ELSIE 



CLLRT IS and G I L BERT 



■ILLY 



CLffTOlV & CORNWELL 

SONGS AND DANCES OF YESTERDAY AND TODAY CLEVER COMEDY 

Direction Rose and Curtia ■- .; - -v. -. '.. In Vaudevilla 



Dir . Rose cfc Cartia 



Abe Feinberg 



"LYRIGA!" 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



l u 



'Zl."i.~Z-i*.-*?'j~ZJA*-*U.t-. ■»/.. l IriV" vS^JiCjci; 



HOWARD & LYMAN 

-'••••- -**■ -''•■• • DANCERS THAT ARE DIFFERENT •*»*«•■««»*• . 



Decerntx* i2\..l917-i 



TliWNtiW WkK ^CiPPER 



25- 




PERSIAN GARDEN 

Theatre — Greenpoint. 

IbniB— Sixteen minutes. 

Style— M usioal. 

Setting — Special drop. . '- 

i As the curtain rises one is inclined to 
tbink.be -is to witness the performance 
of a six-piece orchestra, consisting of 
first and second violins, traps, piano, 
saxophone -and cornet. However, after 
the first number by the orchestra a girl 
appears, singing, and is followed by four 
chorus girls dressed in tights, with fancy 
bodices. 

After the number, the orchestra 'plays 
a selection with, some poorly attempted 
comedy' on the part of the trap drum- 
mer. 

The girl then does another number, and 
again the band plays a selection after her 

exit _ V 

The four girls then make their appear- 
ance in a . terpsichorean dance, which is 
.very poorly executed. The girl then 
comes on again, in the middle of the dance 
and sings a number with the girls. - She 
seems to want to feature the girls, as she 
hugs the back drop. 

There is nothing exceptional about this 
act, except that it carries its own orches- 
tra. The girls are very poor perform- 
ers. It might make a decided improve- 
ment if they were brought on often er in 
tights, to give the gallery gods a chance 
to applaud and, at '. least, have them 
sing. The prima donna has a good voice, 
but it is always drowned by the orches- 
tra. There are too many people in the 
act for the amount of things that they 
do. The act is too big an affair for 
the small time, and too poor for the big 
time. L. R. G. 



BETTIE LEONARD 

Theatre — National {try-out). 

Style — Ventriloquism. 

Time — Fifteen minute*. 

Setting — Special, in three. 

Miss Leonard has a finished ventrilo- 
quial technique ; and several novelties. 
Her straight dialogue work, however, is 
weakened by the poverty of her material. 
Her setting represents a school room, 
and the dummy is supposed to be the 
bad. . boy kept after, hours. Dialogue 
opens and then the 'phone rings. The 
boy's father, phoning, can be heard 
through the receiver. 

Miss Leonard works with three voices 
here and differentiates them all nicely. 
Finally, the father is supposed to put a 
phonograph up at his' end of the wire, 
and tiiis is also heard. The latter is 
effective, and, whether faked or not it is 
excellent.- - ""' " '. " "*."". '. . 

Miss. Leonard, however, should, get . 
someone to write her some, new and up- 
to-date dialogue. With this addition to 
her act there is little question of its Re- 
cess. ' K K. • 




"THE ALLIED BAND" 

Theatre — Loetc's Victoria. 

Style — Musicians. 

Time — Eighteen minutes. 

Setting — Special. : • 

"The Allied Band," nineteen men and 
a girl, alt musicians, represent the dif- 
ferent nations of our Allies. 
. .They start their routine of selections 
with a well executed solo, followed by a 
classical number, for which they were' 
heartily applauded. ■ One of the men, in 
khaki uniform, then sings a song that 
pleases. A solo on the- cornet is also 
rendered by the Camp-fire girl, followed 
by another, song;. For the finish they 
play the "March of the Allies," ending 
with the American anthem. 

The setting represents a camping place 
- on the battlefields of "No Man's Land," 
with some of the men lying around play- 
ing cards. The turn is good and should 
easily find its way into the two-a-day 
houses. M. L.. . 



PAUL AND EDNA WILSON 

Theatre — National {try-out). " ' ' 

Style — Singing and piano. 
Time — Twelve minutet. 
Setting— In one. 

These two people have talent that is 
different from the usual vaudeville sort, 
and it might get them over if they used 
more suitable material. As it is, they 
seem to be attempting the -usual staff - 
without having the temperamental apti- 
tude for it. 

They have none of the tricks of the 
trade: which will get a .'poor stmg over, 
but they have good voices and refine- . 
ment of manner. They should do songs 
which would . bring these characteristics 
out, instead of popular ballads and rags- 
Old Southern melodies' are suggested as' 
suitable vehicles. Though their act, as 
it stands, is worthless, they are much 
too good to give up, and if they use good 
judgment their future looks bright. 

P. K. 



T. J. CARROLL 

Theatre — National (try-out). 

Style — Escapes. >...-•■ 

Time — Ten minutes. 

Setting — Full stage 

This man presents two escapes in an 
inept manner, missing all his chances for 
effect His first is a strait-jacket 
from which he escapes in full view of the 
audience. Houdini got away with this, 
but Carroll never will. He should use a 
cabinet to cover up his lack of finish, if 
for nothing else. 

He then gives an escape which has 
some novelty to it and, if properly done, 
might get over big. it consists of a re- 
volving steel affair, fastened on top of a 
table, and turned rapidly by electricity. 
Onto this the man. is chained and 
claiuped, and the revolutions begin. 
While whirling at great speed he extri- 
cates himself. Carroll, however, takes 
too long about it and is much too noisy. 
If done on a dark stage the flashing of 
the electric sparks about the table would 
add one hundred per cent effect The 
act has practically nothing to recommend 
it Personality is necessary for this sort 
of thing, and Carroll has little. P. K. 



SHERLOCK SISTERS AND CO. 

Theatre— hHfth Avenue. 

Style — Singing and dancing. ... . .. ..... . - 

Time — Seventeen minutes. ..;..' . t ', .. 

Setting — Open in two close in one. 

The Sherlock Sisters and Jimmie Car- . 
son start off -in two, with a Chinese 
song, for which they 'are appropriately 
dressed. The scene then changes to one 
and the. sisters render a song and dance. 
This is followed by a number by the trio, 
after which Carson sings. 

Three verms of a. song are then given, . 
each of the trio appearing: separately 
and .singing. " They finish with a song 
and 'dance and, at the Monday after- 
noon show, they took an encore. r 
The sisters, who resemble, each, other . 
closely, have pleasing personalities and . 
nre graceful dancers. - They wear pretty 
costumes, and make four changes, 'one for 
each time they appear. f — J 
- Carson is a good dancer, and works 
well with his partners. ' "H." W. " " 



"HUNTING FOR A WIFE" \. 

Theatre — Proctor' '» 125th Street^' 
Style— Musical playlet. • ^-\.->: 
Time— Twenty-five minutes. 
Setting— Special. '" "'" \ ----- .-— 
The cast 'of this playlet consists of 
four principals, three-, men, a. gill and a 
chorus of six. The' setting represents' a 
. scene' In a park -and -is cleverly - done. 
■ What little comedy ■ there is- is- poorly 
handled; . . • > ■ • 

The chorus of six pretty girls makes 
- ^several changes of very, attractive gowns, 
'•-'but 1 their work cannot cover that of some 
of the principals,' which is poorly done? 
•> The offering 1b well dressed and has 
good song numbers, but should have dif- 
' ferent .talking' material. "" Then if would 
: B* s? winner. • ~ .-:.:? '. M. L. 



JAMES JACKSON J. 

Theatre — G reenpoint. • , . ^ * ■-. # , . 

Time— Five minutes. 

Stylit—Bonj'o, dog, dancing. - 

Setting— One. 
. James Jackson is a colored boy who. 
plays the banjo upon his entrance.' Then 
hi. has a trick dog which could Stand a 
, bath, and finishes with some soft-shoe 
dancing, which is mediocre; ;_• '.- 

Jackson tries too many things to dot 
any of them well. But he might make a 
good entertainer a\ a' party.' L.'K.'G. ■ 



THE DIXIE SERENADERS 

Theatre — national (try-out). 
Style — Singing and dancing. 
Time — Twenty minutes. 
Setting — Full stage. 

The company presenting this speedy 

"turn is made up of eight people, all but 

two big .men. They get their stuff over 

with the pep which characterises the 

' work of the negro, and, like moat of that ; 

' race,' have good voices. Their repertoire 

is well selected. The two comedians get 

a lot of fun out of their bits, which are 

much above the average. 

They do, in all, nine numbers, and not 
- one of them is dull. They keep the stage 
wideawake during their entire time. The 
act should be popular. P. K. 



LOUIS E. MILLER AND CO. 

Theatre— National (try-out). 

Style— Playlet. 

Time— Fifteen minutes. 

Setting— Full stage. 

This company of four people presents 

' a one-act play which has neither original- 
ity nor surprise to recommend it The 

. acting is not bad, the man, especially, 
being somewhat better than his vehicle. - 
Two girls, one of whom is engaged to 

! the man, decide to make him rush the 

' marriage, which has been dragging for 
some time. He is considering a breach 
of the engagement as he has met an 
heiress.. The. fiancee gets him to her 
apartment and threatens to shoot herself 
unless he comes across. He refuses, and 
she fires a shot falling as though' dead. 

The other girl then enters and accuses 
him of murder. He then remarks he 
wished she were still alive, and he would 

. do as he had promised. With this the 
girl rises and the parson enters. P. K. 

CHARLOTTE LESLAY AND 
CARL HAYDEN 

Theatre — Ridgewood. 

Style — Singing. - .- - > . . ,- 1 t ■ 

Time— Twelve minutes. 

Setting — rn one. ' 

Miss Lesley opens in one, singing the 
love.son^ ^om^Tray^ta," while Hayden 
accompanies . her from the wings. The 

- next - number is "Paradise,'* sung by 
Hayden, which, was followed by Miss 
Leslay singing "Kiss Me Again." Both 
then sang' the "Kiss Waltz" from the 
"Merry. Widow," jaud 'finished with a_ 

; medley of classical and old-time melo- - 

dies. - ' • • '. 

' '■ In number four position this act-went ' 
pver. for _a ±it. . - - S. K. 

BENNETT SISTERS T 

Theatre— Proctor's 68<> Bt. 

yltr— Singing and dancing. 
~"&rrTen^minutes^~ . . 

g — far one and full. "■ 

j . fTJie. Bennett Sisters, two very attract- 
. ive and ambitious misses, present a very 
' good singing and dancing act that is 

pleasingly dressed. 
They open with a song, followed by 
i a cleverly executed dance. The taller 
. of the .two sisters then renders « well 
: played violin solo, which she follows by 
i a dance that could be speeded np a 
i Utile. 

j ' This- is a very neat little turn and 
I should get much better than the opening 

spot on small time. M. L. 



MILCH AND MARTIN . ... 

Theatre — Notional (try-out). 

Style — Musical. 

Time — Eleven minutes. 

Setting — In one. 

The girl of this act plays the violin and 

- the man the piano, both rather well. 
. Their routine is not well selected, how- 
ever, and they have a lot to learn before 
ttiey can get their stuff over in profes- 
sional order. . . , 

The girl plays while she dances, which 
is an effective stunt, especially in one 
number. She also has two costumes. 
They have nothing remarkable to offer, * 
but should work an average act of the 
sort The girl's aggressiveness and self- 
confidence shoulu do much toward getting 
utm over. p. K. 



FRAWLEY AND WEST 

Theatre — Proctor's 23d Street. 

Style — Roman rings. 

Time — Eight minute*. 

Setting — Full stage. 

Frawley and West are two clever 

gymnasts.' Their act consists, mostly, of 

- work on the rings and hand balancing . 

It is on the rings that they show to best 

advantage. 

Several of their ring stunts are out of 
the ordinary, and one special trick is 
featured. The man is suspended in a 
head-to-head fashion from the rings and 
holds the woman with bis teeth, while she 
pivots around. The part of the act. 
where the man enters as a clown should 

• be eliminated, as it has no bearing on 
the' turn whatsoever. 

These two are very clever and can 
travel in almost any company. M. L. 



Theatre— Proctor's 58<fc 8"t. 
Style — Talk and musical. 
Time — Twelve minutes. 
Setting—One. 

- HOUSELY, NICHOOr ANQBZEN ' - 

They open with some sure-fire comedy 
talk which got them off to a good start, 
followed by a saxophone. .solo by the, trio, 
A violin selection is t^eu, played,; after ': 
which the men put over a"" well rendered 
" -sold" 'on the trombone and cornet " This 
was well -.applauded. The woman, in a . 
change ' of costume, then ' demonstrated ' 
that she knows 'bow to put' a song over > 

- - successfully. For ' a finish, the - three- - 

play a solo on the instruments. 

The trio has personality and talent 
and delivers its routine' in s very good 
manner. , v _-..,j ... i M. L. ■ 



"VUYSTAKE TROUPE ~ ' 

Theatre — National (try-out). - ■ 

Style — Pyramid and balancing. - - 

Time — Ten minutes. 
Setting — Full stage. - - 

This troupe, consisting of four men, 

presents one of the best balancing turns 

' the writer has ever seen. They do some 

exceptionally difficult work speedily and ' 
- smoothly. They work together well and 
get their stuff over in orderly and dig- 
nified fashion. 
. .. .This.. is a. good, closing act for any 
bm. P. K. 



26 



THE NEW YORK CUPPER 



December 12, 1917 




P ^^^^^^♦^^^♦♦^♦♦♦♦♦♦^^♦♦♦♦♦^ 



RS OF BURLESQUE j 



BILLIE DAVIES 



PRIMA DONNA 



INNOCENT MAIDS 



Bert Bertrand 



* ■■*■.»■-■* 



Principal C— fjfan 



Lady Buccaneers 



MILDRED HOWELL 

WINSOME SOUBRETTE JACK REID'S RECORD BREAKERS 

McINTYRE AND SHEAHAN 

THE TALKING ACT THEY ARE TALKING ABOUT 

With M oIHe Willuuni' Own Show 

CHARLIE RAYMOND 

Burlaaqaa's Pmdw Straight With Dmv« Marion's On Show 

HARRY HARRIGAN 

ONLY IRISHMAN IN BURLESQUE AS PRINCIPAL' HEBREW COMEDIAN 

BACK WITH JOE BURTON'S STOCK COMPANY KAHN'S FOLLIES 

KATHERINE PAGE 

Prima Donna Hurtig ofc Scimoo'i Big Burlesque Wonder Show 

CORKSCREW SCOTTIE FRIEDELL 

With $1,000,000 Dolk 

»•»» R0MINE and FULLER e— » 



OF CAHni, * ROMINE 
Vudmilb 



OF "CHARMING WIDOWS" 
Burlesque 



*25 BARKERS S£ IDA 



SM WILLIAMS' -GIRLS FROM JOYLAND" 



DONNA 



may f>e:imiviaim 

INGENUE AND A GREAT SUCCESS IN QUARTETTE— LIBERTY GIRLS 




CHAS. E. LEWIS 

SINGING AND DANCING JUVENILE 

With Barney Gerard 1 * "SOME SHOW 



MYRTLE CHERRY 

(Formerly MYRTLE ZIMMERMAN) 

In Vaudeville in Songs and Dances 



CHARLOTTE WORTH 

PRIMA DONNA 

Ability and Wardrobe Direction ROEHM A RICHARDS 



Doing Iriah With Pacemakers 



Ted With the Vote* 



ARTHUR PUTNAM 

Straight— with JOE BURTON STOCK CO. Thi. Week, Follies Theatre 

MAE O'LOUGHLIN 

Featured with 6 Drying GirU With Hip-Hip-Hooray Giri» 



GLADYS SEARS ^ 



>tM 



FLO 



WILL 



DARLEY ^D BOVIS 

PRIMA DONNA CHARACTERS 
STAR and GARTER SHOW 

SARAH HYATT 

PRIMA DONNA monte carlo girls 

FRANKIE LA BRACK 

SOUBRETTE With STAR and GARTER SHOW 



JOE 



WESTON— SYMONDS 



MAIDS OF AMERICA 



ALFARRETTA 

SECOND SEASON 



a SpeWway Gfirla 



•J. Q. CLJINJISallMGHAlVI 



CAY MORNING GLORIES 



COON SHOUTER ingenue 



FRENCH FROUCS 



NORMA BARRY 

Lively LRU* sasavas Mffiea DoBer Dolb 



-PO-P1P Y JUN 



SOUBRETTE 



HIP-HIP-HOORAY GIRLS 



HELEN VREELAND 

mgoeae Prime Donee With Geo. BoBrego's HfavHIp-Hooter Carts 



AIMIMA SAWYER 

INGENUE— BEN KAHN'S UNION SQ. CO. 



Ingenue, Nov With JOE BURTON'S Burlesque Stock Co mp a ny 
BEN KAHN'S FOLLIES THIS WEEK 

HARRY PETERSON 

Singing Straight with Sam W« Cbarmfng Wsdowsv . - Fifth 



DOLLY F I E L D S 

Working for One of the Beat Man in Show Bonnes*. 
Soubrette— Ban Kaha's Follies Company 

THE HASELTINES 



Australian. So 



Comedy, Battel Jnnrnarp. 



O La, I C K 



CHARACTER a* BASSO, 2nd Season with FRENCH: FROUCS— 
Fonneriy Manager of InterTratirmal Four, 



WALTER J. PARKER 

THE NATURAL TAD with THE FRENCH FROLICS. 

JACK F>EARI_ 

"HE WAS THERE, TOO" With Hark. KaJly ot Damsel's PACEMAKERS 



December 12. 1917 



THE HEW YORK CLIPPER 



BURLESQUE NEWS 

(Ctetiraad torn Fag* U> 



GOOD COMEDY AND 
SPLENDID SCENES 

IN "PACE MAKERS" 

Herk, Kelly and Damsel Amusement 
Company's "Face Makers," at the Star 
last week proved an excellent entertain- 
ment in music, song and comedy. 

The offering is in two acts, with five 
scenes. A book by Frank Damsel, called 
"Nedra," proves interesting and amusing. 

The chorus has a pretty lot of girls, 
who sing well and wear attractive cos- 
tumes. The numbers have been well ar- 
ranged and are worked out nicely by the 
chorus. The scenery is bright and pleas- 
ing, particularly the interior of the Pyra- 
mid of "Nedra," which is perfect in de- 
sign and coloring. 

Jack Pearl easily carried off the comedy 
honors of the show. Pearl does a "Dutch" 
character, rather different than is usually 
seen, in a delightful manner. He works 
and talks quietly but in a convincing way, 
which produces no end of laughs. He is 
assisted greatly by Eugene Rauth and Al. 
Hillier. Rauth does a very good Irish 
comedy role. While not having much to 
do, what he has he handles well. His 
"You Don't Have to Come From Ireland 
to Be Irish" was one of the hits of the 
■how. He put it over with feeling. 

Hillier is a corking good Hebrew. . He 
works hard and proves a valuable foil for 
Pearl Harold Whalen, a juvenile 
straight, is perfectly at home in his part. 
He works nicely in the scenes he has with 
the comedians, and puts his several num- 
bers over well. He is a classy dresser. 

Frank Damsel is seen at an advantage 
in the first part, bnt he shines as Bazook, 
the Egyptian Prince, in the Pyramid scene 
in the second act. 

Pretty, shapely, dainty little Frances 
Parr handles the sonbrette role, and she 
takes care of it exceedingly well. She 
reads her lines distinctly and puts her 
numbers over with plenty of vim. She 
has a most pleasing personality and looks 
pretty in tights. Her wardrobe is dainty 
and prettily designed. The pink gown 
with the fan effect, and the black spangled 
dresses, are worthy of mention. 

Tallinn Smalley is the prima donna. She 
has a good voice and offers her numbers 
nicely. Vic Dayton was a little out of 
place Thursday night. The short time she 
was on the stage she did not improve the 
show at all. 

Lillian Crawford and Nellie Montrose 
had small parts which they, handled well. 
William Dunn had a bit in the first apt, 
which he presented nicely. 

Damsel opens the show with a song 
about the people in the cast, which is fol- 
lowed by the opening chorus. A bit with 
Pearl, Rauth and Hillier about a con- 
tract followed. The bit is good and well 
worked up, but is a little too long, and on 
so early it shows the show up at the start. 
The whistling bit, in which Pearl, Hillier 
and Whalen took part, won applause. 

Crawford and Montrose offer a neat 
dancing act, which opens with one verse 
of a song. They do a routine of dancing, 
making one change. 

A talking bit between Pearl and Whalen 
created much comedy. The material is 
good, but credit should go to the way it 
was put over by the two boys. Pearl's 
sneeze was funny. 

Miss Smalley went big with her one 
specialty number which is a little unique. 
Sianij the Russian violinist, won applause 
with his three numbers, which were well 
rendered. 

Damsel has a good show, and is deserv- 
ing of the good business it did at the Star 
last week. Sn>. 



MEEHAN REPLACES PENNY 

Frank A. Meehan has replaced Frank 
Penny with the "Lady Buccaneers" at the 
Victoria, Pittsburgh. He was . placed 
through the Roebm & Richards office. 

SPENCER TO TAKE VACATION 

Billy Spencer will take a three weeks' 
vacation, starting next Monday, but will 
return to the Ben Kahn fold Jan. 7. 



"BLUTCH" COOPER 
REALLY HAS THE 
"BEST SHOW IN TOWN" 

Well deserving the title, is the show at 
the Columbia this week. It is called "The 
Beat Show in Town," is in two acts and 
nine scenes, and has comedy enough 
crowded in it for half a dozen shows. It 
also has pretty girls, good music and elab- 
orate costumes, which blend in artistic 
color schemes, and a great cast of prin- 
cipals. The book is by Billy K. Wells, 
numbers by Ray Perez, music by Hall 
Dyson, and all are staged under the per- 
sonal direction of James E'. Cooper and 
Billy K. Wells. 

Frank Hunter is the chief f unmaker. In 
the first part he does an Italian comedy 
part, changing to black-face in the second 
part, and doing both in a most creditable 
manner. He is a hard worker, is on the 
stage most of the time, is always doing 
something new in tumbling, acrobatic 
stunts, singing, dancing; in fact, he does 
everything a man of his ability is capable 
of doing. His work is fast and' well done. 

Bert Lahr handles the second comedy 
part with ease, doing an eccentric "Dutch" 
in a most pleasing and different way than 
is usually seen. Lahr handles his lines per- 
fectly and delivers them exceptionally 
well. He is a newcomer to burlesque, and 
a welcome one. 

Frank Wesson is another comedian who 
holds his end, when it comes to laughs. 
He works in a tramp make-up of a re- 
fined type in the first act, and changes to 
Irish in the second, handling both nicely. 

Ralph Rockaway proves a corking good 
"straight," feeding the comedians for 
many laughs, in one scene after another. 
He is a good man. His specialty goes 
over big. 

Bud Walker, a dancing, singing juvenile, 
gives a good account of himself, working 
well in his numbers and bits. He dresses 
nicely, makes a good appearance and 
looks his part. 

Frank Davenport is in several scenes. 

Lynn Cantor, a prima donna of class, 
has a remarkable voice of wide range, 
which she uses to advantage in all her 
numbers. Miss Cantor is a pretty young 
lady, with a most pleasing personality and 
an attractive wardrobe. 

Virginia Ware makes a very pleasing 
ingenue. She renders several numbers 
nicely and appears well in her scenes. 

Mattie De Lece is a shapely, pretty 
principal woman, whose appearance in her 
number^ are welcomed. Miss De Lece has 
a\ good voice and clever way of putting 
her numbers over. She wears pretty 
gowns, and looks great in tights. 

Clara Keating, about four feet of 
sonbrette, is all speed. She puts her 
numbers over with lots of vim. 

The numbers have been arranged artis- 
tically also, and the girls work hard, and 
at the same time most naturally. They 
sing and dance and are all that can be 
asked. In fact, they aro far better than 
are usually seen at the Columbia. 

The "kissing" bit of Hunter and Miss 
De Lece is funny, and went big. The 
house building, in the third scene, is novel 
and full of funny situations. 

Hunter slides down the fire ladder, and 
his work at the window created no end 
of laughs. The drinking bit, with Lahr 
and Miss Ware, with Rockaway working 
"straight," proved a success. The young 
lady and Lahr did a fine "drunk." Walk- 
er's whistling in Miss Cantor's number is 
a good piece of work. He does it well. 

The Union speech by Rockaway won ap- 
plause, with Hunter following it up with 
some funny bits. 

Miss Winters led several numbers for 
encores. 

The performance ended with an artistic 
posing act, offered by Mile. Davenport and 
two young ladies, assisted by the chorus 
of the company in song. 

"Blutch" Cooper has a Teal good show, 
and one that will be the talk of any 
city after the first performance. It will 
be a great money-getter. Sid. 



Owing to the Enormous Success of 

Gus Hill's Big Minstrels 

MINSTREL MiN IN All UNES WANTED 

For the Western Company 

now being organized 

Long Engagement for Good 
Singers, Dancers, Musicians 






Call on 

CHAS. A. WILLIAMS 

Gu. Hill's Office 

47th St. and Broadway New York 



Address all communications to 
CHARLES D. WILSON, Man.ger 
Academy of Music 

Wilmington, N. C. 
Dec. 17 to 25 



Wanted Stock Burlesque People at AD Times 

Principal people and good chorus girls. Salary $18, and everything furnished. 
Stock house to run all year around, located in New York City. Address all 
communications to JOE BURTON, National Winter Garden, Second Ave. and 
Houston St., New York. 



ALAMAC THEATRICAL HOTEL 

Formerly the New Recent 
JOS. T. WEISMAN, Proprietor 

Northwest Corner 14th and Chestnut St*., St. Louts, Mo. 

Theatrical Ho*te!ry, Cafe and Cabaret 
Union Help (Member N. V. A. and Burlesque Club) Best Bet on the Circuit 



MEYERS and SELTZER, Proprie to r * 



Where all Show People meet. 

ZEISSE'S HOTEL & H f££t£s£ lw 

PHILADELPHIA Pa y u » ■ Vw,t ' 



LOUIS MARATSKEY 

HUDSON. N. Y.'S LEADING JEW-ELER TO THE PROFESSION 





MATT KOLB 


b^4aaaaa9sr •' 
al If 


Principal Comedian and Producer 




"DARLINGS OF PARIS" 



MIC H ELI N A PENNETTI 

STAR OF BURLESQUE WITH B. F. KAHN'S FOLLIES COMPANY 

AT LIBERTY 

JEAN POLLOCK 



SOUBRETTE 



Room 6, 1604 Broadway, N. Y. 



BERT LAHR 

ECCENTRIC DUTCH . . BEST SHOW IN TOWN 

Signed Three Years More with Blutch Cooper 



28 



TtfE. ; NEW Y PR R.-> C L; I P£ ER 



December 12,. 1917 



»»»»»»^«»<^^»>VX<<«X^^X^r>»M^^^y^^ 





M»yxKK«>x-x-XK->x^->-H^->x~:-:-W'>X">x-M»w»x-x->x-:-M-:-: 



KATE -PLJLLIVIAIV 



FEA 



WITH ROSE SYDEU.-3 LONDON 



DELLA CLARKE and LEWIS WILL 

Injenue with Prim* Donna Voice Character* 

With Broadway Belle 

adg. FLAIG and BEALL haitie 

STRAIGHT SOUBRETTE 

Future Dane* "Who la She 7" Gey Morula*- Chwiaa The Gki with a Mfle of Smflee 



BILLY HARRIS 



THE VERSATILE STRAIGHT 



GIRLS FROM THE FOLLIES 



" SMILING" NELLIE WATSON 

Nifty Soabrette 

WITH DAVE MARION'S OWN SHOW— A REAL SHOW 



FLORENCE TANNER 

The Girt with tha Golden Volte, with nth Century Maids Direction Reehm and Richards 



ETHEL RAY ^Sif 

SOUBRETTE HIP-HIP HOORAY GIRLS 

JEN IN I ~ 

Soubrette villi Army and Navy Girl* 



JIM 



I don't atop any show— I 
k«» II go loo 

Irish Cossrnlan wi th Army 
and Navy Glrla Co, 



PEARL 



PRIMA DONNA 



BROADWAY BELLES 



DIKE THOMAS 

THE DARK BRIGHT SPOT BROADWAY BELLES 

«" CLINTON and COOK a™* 



PRIMA DONNA SPIEGEL REVIEW 



INGENUE 



TEDDY DU-POISIX 

The Gbl Willi Pleasing Personality — With SOCIAL MAIDS 

•JULIETTE BFXMONT 

"JcHettay" Gypsy Violinist — Ingenue 
Diteetfcn, JACOBS and JERMON 2ITH CENTURY MAIDS 

KIT TIE GLASCO 

Ingenue of "Hello America" 



MABEL HOWARD 



SOUBRETTE 



INNOCENT MAIDS 



CHICK BRICMONT 

(GREEN PEA) 
STRAIGHT. . B. F. KAHN/S FOLLIES COMPANY 

LUCILLE AMES 

Ingenue— Soubrette. With Personality and Ability 
■ ■ JACK REID'S RECORD BREAKERS — SEASON OF 1917-18 

LILLIAN FRANKLIN 

SOPRANO - : .--. 

Vain — Class Wardrobe— ... Girts from Joy land 



GEO.E. SNYDER »« lVf AY JANE 

STRAIGHT SOUBRETTE 

Second Season With Broadway Belles 



A WINNER IN THE RACE 



I 



Eccentric Dutch 



Broadway Belles 



CLAUDIA KERWIN 



PRIMA DONNA 



ARMY AND NAVY GIRLS 



PRIMROSE SEMON 

The American Girl Featured with "Hello America" 



MaHo 



Ia.fl 



With Hurt* At Seamen's "Hello America" 



CALIFORNIA TRIO 



HARRY BART 



BEN JOSS 
Sons— Dress and Class with Spiegel Revue 



JIM HALL 



Cmas. VAN OSTEN and CLARK AuralU 

COMEDIAN SOUBRETTE 

MISCHIEF MAKERS 

HARRY HARVEY 

"Our Hebrew Friend" This Season with Innocent Maids 

Have been in firs Broadway production*. Laat aaaaon principal comedian "Vary Geod, Bdaaa,** 
Thai is tha first time I hav* aver been in stow business. 



Worrying "Bluch** Cooper 



AM BARK (BtTMPSEY) ALI 

Making Them Laugh with Mollio Williams' Own Show 

DOC DORIVIAIS. 

rube: komic Merry rounders 

G R A C E PA L M E R 



PRIMA DONNA 



DIRECTION JACOBS AND JERMON 



JACK FAY 

STRAIGHT MAN DE LUXE Max Spiegel's Social Fellies THAT TALL FELLOW 

ELLIOTT and DOLLS 



(JOHNNY) 



(BABA MARION and TESS DE COSTA) 



ANNETTE WALKER 



(MLLE. ADELAIDE) 



VIOLINIST 



HARRY HASTINGS' BIG SHOW 



Singing — Dancing — Straight 



"Darling, of Paris" 



JIMMY CONNORS 

BACK IN BURLESQUE MANAGEMENT BARNEY GERARD 

SID GOLD 

2nd Season with Ben Welsh. Bigger Hit Than Ever.' Vaudeville Next Season 



December 12,. 1917 



THi: .NEW :YORK^:CX*IPJPER 



29 



STOCK AND REPERTOIRE 

( Coo tinned front page 14) 



PLAYERS HAVE GALA WEEK 

Lawrence, Mass., Dec. 8. — This baa 
been ' a ' red letter week for tbe Emerson 
Players. They started off Monday night - 
by giving a military concert and ball at tbe 
State armory, tbe receipts' of which go to 
furnish Christmas dinners for tbe 700 Law- 
rence boys who are . with Uncle Sam's 
army in France, The entertainment con- 
sisted of several novelties, and the Players 
did their bit in making it a success. The 
ball began with a grand march, led by 
Dorothy Dickinson, leading lady of the 
company, with Mayor John J. Hurley as 
her partner. "A. Pair of Queens" opened 
Tuesday night, and excellent bnsinesr baa 
been done all week. Director Bernard 
Steele is back at bis post, recovered from 
his recent accident. Next Monday night 
win see tbe premiere of the much heralded 
play, "Apron Strings." 



NUTT PLAYERS DOING WELL 
Mansfield, La., Dec. 5. — The Nntt 
Comedy Players are playing to excellent 
business through the South. Nona Nutt, 
leading lady, is leaving for a visit to her 
mother in Kansas City, and will be tem- 
porarily replaced by Jessaline Delzell, who 
left Angell's Comedians last week. Mrs. 
Nutt has played leading business with the 
company for several years, and is now 
about to take her first real vacation. 
Charles Drew Mack has replaced Eddie 
Barnes, tbe latter going to Atlanta to play 
in musical stock. Edward Chase, leading 
man, and Dorothy Dumas, who were mar- 
ried on tbe stage dnring the company's 
stay at Minden, will continue with the 
show. Eighteen members of the company 
have joined the Red Cross. Manager Ed. 
C. Nutt has installed a new beating and 
lighting system. 



GORDENIER COMPANY CHANGES 

Commerce, Okla., Dec. 5. — There have 
been several recent changes in the roster 
of the Gordenier Stock Company. Jack 
Haggerty, Louise Gordon, A. C. Stork, DeQ 
Phillips and wife and Monte Gordon have 
left the show dnring the past week Or so 
and Walter Elliott and wife have joined. 
Tbe company now includes Grace Robert- 
son, Grace Connelly, Mabel Porter, Ruby 
Kirke Gilson, W. G. Elliott, N. E. Scbaff- 
ner, Oscar Howland and O. H. Gordenier. 



SEIGEL SUCCEEDS OLIVER AS LEAD 

El Paso, Texas, Dec. 5. — Frederick 
Seigel has replaced Oris Oliver as leading 
man of the Oliver stock, now in its four- 
teenth week. Business continues big and 
the soldier boys at Fort Bliss, five miles 
from here, are regular patrons. Of the 
25,000 boys originally at the camp, there 
are only about 3,000 remaining, but this 
fact does not seem to affect the attendance 
of the performances given by the stock. 



BLAIR REHEARSING NEW PLAYS 

PrrTSBUBOH, Tex., Dec. 10. — Blair's 
Comedians during their stay here were re- 
hearsing several new royalty plays, which 
the company will present after the. first of 
the year. Manager Jesse Blair has' decided 
to lay the show off for Christmas week to 
enable the members to spend the holidays 
at home. 



BYERS STOCK DRAWS WELL 

Motden, Neb., Dec 10. — The Fred 
Byers Stock Co. opened here tonight to 
good attendance. Business baa been good 
all along tbe line and tbe company is giv- 
ing satisfaction wherever it appears. The 
present roster of tbe show is Floy Mann, 
Ora Vanning, Vera Temple, V. E. Ashly, 
W. Niemeyer, Joseph Tonietti and Fred 
Byers. 




REVERTS TO VAUDEVILLE 

Pbovidence, R. I., Dec 10.— -After a sea- . 
son of dramatic productions, the Emery 
Theatre has reverted to split week vaude- 
ville and motion pictures. This makes 
four vaudeville houses in town and leaves 
only the Providence Opera House in the 
dramatic field through tbe Winter season. 

JANE MORGAN RETURNS 

New Haven, Conn., Dec 11. — Jane Mor- 
gan, after a week's holiday, returned to 
her place as leading lady of the Hyperion 
Players, appearing this week in "Mrs. 
Temple's Telegram." She spent Thanks- 
giving week in Washington, D. O, her first 
vacation since September, 1916. 



MICHIGAN STOCK CLOSES 

Holland, Mich., Dec. 10. — Tbe Whitney 
Players stock is closing its engagement 
here, and tbe Opera House will be given 
over to vaudeville and pictures. Tbe com- 
pany bag made man; friends here, and tbe 
various members will be sadly missed by 
theatregoers. 



WILBUR JOINS BISHOP STOCK 

Oa.kt.an-d, CaL, Dec 10. — Crane Wilbur 
has joined tbe Bishop Stock Company, and 
will be co-starred with Jane O'Roark. He 
made bis first appearance with the com- 
pany this week in "Tbe Hawk" Tbe com- 
pany plans a tour of the Coast cities this 
Winter. 



EDMONDS JOINS WOLVERTON CO. 

Howland, Tex., Dec. 9. — Lee Edmonds 
joined the Wolverton Stock Company 
during its engagement here. The show 
carries an excellent line of paper, and is 
billed like a circus. The S. R. O. sign 
faced local patrons on two occasions. 



JOYCE LA TELL JOINS PAYTON 

Toledo, O., Dec 4. — Joyce La Tell has 
joined the Payton Stock Company to play 
ingenue leads. 



CHARLES HUSTED 

STAGE DIRECTOR 

Characters or II— vise 

AT LIBERTY 

Haying been honorably discharged from Na- 
tional Army. Address US Oakas St., Apt. 5, 
Qnud a*pid«, ICch. 



WEEVER SIGNS STERLING 

Loren Sterling, who recently closed with 
the Gordenier Stock Company, has joined 
the Weever stock and the roster of the 
hitter company now includes Marion 
Franklin, Louise Browning, Bessie Haw- 
thorn, Leone Lamonte, Howard Bristol, 
Edwin Weever, George Taylor, Jack Boyer, 
Loren Sterling and Baby Athene. 



WANTED 

Male Quartette or Singers to form 
Quartette. .Call immediately. 307 
Putnam Bldg. LEE P. MUCK- 
ENFUSS. 



WANTED 

Road Attractions; minstrel or Uncle Tom's 
Cabin Cos.; one to three nights a week; 
only theatre in to wn; good stage and 
equipments. Apply- STRAND THEATRE, 

Day les town. Pa. 



INSURE YOUR M ATERIAL AGAINST THEFT 

REGIST ER YOU R ACT 

SEND IN YOUR MATERIAL 

THIS COUPON will be numbered and attached and a certificate will be returned to re* as 
an acknowledgment, and for future reference. The contribution should be signed pl** wl r by the 

person or firm sending the same, and should be endorsed by the stage manager of the show or 
erf the home where the act is being used or other witnesses. Farther acknowledgment wfil be 
made by the name* and numbers being published. 
Address your contributions to 



The Registry Bureau, 



NEW YORK CUPPER. UM 



. N«v Yet* 



Date 

NEW YORK CUPPER REGISTRY BUREAU: 
Enclosed please find copy of nay 

entitled 

for Registration. 

NAME 

ADDRESS 



When yon register a play or scenario that yon intend to submit for reading to any prod 
we wil l furnish a label to be attached to the original, showing that the same has been enf 
in THE CLIPPER Registry Bureau. Get the idea? 




LEW LEDERER 

Dutch Comedian with B. F. Kahn'a Union Square 
Stock Co. 

DIRECTION— ROEHM AND RICHARDS 



Wanted 



» people. Chorus and Principals, Musical Tabloids, 1 

Play PimlwJ ng Co. Dialect comedians who can do Jew or Irish, soubrettes, 
prima donna* (will feature if capable), . juveniles, straight tats. Prefer 
strong specialty people who can play parts. State lowest salary. Can use 

awawawawawawawaawi man with scripts who can produce. Give size, weight, age, experiesce. Send 
"■wawawawamw photos; will return same. Dick Butler, Dave ODowd, write. MATT 
■wamwaamw— KUSELL, Room nt, Longacr* Bldg., N. Y. Call in person «m and attar 

■wawaa snsamssaw asssss D ec , h. 

SAVANNAH & GEORGIA 



TWO COMEDY CORKERS 



EHractle. Harry She*. 



EL0DT 
AKEBS OF 

EUT 



M«F GROWING ! M 
DE FORREST GIR 

at Proctor's ISth St. this waakt Featuring 

THE LOVE THAT I FEEL FOR YOU 

By Y. O. Brostasn The Supreme Ballad. 
Com* fn and gat your copy! Member* of the procession will always find a wsacsag* harm. 

Other songs in preparation. 

BROSSEAU MUSIC C0P0RATI0N 

145 WEST 45th STREET, N. Y. C 



WANTED— For Musical Comedy 

now playing and new company opening Dec 25, Musical Comedy people, all lines. Jtxvaall* 
man (Soloist), large character man (Baritone), character woman with strong singing specialty, 
first class S. * D. Comedian, eccentric dancing team, TOP TENOR for Quartette, chorus girls 
and men with strong singing voices. A-l people for first-das* production. Address HARVEY 
D. ORR, Dec 13-15, Lyric Theatre, AHantown, Pa.; Dec 16-23, Rajah Thoatrw, RaadJag, Pa. 



Wanted— Medicine People 

in all lines; good black {see man; most be 
up in Medicine Acts and know how to act. 
Also good lecturer. Win pay percentage or 
salary. Address C P.- WOODRUFF, Can. DaL. 
■ ■ -Nab. - • '■' ' 



Want to Hear from Musical Comedy Company 

About twelve people, must have union pianist. Can give eight to twelve week* 
at Moose Jaw. Plenty of good time to follow. Give lowest terms. Will sell 
out, for I won't play on percentage. Will advance transportation. Can use good 
chorus girls and musical comedy people at all times. W. B. SHERMAN, Sherman 
Theatre, Moose Jaw, Sask., Canada. 



#-s. r^. K I f~* \A/ r~> ITCT DO POi VIS WANTED FUH P I. U i-lC AT . 'jr. 

SONG WRITc-Ko „,« , ,... iL ,. T , Ll , ,s ^u >m 

PERFORMERS ROBT. H. BRENNEH. 1433 Broadway, N.'Y 



30 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



-December 12, 1917 



U.B.O. 

IZW YORK CITY. 

Palace — Sarah Bernhardt — Belle Baker — Gordon 
A Rice — Li oqb ft Yosco. (Fire to come.) 

Colonial — Alfred Bergen — Dooley ft Nelson — Scho- 
Seld ft Martin — Bailey ft Cowan — Brendall ft Bart 
—Three Jahns — The Duttona — Florence Tempest, 

Alhambra— Paul Dickey — Ward ft Collet) — Ran- 
dal ft Myers — Boatork's Elding School — Rockwell ft 
Wood — Pagan ft Raymond — Morin Slaters. 

Soya! — Lambert ft Ball — Herman ft Shirley — 
Farbar Glrla — Eddy Doo — Blaon City Four — "Mak- 
era of History" — Cumminga ft Mitchell — Grace 
Fiaher — Boganny Troape. 

Riverside — Lydell ft Biggins — Amea ft Wlnthrop 
— "Fantasia" — Dorothy Toye — Everest's Monks — 
lmhoff. Conn ft Corinne. 

BROOKLYN. 

Bnshwick — Emmet, DeVoy ft Co. — Cameron Sis- 
ters— Harry For— Eddie Borden Co.— BUI ft Syl- 
vanny— Hallen ft Fuller— Mclellan ft Carson— 
Francis P. Bent. 

Orphenm— MeMabon ft Chappell — Doree'a Celebrt- 
tlea — Dorothy Regal -Xonette — Cole. Buaaell ft 
DmTis — Beaaia Clayton ft Co. — Althoa ft Bead. 
BTTFFAXO, N. T. 

Shea's — Sylrla Clark — Moore ft Gerald — Wilson 
Aobrey Trio — "Beauty." 

BAIIMOBZ, MX*. 

Maryland — Mr. ft Mrs. Jlmmle Barry — Msleta 
Bocco'ni — Earl Caranaugh Co. — Durkln's Animals — 
Klmberly ft Arnold. 

BOSTON, MASS. 
Ksith'a — Jennie Middleton — Morris ft Campbell— 
Harms Bros. — Nat Nazarro Co. — Kaufman Bros. — 
Beaumont ft Arnold. 

CLEVELAND f OHIO. 
Ksith'a — Joyce, West ft Moran — Mr. ft Mrs. 
Connolly— Kerelake'e Pigs — Fern & Davis — Beatrice 
Herford — Blossom Seely Co.— Krouin's Novelties — 
Mullen ft Coogan. 

coitrsfBTja, ohio. 

Keith's — DeLeon ft Davis — Fink's Moles — Holmes 
ft Buckanan — Easting Campbells. 

CINCINNATI, OHIO. 
Keith's — Sallle Fisher Co.— Jas. Lncas Co. — Ar- 
nold ft Florence — Santos ft Hares — Apollo Trio — 

Pariah ft Pern. 

DETROIT, MICM. 
Keith's — Great Leon— Dickinson ft Deagon— six 

American Dancers — Lida McMillan ft Co. — Ker- " 

Tlllea — Watson Slstera — Louis Simon ft Co. 
DAYTON, OHIO. 
Keith's — lack LatVIer — Wro. Gaston ft Co. — Eli- 
no re ft Williams — F. ft L. Brncb — Fox ft Ward— 
Beeman ft Anderson — WIU Ward ft Girls. 
ERIE, PA. 

Colonial— O'Nell ft Wslmsley— Jeanette Martins 
ft Co. — Joe Barton. 

GRAND RAPIDS. MICH. 
Empress — Gander's Toy Shop — Conrad ft Conrad 
— Burns ft Klssen — Foot Meyakos. 
HAMILTON, CAN. 

Keith's— Dooley ft Sales — Lazar & Dale — Reno — 
Aesthetic Dancers — Wood ft Lawson. 

INDIANAPOLIS, TtfS. 
rand — Lewis ft White — Moss ft Frye — Joe 
Jackson — Rm-della Pateraon — Valacetas Leopards 
—"Peacock Alley." 

MONTREAL, CAN. " 
Orphenm — LeBoy Kaimer ft Belmont — Gygi ft 
Vadle — Clark ft Hamilton — Stuart ft Donahne — 
Abbott A White. 

PROVIDENCE, R.I. - 

Keith's — Dan Burke & Girls— Fred Kornan — 
Seymour Brown Co. — Raymond Bond Co. — Helen 
Trix ft Josephine. 

PITTSBURGH, PA. 

Keith's — Anita Gould — HaUen ft Hooter — Frank 
Taylor Co. — Gladys Hanson. 

ytTTT.A-pTTwma pa.. 

Keith's — Bennett ft Richards — Adeline Francis 
— Kanklcbl Troupe — Brengks's Models — Dorothy 
Brenner — Morton ft Glass — Bert Melrose — Rooney 
ft Bent — Sam Bernard. 

ROCHESTER, V. Y. 

Temple — "Futuristic Berne" — Olga Boris— 
Maurice Borkhart — Walter Weema — Crawford ft 
Broderick — Jos. E. Bernard ft Co. — Potter ft 
Hartwell — Shepherd ft Bay. 

TORONTO, CAM. 
Shea's— Guerln ft .Newell— William ft Marie 
Catty — Frances Dougherty — Balder ft Parker— 
Josie Heather ft Co. 

TOLEDO, OHIO. 
Keith's — Welter C. Kelly — "Sports In the 
Alps" — Three Chants — "Married ria Wireless" — 
Nerins ft irwood. 

WASHINGTON, S. C. 
Keith's— Kenny ft BoUls— Onokl— MeMabon. 
Diamond ft Chappel — Adair ft AdelpM — Valesta 
Maslora Co. — "Naughty Princess." 

YOUHGSTOWH, OHIO. 
Keith's — Lncille Cavannah ft Co. — Mr. ft Mrs. 
George Wilde— John ft Winnie Helming — Lydla 
Barry — WartenDurg Broa. — Clark ft Verdi — Stere 
Freda. 

ORPHEUM CIRCUIT , 
CHICAGO. ILL. 

Majestic— The Four Mortooa— Mr. A Mrs. 
Prsdkin— Chas. Howard A Co. — Moore & White- 
head — Brodean ft Silverman — Jessie Boaley ft Co. 
— Ed. Miller Duo— Four Dannbea. 

Palace— Sam Mann ft Co.— Whiting ft Burt — 
Kalmar ft Brown — Era Taylor ft Co. — Leo Beers — 
Meddling. Watts ft Lowne — Joggling Nelson — 
Mang ft Snyder — Bert Flrxgibbon. 

CALGARY. CAM. 
Orphenm — Jos. Howard A Co. — Frank Crumlt— 
Kanaaaira Japs — Rice A ..Werner — CanneXrL . * 
Craren — laabelle D'Armand ft Co. — The Le Groha. 



VAUDEVILLE BILLS 

For Next W»®&. 



DEB MOINES, IA. 
Orphenm— Marck's Jungle Players — "The Night 
Boat" — William Ebbs A Co.— Frankie Heath ft 
Co. — Santley ft Norton — Conn* ft Alberts — Capt, 
Anson ft Daughters. 

DULUXH, MINN. 

Orphenm — Four Marx Bros. — Bessie Rempel A 

Co. — Spencer ft Williams — Comfort ft King — Im- 
perial Doo. 

DENVER, COLO. 
Orphean — "Submarine FT" — Nina Payne — Mllo— 
Arthur Havel ft Co. — Louis Hart A Co. — Hughes 
Musical Trio— Dlero. 

M— ■ CITY, MO. 
Orphenm — Gertrude Hoffman ft Co. — Ruth Boye 
— Gallagher ft Martin — Edward Esmond ft Co. — 
Frank Hartley — Kltnex, Hawksley ft McClay. 

LAB ANGELES, CAL, 
Orphenm— Nan Halpeiin — Sophie Tucker ft Co. — 
Frank Westpbal— Bert Baker ft Co. — Floyd ft 
Brltt — Cooper ft Blcardo — Jean Adair Co. — Kotms 
Sisters. 

LINCOLN, NEB. 
Orphenm — Eddie Foy ft Co. — Bronxon A Baldwin 
— Lebonati — Leach Sisters— Jack A Cora Williams 
—Betty Bond— "Act BeaatlfuL" 

MINNEAPOLIS, MINN. 

Orphenm — Emma Cams A Larry Comer — "The 
Corner Store" — Dunbar's Maryland Singers — David 
Sapirstein — Kerr ft Ensign — Selma Braatc — Stuart 
Barnes. 

MILWAUKEE, WIS. 
Orpheom — Mrs. Tboa. Whaffen ft Co. — McKay ft 
Ardlne— *Tdear' — "Proeperlty" — Vardon A Perry 

— Merle's Cockatoos. 



Orpheum — Lew Brice ft Barr Twins— BBlle 
Beeres ft Co. — Collins ft Bart — Charles Olcott — 
"Motor Boating" — Norwood ft Hal] — Lorenbers 
Slaters A Co. — Neary Brothers. 

MEW ORLEANS, LA. 
Orpheom — Morgan Dancers — May Navdaln — 
James Watts A Co. — Hufford A Chain — Bennett 
Slaters — Scarproff ft Varvaln — Simmons ft Bradley. 

OAKLAND, CAL. 

Orphenm — Four Husbands — Rita Boland — Winona 
Winters — Bath Bros. — loleen Sisters — Jas. H. 
Cullan. 

OMAHA. NEB. 

Orpheom — Gas Edwards Bandbox Berne — Lillian 
Fitzgerald ft Co. — Moore ft Haager — Mile. Leltsel 
— Georgia Earle ft Co. — Fern, Blgelow ft Meenaa — 
Al Herman. 

PORTLAND, ORE. 
Orphenm — Scotch Lade A Lassies — "For Pity's 
Sake" — Edwin George — Leroloa — Herbert'e Dogs — 
Herbert Clifton— Jim ft Betty Margin. 

ST. LOUIS, MO. 
Orphenm— Capes ft Snow— Moon ft Morris— 

Marie Stoddard — "BnberiUe" — Patrlcola ft Meyers 

— Darto ft Rialto— McCormlck ft Wallace. 
SACRAMENTO, STOCKTON AND FRESNO, "at. 
Orphenm — Emily Ann Wellmann ft Co. — Bnrt 
Johnston ft Co. — Mr. ft Mrs. Mel Borne — Golet, 
Harris ft Morey — Bert Hughes ft Co. — Arthur 
Deagon. 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 
Orphenm — Fanchon ft Marco — Montgomery ft 
Perry — Robbie Gordone — Claude ft Fannie Usher — 
Williams & Wolfos — "Tennessee Ten" — Harriet 
Rempel ft Co. — Willie Weston. 

ST. PAUL, MINN. 
Orphenm — Mack ft Walker — Princess Kalama ft 
Co. — Mrs. Gene Hughes — Bemle A Baker — 
Boothby A Ererdeen — Fire Nelsons— Stan Stanley 
ft Co. 

SEATTLE, WASH. 
Orpheom — Mclntyre ft Heath — Trarers ft Dong- 
las — Rne E. Ban — Alexander Kids — Silvester ft 
Vance — Bee Ho Gray ft Co.— Three Stewart Slstera. 

SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH. 
Orpheom — Trixie Frlganxa ft Co. — Faye A Mc- 
Carthy — Harold Dnkane A Co. — Boland D. Trarers 
ft Co. — Allen ft Frances — Hazel Moran — Areling 
ft Lloyd. - 

VANCOUVER, CAN. 
Orphenm — Avon Comedy Four — Barry Green A 
Co. — Holt ft Rosedsle — The Gandsmldta — Tyler ft 
St. Claire — Bert Swor — Anna Chandler. 

WINNIPEG. CAN. 

Orpheom — Alan Brooks ft Co. — Elsa Bnegger ft 
Co. — Clara Howard — Mack ft Earl — King ft Har- 
vey — Toots Pska ft Co. 

LOEW CLRCUIT 

NEW YORK CITY. 

American (First Half)— Isabetle Slaters— Trlbble 
ft Brown— Walter Ward ft Co. — Will ft Mary 
Rogers — Gliding O'Mearas — Evelyn Cunningham — 
O'Brien Havel ft Co. — Brltt Wood. (Last Half) — 
Hendrlx ft Padnla — Corcoran ft Mack — Gliding 
O'Mearas — Al Noda — "Expansion" — "Big Foot." 

Boulevard (First Half)— Wm. Morris — Maude 
Tiffany — "Apple Blossom Time" — Dale ft Burcb — 
Don Fnlano. (Last Half)— Josephine Leonnardt — 
Herman ft Henley — Francis ft Kennedy — Ray Con- 
tra — Walter Ward ft Co. 

Annas B (First Hsif )— Demarest ft Doll— Via- . 
'cent ft Marl me ..Oast Half)— "The Job"— Jar- 



Lincoln Sours (First Half)— Maroas ft West— 
Mel Eastman — Walters ft Moore — John ft Mae 
Burke — Asaki Dno. (Last Bait) — laabelle Slaters 
— Trlbile ft Brown — Grace DeWlnters— "The Right 
Man"— Great Santell — Lee Walton ft Henry. 

Delancy Street (First Half)— Stone ft Manning 
— The Skstellea— Alice Hanson ft Co. — Leila Darts 
ft Co.— Bobbe ft Nelson — Monroe ft Grant. (Last 
Half)— Cooper ft Lacey — "Apple Blossom Time" — 
C. ST S. McDonald — Dale ft Bnrcb — Bell Thazer 
Bros. 

Greeley Squire (First Half)— Clark ft Wood— 
C er ro "Expansion" — Harry L. Webb — Leo ZarrelL 
(Last Half) — Orerholt ft Young — Mel Eastman — 
Mabel Harper ft Co.— Williams ft Mitchell— Weber 
ft Elliott— Red ft Blondy. 

National (First Half)— Cooper A Lacey— Mabel 
Harper ft Co. — Chas. ft B. McDonald — Andy Rice — 
Chong ft Moey. (Last Half)— Chadwick ft Taylor 
— Alice Hanson ft Co. — Leila Darts ft Co. — Cerro — 
Stephen Sisters. 

Orphenm (First Half) — Toe Yaltos — Josephine 
Leonnardt — Dow ft Dale — Hobson ft Beatty— Jessie 
Haywood ft Co. — Lee Walton A Henry — Saratoa 
Troape. (Last Half )— Nat Barns — Bobbe ft Nelson 
— Murphy ft Klein — The Arleys — Don Fnlano— 
Ellnore ft Carleton — "What Really Happened." 

Victoria (First Half)— Helen Jackley— Miller ft 
Gresn — Ellnore ft Carleton — "The Right Man" — 
"Bis Four" — '■Visions of Japan." (Last Half) — 
Wolford's Dogs — Maude Tiffany— Will ft Mary 
Rogers — Jessie Haywood ft Co. — Brltt Wood — 
Dora ft Feelsy. 

BROOKLYN. 

Bijou (First Half) — Orerholt ft Young— Robin- 
son ft Dewey — Al Noda — "What Really Happened" 
—Francis ft Kennedy — "Red ft Blondy." (Last 
Half) — Gold ft Seal — Dunton & Bnxney — El Cots — 
"The Job" — Chase ft LaTonr — Aaakl Duo. 

DsRalb (First Half) — Gold ft Seal— Nick Versa 
— Herman & Henley — Middleton-Spellmeyer — Weber 
ft Elliott— The Arleys. (Last Half)— Yaltos— 
Robinson & Dewey — Hobson ft Beatty — "Excess 
Baggage"— Andy Bice — Leo Zarrell Dno. 

Warwick (First Hslf)— Flying Heelers— "The 
Job" — Thomas Potter Dunne. (Last Half) — Har- 
riett Marlotte A Co.— Nick Versa. 

Fulton (First Half)— Nat Bums— Hendrlx & 
Padula^WUUama ft Mitchell— Grace DeWlnters— 
Greet Santell. (Last Half)— Wm. Morris — Miller 
ft Green — John ft Mse Burke — Evelyn Cunningham 
— The Skstellee. 

Palace (First Hslf)— Jessie Haywood ft Co.— 
Jarrow — Fenn Trio. (Last Half) — Adrian ft Co. — 
Gardner's Ma n i acs. 

BOSTON. MASS. 

Orphenm (First Half) — Kramer A Cross— Dorothy 
Roy — Harmon Zahns A Dunn— '-"Regular Business 
Man" — Conroy ft CDonneU — DePace Opera Co. 
(Last Hslf) — Alexander ft Swain — Hlnkle ft Mae — 
Rose Berry — Dorothy Burton ft Co. — Friend ft 
Downing — Zeno, Jordan ft Zeno. 

St. Jamas (First Half)— Adams ft Mangle- 
Three Moriarty Girls— "The Mollycoddle" — Lane 
ft Smith— Raskin's Russians. (Last Half> — Fergn. 
son ft Sunderland — Rowla ft Von Kaufman — Ryan 
ft Joyce — Penn Trio. 

BALTIMORE. MS. 

Hippodrome (First Half)— Four Martells — Carry 
ft Graham — Howard ft Sadler — Ryan ft Richfield — 
Lander Bros.— Renee Girls. 

FALL BITES, MASS, 

Bijou (First Half)— Alexander A Swain — Rose 
Berry— Dorothy Barton A Co. — Friend ft Downing 
— Zeno. Jordan ft Zeno. (Last Half) — Dorothy 
Roy — Harmon. Zarnes A Dunn — "Regular Busi- 
ness Man" — Conroy A O'DonneH — De Pace Opera 
Co. 

NEWARK. N. J. 

Majestic (First Half) — Murphy A Barry — Ward 
A Shubert — Ray Conlon — "The Job" — Chase A La 
Tour— Stephen Sisters. (Last Half)— Stone A 
Manning — Clark ft Wood — Exposition Jubilee Four 
— B. Kelly Forrest — Walters A Moore — Helen 
Jackley. 

NEW ROCHELLE, N. Y. 

Loew's (First Half)— Adrian ft Co. — Harriet 
Marlotte A Co. (Last Half)— Flying Heelers— 
Thomas Potter Dunne — Jessie Hayward ft Co. 
PROVIDENCE. B. I. 

Mavjestio (First Half)— NorveUos— Art Smith — 
Ferguson ft Sunderland — "Mimic World." (Last 
Half) — Adams ft Mangle — Lane ft Smith — "Mimic 

World." 

Emery (First Half)— Wood ft Halpertn— Jean- 
nette Cbllds— Walker ft in — Arthur Upson. (Last 
naif l — Gilmore A Brown — Kramer A Cross — Three 
Moriarity Sisters. 

SPRINGFIELD, MASS. 
Broadway (First Half) — El Cots — Rowls A Von 
Kaufman— Ryan ft Joyces — Penn Trio. (Last 
Half) — Norreims — Jeannette Cbllds— "The MoTly- 
»oddle" — Art Smith — Raskin's Russians. 

_ TORONTO, CAM. 

Tonga Street (First Hslf) — Rambler Sisters — 
Simmons ft Simmons — -"Girl with Diamond Harp" — 
"Holiday In Dixieland"— Cardo ft Noll— Old 
Soldier Fiddlers. 

POLI CIRCUIT 

BRIDGEPORT, CONN. 

Pali (First Half) — Elizabeth Cutty — "Congress- 
man Kitty"— Hart A Clark— Belleclslre Broa. 
(Last Half)— Knapp ft Cornelia— Ethel McDonougb 
' — "Varietee De Dance" — Barnes A Robinson — 
Gsrdnettl Bros. 

Plaxm (First Half) — Juno Salmo— Stewart A 
Olive — Kennedy, Sneriden ft Day — "Hunting for 
a Wife." (Last' Half)— Dean A Thatcher— Pal- 
frey. Hall A Brown. 



HASXTOAD, CONN. 

Palace (First Haiti — Fenwick Girls— Roger Gray 
A Co. (Last Hslf)— Tony— DuQuesne Comedy 
Four. 

Pall (First Half)— laabelle Miller ft Co.— 
Barnes ft Boblis»3Ti— Piltrey. Han ft Brown. 
(Last Half) — Joe ft Vera Whlte^-"Congressmsn 
Kitty"— "Hunting for ■ Wife." ■ 
NSW HAVEN, CONN. 

Bijou (First Bait) — Dean ft Thatcher — Loner 
Haskell — Hardeen. (Laat Half) — Jano Salmo— 
Stewart ft Olive — Kennedy. Sbertden ft Day— 
"In the Trenches." 

SCRANTOK, PA. 

Poll (First Hslf) — Bud ft Jesse Gray— Maud Bock- 
well — "Danses D'Art" — Bob Hall— Seren American 
Minstrels. (Last Hslf)— Foy Toy A Co. — GalUnari 
Sisters — "Second Childhood" — Fred Allen— Five 
Will Is ma. 

SPRINGFIELD, MASS. . 

Palace (First Hslf) — Marriott Troape— Chas. 
Bradley — Knapp A Cornelia — Tony — "Too Many 
Sweethearts." (Laat Half) — Newell A Most- 
Elizabeth Catty — Karl A Curtis Co. — Somers ft 
Morse — Zelaya— Roger Gray A Co.— Belle Claire 

Bros. 

WORCESTER, MASS. 

Plaza (First Half) — Stanley Ga ii l nl A Co.— 
Carlisle ft Boms. (Last .Half) — Chas. Bradley — 
Isabella Miller ft Co Marriott Troupe. 

Poli (First Half)— Cip. Powers ft Co.— Joe ft 
Vera White — Earl ft Curtis Co.— Zelaya — Caesar 
BlTOlL (Lilt Half) — "Too Many Sweethearts." 
WATERBURY, CONN. 

Poll (First Hslf) — Gardnnetti Bros. — Newell ft 
Most — Somers ft Morse — "In the Trenches" — 
Dnquesne Comedy Four — "Varietee De Dance." 
(Last Half)— Fenwick Girls— Carlisle ft Roma— 
Hart ft Clark — Hardeen. 

Poll (First Half)— Foy Toy Co.— Gallarinl 
Sisters — "Second Childhood"— Fred Allen— Five 
Williams. (Last Hslf)— Bod ft Jessie Gray- 
Maud Rockwell — "Danses D'Art" — Bob Ball— 
Seren American Minstrels. 

PANT AGES CIRCUIT 

BUTTE, MONT. 
Pantages' (Fire Days) — "Bride Shop" — Flo ft 
Ollle Walters — Senstor Francis Murphy — Jack Ken- 
nedy ft Co. — Bodrlgnes. 

CALGARY, CAN. 
Pantages'— Lottie Mayer A Diving Girls — Bea- 
' trice McKenxie^ — Brooks ft Powers — "Lota ft Lots" 
— Johnny Singer ft Dolls. 

DENVER, COLO. 
Pantages'— "Bon Voyage" — Jessie ft DoUle Mil- 
ler — The CromwellB — Brady ft Maboney — "Saint 
and Sinner." 

EDMONTON, CAN. . 
Pantages'— Mlnett A Sidelll— Musical Knehns— 
The Frescotts — Wilklns- A WilklDS — "Bachelor 
Dinner." 

GREAT FALLS, MONT. 
Pantagea'— Rosalind — The Langdons — Jarrla ft 
Harrison — Tony ft George — Florenx — Dixie Harris 
— Variety Foor. 

wawbar CITY, MO. 
Pantages'— Maxlne Parrlsb — "Oh, Too Deril"— 
Nell McKlnley — "A Friendly Call"— Dumitrescu 
Dunham Troupe — Lane ft Harper. 

LOS ANGELES, CAL. 
Pantagvs' — Bcebla Pearl — Equestrian Lion — Wil- 
son Bros. — "Fireside Revere" — Parsons A Irwin — 
Lord ft Fuller. 

MINNEAPOLIS, MINN. 
Pantages' — Billy King ft Co. — Hilton ft Lazar — 
Stelner Trio— Countess Verona — Raymond ft 
Carerly. 

OAKLAND. CAL. 
Pantages'— Ryan ft Biggs— Rlgoletto Bros.— Ash 
A Shaw — Larson A Wilson — Six Serensdera. 
OGDEN, UTAH, 
Pantagea' (Three Days) — Georgia Howard— 
"Count and the Maid" — Four Earls — Tom Ed- 
wards ft Co. — Afleen Stanley — Sllber A North. 
PORTLAND, ORE. 
Pantagea' — "Honey Bees" — Maurice Samuels ft 
Co. — West ft Hale— Transfield Slstera — Mile. 
Therese ft Co. 

SEATTLE, WASH. 
Pantages' — George Primrose MInatrebi — Jan Ru- 
bin! — Barton ft Hill— "Weil. Well, Well"— Marl 
ette's Marionettes — Alice Hamilton. , 

SPOKANE, WASH. , 

Pantagea' — Wilson's Lions — Burke — Tuobey ft 
Co. — Ema Antonio Trio— Lewis ft Lake— Grindell 
ft Esther. 

BAN DIEGO, CAL, 

Pantages' — Willard — "Dream of the Orient"— 
Boey ft Lee — "All Wrong" — The Younger* — 
Claude Coleman. 

SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH, 
Pantages' — Julia Curtis — Four Bolloways— Cook 
& Lorem — Von Cello— Goldberg A Wayne— Greet 
Llnd. 

SAM FRANCISCO, CAL. 
Pantages' — Foor Casters — Strand TrU> — Pedrlnl's 
Monk — Doris Lester Trio — Harry Jolson — Winifred 
Gilfrain Dancers, 

TACOMA. WASH, 
Pantages' — Four Readings — Mutnford ft Thomp- 
son — Herbert Brooks — Zira's Leopards — Jos, K. 
Watson— Johnson-Dean Revue. 

VANCOUVER, CAM. 
Pantages' — "Courtroom Girls" — Cbanncey Mon- 
roe A Col — Jackson A Wahl — Marie Lararre — Hill 

ft - Ac term an — Barns ft Lynn.' 

VICTORIA, CAN. 

Pantages'— The Donals — Ryal ft Early— Bill 

Fruitt — "Cycle of Mirth"— Naynon's Birds— Van 
ft Carrie Avery. 



WINNIPEG. CAN. „£..' • 
Pantages'— Ward, Bell ft Ward— Owen ft Moore 
— Song and Dance Berne — Hampton ft Sbrtner — 
Gruber's "Animals. 



December. 12, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



31 



. ; S. * C. CIRCUIT 

C3BCnrKATI,.0HlO. ■ '■•" 
Empress — Six Soctbern 8erenaden — Stratford 
Four— afaybclle Phillips— Heara ft Boner. 

■ detsoit, hich. 

Kile* — Bert Lennon — Levj A Cooper — Belle 
OllTer— Kalma — Madge Morton Trio— Lee Vala- 



FASOO, H. B. 
Grand (Flnt Half) — Freckle Fay ft Jan Boja 
—Earl * rjonehlne — Boee ft Boaana — Barton * 
Boa*, (last Half)— Lo Poo Tranpe — Billy Small— 
Weston * Brooke. 

JAxTESvTIXE, WIS. 
Apollo Oast Half)— Six Colonial Belle. -Warts 
ft Evans— Etta Bergen — Eary ft Eary. 
JACKSON, MICH. 

Btjaa (Flrat Halt)— Boberta ft Italtland— Jack 
Beddy. (Last Half) — Taylor Triplet*— Three 

Robins. 

MASON CITY, IOWA. 
Cecil (Pint Half)— Pantier Duo— Deibel ft Bay 
— iflinore Sherman. (Laat Half)— Boscoe'a Royal 
Nine. 

siotrx our, iowa. 

Frtnoeai (First Half)— Stlth ft Oexnier— Har- 
aob ft O'Coooer — Cased, Irving ft Cased — La. 
Merit's Cockatoo* — Boecoe'a Koyal Nine (Laat 
Half)— Baraold'a Docs— Diebel ft Ray— Melnott* 
laNole Trbope— "Bally Hoo Trio." 

si. patti., una. 

Hippodrome (Flrat Half)— "Military Fonr"— 
"The Barrier" — Billy Small— Weaton A Brooka — 
Lo Foo Troupe. (Last Half) — Fay ft Jan Boy*— 

la Mont's Cockatoo* — Barton ft Home. 

STJPEBIOE, WIS. 
Broadway (Flrat Half)— Eary ft Eary— Six 
Colonial Belles — Great Akl Kama ft Co. 

...- nouz falls, s. d. 

Orphean (Flrat Half) — "Cupid's Garden" — Kil- 
larney Duo — Melootte LaKole. Tronpe. (Laat Half) 
—Caaad, bring ft Cased — Harmon ft O'Conner. 

I NTERS TATE C IRC U IT 
AT CHISON. KA*T. 
Orpheaa (Dee. 16) — Three Kswanae — Colombia 
dry Fonr — Orrille Stamm — Three Qlbaon Girls. 
AUSTIN. TEX. 
Majeatie (Dec 21-22)— Jack ft Foria— Amanda 
Oray ft Co — Ed Lee W ro the ft Co.— Hedges * 
Hedge* — Rita Mario Orchestra — Hunting ft Francis 
— Asahl Tronpe. . 

BEATJMONT, TEX. 
Kyi* (Dee. 18-19)— Jack ft Fori*— Amanda 
Oray * Co.— Ed. Lee Wrotne * Co.— Hedge* ft 
Hedges— Bito Mario Orchestra — Hunting ft Fran- 

<rU — Asahl Tronpe. 

tllT.T.H I TT 

Majestio — Capes ft Snow — Three Vagrants — 
"Vacunm Cleaners" — Nella Allen— George Sehind- 
ler — Geo. Damcrel ft Co. — Milton Delong ft Sister — 
Billy Bouncer's Circus. 

FORT WORTH, **ess1 

Majestic— Moon ft Morris— MeCormaek ft Wal- 
lace—Marie Stoddard— "BaberiUe" — Patrleola ft 
Meyers — Decree ft Dopree. 

Ryan (Flrat Half)— Margaret Byan — "Whsn 
We Grow TJp" — Morgan, Martin ft Snyder— Gabby 
Bros, ft Clarke. (Laat Half)— Clark ft Chappelle 
— Nelson. Bann ft Demoode — Jimmy Lyons— 
BeUrlam Trio. 

GALVEBTON, TEX. 

Oread Opera House (Dee. 19-17) — Jack ft Foria 
—Amanda Oray ft Co. — Ed. Lee Wrothe ft Co. — 
Hedges ft Hedges— Bits Mario Orchestra— Hooting 
ft Francis— Asabl Troupe. 

HOUSTON. TEX. 
MaJsatJo-La La Selblni— O. Al Randegar— 
"Race of Man"— Porter J. White ft Co.— Olive 
Briscoe— Nellie Nichols— Six Virginia Steppers. 

JOPLIH, XO. 
Electrio (First Half ) — Orpheus Comedy Fonr. 
(Last Half)— Two Specks— Colonial Maids. 

KASSAS CITY, XAS. 

Qectrlo (First Halfl-VTwo Specks— Colonial 
Maids. (Last Half)— Van Horn ft Ammer— Peer- 
less Trio. 

aasaaaasti CUT, XO. 

Globe (Pint Hair)— Swain's Norclty — Qaynell 
Ererett ft Co. — Pat ft" Peggy Hoolton — Win. 
Tralnor ft Co. — Weiae Troupe. (Last Half) — 
George Sehlndler — Tom Lindsay ft Lady Bags— 
Axtrd Brother*. 

LITTLE BOOK, ABE. 

Majestio (Flnt Half)— Kennedy ft Burt. (Last 
Half)— Musical Hunters— Clark ft Larler— Archer 
ft Belford— Wllmoa Westonl— Harry ft Burt 
Gordon. 

OKLAHOMA CITY, OKT.A. 

Lyric (Flrat Half )— The Zlm*— Jimmy Lyons-— 
Kelson, Bann ft Demonde — Clark ft Chappelle — 
Belgium Trio. (Laat Half) — Curtis Comedy 
Canines — Derex ft Wood— Hagen ft Elton Co. — 
Annie Kent— San Fong Lin Troupe: 
P-IBT BLT/FT, ARK. - 

Hanber (Flnt Half)— BramiDos— Hodge ft 
Lowell— Delmore A Moore — Foot Belmont*. (Laat 
^w 1 "— "Borglafs Union"— Lee ft Lawrence— 
Olivetti. Moffett ft Clare... 

SPRINGFIELD, OHIO. 

FJeotrlo (First Half)— Five Violin Girl*— Avery 
ft Wmiama. fLaat" Halfj^-Orphenm Comedy 
* oar. 

St. JOSEPH, MO. 

Electrio <F1r*t Half)— Van Horn ft Ammer— 
p eerless Trio. 

.^S* 1 irlnt Half)— Tiller Sisters— PhiBp De- 
™* Players. (Last Half)— Bertie *M— f*Jk»ssg, 

. . BAH. AHT0XXO, TEX. 
*y«*»la^Alexande* Broal A Evelyn— Pie tro— 
SS2VjP ,wter * Oo.-^CU(rord ft WIlU-Foor 
Hslsy maters— "Broadway Berne," 



8AM AKTOMXO, TEX. 
Prtnceaa (Flnt Half)— Miriam Msbr— Otto 

Koerner A Co. — Doyle A Wright— Bonomer Arabs. 
(Last Half)— Margaret Byan — "When We Grow 
Dp"— Morgan. Martin ft Snyder — Gabby Bros, ft 
Clark. 

TULSA, OKLA. 

Empress (Flrat Half)— Curtis Comedy Canine* — 
Derex ft Wood — Hagen * Elton Co.— Annie Kent — 
Son Fong Lin Tronpe. (Laat Half) — Swain's 
Novelty — Gaynell Ererett ft Co. — Pat ft Peggy 
Hoolton — Wm. Tralnor A Co. — Weiss Troupe. 
TOPEKA, KAN. 

Novelty (First Hslf) — Three Kswsnas— Three 
Gibson Girls — Colombia City Four — Orvllle Stamm. 
(Last Half (—Tiller Slater*— Philip De Voe 
Playen. 

WACO, TEX. 

Auditorium (Dee. 18-17)— Musical Hunters- 
Clark ft Lavier — Gould ft Lewis— Theodore Kos- 
loff — Wllmo* Westonl — Begal ft Bender. 
WICHITA, KAN. 

Princess (Flnt Half)— George Sehlndler — Tom 
Lindsay ft Lady Bugs — A**rd Brothers. (Laat 
Half) — Three Kawanaa — Three Gibson Girl* — 
Columbia City Four— Orrille Stamm. 

. W. V. B. O. 

ANN AKBOB, MICH. 
Majestio (First Half)— George ft May Lefevre— 

Duval ft Simons — Tom Linton ft Girls — Al Abbott 
— Sbtw'i Comedy Circus. 

BATTLE CBr.KK, MICH. 

Bijou (Flnt Half)— Aerial Mitchell*— Gilbert ft 
McCutcaeon — Haviland Thornton " Co. — Backer ft 
Winifred — Welch, Mealy A Montrose. (Last 
Half) — Myrl A Delmar — Falrman A Patrick — 
Marie ft Billy Hart— Richards ft Kyle— Creole 
Band. 

DAHVTLLE, ITT.. 

Palace (First Half) — Florena Duo — Balnea ft 
Goodrich— "A Real Pal"— Ben Delle ft Co. — 
Thalerlo'a Circus. (Last Half) — Better Bros. — 
Moore ft Boss — "Finders. Keepers" — Creigbton. 
Belmont ft Creigbton— Sampson ft Dellls. 
POST WAYKE, TED. 

Palaos (Flnt Half )— "Good Bye Broadway." 
(Last Half) — Gaston Palmer— Balnea ft Goodrich — 
Dare Manley— "Black ft White Review" — Oscar 
Lorraine — Joe De Koe Tronpe. 

FLINT, MICH. 
Majestio (First Half)— Tasmanlan Trio— Gran- 
ville ft Mack — Tom Darlea ft Co. — O'Connor ft 
Dixon — Diana's Model*. (Last Half) — Wllford Da 
Bola — Dnnley A Merrill— -Asoris Trio — James 
Uchter — "Smart Shop." 

INDIANAPOLIS, IND. 
Lyrio — Eddie Badger — Walsh A Bentley— Chief 
little Elk ft Co.— Jack Dresner— "Please Mr. 
Detective." 

JACKSON. MICH. 
Orpheum (Flnt Half) — "Twentieth Century 
Whirl." (Last Half) — Marcos— Arco A Virginia 
Lew Welch ft Co. — Eepe ft Dutton— "Girl from 
Holland." 

KALAMAZOO, MICH. 
Majeatie (Flnt Half) — Myrl A Delmar — Fair- 
man A Patrick— Marie & Billy Hart— Richards ft 
Kyle— Creole Band. (Last Half)— Aerial Mltehella 
— Gilbert ft McCutcbeon — Haviland Thornton Co. — 
Bucker A Winifred — Welch, Mealy A Montrose. 
LANSING, MICH. 
Bijou (First Half)— Hereon— Arco ft Virginia- 
Lew Welch ft Co. — Eepe ft Dutton — "'Girl from 
Holland." (Lsst Hslf) — "Twentieth Century 

WhlrL" 

LAFAYETTE. IKTI. 
Fsxafiy (Flnt Hslf) — Better Bros.— Dave Man- 
ley — "Flnden Keepers" — Moore ft Bose — Zelgler. 
Slater ft Kentucky Fire. (Last Half)— Kloreni 
Duo— Manner ft Bojer*— "A Real Pal"— Whlt- 
aeld ft Ireland Co. — Tbalerlo's Circus. 
MUSKEGON, MICH. 
Secant (First Half)— Go* Henderson— Stroud 
Trio — Corse Peyton ft Co. — Fitch Cooper — Em- 
pire Comedy Foot. (Laat Half)— "Good Bye 
Broadway." 

OAKLAND, CAL. 

Pontine (Flnt Half)— Gaaton Palmer— The 
Clines — "Six Peaches and a Pair" — Bae ft Emma 
Dean — Degnon ft Clifton. (Last Half) — On* 
Henderson — Stroud Trio— Duval ft Simmons — AL 
Abott — Empire Comedy Pour. 

SAGINAW, MICH. 

JofTen-Strand (First Half )— Wllford DuBols— 
Duntley. ft Merrill— Asoris Trio— James Lichter — 
"Smart Shop." (Laat Half) — Taamanlan Trio— 
Granville ft Mack— Tom Davie* ft Co.— O'Connor 
ft Dixon — Diana's Models. 

W. V. M. A. 

■ ALTON, ILL. 
Hippodrome (Flnt Half)— Henry ft Moore— 
Ward ft Raymond. (Laat Half)— "Magaxtne 
Girls."- - • l ■ .. 

' ASHLARS, WIS. 
Royal (Dee. 21-22)— Ed. Wilson— Bob ft Peggy 
Valentine — Howard ft Graff. 

ANACONDA, MOST. 

Bluebird (Dee. 16) — Kenny ft Lajrnnce 

Bernard ft Merrltt — Knight, Benson ft HoDoway — 
"Camp in the Bookies" — George F. Wall— Bone- 
sett! Tronpe. (Dee. 19) — Alvarex Dno — Bsssass ) 
Asher — Walah ft Rand — "A Night with the Poets" 
— Lew Ward — Shanghai. Trio. 

BLOOMINGTON, ILL. 
Majeatie (Flnt Half)— Walter Baker ft Co.— 
Bagapatlon Six — Creigbton. Belmont & Creigbton— 
The Rial*. (Laat Half)— Willie Mlasem ft Co.— 
Roth ft Roberta— Wm. Morrow ft Co.— Jim Me- 
Wlllisms — "The International Revue." 
.. . BILLINGS, MOMX. - 

Babcock " (Dec 20)— Tbiesen's Pets— Calvin ft' 
Thornton— Millard Bros.— Ds Forest Bros. A 
Falke— Dave Thursby— Dekock Tronpe. (Dae. 2S- 
24)— Le Boy ft Paal— Waiman 'ft Deny— Frank 
Sogers— Dorothy Deechelle A Co.— Dedlc VeMle ft 
Co. .•" • '• :" •.'•:. .'.--■ 
( Continued on pagi SS.) ■" 



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the theatrical business. 

Contains a complete diary for the season, the names 
and addresses of all Theatrical Managers, Vaudeville 
and Dramatic Agents in New York, Chicago, Boston, 
Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, San Francisco, Canada; 
Music Publishers; Theatrical Clubs and Societies; 
Moving Picture Firms, and other useful information. 

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THE CLIPPER DATE 

AND RED BOOK 

(For 1917-1918) 



BOOK 



To THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 
1604 Broadway, New York 



32 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



December 12, 1917 



Route* Mast Hatch TnU Office Not 
TLmh Saturday 
DRAMATIC AND MUSICAL 

Adams, Maude — Princess, Toronto, Can., 10- 

15; Russell. Ottawa, 17-18. 
"Art and Opportunity" — Cort. N. Y. Indef. 
Anglin, Margaret — Little Theatre, Phlla., in- 

"Arabian Nights" — Colonial, Boston, 10-23. 
"Broadway After Dark" — Independence. la., 
12; Coggon, 13; Anamosa, 14; Savanna. 

III. 15 ; DeWltt, la., 16 ; Tipton, 17 ; 

Wapello, 18. 
"Blind Youth" — Republic, indef. 
"Bualness Before Pleasure" — Eltinge, New 

York, lndef. 
"Barrle Plays"— Hollls, Boston, 10-22. 
"Boomerang" — Garrlck, Phlla. 10-23. 
"Cheer Up" — Hippodrome, lndef. 
"Come Out of the Kitchen" — Powers, Chi- 
cago, lndef. 
"Chu Chin Chow" — Manhattan O. H., lndef. 
"Country Cousin" — Gaiety, N. Y., lndef. 
"Cure for Curables'" — Majestic, Boston, lndef. 
"Doing Our Bit" — Winter Garden, N. Y. 

index. 
"De Luxe Annie" — Wilbur. Boston, lndef. 
"Every woman" — Staunton, Va., 12 ; Boanoke, 

13 : Danville. 14 ; Greensboro, N. C, 15 ; 

Rocky Mount, IT ; Raleigh, 18. 
"Eyes of Youth" — "Maxine Elliott's Theatre, 

lndef. 
"Eileen" (Joe Weber, mgr.) — Buffalo, N. Y., 

"Furs 'and Frills"— Plymouth, Boston, indef. 

"Girl Without a Chance" (East) — Amster- 
dam, N. Y., 12; Lowville, N. Y., 13; Car- 
thage, N. IV 14 : Watertown, N. Y., 15 ; 
Cornwall, Ont, 25 ; Farnham, Quebec, 26 ; 
Tlconderoga, N. Y., 27 ; Plattsburgh, N. Y., 
28-28. 

"A Good for Nothing Husband" (Western) — 
Wells, Minn.. 12; LeSueur, Minn., 14; 
St Peter, Minn.. 15. . L 

•The Girl Without a Chance" (Western) — 
Vale, Idaho, 12 ; Payette, Idaho, 13 ; 
Baker City, Ore.,14-15; Pocatello, Idaho, 
25: Ashton, Idaho. 27: Blackfoot, Idaho, 
28; Dillon, Mont., 29; PhUUpsbnrg. Mont. 

"A Good for Nothing Husband" (Eastern)— 
Williamson, N. C, 12; Washington, N. C. 
13 ; Balelgh, N. C., 15; Suffolk, Va.. 25 ; 
Scotland, V. C. 2ft: Ktaston, N. C. 2i : 
Newberne, N. C, 28 ; Wilmington, N. O, 
20; Lnmberton, N. C 31. 

"Gypsy Trail, The" — Plymouth, >. Y. lndef. 

"GraBS Widow" — Liberty, N. Y., indef. 

"Gay Lord Quex"— .,.. ,„„, «„ v V 

"Good Morning Rosamond" — 4Stn St. «. i. 

"Hans " and Frits" — Barnsboro, Nebr. 12 : 
Johnstown, 13; Unlontown, 14; Connells- 
vUle, 15. ' _ _ ___ . 

"Have a Heart" (H. C. Savage, mgr.)— 
Birmingham, Ala., 12; Anniston, 13, 
SelmaTl4; Mobile, 15; New Orleans, La.; 

"HaTe 3 'a Heart;' (West)— Illinois Theatre, 

"HamUtln" — Bla'ckstone. Chicago, lndef. 
"Here Comes the Bride"— Colonial, Chicago, 

"Hef Regiment"— Knickerbocker, N. Y. indef. 
-Johnny Get Yonr Gun"— Cort, Chicago. 

"Ja n ck o' Lantern"— Globe, N. Y. lndef. 
"King. The" — Cohan's, N. 1.. lndef.- 
Kellard. John B-^Co.. Calgary. *■*• c * n " 

"Katllika"— Davidson, Milwaukee, 8-16. 

"Lombardi. Ltd." — MoroBCO. N. Y„ lndef. 

"Leave It to Jane"— Longacre Theatre, ln- 
def 

"Land of Joy"— Park, N. Y. lndef. 

"L'Elevatlon — Playhouse, r». x -«*■*• . - 

"Love o' Mike— Knickerbocker, Chicago, Ind. 

"Miss 1917"— Century, N. Y Indet 

Mack. Andrew— Buffalo, N. Y„ 10-15: Dun- 
kirk, 17; Warren, Pa., 18. 

"Madame Sand" — Criterion. N. Y. lndex. 

"Maytlme"— Shubert Theatre, lndef. ... 

"Man Who Came Back"— Princess, Chicago. 

"Mafwerader. The" (B. W. Tuny)— Booth, 

•Montana 1 "— Royal, Nebr. 12 ; Plainview. 

13; Meadow Grove, 14 ^Petersburg, 16 
MantelL Robt, Co.— Cincinnati, O., 17-ZZ . 

"Nolhln? °But fee 2 TTUth"-Adelphl. Phlla. 

"Naushty Wife, The"— Harris. N. Y„ lndef. 

••One B Girl's E^erience" (BMttgWg. 
111., 12: Wapello, Ia^l3 : Iowa Clty^w , 
Washington, 15 : Ottumwa. 16 ; What 
Cheerr 17 : Oskaloosa, 23; Cedar Rapids, 
25 

"Oh," Boy"— Casino. N. Y. lndef. 

"Oh Boy"— La Salle Chicago, lndef. 

"Odds and Enda"— Bijou, N. 5»*Kp •««•£. 

"Ovpt the TOD" — *8th St Boot. N. Y, index. 

W B hffilftuk B. Smith, mg£)— 
nnnnrfi II 12- Marengo, 13: Brooklyn. 
?4f5?w HtvenT'lsTrrM?, 17: Waterloo, 

"Pollyanna"— Broad, PhUa. 10-1/7. 
••Peter Ibbetson" — Lyric, Phlla.. 10-1T. 
"Fasstag Stow of 1917"— Garrlck, Chicago, 

"MxvSfMfc a Past"— Belasco, N. Y. lndef. 
• ™m*Pom? with Mltzl Hajos (H. W. Sav- 
age)— Columbia Theatre, San Francisco. 

"P?p\ L s o'°"pan"— Hudson Theatre. N. Y., ln- 

"Pa!s First"— Elmlra, « U. lt?_ j ft»SE 

ton. 13: Oswego, 14: Watertown. 15 . His 
Majesty's Theatre, Montreal. Ca. 17-^4. 
"Riviera Girl"— New Amsterdam. N. Y„ ln- 

"Rambler Rose" (Ctaa. Frohman, mgr)— 
Stamford, Conn., 10; New Haven, 11-ia, 
•^fnbow^Gg'-The Forrest, PhUa-_10-15. 



ROUTE LIST 



"Seventeen" — Stuart Walker Co. — Playhouse, Shubert Stock — St Paul, Minn., indef. 
Chicago, 10-15. Somervllle Theatre Players — Somerrtlle, 

Mass., lndef. 
Spooner, Cecil, Stock — Grand Opera House, 

Brooklyn, lndef. 
Sites-Emerson Co. — Lowell, Mass. indef. 



LlllCHgU, 1U.I9. 

"Trail of the Lonesome Fine" — Parkersburg, 
W. Va„ 12; Fairmont, 13; Grafton, 14; 
Cumberland, N. Y„ 15. 

"Tailor Made Man" — Cohan & Harris, lndef. 

"Tiger Rose" — Lyceum, N. Y. lndef. 

"Turn to the Right" — Tremont Theatre, Bos- 
ton, 10-21. 

"Twin Beds" — Baltimore (Ford's), 10-15. 

"Uncle Tom's Cabin" (Win. Kibble) — To- 
ledo, la., 12; Des Moines, 13-16; Oska- 
loosa. 17: Centervllle. 18. 

"Upstairs and Down" — Park Sq., BoetoD, 
Mass., lndef. . 

"Very Idea, The" (Messrs. Shubert, mgra.) — 
Astor, New York City, 10-15. 

"What's Yonr Husband Doing?" — 39th St, 
N. Y„ lndef. 

"Wanderer, The" — Boston Opera House, Bos- 
ton, indef. 

Wilson, Al. H. — Johnson City. Tenn., 12: 
Bristol. 13; Roanoke, Va., 14; Lynchburg, 
15; Richmond, 23-26. 

Washington Sq. Playere — Comedy, N. Y., in- 
def. 

"Why Marry" — Cohan's Grand, Chicago, ln- 
def. 

"What Next" — Olympic. Chicago, indef. 

"You're In Love" — Chestnut St 0. H., Phlla., 



lndef. 



STOCK 



■gffivi^vffiSS^tf*^ 



Skinner. 

Columbus. o» "i.^SH?"!?^. "SB 
ersburg. W. Va., 14: Wheeling. 16. 



Audltorium Players — Maiden, Mass., indef. 

Alcazar Players — San Francisco, indef. 

Austin, Mildred, Musical Comedy (Star) — 
Louisville. Ky., lndef. 

Aborn Opera Co. — Pittsburgh, Pa., lndef. 

Alhambra Players — Alhambra Theatre, York, 
Pa, indef. 

Baker Stock Co. — Portland, Ore., lndef. 

Bunting, Emma. Stock Company — Grand 
Opera House, San Antonio, Tex., lndef. 

Bishop Players — Oakland, CaL, indef. 

Blaine's, James, Players — Saskatoon, Can., 
indef. 

Bnrnes, Melville — Northampton. Mass.. indef. 

Bradley & Earl Stock Co. — Strand. San An- 
tonio. Tex., indef. 

Byers, Fred, Co. — Mlnden, Nebr. 10-16. 

Cooper Balrd Co. — Zanesville. O. lndef. 

Crown Theatre Stock Co. (T. W. Rowland, 
Sr.) — Chicago, indef. 

Cutter StockCo.— Norwich, N. Y., 10-16. 

Chicago Stock Co. (C. H. Rosskam, mgr.) — 
Lewiston, Me- 10-22. 

Dominion Players — Winnipeg, Manitoba, Can., 
lndef. 

Dwlght, Albert, Players (G. A. Martin, mgr.) 
K. and K. Opera House, Pittsburgh, Pa., 
indef. 

Dainty, Bessie, Players (I. E. Earle, mgr.) — 
Orphenm Theatre, Waco. Tex. lndef. 

Dnhinsky Bros. — St Joseph, Mo., lndef. 

Dnblnsky Bros. — Kansas City, lndef. 

Enterprise Stock Company (Norman Hllyard, 
mgr.) — Chicago, indef. 

Earl Stock (Larry Powers, mgr.)— Sharps- 
burg, Pa. lndef. 

Emerson Players — Lawrence. Mass., lndef. 

Elbert & Getchell Stock — Des Moines, la., 
lndef. . . . 

Earle, Ira. Stock— Waco,- Tex., lndef. 

Fielder, Frank, Stock — Elmlra, N. Y.. lndef. 

Fifth Ave. Stock — Fifth Ave. Brooklyn, ln- 
def. 

Gordlnler Bros. Stock — Ft Dodge. la, lndef. 

Grand Theatre Stock Co.— Tulsa, Okla.. lndef. 

Glaaer, Vaughn, Stock — Detroit, Mich, lndef. 

Holmes, W. Hedge — Troy, N. Y. lndef. 

Howard, George. Stock Co. — Vancouver. 
B. C, Can. indef. _ „ __. 

Hippodrome Stock Co. — Hippodrome. Oak- 
land. Cal. lndef. _ . _ . 

Jewett, Henry, Players — Copley, Boston, ln- 
def. 

Kenyon Stock Co. (Forty U Bott, mgr.) — 
Kenyon, Pittsburgh, Index.' _. 

Knickerbocker Players — Philadelphia, lndef. 

Katzes, Harry. Stock — Salem, Mass. lndef. 

Kraeger. M. P. — WUkes-Barre, Pa. lndef. 

Lakeside Musical. Comedy Co. — Denver, Colo. 

Lieb, Harris, Stock Co.— Wilson, Chicago, tn- 

Lewls". Jsck X. Stock (Jack X. Lewis, mgr.) 

—Chester. Pa., index. ■_ _ 
Liberty Players — Strand, San Diego. Cal. 
Lillem, Ed. Clark, Stock— Chester, Pa. lndef. 
Levy, Robt— Lafayette, N.Y. lndef. 
Levy, Robt— Washington, D. C. lndef. 
Miller & Ball Stock Co. — Steubenvllle, 

lndef. mT 

Moses * Johnson Stock — Paterson, N- 

MacLean, Pauline, Stock (W. W. BlchardB, 
mgrj — Samuel's Theatre,- Jamestown, 

Modern" Players— Pabst, Milwaukee. Wis., In- 

Marcus Musical Stock Co.— New Bedford, 

Mass., lndef. . ... 

Morosco Stock— Los Angeles, lndef. 
Mills, E. C. — Oklahoma, Okla.. lndef. 
Marks Bros. Stock Co. 

Nlggemeyer. C. A. — Minneapolis, Minn, lnder. 
Orphenm Players (Geo. Ebey. mgr.) — Oak- 

Orpheum Stock Co. — Orphenm, Newark, N. J. 

Oliver, Otis, Players — El Paso. Tex., lndef. 
Oliver. OOa. Players (Otis Oliver, mgr.)— 

Wichita. Kan., lndef. ... 

O'Neill, Wm.— Manchester, N. H-lndef. 
O'Hara-Warren-Hathaway— Brockton, Indet 
O'ConneU, J. F., Stock— Halifax, N. S. lndef. 
Poll Stock — Bridgeport, Conn. Indef. 
Poll Stock— New Haven. Conn, tadef. 
Packard-Jay-^Jersey City, N. J. lndef. 
Phelan. E. v.— Lynn, Mass. index. 
Shannon Stock 0>.— Winchester. Ky. 10-18. 



O. 

J-. 



siies-Kmerson «.o. — uweii, Mass., inaex. 

Sites-Emerson Co. — Haverhill, Mass., indef. 

Van Dike & Baton Stock (F. Mack, mgr.) — 
JopUn, Mo. lndef. 

Vollman, E. H. Stock — Stockton, Cal. lndef. 

Vollmao — Salt Lake City, Utah, lndef. 

Williams. Ed. Stock — Kokomo. lndef. 

Wilkes' Players — Seattle, WaBh. lndef. 

Wilson, Tom — Lyxlc, Butler, Ind. 

Wallace, Morgan, Stock — Sioux City, la., ln- 
def. 

Wlllard, Fred, Stock — White Plains, N. Y. 
lndef. 

INTERNATIONAL CIRCUIT 

Attraction* for the Waak of December IS 

"Buster Brown" — Washington. 
"Honolulu Lou" — Louisville. 
Katzenjammer Kids — St Louis. 
'•Mutt and Jeff" — Peoria 16th only. 
"Millionaire's Son and the Shop Girl" — 

Cleveland. 
"Marriage Question, The" — Imperial, Chicago. 
"Only Girl. The" — Detroit. 
"Natural Law. The" — Milwaukee. 
"Thurston" — Omaha, Nebr. 16-19-21-22. 
"Wizard of Wiaeland" — Bocbester. 

BURLESQUE 

Columbia Wheel 

Al Reeves— Gaiety. Detroit, 10-15; Gayety, 

Toronto, Ont, 17-22. 
Ben "Welch — Bastable, Syracuse, 10-12: 

Lumbers. Utica. 13-16; Gayety, Montreal. 

Can. 17-22. 
Best Show in Town — Columbia. New York, 

10-15; Casino, Brooklyn, 17-22. 
Bowerys^ — Palace, Baltimore, 10-16: Gayety. 

Washington, 17-22. 
Burlesque Revue^ — Gayety. Washington, 10- 

16: Gayety. Pittsburg. 17-22. 
Burlesque Wonder Show — Gayety, .Pitts- 
burg. 10-16; Star, Cleveland, 17-22. 
Bon T"ons— Majestic. Jersey City. 10-16; 

People's. Philadelphia, 17-22. ■ 

Behman Show — Park. Bridgeport, 13-16; 

Colonial, Providence, 17-23. 
Broadway Frolics — Gayety, St Louis. 10-15; 

Star and Garter. Chicago, 17-22. 
Bostonlans — Empire, Newark, N. J. 10-16; 

Casino, Philadelphia. 17-22. «__. 

Follies of the Day — Jacaue's, Waterbury, 

Conn. 10-15: Cohan's, Newburg, 17-19: 

Cohan's, Poughkeepsle, 20-22. 
Golden Crooks— -Gayety, Boston, 10-16; 

Columbia. New York. 17-22. 
Hello American— Gayety, Toronto, Ont, 

10-15; Gayety, Buffalo, 17-22. 
Harry Hastings — Miner's Bronx, New York. 

10-15; open 17-22; Orpheum. Paterson, 

24-29 
Hip, Hip. Hoorah— Casino. PhUadelphla, 

10-15; Miner's Bronx. New York. 17-22. 
Howe, Sam— Casino, Boston, 10-15; Grand, 

Hartford, Conn. 17-22. 
Irwin's Big Show— Orpheum. Paterson, 

10-15: Majestic. Jersey City. 17-22. 
Liberty Girls— Cohan's, Newburg, N. Y. 

10-12; Cohan's, Poughlceepsle. 13-15; 

Hurtlg & Seamon's. New York, 17-22. 
Majestic — Berchell. Des Moines, la. 9-14; 

Gayety. Omaha. 17-22. 
Merry Rounders— Olympic Cincinnati, 10- 

15: Columbia, Chicago. 17-22. 
Million * Dons — Gayety, Kansas City, 10- 

16: Gayety, St Louis, 17-22. 

Mollle WlBlamB— open 10-15; Orpheum, 

Paterson. 17-22. 

Marlon's. Dave— Star and Garter, Chicago. 

10-15: BercheU, DeB Moines, la., 16-20. 
Maids of America — Empire. Toledo, O. 

10-15: Lyric. Dayton, 17-22. 
Oh, Girl — Hurtlg ft Seamons, New York, 

10-16: Empire. Brooklyn, 17-22. 
Fuss Puss— Corinthian, Rochester, 10-15: 

Bastable. Syracuse. 17-18; Lumbers, 

TJtlca, 20-22. ^_ . „ . 

Roseland Girls — Gayety, Omaha, Neb. 

10-16; Gayety, Kansas CIty,17-«. 
Rose Sydell's— Empire, Albany, 10-16: 

Casino. Boston. 17-22. ^^ 

Step Lively— Empire. Brooklyn, 10-15; 

Park, Bridgeport. 20-22. __ ^_ 

Star and Garter — Grand, Hartford, fjoun. 

10-15; Jacques, Waterbury. Conn. 17-22. 
Sporting Widows— People's, Philadelphia, 

10-16; Hurtlg ft Seamon's, Mew York, 

17-22 
Social ' Maids— Lyric, Dayton. O., 10-18: 

Olympic Cincinnati, 17-22. • 

Sight Seers — Gayety. Buffalo, 10-16; Corin- 
thian. Rochester. 17-22. 
Sam Sldman — Columbia, Chicago, 10-16: 

Gayety, Detroit. 17-22. . 

Splegal's Review— Star. Cleveland. 10-15; 

Empire. Toledo. 17-22. 

Some Show — ColonlaL Providence, 10-15; 

Gayety, Boston, 17-22. 
Twentieth Century Maids— Gayety, Mon- 
treal, 10-16; Empire. Albany, 17-22. 

Watson's Beef Trust— Casino. Brooklyn, 

10-16; Empire, Newark, 17-22. 

American Wheel 

American — Gayety. Minneapolis, 10-18: 
Star, St Paul, 17-22. ~ ___ 

Army and Navy Girls— Howard. Boston. 
10-16: Orpheum, New Bedford, 17-19: 
Worcester. Worcester, 20-22. 

Aviators— Majestic tedlanar^Us. 10-15; 
Terra Haute. Ind.. 16; open 17-22; Ly- 
ceum, Columbus. 24-29. • 

Auto Girls— star. Brooklyn. 10-16: Gayety. 
Brooklyn. 17-22. 



Broadway Belles — Majestic Scranton, 10- 

16: Blnghamton, N. Y. 17-18; Oswego. 

19; Niagara Falls, 20-22. 
BltCt Blng, Seng — Youngstown, 1S-16; Vic- 
toria, Pittsburg,. 17-22. 
Cabaret Girls — Olympic, New York, 10-16; 

Gayety. Philadelphia. 17-22. 
Charming Widows — Warburton, Yonkers, 

N. Y., 10-12; Hudson, Schenectady, 13-16; 

Holyokc 17-19; Springfield. 20-29. 
Darlings of Paris — Englewood, Chicago, 10- 

16; Empire, Chicago. 17-22. 
Follies of Pleasure— New Bedford, 10-12; 

■Worcester. 19-16; Olympic New York. 

17-22. 
Forty Thieves — Grand, Trenton, 12-15; 

Gayety, Baltimore, 17-22. 
French Frolics — Gayety. Philadelphia. 

10-15; Majestic Scranton, 17-22. 
Gay Morning Glories — Star, St Paul. 10-15: 

Duluth. 16; open 17-22; Gayety, Kansas 

City. 24-29. _ . 

Grown Up Babies — Lyceum, Columbus. 

10-15; Court, Wheeling, W. Va. 17-19; 

Grand, Akron. 20-22. 

Girls from Follies — Open 10-16; Century. 

Kansas City, 17-22. _ 

Girls from Joyland — Gayety, Milwaukee, 

10-15; Gayety, Minneapolis, 17-22. 
Girls from Happyland — Penn Circuit, 10-1B; 

Grand, Trenton, 19-22. , _ 

Hello Girls— Holyoke, Mflsa., 10-12; Spring- 
field, 13-15; Howard, Boston. 17-22. 
Innocent Maids — Star, Toronto, Ont, 10- 

16; Savoy, Hamilton. _ . . „ 
JoUy Girls— Trocadero, PhJladerphU.10-15: 

South Bethlehem. 17: Easton. 18; Wllkes- 

barre, 19-22. _ ^.^_ 

Lid Lfitera— Open 10-16; Lyceum, Colum- 
bus, 17-22. 

Lady Buccaneers — Pittsburgh, 10-16; Penn 
Circuit. 17-22. 

Mischief Makers — Garden, Buffalo, 10-15; 
Star, Toronto, Ont, 17-22. ■ 

Military Maids— Empire, Cleveland. 10-15: 
Park. Erie. Pa. 17-18: Ashtabula. O., 19: 
Park, Youngstown. 20-22. 

Monte Carlo Girls — Niagara Falls, 13-16; 
Garden, Buffalo, N. Y. 17-22. 

MUe-a-Mlnute Girls — Wilkesbarre, 12-15; 
Empire. Hoboken, N. J.. 17-22. 

Orientals — Century, Kansas City. 10-15: 
Standard, St Louis, 17-22. 

Pacemakers— Gayety, Brooklyn, l°,-i|> 
, Warburton, Tonkers. N. Y.. 17-19; Hud- 
son, Schenectady, 90-29... 

Pat White"o — Court, Wheeling. W. Va.. 10- 
12; Grand. Akron. O. 13-16; Empire, 
CTeveland. 17-22. .-_,-. 

Parisian Flirts — Gayety. Baltimore. 10-15; 
Trocadero. Phlla.. 17-22. 

Review of 1918 — Empire. Hoboken. N. J., 
10-15; Star. Brooklyn. 17-22. 

Record Breakera — Cadillac Detroit, 10-15; 
Gayety, Chicago, 17-22. 

Social FoUles — Savoy. Hamilton, Ont, 10- 
15: Cadillac Detroit. 17-22., 

Some Babies— Gayety, Chicago, 10-15: 
Gayety, MUwaukee, 17-22. 

Speedway Girls — Empire, Chicago, lo-ib . 
Fort Wayne, 16; Majestic todianapolis. 
17-22 

Tempters — Standard. St Louis. 10-16; En- 
glewood. Chicago, 17-22, 

PENN CIRCUIT - 

Monday — Newcastle, Pa- 
Tuesday — Johnstown, Pa. 
Wednesday— Altoona. Pa. 
Thursday— Harrisburg, Pa. 
Friday— York. Pa. 
Saturday— Reading, Fa. 



MISCELLANEOUS 



Adams, James— Floating Theatre, Elisabeth 

BragT' *' Bragg Show— Southbury, Conn . 

Mysterious Smith Co. (A. P. Sndth, mgr.)— 
Malad City, Id., 12-13; CoalvUlc Dtab 

Rlcton's* Show — Waveland, Ind. 10-17. 

MINSTRELS 

Cobnrns. J. A.— Fltsgerald, Ga. 12 ; Way- 
crossTl3: Thomasvllle, 14; Dotban, Ahu, 

Field's. A. G. Minstrels—Greenwood. Miss., 
5; Greenville, 6; VIcksburg, 7; Natches, 
8- Jsckson, 9-10; Grenada, ^7; Columbus, 
O. 18-24. 

CIRCUS AND WILD WEST 

Shlpp * Feltus— En route through South 
America. Address us at Bivadavia 835. 
Buenos Aires, Argentina. 

TABLOIDS 
Army _ and Navy Girls— Okmulgee, Okhw 

Pales, 'chas. T. Comedy Co. — Greer, S. C, 

16-22. 
Hale, fessle, Co.— Hooker. Tex>, 11-17. 
"Isle of Roses" — Waco, Tex. 10-15, Hous- 

-t& and Vernon Gem"-Llttle Bock, Ark, 

"Lyon's American Maids"— Weston, W. Va. 

ZarrowU^AueW^ (Jack- Gtant, 

Oh^^ohn?y eW o§ n8 » Sji^fc^: 
»nn Ps 12- Mt Carmel, 13; Sunhury. 14. 

^ &Snetand^^S : Bte 
-Oh?' Johnny. OhT (W««ern-Jn« L» 

20-22. 



December 12, .1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



33 



VAUDEVILLE urn* 

( Con t hu w J frean PUN 5» and 11) 



JsUlXb, MONT. 

Pooplei' Hippodrome (Dec. 16-18) — Alvarei Duo 
— Bowlle Asher — Walsb & Band — "A Night with 
the Poets" — Law Ward — Shanghai Trio. (Dee. 
19-22) — Juggling ' Dellsle — Leonard & Baler — May 
A Billy Earl— Nick Santoro & Co.— Bert Draper — 
Qandell Sisters * Co. 

CHICAGO, JUL. 

Windsor (First Half)— Fred's Pigs— Gladys 
Corlell— Will Stanton & Co.— Wilton Sisters- 
Boy A Arthur. (Last Half )— Karletoo A Klif- 
ford — Bd. A Irene Lowry — Veterans — Harry Rose. 

Avenue (First Half) — Flying Boos — Mr. & Mrs. 
Wm- O'Clare — Bd. & Irene Lowry — Tennessee Trio 
—Stewart A Diggs. (Last Half)— Boll & Boll— 
Johnson & Kollloson — Laypo te Benjamin — Stewart 
A Dlggl. 

Bediie (First Half) — Swan A Swan— Mahoney 
A Sogers — Morgan & Gray — Emily Darren * Co. 
— "Fascinating Fllrta." (Last Half)— Montambo 

* Wells— Tojettl A Bennett— W1U Stanton * Co. 
— Yates & Beed— Boy * Arthur. 

Wilson (First Half)— Willie Mlssem * Co. — 
Lieut. Bowman — Broghtou A Turner — Barber as 

Jackson — Montamo T. Wells. (Last Half) — Two 

Blondra — Anderson Ac Golnes — Mr. A Mrs. Wm. 

O'Clare — Harry Adler — Col. Diamond 4 Daugbter. 

COUNCIL BLUTFB, IA. 

Hicbolaa (First Half)— DarU * Walker— Prince 

* Ktcss— Burke 4 Bnrke— Fare 4 White. (Last 
Half) — Williams A Cnlrer — Stanley 4 Lea. 

CEDAR RAPIDS, 14. 

Majestic (First Half)— Hayatake Bros.— Flake 
4 Fallon — Hugo Lntgens— Al White 4 Co.— 
Holden 4 Hereon — Col. Diamond 4 Daoghter. 
(Last Half) — Wm. DeHollis 4 Co.— Harry 4 Etta 
Conley — Yalsyada A Brazilian Nats — "Zlg Zag 
Berne" — Kelly 4 Calvin — Booth 4 Leander. 
CANTON, TT.T. 

Prineeaa (Last Half)— The Morenos— Marjorie 
Canon — Mack 4 Hastings — The Bimbo*. 
DULUTH, KTNS. 

Haw Grand (First Half)— Two Bnby Girls— 
"Herehant Prince" — Ires Leahy 4 Farnswortb — 
Davis A Kitty. (Last Half) — Cnmmln 4 Sea- 
bam — Wilson A Wilson — Boyal Italian Sextette — 
Stetson A Bnher. 

EAST ST. LOUIS, XXX. 

Ether's (First Half)— Three Weston Sisters — 
Lewis A Leopold — Hardy A Wilson — Togean 4 
Geneva. (Last Half) — Swan 4 Swan — Brace 4 
Betty Morgan — Brans A LaSalle — Marmeln Slaters. 

FORT DODGE, IOWA. 

Princess (First Half)— Stanley A Lea— Viola 
Lewis A Co. (Last Half) — Jim A Irene Marlyn— 
"Lincoln of the U. S. A." — Arthur Bibby — Mailne 
Bros. A Bobby. 

FORT WILLIAM, CAST. 

Orphaam (Dec. 15-19)— Three Mlllards— Maggie 
Le Clair 4 Co. — Lou Burns — Knrtelll. (Dec 21- 
22)— -Two Ruby Girls — "Merchant Prince"— Ives 
Leahy A Farnswortb — Davis 4 Kitty. 

OBAHS FOBKS, N, D, 
Grand (Dec. 21-23) — Adams A Thomas — Cal- 
rert 4 Ardell — Avallon Troupe. 

OBEAT FAILS, MONT. 
Palace (Dec 15-16) — Juggling Dellsle— Leonard 
4 Haley— May 4 Billy Earl— Nick Santoro 4 Co. 
— Bert Draper— Gandell Sisters A Co. (Dec. 20) — 
Bice. Bell 4 Baldwick— Valle— Orr 4 Hager— 
Minerva Courtney A Co. — Jack George Doo — 
"Visions of Art." 

HASnTBAL. MO. 
Park (Flrat Half) — June 4 Irene Melva — Mack 
A Hasting.. (Last Half)— Bodway 4 Edwards— 
John 4 Nellie 01ms. 

IOWA CITY, IOWA. 
Esglert (Last Half)— Prince 4 Kreaa— Mandle 
DeLong — "Small Town Opera." 
70LEET, ILL. 
Orpheum (Last Half) — Three Weston Slaters — 
Holden 4 Herron — Ben Deeley 4 Co.— Madison 
4 Winchester — Dan Sherman A Co. 

KENOSHA, WIS. 

Virginian (Last Half)— Billy Klnkald— Barber 
4 Jackson — Musical Lands — Saxon A Clinton — 
Page, Hack A Mack. 

LINCOLN, MED. 

Lyric (First Half) — Jss. A. Dunn— "191T Winter 
Garden Berne." (Last naif) — Fox A Mayo— 
Torcat's Novelty. 

MINNEAPOLIS, afXnTH. 

Hew Grand — Paul Fetching 4 Co. — Five Funsters 
— D'Amore A Douglas — Fogarty A Williams — 
Robert 4 Robert. 

Row Palace — Bexo— Fred A Mae Waddell— 
Marcelle — Hippodrome Four— Three Alezs — Nip 4 
Tuck. 

MASON CITY, IA. 

Regent (First Half) — Commln A Seaham — Ed. A 
Jack Smith— De Veanx Dell 4 Joe — Arthur 
Blgby— Booth 4 Leander. (Lut Half)— Qua 
Erdman — The McFarlands — Viola Lewis A Co. 

NORTH YAKIMA. WASH. 
Empire (Dec. 16-17)— Skating Venules— Follett 
A Wicks— Marahsll A Covert — Jere Senford — Kelly 
Wilder 4 Co.— Three Begala. (Dec 21-22)— 
Violet 4 Charles — Kliabey 4 Geneva — Dolly Ben- 
nett 4 Young — CUf Dean Players— Zuhn A Drela 
— Swains' Cockatoos. 

OSHXOSH, WIS. 
Majestic (Last Half)— Odonne— Moore 4 White 
Brougnton 4 Turner — Markle A Montgomery — Boeb 
Bros. 

OMAHA, BEB. 
Empress (First Half)— The McFarlands— 
Lawrence 4 Edwards — Frank Ward — "Temptation." 
(Lut Half)— Trick 4 Adair— Little Caruso 4 Co. 
Ed. 4 Jack Smith — Three Melvln Bros. 



OAKLAND, ftiT 
Hippodrome (Dec 16-18) — Fisher's Circus— Byrd 
4 Harvey — Eastman A Moore — Capt. Kidder A Co. 
— Dan Abeam — "Mary's Day Out." (Dec. 10-22) — 
Buster A Eddy — Frank 4 Waters — Thornton 4 
Thornton— Corty Sisters— Fred Rogers— Three 
Hianos. 

PORTLAND. ORE. 

Hippodrome (First Half) — Hicks 4 Hart — Two 
Brownies— Paul Earl— Sorrento Quintette — Jonea 4 
Jones — The Brads. (Last Half) — Cheater John- 
son—Fox A Evans — Xylo Phlenda— Develln A 
Miller — Pearl Bros. 4 Burns — Blva-Larson Troupe. 

PEORIA. Hi. 
Orpheum (First Half) — "Merry Go Bound." 
(Last Half)— The Rials— La France A Kennedy— 
Eadie A Bamsden — Bay Snow — Pernlkofi* A Boss 
Ballet. 

aunrcY. nx. 

Orpheum (First Half) — Three Bobs — Austin 4 
Bailey — La Sova 4 Gllmore — Harry Bose— Plplfsx 
A Panlo. (Last Half)— Lewis A Leopold- 
Daniels A Walters — Long Tack Sam A Co. 

REQIHA. CAN. 
Regina (Last Half )— BiUie Bowman— Charles ' 
Belvechblo 4 Co. — Stanley 4 Gold— Hong Kong 
Troupe. 

SASKATOON, CAN. 

Empire (First Half) — BiUle Bowman — Charles 
Delveehbfo 4 Co. — Stanley 4 Gold — Hong Kong 
Troupe. 

BT. PAUL, MINN. 
Hew Palace (First Half) — Cummin 4 Seaham — 
"Honor Thy Children" — Wilson A Wilson — Boyal 
Italian Sextette — Stetson A Huber. (Last Half) — 
Davis 4 Kitty— Hallen 4 Goes Oklahoma Four. 

SUPERIOR, WIS. 
Palace (First Half)— Two Edwards — Kimball 4 
Kenneth — Luck! A Yost — Markee A Montgomery — 
"Tates' Motoring." (Last Half)— Cliff Bailey 
Duo — "Honor Thy Children" — Black 4 O'Donnell — 
Conway 4 Fields — Archie Onri 4 Dolly. 

ST. ions, mo. 

Grand — Edwards 4 Louise — Mack A Maybelle — 
Thomaa Trio— '■Paradise Valley." 

Empress (Flrat Half) — Herberta Beeson — Bruce 
A Betty Morgan — "Magaaine Girls" — Krani 4 La 
Salle — "Cycling McNutts." (Last Half)— Togean 
A Geneva — Austin A Bailey — Lelo Shaw A Co. — 
Hardy 4 Wilson. 

Park (First Half) — La Dora — Bodway A Ed- 
wards—Sextette Deluxe— Harry Adler. (Last 
Half) — Taylor A Arnold — "Echoes of Broadway" — 
Wallace Galvin — Plpifax A Panlo. 

Colombia — Novelle Bros, — Haddon A Norman — 
Yamamoto Bros_ — Julian Hall — Hiatt 4 Geer— 
"Flirtation" — Strassler's Animals. 

SPOKANE, WASH. 

Hippodrome (Dec 16-1S)— Sweeney 4 Newton — 
Aleva Duo— Adanac Trio — "Wireless Girl"— Kelly 
Wilder A Co. — Lavioe Trio. (Dec. 19-22) _ Kenny 
A LaFrance — Bernard A Merrltt — Knight. Benson 
4 Hollowsy — "Camp in the Bookies" — George F. 
Hall — Bonesetti Troupe. 

SACRAMENTO, CAL. 
Empress (First Half) — Monahan A Co. — Cook A 
Hamilton — Clare A Le Claire — Gene Knight's 
Seven Symphony Belles — link A Robinson — Costa 
Troupe. (Last Half) — The Totos — Vincent -A 
Carter — Seven Variety Dancers — Amedto — Alice 
Teddy 4 Co. — Barney First. 

SEATTLE. WASH. 
Palace Hippodrome (First Half) — Chester John- 
son — Fox 4 Evans — Xylo-Pbiends — Develln 4 Mil- 
ler—Pearl Bros. 4 Burns — The Blva-Larsen 
Troupe. (Last Half) — Loralne A Mltchel — Leever 
A Leroy — "The Pool Boom" — Three Melody Girls— 
The Angelas Trio— Dudley Trio. 

BAH JOSE, CAL. 
Victory (First Half)— Buster 4 Eddy— Frank 4 
Waters — Thornton A Thornton— Corty Slaters — Fred 
Rogers — Three Rianos. (Last Half) — Monahan 4 
Co. — Cook A Hamilton — Clare A LeClalre — Gene 
Knight's Seven Symphony Belles — Link 4 Robin- 
son — Costa Troupe. 

TACOMA. WASH. 
Recent (First Half) — Loralne A Mitchell — Leever 
4 Leroy — "The Pool Boom" — Three Melody Girls 
— The Angelus Trio — Dudley Trio. (Last Half) — 
Skating Vennses — Follett A Wicks — Marshall 4 
Covert — Kelly Wilder A Co. — Jere Sanford — Three 
Regale. 

VrBGINIA, MINN. 
Lyrio (Dec. 21-23)— Two Edwards— Kimball 4 
Kenneth— Lueki A Yost— "Tates' Motoring." 

WASHBURN, WIS. 

Temple (Dec 20)— Ed. WUson— Bob 4 Peggy 
Valentine — Howard 4 Graff. 

WINNIPEG, CAN. 
Strand (First Half) — Adams A Thomas — Calvert 
A Ardell — Marston A Msnley — Avallon Troupe. 
(Last Half)— Three Mlllards— Maggie LeClalr 4 
Co. — Lou Burns — Kartell). 

WASHINGTON, S. 0. 
Belleville (First Half) — Coy De trick ey— Both 4 
Roberts — Marmeln Sisters. (Last Half) — Herberta 
Beeson — Henry 4 Moore — Five Violin Beauties. 

WATT A WALLA. WASH. 
Liberty (Dec 16-17)— Violet 4 Charles— Klisby 
4 Geneva — Dolly Bennett 4 Young — Cliff Dean 
Players — Swain's Cockatooa — Zuhn 4 Drels. (Dec 
21-22) — Sweeney 4 Newton— Aleva Duo— Adanac 
Trio— "Wireless Girl" — Lavine Trio. 



"DOCTOR'S DILEMMA'* 
GIVEN IN GERMAN AT 
IRVING PLACE THEATRE 

"Der Arzt Am Scheidewege," the Ger- 
man version of Bernard Shaw's five-act 
comedy "The Doctor's Dilemma," was the 
latest production at the Irving Place, 
with Hedwig Reicher in the part of Jen- 
nifer. It is, of course, unnecessary to say 
anything about the play itself, and, re- 
garding the cast, it must be said that 
every member of it gave his best to por- 
tray the role entrusted to him. 

Miss Reicher, who has not been seen 
on the German stage, upon which she 
made her debut in this country, for quite 
some time, apparently found it easy 
enough to act once more in her mother 
tongue, though at times she as well as 
some of the other members of the cast 
were not letter perfect. This is not to be 
wondered at in view of the tremendous 
size of the various parts. 



Herr Marlow acted Sir Colenso Ridgeon 
well, while special praise must be 
awarded Herr Feist, whose Sir Patrick 
Cullen was a real masterpiece, and whose 
stage management was excellent. Herr 
Holznagel might have been a good deal 
more polished. Herr Schlegel played the 
part of Dr. Walpole with his amiable 
lightheadedness. 

Herr Christians selected for himself the 
task of portraying the easy going, frivo- 
lous, talented painter whose career is 
brought to an untimely end by consump- 
tion. He played it well and without ex- 
aggerating. Clairette Claire and Hertha 
Schoenfeld deserve mention for their,, 
work in smaller parts. 

Bekolina. 

AT LIBERTY 

BRUCE RINALDO. Lssusa, Heavies, Director. 

5 (eet 10 inches: weight 170. 

HFI.FNE DELMAR. Leads, Heavies. 5 (cct 

6 inches; weight ISS, Write or wire Elks 
Home, Clarksburg, West Va. 



Ruth Hastings 

Prima Donna — French Frolics 



HOT %l PRESS 

JUST OUT— NOW READY 

THE NEW 

McN ALL Y'S I^T Q 

BULLETIN IN O. -3 

PRICE. ONE DOLLAR PER COPY 
IT CONTAINS THE FOLLOWING GILT-EDGE Ur- 

TO-DATE COMEDY MATERIAL: 
20 Senaaiiai Moseleaies, each one s posture hit 
All kinds. wi'>«n r Hebrew, Iriin. Dutch. Wop, 
Kid, Kube. Black and White Fsce, Female. Tramp 
and Slump apnea. 

14 Reariss Aits far Ta> Malta. Escb set SB 
applause winner. 

12 Orliioal Acts for Halt ui Fisule. Tber°n 
make Eootl on any bill. 

32 Sin-Fin Piracies on all of Broadway's latest 
■one nltfl- Each one la full o' pep. 
2 Roof Llftioi Trie Acta, one for two males and 
one female entitled "Tie ii Coasiar," the other 
for three mala entitled "Tea. Dick aae Harry." 
These acta are 24 karat, sure-fire hlta. 
2 Rattlles Qiirtittc Ash, one for torn malt* 
entitled "Fear *t a Kloi," the other for two 
males and two females entitled "The flint Way." 
Both acts are sllie with humor of the Blb- 
Uekllns kind. 

A New Cents* Sketts entitled "A Cssatry stall" 
If • a scream from start to finish. 
A Gnat Tasloll Ceastfy sad tsrlenM. entitled 
"WeMlst Belli." Ifi brlfht, hnesr and bubbles 
orer with wit. 

Mcnairy's Merry Minstrels, caeiirtlei sf 8 csrklss 
Int- parts with atde-snlimnf Jokes and hot-shot 

Gnat Mlertrcl Flails entitled "Lett an* Wee." 

It keens the audience renins tnrotsrbont the entire 

act. Kiaartas sf Cracker jack. Crass Fire Jakes sal 

Can ahldi can be used for atdrwiD: conrtrtatioo 

for two main and male and female. 

Oealet* other comedy m a terial which la useful to 

the tioderille ue i fon u ei. 

Resmser the price at Mclslbrs Belittle Ma. 3 

is aary set Cellar per ease; ar trill **■« jssj 

MtKiliy'i Bsllstia la 2 Hi ) far Jl.so, with 

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WM. McNALLY 

a EAST 18tli STREET, NEW YORK 



Central Fibre Wardrobe 




■ z a a ■ 

$35.00 

*s i n i nv, 

$40.00 

Equal to the 
a t e r a s e $60.00 

trunk and guar- 
anteed. 

CENTRAL TRDNI 
FACTORY 

SIMONS A CO. 
700 Arch St. 

Phila. 



GREATEST SURE FIRE SONG 

A Parody oa "Canning the Kaiser" 

Positively a Riot. Price $1.00 

CLARKSON 
711 Sth Ave. Himtlssctoaa, W. Va. 



CAN YOU USE ME? &%£££ !c& 

(or chorus or quartette. Play cornet, set imaJ 
parts. Address I. I. BORERS, 680 Wast l«*ta Bt, 
New York, care Slattery. 

AT LIBERTY— DEC. IS 

RICHARD LLOYD 

Aae SO, Height 6-11, Weia-ht 1T5. Versatile Gen- 
eral Business Actor. Baritone Singing Voice. Ex- 
cellent appearance — Specialty. Address Colonial 
Hotel. Ptttsbnrt, Fenna. . 

XOTKER AND DATJQHTEB. AGE 00 AND It, 
BOTH CAPABLE OF BEING FEATUBED, 

WANT 

Manager with Capital 

to open Dramatic Co. Id Oklahoma, play In g tb» 
Cotton and Oil aectlona where there la morrt/. 
Must bo lioneat. reliable and business appearance. 
Address CLARA alAXONE, SSOft E. 4th Bt., 
Oklahoma. City. Okla. 

WANTED 

Present address of CHARLES T. SMITH. Man- 
ager. "Mae Edwards Repertoire Co.." or towns In 
wblcb be ban played recently. Address CHARLES 
STTatNEB, ISIS Tribune Bids., Chicago. 



FULL LINE STOCK PAPER FOR 

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AT J CENTS PER SHEET 

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PRODUCfR AND COMEDIAN 
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EMPIRE THEATRE, 
Hci.aan. N. J. 

[Member sf T. B. C) 



KYRA 



W ANTED 
For Human Hearts Co. 

Mac for Tom Locran and woman for Mrs. Logan. 
State full particulars. Also tfronjj cornet player. 
Address by _letter only. C. R. RENO. 1402 
Broadway, ' New York. 

WHEN WILL 

i MADISON'S BUDGET No. 17 

BE READY ! 

I My answer la "In a few weeks." 'Twill be I 
1 a rlcb feast of newest comedy material. 
Price as usual. ONB DOIXAB. Meanwhile 
for 01.50 yon can secure tbe current Inane 
I (No. 16) immediately and an advance copy I 
I of No. IT soon as ready. JAKES XASISOaT, 
* 10M Third Aeenna. Mew York. 




THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



December 12, 1917^ 




MENZELTS 

CONSERVATOIRE 

DE CHOREGRAPHIE 

CLASSIQUE 

22 Eut lGlh Street 

Phone, Stayveaant 3334 

New York 



PLAYS 



F0* STOCK, REPERTOIRE. AMATEUR COMPANIES 

LARGEST ASSORTMENT IN THE WORLD. Book* for home 
amusement, Negro Flays. Paper, Scenery, Mrs. Jarley's Wax 
Works.. Catalogue Free! Free I Free I 

SAMUEL FRENCH, 28 Weil 38th St., New York 



JACK 



NICK 



EDWARDS and GEORGE 



Two Italians in a Day Off 

Direction Jack Potsdam 



BOXY 



FRANK1E 



O'BRIEN & HALL 

IN MELODY AND SONG— Direction JACK POTSDAM 



Supreme Contralto— Vaudeville'* Youngest Character Comedienne 

In oawto-4ata abulia*) by Harry Voa Tuxar and Lou Klatn. Dtractien-SAMIJEL. BAERW1TZ 



STEAMFITTERS 



Direction— MARK LEVEY 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



Three EDDY Sisters 



U. B. O. Time 



Singing — Dancing — Costume Change* 
"A STUDY IN DAINTINESS" 

Direction, CHAS. WILSHIN 



MARGUERITE COATE 



COMEDY SINGING 



Has Returned to Vaudeville 



HARRY 



THE DIPFYIST" 



GLADYS 

& CROLIUS 

DIRECTION— MEYER NORTH 



CHAS. JACK 

SHARP* aimd AX K I ISIS 

tm tie Corking Melange "DIDNT WE?— ~ 



VAUDEVILLE REVIEWS 

(Continued from Pa\fea J and &) 



HARLEM OPERA HOUSE 

(Last Half) 

The Rubio Troupe, six people who do 
acrobatics and dances in a swift manner, 
opened to generous applause. 

Jennings and Mack, blackface come- 
dians, followed, and are reviewed under 
New Acta. 

A one-act play, called "No Children Al- 
lowed," was given by Maurice Freeman, 
and .company. The act is staged and pre- 
sented in a spectacular manner, the full 
Btage setting being one of the best seen 
this season. It represents the court of a 
fashionable apartment bonse, and is very 
realistic; 

The Fabiana Sisters scored with their 
violin, piano and singing act, in which 
they give the popular ballads of several 
years ago. Their rendition of the Italian 
operatic air was well received. 

Sampsell, Leonhard and company fol- 
lowed, and are reviewed under New Acts. 

Herbert Ashley and Jack Ahlman fol- 
lowed in- one of the best written and acted 
team acts the writer has seen in a long 
•while. ' They work in a special drop rep- 
resenting a park scene, with a bench in 
the middle. Their dialogue is connected, 
and their turn might almost be called a 
one-act play. One plays an Irish-Ameri- 
can, while the other is a Jew of the quick- 
witted Potash and Perlmutter type. The 
Irishman is about to commit suicide and 
tells his story to the Jew. He has stolen 
the bank's funds to buy his fiancee a ring, 
and it has been found out. The bank of- 
fered to let him go if he returned the 
' money, but the girl wouldn't give back 
the ring. 

The Jew points out how glad he should 
be that he didn't marry such a girl, and 
offers to give him tbe money. 

"Courting Days," a miniature musical 
comedy with more than the average allot- 
ment of plot, closed the bill. The act 
is presented by a company of seven in a 
special set. The acting is much above the 
average. It is altogether a pleasing act. 

P. K. 



AUDUBON 

(Last Half) 

After the Overture, Queenie Dunedln 
opened the bill. She starts with & song, 
does a dance, walks a tight wire, rides a 
bicycle and finishes with a few somer- 
saults. The girl is fairly clever and 
seems perfectly at home on the stage. 
She might eliminate some of the gags 
while performing on the wire. The audi- 
ence only gave her a small hand. 

The Chang Wah Four followed. Three 
of them make their appearance in Chinese 
garb, the fourth one only putting in an 
appearance in the middle of their act. 
Why he doesn't appear in the opening is 
a mystery, as he has a good bass voice. 
They sing a number of selections which 
are very well put over. A bass solo re- 
ceived a large round of applause, as did 
their final number. 

George Felix and Dawson Sisters was 
the poorest act on the' bill. Felix resorts 
to a lot of old comedy which burlesque 
shows have done to death, such as play- 
ing checkers with whiskey glasses, hang- 
ing his cane on an imaginary hook and 
the like. The girls do a Hula number and 
should stop there instead of going into 
the next. The piano in the act could be 
eliminated. One good bit by Felix is 
drawing a chair and table on a blackboard 
and then sitting on the chair with his 
feet on the table. 

The Debelas Trio, with their violin, 
piano and singing, stopped the show. 
Each number received a generous round 
of applause, especially the man's violin 
playing. They were forced to do an en- 
core and even after that it was hard to 

keep the house quiet.' - 

Thos. Swift Co. has a novel act. He 
tries to sell a girl a new act, and the por- 
trayal of the reading is enacted by them. 

The lines are good, catchy and full of 
ginger. L. R, G. 



PROCTOR'S 125th ST. 

(Last Half) 

After a Paths News Pictorial Frawley 
and West, two clever acrobats and hand. 
standers, began the vaudeville part of the 
programme, and received approval during 
the entire act, with a hearty outburst of 
applause for their closing stunt. 

Frank and Grace DeMont, man and girl, 
in a talking, singing and dancing act' were 
heartily received. They open with some 
sure-fire talk which got them over to a 
good start. The woman sings two songs 
and her partner one. After a bit of com- 
edy talk, they finish with a dance and 
went off to a good hand. 

William B. Friedlander'a "Suffragette 
Review" followed and gave good enter- 
tainment for' about thirty minutes. The 
act possesses good songs, fair comedy and 
the gowns the girls wear are gorgeous. 
The comedian of the act handles bis part 
to good advantage. Tbe turn doses with 
a suffrage song put across very well. The 
offering pleased. 

William and Ada White came next and 
presented a routine of song and dance 
numbers. They are more fully reviewed 
under New Acts. 

Frank Dobson, assisted by a young 
lady whose name does not appear on the 
billing, ' followed and received a rousing 
welcome. He goes through bis act with a 
lot of ginger. He is one of those "nut" 
comedians who does not have to exert 
themselves in order to extract laughs. 
The comedy certainly hit the mark , and 
tbe specialty number with the girl was 
cleverly put over, being rewarded with 
loud applause. For an encore he sings a 
song. 

The El Rey Sisters, two good roller 
skaters, present a routine of fancy skat- 
ing which pleased. Going through three 
or four numbers, they close with a whirl- 
wind exhibition for which they were' well 
applauded. 11. L. 

WARWICK 

(Last Half) 

The three Perones, two women and a 
man, opened the vaudeville portion of the 
bill, and presented a classy act that won 
for them well-deserved approval. For 
their first number they did a dance, using 
castanets, which bore a resemblance to a 
fandango. This they followed with a 
number in which they danced while. play-, 
ing their own music with' bells, the or- 
chestra merely accompanying. 

HInkel and Mac, man and woman, with 
a comedy talking and singing skit, were 
received with marks of approval. They 
open with a good line of comedy talk on 
the order of quick repartee and get 
laughs. Hinkel then sings, and this is 
fpllowed by more comedy talk They 
finish with a song. Hinkel has a fine 
baritone voice which be uses to good ef- 
fect. He is also an adept at "mugging," 
which helps the comedy not a little. Miss 
Mac has a pleasing personality, and is a 
good foil for her partner. 

Frances Rice, with her imitations of 
Belle Baker, David Warfleld (in "The 
Music Master"), Lillian Shaw, Eddie Foy 
and Bertha Kalish, scored a great big hit. 
Her "take-off" of Foy is remarkable. 

DemareBt and Doll, man and woman, 
scored with ' the biggest hit of the bill. 
. The woman is petite and pretty, and 
makes a pleasing appearance. Her part- 
ner is a capita] comedian and a remark- 
able pianist. His best work was probably 
his double melody playing and the Sousa 
March, with variations. 

Howard's Bears closed the bill. It is 
one of the best trained animal acts before 
tbe public. The bears are remarkably in- 
telligent, and work on a globe, ride a tri- 
cycle and waltz. The bear, that wrestles 
with the man is a wonder. There are also 
five dogs in the act, which is presented by 
two men and a woman. 

"The Clever Mrs. Fairfax" was the fear 1 

ture picture and held them, '• ■''•''' -•'■'"■ '•''"• 

*•'■•' B. W. ' 



, December 12,a917 



THE NEW TOM CLIPPER 



35 




In cardar to avoid mistakes and to Insnr. th« prompt delivery al the UttaCS adliai Head 

fa this list, a POSTAL CARD mint be Mat raquraUoi na to forward your letter. It moat 
b. slraad with your full nam* and th. address to which th. latter la to ha sent, and tna 
line of bus taess followed by the lander should ba mentioned. 

Please mention the date (or number) of the CLIPPER In which the Utters aant far 



aassiaisn. Hairy 
BWkawdV W. 
MUlno. Jin 



Craack, Jos, 
Disk. Oscar 9. 
fiscal**. Billy 
Kdvarde, ffu. 

Ed. 
Fi eld, N orman B. 

(hid, fad 
GUtrr, Dsts 
Orsnt. Alf 




GENTLEMEN 

Hira, W. C MfAnallan, Joe 

Jacobs, M Mottles, Id. 

Jewell, AlUon Krell. kit. 

Keeraer, J. r. Artbor 

Lstonr, On. a. Hilton, PMllp 

Lotbtr. Jot Mar. Etbtl 

Llptoo. V. lfawMea pan 

Untaater. John Killer. H. B. 

Hillary. Barton O'Du. Wi 

Miller. Ambrose nn, B. B. 

Hertta, Geo. _ Both Eddy 



Mack. Qua. E. 

Murphy, W. 



Bujmu, b. h. 



C L. 

Fuleber, Vera M. 

Huter, Kethryne 



LADIES 

HIHj, Anna MorreU, Beits 

Inrto. Mrs. Jaik Martin, rellse 

Jewel VlfUn Mantall. OoldU 

Joyce. Marlon Mattes, Mae 

KJnulfj, Anna McOulre. Florence 

KUdare. Kethryn May. Alma 

La Belle, Char Marun. LUllm 

La Bon. Jean Mstbrneo. ley 

Lee, Mildred Owerje. Iocs 

La Tmier. Ber- Poem. Babe 

niece Bunell. Helen T. 
Lelfb, Mabel 



Speeder. F. * 


Thoraaa, Dire 


dene 


Tmer. Chia. T. 


BUM. Barney 

fmrTll E D wVD i lT*^ * 


Tyson, Morton 
Wlhu, Pens 


belt 


Welti. Bars a 


Soon. Geo. ' 


William*. Harold 


Steals, BstB 


Waldeo. A. K. 


Shsyne, Nell 


wuilami. Qrar 


Starr. Hap 


Wsah, Howard 


BL Vraln. 


D. 


Rfcbard 


Wrtn, Mr. 


Sherman, Orrtn 


Yoonf , Billy 
Tocsacr, J. C 

E 


Bwadlrf, E. B. 


Bernoldf. Sidney 


Sherwood. Marlon 


Bo-ell. Mse 


Sadler. Ethel 


Reynolds, Vlr- 


Bootb, Dorothy 


gtrda 


Bplalen, Mil. 


Spaeth, Vials 


John 


gtanley. Dorothy 
St. John, 


Wan. BBI. 0. E 


William., Mtaj 


Kiflanore 


M. 


Sutherland. Blos- 


Wettaa, Blanche 


aom 


Wlllli. Ma; 


Btemblar. Sallle 


Weir.' Mamie 



PLAYERS ENGAGED THIS WEEK 



Lew - Loekett and Jessica Brown, by 
Cohan and Harris for George M. Cohan's 
Revue. 



Folliet Paget, by Oliver Morosco, for 
"Madonna of the Future." 



Harry and Anna Seymore, by Hitchcock 
and Goete, for their Revue. 

Al and Fannie Stedman, by Cohan and 
Harris, for their Cohan Revue. 

Anna McDonnell, by Oliver Morosco, for 
"Upstairs and Down." 

Edna . Pendleton, by the Shuberts, for 
"You're in Love." 



Anna Earl, by Hitchcock and Goetz, for 
"Once in June." 

0. P. Heggie, by J. Hartley Manners, 
for "Magic ~ 

James Spottswood, by A. H. Woods, 
for "Mary's Ankle." 



Harry Ashford, by William A. Brady, 
for "The Man Who Stayed at Home." 



Richard Carle, Elizabeth Brice, Welling- 
ton Cross, the Three Dooleys, Marion 
Davles and Edna Aug, by Hitchcock and 
Goetz, for "Words and Music." 
i 

Josephine Whittell, by Hitchcock and 
Goetz, for "Hltchy-Koo." 



DEATHS OF THE WEEK 



CHARLES. EDWIN TUTHILL, formerly 
and for thirty years auditor and financial 
man -for the Hyde and Behman theatres, 
died December 8 at his home In Brook- 
lyn from old age. His daughter, Mrs. Ed- 
ward Estnonde, well known In the pro- 
fession, survives. Funeral services were 
held last Saturday night and the remains 
were interred Sunday in Cypress Hills 
Cemetery. 

WALTER HALE, well known as actor, 
artist and war correspondent, died at his 
home,. 27 Washington Square North, last 
week. His wife Is also Known professional- 
ly. The funeral was held last Thursday 
"morning;, and Interment was In Graceland 
Cemetery, Chicago. Mr. Hale was forty- 
nine years of age and was a native of 
Chicago. After the death of the father the 
family moved to St. Paul from Chicago, 
where he received his early education at a 
military, school, .then left tor a position 
In an architect's office as he showed much 
ability In the art of drawing. Later on he 
left this position to go on the stage and 
wan affiliated with such, actor, and 
actresses as, Julia Marlowe, W. H. Crane, 
James K. Hackett, John Mason, and 
Augustus Thomas. Twice he visited the 
battle fields of France and was one of the 
few -who remained In the Citadel of Ver- 
dun. 

' CHARLES A. CARROLL, forty-seven 
years of age. who played, many leading 
Darts with Guy BateB Post, died at a hos- 
pital in New York on December S, last, 
from complications of diseases. His last 
stage appearance was In "Omar The Tent 

EDNA CARROL, the musical wonder, 
died last Saturday, December 8, from a 
nervous breakdown at ber home In West 
Twenty-Third street, at the age of thlrty- 
alx. Miss Carrol had played in various 
parts of the country on concert tours, 
vaudeville and high-class cabaret stages, 
making ber appearance on the Keith Cir- 
cuit and at HesUy*s In this City, and nad 
conducted a studio of her own here. Miss 



Carrol was born in Cincinnati and received 
her education there. Following its comple- 
tion, she began ber career as a musician, 
later going upon the vaudeville stage, with 
her sister Lea, under the name of the Car- 
rol Sisters. After appearing In vaudeville 
for about five or six years, she came to 
New York and devoted her time to private 
entertainments. The body was taken to 
the Campbell Funeral Church. Broadway 
and Sixty-Sixth street, where services were 
held. The body was cremated. 

JAKE WALLACE, the pioneer banjo 
player, died November 23 at his home In 
Sen Francisco. He came to San Francisco 
in 1866, and made his appearance at the 
American Theatre, situated at Halleck and 
Sanaome streets. He married Ada Morris 
(Ida Flake), who was his first wife while 
they were 'playing at the Melodlon, at the 
corner of Clay and Kearney streets. Jake 
Wallace had in his time played with all the 
noted minstrels of the united States, and 
There Is not a mining town, village or ham- 
let on the Pacific Coast that he did not 
vlalt during his professional career. He 

leaves a brother. George Wallace, In Oak- 
land, and a slater in San Francisco, to 
-mourn his loss. He was a native of New 
York City and eighty-one years of age. 

LOUIS EDGARD, leading man for Lau- 
rette Taylor In "Over There," died last 
week from a general breakdown, which was 
the result of overwork, in St. Luke's Hos- 
pital. Mr. Edgrard had been working day 
and night for the past few years. Dur- 
ing the day he would work at moving 
picture studios being featured in William 
A. Brady pictures. And at night he would 
1111 parts in some theatrical production. 
Although he was warned, he refused to 
stop. Mr. Edgard was born In England 
and brought to this country by Charles 
Frohman. After the drowning of Charles 
Frohman, he Joined ' forces with ' Daniel 
Frohman. He was thirty-eight years of 
a«. and bad a mother, living in England. 
Funeral' services were held. In Campbell's 

«nd>rtakfng establishment, >at -Broadway 
and Sixty-sixth street, v.yj, .!•' ! 1 1 "iT*-: 




ALBOLENE 

WILL convert Pierrot or Pierrette 
into plain Mister or Master, Mrs. or 
Miss,— easily, quickly snd pie 
lene is the perfect make-up r 
the x*ta in good condition. 

ALWHANS M 

la 1 and 2 esn_. 

Just neat for tan mats- QLe*"*'" I 

ap baa; aba la H sad 

I lb. earn. 
Boy ALBOLENE at any Brat i 

In mate-OS. 

McKESSON * ROBBLN3 
■ Incorporated 

Manufacturing Chemists Eat. 1888 

II Fulton Street Naw York 




..iCPz- 



CORPORATIONS 

ORGANIZED 

In New York $57.50 

Including complete outfit. Ac- 
counts collected everywhere. 
Call, write or phone Suite 201, 
1547 Broadway, Gaiety Theatre 
Building. Telephone 7745 Bryant. 




CLYDfc PHILLIPS 

Offer, that besutlfnl set 

MABEL 

NAYNON'S 
BIRDS 



One of the rarities of vaude- 
ville. An net with a nama 
and talent combined. 

PaWtafM Theatre, Vkitorl*, 
B. C. Week of Doc 17. 



NEW YORK THEATRES 



B F. KEITH'S 

PALACE 

Broadway & 4Tth St. 

Mat. Dally at 2 P. II. 

23, SO and Toe. 

Beery Night 

2S-50-75-$l-$1.50 



LADY DUIT GORDON, 
DORALDINA, LAMBERT 
* BALL. CHARLES 
ORAPEWIH, AXES *j 
W1NTHR0P. CTJMMrHGS 
A MITCHELL, HERMAN 
4 SHIRLEY. SIOFHAHZ 
A CO.. PALACE VZWS 
PICTOKIAL. 



ELTINGE 



West 42nd St. Etct. 
S.30. Matinees Wed. A 
Sat. at 2.30. 
A. H. WOODS presents 

BUSINESS BEFORE PLEASURE 

A new comedy by . Montayo o Ols sa and Jule. 

Eckert Goodman, with BARNEY BERNARD 

sad ALEXANDER CABS. 



B.FW AUCTFRfiAU w «»< i;j st - E ™- 8is 
ilLTT nm j I IIIU flrn Mat., wed. a sat. 2.1s 

Klsw A Erianror'a rraatast of all musical comedy 
triumphs. 

THE RIVIERA GIRL 



by 



Ouy Bolton snd P. O. Wedehanss. 



Book 
Wod. 



snd Lyrics by 



MOROSCO 



45th St. West of B'wsy. 
Bres. at Ma Matinees 
Wed. A Bat. 2.20. 
OLIVER MOROSCO'8 LAUOKXHQ BZHSATIOaT 

LOMBARD., LTD. ^5^8 

KsTeat comedy hit In years. Boats • woaka la 
adraBoe. 

CHI II f flHAM Theatre. «a St. a B'way. Braa. 
•JLV. in. VU1UM1 8.20. Mat.. Wed. 4 Sat. 2.20. 

COHAS ft SAEBJA PJaEgSHT 

MR. LEO DITRICHSTEIN 

la a Maw Comedy 

"THE KING" 

By CaUlavat da Plan and Arena. 



rDfTCDinN B'wsy A 44th St. Braa. AJ6. 
VaUlEaUVtl Mats. Wed. ft Bat. Ala 

lVfRS. FISKE 

In -v Htw Play 

lVtadarnie Sand 

"An eTenlna of purs dsUxht."— Bra. Mail. 



REPUBLIC £.7. •!?«."■. «... as 

LOU TELLEGEN 

"Blind'youth" 

A saw play In three acta by wmard Xaok sad 
Lob Telleran. 

I IDE D TV * 2 <>d St. A B'way.. Bret. 8.20. 
LlDEiKl I Mate. Wed. A Sat. 2.20. 

Xlaw ft Erlancsr Maaagara 

MADISON COREY rRESXBTS 

THE GRASS WIDOW 

A aov W n-'< «-' Osmsdy by nhennlnr Pollock and 
Basaold Wolf. 



"CBEER UP 



»» 



"QSEATE8T 

BTJCCE88 

EV ER KNOW N" 

Stared by 
B. R. BUBNSIDE 



AT THE 



DILUNOBAM 



MATUU 

Cttrj Day 

HIPPODROME 

asm t Waste Aaaal 



BELASCO 



West 44th St. EvcDlnfti at 
S.30. Matinees Thursday and 
Saturday at 2.30. 
DAVID BELASCO pre.enta 

POLLY WITH A PAST 

A Comedy by Doerf* Middleton sad Ouy Bolton. 



B'way ft 40th St. Etc*. 2.20. 
Mats. Wed. A Sat. -2.20. 



GAIETY 

ALEXANDRA CARLISLE 

IH THE TARKINGT0N-8TREET COMZDT. 

"THE COUNTRY COUSIN" 



TUestre. 45th St. A Bway. 
8.20. Matinees 
Thurs. A Sat. 2.20. ' 



LYCEUM IS 



DAVID BELASCO Presents ' 
A plav of the Great Northwest by WlUard Mack. 

TIGER ROSE 



sfBaVV BDDnrVlTD n*ar. A 38th St. En. 8.20. 
AnIl<&UU>Ul>ACn Mats. Wed. A Sat. st 2.20. 

DONALD BR5AISI 

In the UttBioal Comedy Bacoeta 

HER REGIMENT 

By Wru. Lo Baron A Victor Herbert. 

BROOKLYN HOUSES 

a |v I /". Flatbush Awa 

||>I V -' and State St 

1 Smok. II Yaa Uas* 

Hat DaBr- LaeHaa It*. 

EVERY DAY LADIES' DAY 

BELLY WATSON CO 

Ceaseart Inry 




STAR 



JAY, HEAR PVLTOB ST. 
BtATZBEZ DAILY. 
Telephone Main ltM. 

THIS WEEK 

AUTO GIRLS 

Beat Week— 'R EVIEW OF'ISU." 

EVERY SUNDAY TWO BIO COB CERTS— TWO 

IS— FEATURE VATTDETILLE STTRPRiaEa-r-14; 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



December 12, 1917 




NARROW TRAIL' 

CAN BE 

SHOWN 

RESTRAINING INJUNCTION DENIED 



After a lengthy controversy, Justice 
■Goff last week denied the application of 
the N. Y. M. P. Corp. for an injunction 
restraining Aricrait from distributing the 
first Win. S. Hart product, "The Narrow 
Trail," and vacated the temporary stay 
granted, pending the argument of the in- 
junction. 

The N. Y. Motion Picture Company 
claimed that the scenario wag rightfully 
-their property through its contract with 
C. Gardiner Sullivan, scenario writer. 

While Thos. Ince was general manager 
of the company he employed Sullivan and 
Lambert Hillyer for contract terms which 
have not as yet expired. After the ter- 
mination of Ince's employment he entered 
into an arrangement with Wm. S. Hart 
And formed the "Wm. S. Hart Produc- 
tions, Inc.," entering into competition 
with the N. Y. M. P. Company. The lat- 
~ter claimed that Ince had induced scenario 
writers, directors, actors, etc., to break 
their contracts and go to work on a pic- 
ture that he was making, "The Narrow 
Trail." A girl employed as a writer ia 
-said to have seen Sullivan in the Hart of- 
fices, although under contract with Tri- 
angle, and that he said that he was work- 
ing on a picture supposed to be Hart's 
story but, in reality, his own. 

Ince denied that he had induced the 
Triangle players and writers to break 
their contracts and join him and also de- 
nied that Sullivan wrote the scenario. He 
also denied that he had employed the 
Utter and stated that he had no inten- 
tion of employing him Hart stated that 
he was the owner of the script and that he 
personally supervised the picture. 

Justice Goff, after an elaborate and 
painstaking review of the affidavits, 
-stated: 

"Upon an examination of all the papers 
submitted upon this motion, I am of the 
opinion that there is not such certainty 
or even probability of the plaintiff suc- 
ceeding upon the trial of this action as 
wonld warrant the relief sought herein. 
Nor is there any such preponderance of 
•creditable evidence as would justify the 
plaintiff's assertion of ownership of the 
-scenario of the "Narrow Trail.' " 



MAE MURRAY LOSES DIVORCE 

Los Ancki.es. Dec. 10. — A divorce was 
refused to Mae Murray, formerly of the 
"Follies" and now a movie star, here, yes- 
terday, on the grounds that the actress did 
not have sufficient corroboration for her. 
statements. Judge Wood, who made the. 
decision, recently refused to grant fl di- 
vorce to James Young from Clara Kimball 
Young, for the same reasons. 

Miss Murray's husband is a New York' 
broker, Jay O'Brien. She alleges cruelty 
since the very day of her marriage. 
O'Brien did not appear and no defense was- 
filed for him. 



BOOST ANSON FOR LICENSE HEAD 

A committee of men who are the powers 
of the film industry held a meeting last 
week, and went on record in advocating the 
appointment of Grant W. Anson as com- 
missioner of licenses, by the writing of a 
letter which is to be addressed to Mayor- 
-elect Hylan by President Brady of the 
film association, indorsing Mr. Anson's 
-candidacy. Those attending the meeting 
were Walter W. Irwin of the Greater 
Vita graph. William A. Brady. J. E. 
Brulatour. Eastman Gens. P. A. Powers. 
Arthur H. Friend. William A. Johnston. 
Louis F. Blumenthal and Louis L. Levine. 



MANNERS LOSES 

HIS TRIANGLE 

SUIT 



MORE ITALIAN FILMS READY 

The second series of official Italian War 
films will be released for the entire United 
States some time in January, it was an- 
nounced this week. The pictures show 
the fighting on the Adigio Plateau and 
the Piave River. They are now on the 
way over, and are expected to reach 
America this week. The Fort Pitt The- 
atre Company, of which William Moore 
Patch is president, will handle the pro- 
duction. 



SELECT MAKES CHANGES 

Several changes have been made in the 
Western exchanges of Select Pictures. 
Harry Hicks, branch manager, haa been 
transferred from Los Angeles to San 
Francisco. He will be succeeded by Ber- 
nard E. Loper, who has been Pathe's 
manager in Los Angeles for five years. H. 
L. Knappen will become manager of the 
Denver exchange. Charles S. Goetz will 
be sales manager at Kansas City. 



WINS SUIT OVER CARUSO 

An award of SI .270 and costs was given 
Dr. Pasquale-Marafioti last week by the 
•Citv Court, as damages due fOT the fail- 
ure" of Clarence W. Willets to fulfill a 
■contract which called for the appearance 
of Caruso in movies. Willets, it was al- 
leged, promised to furnish the funds for 
the making and exploitation of the pic- 
tures. Caruso appeared on about 1,000, 
but WiHeta did not furnish the extra cap- 
ital and the project was dropped- Dr.' 
Marnfioti is official physician of the 
Metropolitan Opera House. 



NO MONOPOLY ON "HAPPINESS" 



ACTRESS BURNED 

Florence Atkinson, a member of Clara 
Kimball Young's company, was burned at 
the Select Pictures studio hist week by 
the explosion of an alcohol lamp in her 
dressing room. She was so seriously in- 
jured that it has become necessary to 
postpone the making of the current pic- 
ture, "The Marionettes," until she has re- 
covered. 

"SHAME" ALMOST READY 

"Shame," the Jules Bernstein produr- 
tion in which Zena Keefe is starred, will 
be ready for exhibitors in the next few 
weeks. The special press book which 
will serve to advertise the picture has 
just been completed. John W. Noble di- 
rected. It will be released as a state 
rights feature. 

LOEW BOOKS «TREEDOM" PICTURE 

Marcus Loew has booked Goldwyn's 
'Tor the Freedom of the World" for his 
entire chain of theatres and will back 
the booking with a special advertising ap- 
propriation of his own. The picture has 
met with huge success throughout the 
country. 

ARTCRAFT NAMES FIRST FILM 

The first Artcraft release for the New 
Year will be "Rose of the World," with 
Elsie Ferguson, recently produced at the 
Fort Lee studios. The story is adapted 
from the novel of the same name. Miss 
Ferguson's leading man is Wyndam 
Standing. 

RAUF GIVES SHOWING 

A private showing of "The Struggle 
Everlasting," Harry Rauf s modern mor- 
ality play, will be held at the Shubert 
Theatre next Sunday night, Dec 16. 
Florence Reed is starred. The story was 
written by Edward Milton Royle. 



The order to restrain the Triangle Film 
Corp. from using the title "Happiness" 
for a picture was reversed last week in 
the Court of Appeals. 

The suit was started last May when 
it was shown that J. Hartley Manners 
had written a one-act play entitled "Hap- 
piness," which ran for seven performances 
at the Cort Theatre in 1914 with Laurette 
Taylor as the star. Later in 1915, 'he an- 
nounced that "Happiness" was to be pre- 
sented in three acta. He contended, in 
his suit, that in this way he acquired a 
property in the word "Happiness" as a 
trade mark when used in connection with 
a play. 

In February of this year the N. Y. 
Motion Picture Corp. produced a picture 
and titled it "Happiness" without having 
any knowledge of Manners' play, and pre- 
sented it at the Rlalto Theatre in Brook- 
lyn. Manners notified the management of 
the theatre of his exclusive right to the 
title and also notified Triangle. 

There is no similarity between the pic- 
ture or the sketch. 

The latest ruling was that Manners bad 
abandoned his rights to the title and the 
affidavits showed that he had never ob- 
tained a prior right to or any monopoly 
in the word because of seven perform- 
ances. The word "Happiness" being pub- 
lic property must, in order to acquire sec- 
ondary significance, have been used gen- 
erally In connection with a play and so 
have become known to the public, likely 
to be misled, the court held. 

MOVIES LOSE CASE FOR HER 

Los Angeles, Cal., Dec 8.— Mrs. Mary 
Brace, who was suing the Los Angeles 
Street Railway Co., lost her case in a 
novel manner. 

She claimed that her arms had been 
permanently disabled in an accident and 
that she could not use them at alL The 
railroad people had a motion picture cam- 
eraman watch her and caught some pic- 
tures of her doing her own washing and 
banging out her clothes. The pictures were 
shown in court and she lost her case. 



TO SELL CLUNE FILMS 



W. E. Shallenberger, president of the 
Arrow Film Corporation, will market the 
Clune productions, "Bamona" and "The 
Eyes of the World," for all unsold ter- 
ritory. The deal between the two men 
was concluded this week. Robert W. 
Priest, who ia associated with Shallen- 
berger in the state rights business, is 
planning the advertising campaign. 

MAKING 2ND HART FEATURE 

W. H. Productions, which are releasing 
on a state rights basis the first W. S. 
Hart feature, "The Bargain," announce 
that they have in preparation his second, 
which will be entitled "The Bandit and 
the Preacher." Supporting Hart are 
Robert Edeson, Herschall Mayo, Rhea 
Mitchell and Gladys BrockwelL 



"THE DEVIL STONE" FOR FARRAR 

The next production to be released by* 
the Artcraft Pictures Corp. will present 
Geraldine Farrar in her newest photoplay 
vehicle, "The Devil Stone." CecU DeMille 
is responsible for the staging. 

In the cast are Wallace Reid, Hobart 
Bosworth, Tully Marshall, James Neill, 
Gustav von Seyffertitz, Ernest Joy, Ma- 
bel Van Buren, Lillian Leighton, Burwell 
Hamrick. The picture will be released 
Dec 17. 

CHICAGO BARS "CLEOPATRA" 

Chicago. 111., Dec 10. — The William 
Fox spectacle "Cleopatra," with Theda 
Bara. has been censored and prevented 
from showing in this city by Major Funk- 
houser, who has the approval of the press 
in this case. The claim is that she does 
not wear enough clothes and that her 
movements are too sinuous. 



The U. S. Department of Agriculture is 
putting out a series of official food films, 
showing the vital importance of increased 
production and conservation of foods. 
The Universal is making the pictures by 
a special arrangement. The first release 
is already out. 



GENERAL HAS NEW SERIAL 

General Film Company will release, 
some time in January, a new serial, "A 
Daughter of Uncle Sain," now being com- 
pleted. The picture will be in t welve 
reels- Jane Vance is the star, with Will 
Sorella supporting her. 



FAIRBANKS TO OPEN PJVOU 
Douglas Fairbanks' next picture to be 
released by Artcraft, "A Modem Mus- 
keteer," has been selected by S. L. Roth- 
apfel to open the new Rivoli Theatre. 
Both the Knickerbocker and Bialto have 
presented a Fairbanks picture as the ini- 
tial attraction. 



GOLDBURG OPENS BUREAU 

Jesse J. Goldburg, who was recently 
sales and exploitation manager of Ogden 
Pictures, haa opened offices in the Times 
Building, and will conduct a State Rights 
Sales and Exploitation Service. He will 
handle productions, take care of publicity, 
advertising and all details. 



SHOW NEW FILM TODAY 

The initial production of the Hoffman- 
Foursquare picture, "Fringe of Society," 
will be shown today at Loew's New York 
Theatre, The story is by Pierre V. R 
Key. Starring in the cast are Ruth Ro- 
lando-Leah Baird, Milton Sills and J. 
Herbert Frank. 



FILM NEWS CONDENSED 



Marguerite Clark is in the South finish- 
ing "The Seven Swans," scheduled as a 
Christmas release. 



William Russell is at work making his 
sixth picture of the current series called 
"Polo Jack." Francelia Billington will 
play the leading feminine role. 

William Russell is the headliner in the 
Mutual release scheduled for the week of 
Dec 17, appearing in "New York Luck," 
a story of "frazzled finance," intrigue 
and romantic adventure in the Metropolis. 



Adam Hull Shirk, publicity expert of 
the Paramount Pictures Corporation, left 
last week for California to handle more 
publicity in the studios of the concern. 

A newcomer to the Lasky photoplay 
productions is Gustave von Seyfferitz, 
who appears in Artcraffs "The Devil 
Stone," with Geraldine Farrar, to be re- 
leased shortly. 

Production of Elsie Ferguson's new 
Artcraft picture, "The Song of Songs," 
adapted from Edward Sheldon's well 
known play of the same name, has been 
transferred from Fort Lee, N. J., to the 
Fifty-fourth street studio, New York. 

William S. Hart and Company are in 
the Santa Cruz country filming some "big 
tree" scenery for the famous actor's next 
Artcraft release With Hart are E. E 
Allen, Gertrude Claire, Maude George, 
Robert Gordon and thirty other players 
of the Thomas H. Ince studios. 
(Co*«iit««if on page 38) 



December 12, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



"BECAUSE OF A WOMAN" 

Triangle— Released Dee. 16. 
Cast 

Noel Clavering Jack Livingston 

Valerie Qreemeay Belle Bennett 

Allen Barrett George Cheseboro 

Muriel Gvrynne Louella Maxam 

Lucia Malvern LiUian Langdon 

Colonel Gtcynne. Josef Btoickard 

Story — Romantic. Deals with dual love af- 
fair and vindication of a young man 
through a so-called "siren." Written 
by E. Magnus Ingleton. Produced for 
Triangle by Jack Conway, with the 
Triangle Players. 
. Remarks. 

Noel is a young business man who is in 
love with the daughter of the treasurer of 
his company. Colonel Gwynne. Barrett, a 
mining expert, is also in love with her. 

There is a great coal deal coming off 
which is known to only three men. They 
are the president, the colonel, and Noel. 
Barrett steals the plans and sells them to 
the opposition. The blame is fixed upon 
the colonel, and, in order to shield him and 
his daughter, Noel takes the blame upon 
. himself, and vanishes in the desert. 
. . Barrett, also in the desert examining 
some property, comes to the station, and 
Noel forces him to sign a confession, stat- 
ing that he is the man who sold the secret- 
Barrett fools Noel into believing that he 
is married to Muriel, his old sweetheart, 
and Noel lets him go. Noel, finding out 
that he has been tricked, then goes to the 
city to revenge himself. But, finding 
Muriel and Barrett happily married, puts 
off his scheme. 

Barrett had been carrying on an affair 
with Valerie, a New York girl, who does 
not know he is married. Noel tries to 
stop this by winning the girl himself, and 
succeeds. Valerie overhears a conversation 
between Noel and Barrett and, learning 
the truth, rushes home, followed by Noel, 
who breaks into her house to propose to 
her. She accepts and all ends happily. 
Box Office Value. 
Two or three days. Play up title 
strongly. * 

"MY LITTLE BOY" 

Cast. 

Fred Emory Johnson 

Clara EUa Hall 

Paul Zoe Roe 

Uncle Oliver Winter Batt 

Joe - Harry Holden 

Clara's Mother Qretchen Lederer 

Story— Dramatic Written by Elliot J. 
Clawson. Produced for Bluebird by 
Elsie Jane Wilson, featuring Zoe Rae, 
EUa Hall, Emory Johnson and 
Gretchen Lederer. 

Remarks. 

This is a story with a real heart appeal. 
The dreams of Clara, and Fred have come 
true. 

Fred's uncle Oliver is a crab, so to speak. 
He is grouchy and stern. Fred and Clara 
are in love and to be married. Uncle 
Oliver objects and Fred tells him that he 
is no longer afraid of him, and leaves the 
house quite abruptly, after Oliver has dis- 
owned him. 

Six years go by, and Fred comes to in- 
vite his uncle to go for a hunting trip 
through the Christmas holidays. Uncle 
Oliver agrees, and complains of everything, 
not excepting the joy of Fred's little boy 
over his toys. 

Two days later be starts on the hunting 
trip, and, while looking for game, shoots 
and kills the little boy, having mistaken 
him for a turkey. Some years later, Fred 
and Clara have become estranged, and are 
about to be divorced. The efforts of Oliver 
to reunite them succeed on the anniversary 
of the child's death, and all ends well. 
Then Oliver wakes up and finds he has been 
dreaming. It is Christmas, and. as the 
bells toll, a change comes over him and, 
rushing down stairs, he kisses everybody a 
Merry Christmas, and all really ends well. 

The acting of an characters is first rate. 
Emory Johnson is a fine young hero, and 
his work deserves especial praise. Ella 
Hall is very good. 

Box Office Value. 

Regular program run. Play Zoe Rea 

stronx: 




FIGHTING MAD 

Butterfly. Five Reels. 
Cast 

Doctor Lambert William StoweU 

Mary Lambert Helen Gibson 

Clean-Dp West Hector Dion 

Faro Fanny Betty Schade 

Smith Alfred Allen 

Lilly Swyer Mildred Davis 

Frank Barter M. K, Wilson 

Story — Dramatic tale of early Western life. 
Written by J. G. Alexander and Fred 
Myton and produced .for Butterfly Pic- 
tures by E. J. LeSaint 
Remarks. 

"Doe" Lambert arrives, with his wife, in 
Arapaho Flats, whither he has come to teach 
the Gospel and practice medicine. West, 
a gambler, is shot, and Lambert takes him 
in and cures him. During his illness West 
has made love to Lambert's wife, and final- 
ly persuades her to leave with him. She 
does so, giving as her excuse the fact that 
she is to become a mother. 

After a time, however, she is disillu- 
sioned, and returns to her old home, only 
to die as her baby is bom. West then 
sneers at Lambert and insinuates that his 
wife was not all she was supposed' to be. 
They fight and Lambert is overcome. In 
desperation he leaves the baby on the door- 
step of Smith, a saloonkeeper, and van- 
ishes. Faro Fanny, a dance hall girl, has 
seen him do it. 

Years go by. Lambert-is now a drunken 
recluse, and a man hater. One day Lilly, 
Smith's daughter, takes a liking to him 
and tries to reform him. He gradually 
breaks away from his bad habits and be- 
comes his old self. One day Lilly comes 
to him and tells him that a woman is very 
sick. He goes to her and finds it is Fanny, 
who tells him West is in town, and that 
Lilly is his own daughter. Lambert shoots 
West, and explains about the girl. All 
ends well. 

Box Office Value. 

Two days. 



"RAFFLES" 

Weber Photo Dramas. Seven Reels. 

State Rights Release. 

Cast. 

Raffles John Barrymore 

Captain Bedford Frederick Perry 

Lord Amersteth H. Cooper Cliff e 

Bvnny Manders Frank Morgan 

Mrs. Vidal..... Corwtine Mayo 

Gwendolyn. Evelyn Brent 

Oratoshay Mike Donlin 

Lady Melrose Mathilda Brundage 

Marie Xita Alien 

Story — Melodramatic. Taken from Eugene 

W. Presby's play of the same name. 

Scenario by Anthony B. Kelly. Directed 

by George Irving. Featuring John 

Barrymore. 

Remarks. 

E. W. Hornung/s "Raffles" stories had 
great vogue, and Presby's spoken drama 
was popularized by the late Kyrle Bellew, 
who appeared in the title role. There have 
been minor changes in the film version, 
but in the main is like the drama. 

In the title role John Barrymore does 
excellent work. He plays the society crook 
with just the right nonchalance and makes 
Raffles a possible character. Of the sup- 
porting company, Frederick Perry. Frank 
Morgan and Evelyn Brent probably were 
the best, although they all gave good per- 
formances. 

The direction and camera work are ex- 
cellent, and there is no reason why "Raf- 
fles," in screen form, should not duplicate 
the success of "Raffles" as a spoken drama. 
Box Office Value. 

Full run. 



THE SCARLET CAR 

Billy Winthrop Frankly n Farnum 

Samuel Winthrop 41 Filson 

Paul Revere Forbes Lon Chaney 

Beatrice Forbes .Edith Johnson 

Ernest Peabody Sam De Qrasse 

Cyrus Peabody Howard Crampton 

Jim Pettit William Lloyd 

Story — Comedy drama, starring Franklyn 

Farnnm. Written by Richard Harding 

Davis. Produced by Joseph De Grasse. 
Remarks. 
. Billy Winthrop is the son of the owner 
of the town newspaper, and an idler. His 
father owes money to the bank, the presi- 
dent of which, Cyrus Peabody, is trying to 
cover a shortage of $35,000 by a false en- 
try. Forbes, the cashier, discovers this 
and takes the page out of the ledger. 

That night Forbes, while working, hears 
voices in the bank, and finds the Peabodys, 
father and son, with a stranger. He tries 
to get the book, but is knocked down and 
supposedly killed. The next morning a 
wrecked scarlet car is found and the body 
of a man, not Forbes, is fonnd. 

Billy, who is in love with Beatrice, 
Forbes' daughter, is settled down now, and 
the editor of the paper in his father's place. 
Ernest Peabody is to be engaged to Bea- 
trice, and Billy is not invited. He has a 
wallet, picked up at the time of the wreck, 
and this gives him a clue as to who the 
real culprit in the robbery is. He and 
Beatrice elope, and are followed by Ernest, 
who tries to force Beatrice to marry him, 
but Billy spoils his plana Ernest, in re- 
yenge, incites a mob of villagers to tar 
and feather Billy. 

Meanwhile, Billy and Beatrice have 
found a little cabin in which Forbes, who 
is now insane, lives. They try to get the 
ledger page from him, but cannot. The 
mob is about to carry Billy off, when a 
rider on a white horse is seen. Forbes, 
mistaking him for Paul Revere, renders the 
ledger page as a report to the "General," 
who turns it over to Billy. The guilt of 
the Peabodys is then proven, and they get 
the tar and feathering they meant for 
Billy. Lon Chaney does a good piece of 
character work. 

Box Office Value. 

One or two days. 



PETROVA PICKS 3RD FILM 

The third vehicle in which Madame Pe- 
trova win be starred is "The life Mask.'' 
w«H«m« Petrova has chosen the story 
herself. Mrs. L. Case Russell will adapt 
and aeenarioize the story. 



•THE TENDERFOOT' 

Blue Ribbon. Five Reels. 

Released December 3rd 

Cast 

Jim William Duncan 

Cynthia Carol Hollotcay 

Ellen Florence Dye 

Jack Joe Ryan 

Story — One of the Alfred Henry Lewis 

"Wolfville" tales. Directed by William 

Duncan. 

Remarks. 

This story succeeds admirably in what 
it attempts to do, but whether its nature 
will bring it large popularity is a matter 
of question. 

It is simply the old western melodrama 
of Indians and" cowboys exceedingly well 
done. The whole story is sheer sensation, 
with all the old characters and situations, 
although in admittedly thrilling fashion. 
The directing has been excellently done, 
and scarcely a technical fault can be found. 

The story is briefly this : Jim. a man 
from the East, is at first unpopular with the 
cowhpys, but distinguishes himself in a 
fight and from then on, is the camp idol. 
The eastern girl whom he loves comes on, 
and they become engaged after he saves her 
from a disagreeable affair with the Indians. 
Bnt a western girl gradually wins his 
affection by her sincerity, and, in time, he 
sees through the superficiality and coldness 
of his eastern sweetheart 

William Duncan, who directed as well 
as played the leading role, leaves nothing 
to be desired. His fight scenes are real 
and exciting. The acting of other mem- 
ten is satisfying. 

Box Office Vane. 

One day. 



"THE CRICKET" 

Released Nov. 22 by Universal. 

cut. 

TheCrieket (a child of 8) Zoe See 

The Cricket ( at 18) Rene Rogmrt 

Saveline Fred Ward 

Caesar Barry Holden 

Pinglet Winter Hatt 

Pascal ( a boy of 10 ) George Hupp 

Pascal (at 22) Hoi Cooler 

Story— Comedy drama. Written by Elliott 
J. Clawson. Directed by Elsie Jane Wil- 
son. Featuring Zoe Rae. 
The Cricket, the young daughter of Mme. 
Roaimond, orphaned at the axe of six, h 
adopted by three impecunious actors. 

Twelve years pass. Success baa smilea 
on the three actors, who now live In a fash- 
ionable section bnt continue to pay the rent 
of the old garret which was their home in 
the days of their poverty. The Cricket is 
now a young lady and her foster fathers 
attempt to select a husband for her. She. 
however, has ideas of her own and elopes 
with Pascal, a sweetheart of her childhood 
and now an actor. Her elopement causes a 
disagreement between her foster fathers 
and, breaking a lifelong friendship, they 
separate. Six years more elapse and the 
old friends are reunited through the little 
child of Pascal and the Cricket. 

Here is a story, full of sentiment and 
heart interest, well written and directed 
and capitally directed. The one apparent 
fault in the picture can be blamed on the 
director. The girl chosen for the Cricket 
should have been nearer the type of Zoe 
Rae than is Rena Rogers, who, while sha 
acts the role capably, is a blond and bears 
no resemblance to little Miss Rae, who, in 
the picture at least, is a brunette. 
Box Office Value. 
Full run. . 



"A CASE AT LAW" 

Triangle. Five Reels. 
Released Nov. 18 by Triangle. 

Cast. 

Doctor Sanders Bilsy Hatch 

His daughter Mayme Pauline Ourley 

Jimmy Baggt Dick Reason 

"Art." the saloon-keeper. Jack Dillon 

The "Lob" Ed Sturgis 

Story— Melodramatic. Written by William 
Dudley Pelly. Directed by Arthur Roe- 
son. Featuring Dick Rosson and Panline 
Curley. 

"A case at Law" is propaganda against 
drink, but is by no means convincing. It 
has no plot and is chiefly a series of inci- 
dents, dealing mostly with "boose fighters." 
The slender thread of the story disclose* 
deals with a doctor, a reformed drunkard, 
who has gone straight for fifteen years, in 
spite of the attempt of a saloon-keeper to 
make him backslide. The climax is reached 
when his daughter, whom he has not seen 
for fifteen years and who does not recognise 
him, brings her drunken husband to bint 
to be cured Finding there is no law pro- 
hibiting the sale of liquor to his son-in-law, 
the Doctor takes the law into his own 
bands and "shoots" up the saloon, seriously 
wounding its proprietor. He Is arrested, 
but a jury before a Justice of the Peace, 
acquits him on the ground of "justifiable 
self-defense." This makes the daughter 
happy, although the doctor does not let her 
know that he is her father. 

Good acting is done by Riley Hatch as 
the doctor, Panline Curley as his daughter, 
and Dick Rosson as the son-in-law. How- 
ever, it requires more than good acting to 
make a film. There is neither suspense nor 
interest in the story. 

Box Office Value. 
One day. 

"THE ROSE OF BLOOD" O. K. 

Through the committee on Public In- 
formation, the United States Government 
has given its approval of the Fox picture 
"The Rose of Blood," which shows the 
overthrow of the Czar. This sanction was 
given in the face of the statement of 
Major Funkhouser, the Chicago censor, 
that he had refused a permit for the 
showing of the production because the 
George Creel body had requested such 
action. 



,38 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



•December 1 12, , J917 




Josie Sedgewick has a new Bnick ear. 
Arthur 6. ' Hoyt la suffering from a 

broken bone in hi* foot. 



Philip H. White has been added to the 
staff of aesnario writers at Culver City. 

Lynn Reynold*, Triangle director, is 
the father of a baby boy. 

Blanche Payson has recovered from' her 
recent injury. 

Dorothy- Dalton has gone to Arrowhead 
Springs for a brief rest. 

Earl Rodney will support Enid Bennett 
in Paramount pictures. 

Barry Korey, Vitagraph star, is the 
owner of a new five-passenger HupmobQe. 

"Kan of Marie Mountain" is to be re- 
leased on Dec. 17, and "Bimrock Jones" 
in January. 



Grace Darmond has been signed by 
Greater VHagrapb to appear in Blue Rib- 
bon features. 



The Sessue Hayaknwa Company is re- 
turning from. Hawaii, having completed 
its work there. 



Alice Terry has returned to the Vita- 
graph studios after a successful operation 
for appendicitis. 

Caroline Rankin has returned to the 
Triangle Keystone studios after an ab- 
sence of two months. 



Steve Rounds and W. J. Wheeler have 
been added to the staff of Cliff Smith, 
director of Roy Stewart. 

' In' - the supporting ■ cast for Dorothy 
Dal ton's next picture will be Thurston 

Hall and Melbourne McDowall. 



Olive Thomas plans a trip to New York 
on the 17th, so as to spend Christmas 
with her mother in Pittsburgh. 

Verne Hardin Porter, Triangle scenario 
writer, is living in the house -formerly 
owned by Jack London in California. 

Hedda Nova, the beautiful Russian ac- 
tress, will begin work on her first fea- 
ture for the Vitagraph Company some 
time this week. 



Otto Lederer, Vitagraph character ac- 
tor, has written and produced a sketch 
called "Partners." It is appearing on 
the Pantages time. 



Van Zimmerman, producer for Para- 
mount, has enlisted in the 158th Ambu- 
lance Corps, having resigned his position 
with that company. 

Eddie Lyons and Lee Moran returned 
to Universal City from New York last 
week and will immediately start work 
on the production of one reel comedies. 



The W. H. Productions Company an- 
nounces the sale of their two-reel William 
S. Hart features for New York to the 
Dispatch Film Service, New York City. 

Wyndham Standing will have an im- 
portant role in the "Life Mask," the third 
Petrova picture, which was begun last 
Friday at the Biograph studio in Harlem. 

The Greater Vitagraph Company has 
begun releasing a new brand of polite 
comedies featuring Edward Earle and 
Agnes Avers under the name of "Vita- 
graph Comedies." 

Production' has been begun at Metro's 
West Coast studios in Hollywood, Cal, on 
"Revenge," the next starring vehicle of 



Edith Storey, "the Bernhardt of the 
screen." . .. ■ 

W. H. Productions announce the sale 
of their entire' two-reel Hart productions 
for Colorado, New Mexico, Wyoming and 
Utah to the Four Square Pictures Cor- 
poration of Colorado; 

Triangle releases for the week of Dec 
16 are "Because of a Woman," "The Ma-. 
ternal Spark," two dramas, and "The 
Sanitarium Scandal," "His Bad Policy" 
and "A Discordant Note." 



Francis X. Bushman and Beverly 
Bayne, the popular Metro co-stars, have 
started work on the comedy-melodrama 
the Metro Corporation is to present called 
"The Woolworth Diamonds." 



Admirers of the stories of Myrtle Reed 
will rejoice to hear that one of her most 
popular novels, "A Weaver of Dreams," 
has been acquired by Metro Pictures Cor- 
poration for the use of Viola Dana. 

Another member of the Yorke-Metro 
Corporation enlisted in the service of 
Uncle Sam when Johnnie Waters, assist- 
ant director to Harold Lockwood, left the 
organization at Its location in New 
Hampshire last week. 



Dwight Begeman, cameraman, is the 
latest Metro employe to enter the Berviee. 
He has left for his home in St. Paul to 
enlist in the Navy, and hopes to be as- 
signed to the work of -taking motion pic- 
tures for the Government. 



Louis Burstein, president of the King- 
bee Films Corporation, announces that 
tbe production of his first five-reel comedy 
has been postponed till after the war. 
Billy West will star in the picture, which 
will be called "Old King Sol." 

Under the direction of Cedrio Gibbons, 
the Edison studios are assembling a series 
of unusual Japanese settings, in prepara- 
tion for the production of "The Weaver 
of Dreams," from the story of the same 
title by Henry Albert Phillips. 

"The Belgian," Sidney Cicotfs first in- 
dependent production, financed and di- 
rected by the producer himself, was 
shown at the "Hero Land Bazaar" at. the 
Grand Central Palace last Wednesday, 
when Belgium Day was observed. 



Announcement was made last week by 
Frederick L. Collins, president of the 
Petrova Picture Company, that arrange- 
ments have been consummated whereby 
Frank Crane will direct the third starring 
vehiele of Madame Olga Petrova. 

Mme. Nazimova will eat her Christmas 
dinner in St. Augustine, Fla. She and 
her company will leave at once for the 
.Southern city, where they will spend sev- 
eral weeks in preparation of a new special 
production de luxe, under the direction of 
George D. Baker. 



Leopold D. Wharton arrived in New 
York last week from Battle Creek, where 
he has spent a few weeks on the advice 
of his physician. He has come East in 
order to assist his brother, Theodore, in 
the directing of the first series of "The 
Eagle's Eye," a new secret service pic- 
ture, by William J. Flynn of the Tjnited 
States Secret Service. 



"The Eyes of the World" will be given 
a trade showing in New York shortly. 
Much interest attaches to this production, 
as it is an adaptation from Harold Bell 
Wright's famous novel of the same name, 
and was produced by W. IL. Clune, whose 
wonderfully artistic production of "Ra- 
ni ona" was presented at the Forty -fourth 
Street .Theatre for an . extended run. 



nounced last week by the W. H. Produc- 
tions Company to Mike Rosenberg, of 
Seattle, for the states of Washington, 
Oregon, Idaho and' Montana. Rosen b erg 



has closed the deal whereby he will se- 
cure the rights to the same' territory for 
the second William- S. Hart production, 
now in preparation. 




The sale of William S. Hart as "the 
two-gun man* in '"The Bargain ,". was an - 



"BUCKING BROADWAY 1 ' 

Butterfly. Five Keels. 
Cast. 

Cheyenne Barry Harry Corey 

MoUy Molly Malone 

B*r Father L. M. Wells 

The Captain Vetta Peg? 

Story — Western drama, featuring Harry 
- Caney and Molly Malone, and written 
by George Hlvely. Scenario and 
direction by Jade Ford. 
Remarks. 

This is another of the Cheyenne Harry 
stories. 

Tbe peculiar part of these stories is that 
they bear no relation to one another, and 
yet Carey plays the same role in each. 

The story deals with a cowboy and his 
sweetheart, who are perfectly happy until 
the entrance of the villain in the shape of 
a contracting agent. He induces the girl 
to elope with him to the city. 

Cheyenne follows in an effort to find her. 
He meets a couple of crooks in the hotel 
who try to trim him, but, on hearing his 
story, promise to help. 

He gets word that the agent and girl are 
together. Following them he starts a free 
for all fight on the roof-garden of the 
hotel; a bunch of cowboys who have arrived 
with a shipment of horses helping him to 
clean up. All ends in the usual happy 
way, however. 

The only thing to recommend this pic- 
ture is. the good- fight scene. There are 
many improbable moments in the picture. 
Harry Carey handles his part in his usual 
masterly way, and Molly Malone makes a 
charming character. 

Box Office Value. 

One day. Play up Harry Carey. 

"THE MATERNAL SPARK" 

Triangle — Released Dec. 16. 
Cast. 

Howard Helms.... Rowland Lot 

Mary Helms , . .Irene Hunt 

Bumpkins .Joey Jacobs 

John J. MiUs. ..... .-.-. . . . . .Edwin Jooson 

Clarice Phillips. . . . . ... . . ..Josie Sedgwick 

Longing Havcley. ....... .Frank Lev: out gh 

Mitts' Lawyer Frank McQuarrie 

Story— Dramatic Deals with the strength 
of mother love. Written by R. Cecil 
Smith. Produced for Triangle by G. P. 
Hamilton, with Triangle Players. 
Remarks. 

Helms and his wife and child have been 
brought to the city by Mills, a traction 
magnate. Helms is Mills' private secre- 
tary. 

Hawley, a Wall Street shark, tries to get 
a tip from Helms, and introduces him to 
Clarice, who instead of seeking the tip, 
falls in love with him. . . 

Mills then notices that Helms is away 
from home too often, and discovers from his 
wife that he goes out every night. He 
has him tracked and, finding that he is 
trading in Wall Street, breaks him, and 
then discharges him. Helms* wife mean- 
time has discovered his relations with 
Clarice and visits her to try and persuade 
her to let Helms go. The mother love in 
Clarice is aroused, and she sends Helms 
back to his family-. Helms then goes back 
to their home town, while she is left alone, 
having sacrificed- her all for love. 

This picture is one. with a- heart appeal 
that rings .true. Josie Sedgwick, does the 
best work of the entire company, : though 
the' acting of the company is very good; .'■'; J 

?. : !. ■'". iBox6fftjey**r«': •*t\l~"-i 
'Ohe'daj^'"' ; '"'' , "— -.- ;. ■.- .»*--'J 



•THE ETERNAL TEMPTRESS" 

Paramount. Five Reels. . 
Released Dee. 3 by Paramount. 
Cast. 
Prince** Cordelia Sanzio . . . Lina Cavolieri 

Angelia Mildred Con*elman 

Harry Althrop EUiott Demter 

Count Rudolph Frbt. .Allen Hale 

Prince Estexary Edward Fielding 

Colonel Althrop Hatten Mostyn 

Ambassador Lawton. Jamet Laffey 

Borgslov , .Pierre De Matteit 

Jeweler Peter Barbier 

Story— Dramatic. Written by Mme. Fred 
De Gresac. Scenario by Eve Unsell. 
Directed by Emile Chautard. Featur- 
ing Lina CavalierL 

Remarks. 

A tale of love, political intrigue, crime 
and the ways of Austrian spies, is disclosed 
in "The Eternal Temptress." 

An Italian princess, Cordelia Sanzio, is 
the central figure. Harry Althrop is her 
slave and, for love of her he squanders bis 
fortune, forges the name of the American 
Ambassador to Rome, and steals a state 
paper from the American Embassy, which 
he sells to Count Rudolph FrizL an Aus- 
trian spy. The princess really loves him 
and, wheu she learns from him .what he has 
done, goes to the count's apartment, kills 
him, gets the state document, which she 
returns to the American .^gnbsssador, thus 
saving the honor of the man she loves. She 
then commits suicide.. 

It is' an interesting story, and is well 
acted, tbe star doing particularly good 
work The direction and photography, are 
aleo'A-l. 

Box Office Value. 

■ Full run.' ' 



"THE MARRIAGE SPECULA- 
TION" 

Vitagraph — Five Reel* — Released Deo. 10. 
Cast. 

Mr. OUday Charles Kent 

Clara Wilton. Mildred Manning 

Biltte Perkins.. .:.... .Wallace McDonald 
Story — Farce. Written, by Cyrus Town- 
send Brady, produced for Vitagraph, 
. and directed by Ashley Miller. 
• ■ Remarks. 
■ Cliday has saved $10,000 in twenty years 
of work in a pickle factory. Clara, who 
works in a candy store, dreams of a bright 
future while her sweetheart, Billy, dreams 
of nothing, and cares for nothing. 

Cliday proposes to invest his money in 
Clara's education, if she will marry a mil- 
lionaire and make him comfortable for life. 
She agrees, and, taking leave of Billy, 
goes with Cliday to the city, where she soon 
becomes the social rage. Down to tbe last 
$100, she determines to marry one of the 
rich men in the hotel, despite her love for 
Billy. An adventurer, who masquerades 
as an English heir, is her choice. 

Billy, meanwhile, has awakened, and is 
now the owner of a progressive grocery 
business. He disguises himself and pretends 
to be an Italian count, thus making it 
easy for Mm«i»lf to unmask the adventurer. 
During a fight with the false nobleman, it 
is discovered that Billy is the real heir, and 
all ends well. 

The acting of the three principals is very 
good,- that of McDonald being, especially 
clever. A fair feature. ;-' % ' 

Box Office Value. '1 

.Regular program run. Two or three 
day's. ' ' '* '*' * ". 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



DR. JULIAN SIEGEL, the Theatrical Dentist 

-uits J* PUTNAM BUILDING. NEW YORK CITY Phot*. Bryant *** 

EXCEPTIONAL RATES TO THE PROFESSION 



ST. REGIS RESTAURANT 

165 WEST 47th STREET, NEW YORK 

(OPPOSITE PALACE STAGE DOOR) 



Bal's Dreadnaught 




AT SUBMARINE PRICES 

M inch SU.ao 3* inch *22-$» 

JZ inch Zt.M M "eh Z2.S4 

34 inch 21.M 40 inch 23.00 

42 Inch $23.5* 

WILUAM BAL COMPANY 

145 W. 45th St.. N.Y. 4 W. 22d St., N.Y. 

NEW CIRCULAR NOW READY 

Mail Orders Filled Same Day Received 

95 Deposit Required 



>m«? 




* VSEDBYTME " < 



PROffSSlOM 



HunK 



Send for 1917 Catalogue 
C. A. TAYLOR TRUNK WORKS 

678 N. Halsted St., Chicago 
MO W. 44th St., New Tork 



"The Theatrical 
Route" 

Comfortable steamers leave New 
York, Pier 32, N. R., foot Canal 
St 6.00 P.M., West 132d St 6.30 
P.M. daily, including Sunday; also 
Sunday morning at 9.30 for Al- 
bany, Troy and the North. 

Save money 
Travel in comfort 

HUDSON NAVIGATION COMPANY 



rati out 



14b. 8 i 10 rastwstctleai. 
10», 4 poses 



.12.50 
.10.1 



00 



H. JACOBSON 



'rrtrt Tkrvfricat 

An., KV 42*4 St, 
I 74*4 



Vtrk 

t. H Terr 



THREE SHEETS 

TYPE ONLY 

CONSISTING OF THIEE 28 I 42 SHEETS FLAT. 
Small Aemnt Dluliy matter. 

Black on Bed or Blue Two 

QuanUtj. Yellow, on White. Colon 

100 810.50 810.50 914.00 

200 17.00 17.00 22.00 

300 23.00 23.00 29.00 

400 26.00 26.00 35.00 

500 35.00 35.00 40.00 

Owlnf to market condition* all price* subject to chance 
without notice. Send for price list of all Hods theatrical 

type work. Commercial wort same price*. Tern*: Cain with 
order. Send 10c for route book. 

GAZETTE SHOW PRINTING COMPANY 

HMTTwta. ILLINOIS. U. S. A 

Wigs, Toupees, Grease Paint, Etc 

Send for Price List 
G. SH1NDHELM, IN Wsat Uih St, N. Y. 



SCENERY 

Theatres &nd productions 

Vaudeville Acts Equipped 

MURRAY HILL SCENIC STUDIO 

488 6th Ave., bet. 29-30 th SU. 
Tel. Had. So... 4892 Tom Creamer, Mjr. 



Others Succeed. Why Can't Tout 

STAGE TRAINING 

Drama, Comedy, Yarteillle, Stan oine- 
ie| and Photo Play Ta.ght. Trrhnli-al 
and Practical Courses. Celebrities who 
studied under Mr. Alriene; Annette Kel- 
lennann, Nora Bayes. Haiel Dtwn, 
Joseph Santley, Harry nicer. Mile. 
Dane. Van Fuller. Dolly Sisters, Taylor 
Holmes. Vitian Preseott, Eleanor Painter 
and others. Write lor catalogue men- 
tioning study desired. 

Aivieae Theatre Set**] of Aetmuj 

57th St., at Broadway 

Entrance 225 W. 57lh St. New York. 



Theatrical Profession 

ATTENTION 




It yon are bothered with Soar Sick Stomach, 
Heartburn, Distress After Eating, Belching or 
Wind, Bis; Head In the morning or other 
stomach trouble*, I want you to hare a 
sample of Priest's Indigestion Powder. Sent 
free to any address. Dealer* carry the 25c. 
and (1.00 sites, but I want yon to try It first 
at my expenae. 

B. K. PRIEST. Ph. C. Bangor, Me. 



PHILADELPHIA 

via New Jersey Central 

EVERY HOUR ON THE HOUR 

From Liberty St.. 7 A. M. to 10 P. M. 

and at Midnight with Sleepers 

It MINUTES OF THE HOUR 

From W. ZSd St. 

YOUR WATCH IS YOUR TIME TABLE 

Consult P. W. HEROY, E. P., Agent 

144* BROADWAY. NEW YORK 



WIGS 



TOUPEES, GREASE 
PANTS, ETC 

A. M. BUCH & CO. 

11* N. Nmth St, PhnaamlpMa 



ACTS, etc.. to order. Particular* for 
stamp. Interview* by appointment. 

Mary E. F. Thayer. 2190 Broad St., ProTldetM. 

R. I. 



C L I F» F» E R 

BUSINESS INDEX 

Advertisements not exceeding: one line in 
length will be published, properly classified, in 
this index, at the rate of $10 for one year (52 
issues). A copy of The New York Clipper 
will be sent free to each advertiser while the 
advertisement is running;. 



THEATRE AND WOOD FOLDING CHAIRS. 

New and Second Hand 
Atlas Seating- Co., 10 E. 4Jrd and 7 E. 42nd St. 

New York. 

CHEWING GUM-BALI CANDY COATED 

Toledo Chewing Gum Co., Factories Bldg., 

Toledo, O. 

LAWYERS. 
F. L. Boyd. Attorney, 17 N. La Salle St., 

Chicago. 
E. J. Ader, 10 South La Salle St., Chicago, III. 
Joseph A. O'Brien, 1402 Broadwav, New York 

City. 
Edward Doyle, Attorney, 421 Merchants Bank 

Bldg., Indianapolis, Ind. 

MUSICAL CLASSES. 
A. Brauneiss, 1012 Napier Ave, Richmond Hill, 

N. Y. 

MUSIC COMPOSED. ARRANGED. 
Chas. L. Lewis, 429 Richmond St., Cincinnati, 

Ohio. 

SCENERY AND SCENIC PAINTERS. 
Howard Tuttle, 141 Burleigh St., Milwaukee, 

Wis. 

SCHELL'S SCENIC STUDIO 

381-583.585 South High St., Columbus, O. 
SCENERY FOR HIRE AND SALE. 
Amelia Crain, R19 Spring Garden St., Philadel- 
phia, Pa. 

SONG BOOKS. 
Wm. W. Delaney, 117 Park Row, New York. 

STAGE LIGHT EFFECTS. LAMPS 

(Bought, Sold) 

Newton Art Works, 305 W. I5th St., New York. 

TENTS. 
J. C. Goss Co., 10 Atwater St, Detroit, Mich. 

THEATRICAL GOODS. 
Boston Regalia Co., 387 Washington St., Bos- 
ton. Mass. 

THEATRICAL HARDWARE. 
Graves Hardware Co., 47 Eliot St., Boston, 

Mass. 
A. W. Gerstner Co., 634 8th Ave. (41st St.), 
N. Y. 
THEATRICAL PICTURE FRAMES. 
Levy's, 316 to 320 West 42nd Street, New York. 
937 Brvant. 

THEATRICAL PROPERTIES. 
E. Walker, 309 W. J9th St., New York. 

TRAsMsSFEKS 
Walton, 455 W. 33d St., N. Y. 1179 Greeley. 

VENTRILOQUIST FIGURES. 
Ben Hobson, 201 West 144th St.. N. Y. C 

VIOLINS AND SUPPLIES 
August Gemuender & Sons, 141 W. 42nd St., 

N. Y. 
John Friedrich & Bro., Inc., 279 Filth Ave., 

N. Y. 
S. Pfeiffer, 145 W. 44th St., N. Y. C 



WARDROBE PROP 
TRUNKS. SS.OO 

Big Bargain. Have been used. Alio a few 
Second Hand Innovation and Fibre Ward- 
robe Trunks, $10 and $15. A few extra large 
Property Trunks. Also old Taylor Trunks 

nd Bal Trunks. 
Parlor Floor. 28 W. 31st St, New York City 



VC ■ \r wT>nnSTAGE AND 
El I— V Ei 1 PICTURE SETTINGS 

BEATJM0KT VELVET SCENERY STUDIOS, 1007 
Columbia Theater Bldg,, 47th St. and Broadway, 
Hew York City. 



PLAYS 



VAUDEVILLE ACTS, ETC 
N. Y. PLAY BUREAU, Tre 
moot Theatre, N. Y. City 
Stamp for catalog. 



ACTS FOR SALE CHEAP. We 
Buy. Sell or Kxchatige ns<*l 
ApimratUM, rrnfcwNional Catu- 
Ior 10c. Tarlor Trick catalog FREK. ■ Write inr 
Cull. Hcrnraan Mario Co . Eta. 1, 470 8th Jr., N. Y. 



MAGIC 



PLAYS 



— ** 8e>15»Q«j 
IN MANUSCRIPT A YEAR 

New winner* — Tried Successes. Special Pictorial 
Printing. Send stamp for catalog. STAGELORE 
FLAY CO., 1400 Broadway, IT. Y„ Dept. C. 



Li4 of Professional and Am- 
ateur Plays. Vanderille 
Sketches. Monologs, Minstrel 
Dialogs. Make-up Goods, etc. 



PLAYS 

Material. Recitations. 
CATALOG FBEE. 

FITZGERALD PUB. CORPN, 
Successor to Dick * rmrerald. 20 Am 8t. New Tork. 

NEARLY NEW 

Evening Gowns and Wraps 

Foil Diets, Taiedo aJ Prince Albert S-h» 

LUCY GOODMAN. 2315 S. State St.. Chicago 



Drops and Curtains $12.50 

Painted to order, any ale* up to 14 by 20 ft., in 
either Diamond Dye, Oil or Water Colo r*. A ll 
kinds of SCENERY at lowest price*. BCECELL 
SCENIC STUDIO, Columbus, Ohio. 



.TTCUTinkl We buy and sell PLAYS, 
A I I El* HUH SONGS, all kind* of good ipe- 
cial material. Moslc composing and arranging. 

If, Y, FLAY -MUSIC BUKEAU. 87*8 Broadwwy, 

m*. X. Bs vacua. 



TIGHTS 

Cotton Tights, TtTT good qiulltj. 
a pair SI. 00. Wontfd Tlgnla. 
medium weight. t'2.23 ■ Mir. 
Wonted Ttghu. bravy ..fight. 
S3. 00 s pair. Imported alia 

plaltst. iLctits. in bright K«-d sad 
goldi'n Brown, only 92.30 * 
pair. Sllkollne Tight* In all 

colon. (2.50 s pair. Heat? 75 
per <*oL Imported silk tights. 
In bright Red only, rrdurrd from 
JG.DO to $4.00 s pair. Full 
sleeve Shirts to match tights, 
sane price as tights. Orders 
filled promptly. Clipper Catalog 
fn-e on application. 

D1TRIM AMD V'ANIJL 

210-212 W. Madison St.. Chicago. 111. 




TIGHTS 

Silk Opera Hose and Stockings 

An Onr Specialties 

QUALITY the BEST and PRICES th* 

LOWEST. 

Gold and Silver Brocades, Bilks, Satins, 
Theatrical Jewelry, Spangles, Etc Oold 
and Silver Trimmings. Wigs, Beazda and 
all Oeods Theatrical. Catalogues and Sam 
pie* open request When asking for Cata- 
logue, pleaae mention what good* are 
wanted. 

J. J. WYLE & BROS., Inc. 

(Successor* t*> Slsurman and Weal) 



PAWN TICKETS BOUGHT 


CASH PAID IMMEDIATELY 


for Pawn Tickets. 


Diamonds, Precious 


Stone* and Jewelry 


Appraising free. 
Open evening*. 


Strictly confidential. 


FORCOTSTON'S 


1432 Broadway. N. 


Y. Cor. 40th St. 



TIGHTS. UNION SUITS 

SVMMETRICALS and 

THEATRICAL SUPPLIES 

Write for Catalog*. No. 8 



i 



L WALTER G.BRETZFIELDCO. H I 

INC. __ 

T 1367 BROAOWIT. 01. 

Cor. 37th St. S 




PLAYS 



Large List of 
New Profes- 
sional and 

Amateur Plays, Vaudeville sketch- 
es. Stage Monologues, New Min- 
strel Material, Jokes. Hand-Books 
Operetta*. Folk Dances, Musical 
Piece*. Special Entertainments, 
Recitatkm*. Dialogs.**. Speaker*. 
TaMeaxnc, Drills. Wigs. B •arda. Gn*i a Paints and 



Other Make-up Good*. CATALOGUE FREE. 

T.8.DENISON SCO., DEPT. 17, CHICAGO 

MflgWrHCrS M9BQ3I f on bating read n^" Manual of 

Compealn* and Publlsulnr. " This book sates and makes 
awory, also tiers taloable. honest advice. Pries 35c 
H. I. BADE! MUSIC CO . 133 East 34U St. N. V City. 



READ THE CLIPPER 
LIST OF LETTERS 

SECOND-HAND 

G O WN S 



ANDREWS. 506 S. State St.. CHICAGO 



Phone Bryant 1261 



GLOBE THEATRICAL 
TRANSFER 

Lon*-«ad-Short-Ha>ulmj, Motor- 
Truck Service 



Phone*, 852—1994 Greeley 

White's Theatrical Transfer Co. 

ZW W. JSth St, New York 
AUTO SERVICE 



WIGS 



Human Hair. Irish. Dutrb. Jew, 7*e. 
ea. Soubrettr or Men's Dress w*L 
$1.00. $1.50: Negro. 25c.. 84*., 
7.5c; Tlthis. »0c. Intaot atdgpnt. 
Catalot Free. Paper Ha*>. Maats. 
Noeellies. Praps. KUrKwt BM, 
46 (toper ft).. N. T. 



Th« Techmical Pagss, Ngw Yo«g 




-;tiJE^r?rrrir?l]irr l '"" r ^ l ' :r ~ r ''' '' ■--■■•l-irmn-l'l-l-l-l-r rMrr:irrT»lMTMi^MMMWMlIMM«WIMMi^W«WMnWl«WlBBMM^MnMB«l.^iM^WiBWiM^M^MWftl^^^^M^MMWl»lM^g^^g»^^^^f ^f^-^^ ^^^^^^.^^^^TMrM^^^—^^^— ———■«■ mb^b^^^^^^^^^^^^^m^^^^^^^ 



isoinnjjwrauiijwmjiwiniiiwwimnra^ (S7*W4X* ™ ^55r I iwmtinimiiuiirnminniinimiui 





LAST CALL FOR THE 

Christmas Issue of 

The New York Clipper 

(The Oldest Theatrical Publication In America) 

will be issued December 19th 

A display announcement in this 
number will be read by managers, 
agents and producers the country over 

Everyone interested in the show business is interested 
in The Clipper. Thafs why Clipper advertising pays! 

It is not a question of "Can you afford to be 
in itr but "Can you afford not to be in it?' 

Send your copy in now! 

Last form closes Dec. 15th 





1 1 






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f ... ^- ; v. ^_ 







^ ^ ■ gM i U ^ OLDEST THEATRICAL PUBLICATION IN AMERICA 
[DECEMBER I9 T 19»7)0Q l|h!«* ' ^Ji^ OTfWHCE IO CENTS I 



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THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



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Belle Baker 



WISHES THE WHOLE WORLD 



A Merry Christmas and A Happy New Year 




Headlining for two and three consecutive weeks over the B. F, Keith 

Circuit the season of 1917-1918 

Direction: ED. S. KELLER 

At B. F. KEITH'S PALACE THEATRE This Week December 17 



? 

December 19> 1917 



THE NEW YdRK CLIPPER 



wmmm 




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! 



! 



B. F. Keith's 

I Circuit of 
Theatres 



A. PAUL KEITH, President 

E. F. ALBEE, Vice-President and 
General Manager 



UNITED 
BOOKING 
OFFICES 




Artists and acts of every description suit- 
able for vaudeville can obtain desirable 
engagements in these offices. You can 
book direct by addressing S. K. Hodg- 
don. booking manager of the United 
Booking Offices. 



OFFICES: 

B. F. Kei th'» Palace Theatre 
New York City. 




. 







I 






1 



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I 
I 






1 






|>uletfoe Greeting* 



Amalgamated 

Vaudeville 

Agency 




B.\S. MOSS 

President 

\ 

General Executive Offices: 
729 SEVERTH AVE., 

at Forty-ninth St. 



M. D. SIMMONS 

General Booking Managers 



ARTISTS can secure long engage- 
ments by boohing direct with u* 



I 



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Decijjiiber 19, 1917; 



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Dolly Sisters 

Manageme nt , = 

Raymond HitchcocK 






■'■•■.- . ' 

■-■••'.'•':-: 



Caoyrishted, U17, by the Cl i pp e r Corpormtlon. 



Founded br ' 
FRANK QUEEN, ISS3 



NEW YORK, DECEMBER 19, 1917 



VOLUME LXV-No. 4* 
Price, Ten Ctsts 




MERRY CHRISTMAS 



wmiiiiiiwuMiiwiiiiwM^aniBiwiiMmiiaiMMiMiiiiiiiaMaMM^^ 




SHUBERTS BREAK CONTRACTS 
AND STAR T THEA TRE WAR 

Fight Which Began in Philadelphia with K&E Extends All Over 

Country as They Announce Cancellation of Agreements 

Made Six Years Ago 



The definite break between Klaw and 
Erlanger and the Shuberts, which was 
predicted in The Clxppeb of two weeks 
ago, took place this week when Lee and 
J. J. Shubert announced that they bad 
severed all booking" and pooling arrange- 
ments with the other firm. The trouble, 
which started in Philadelphia, has now ex- 
tended to the entire country 1 . The cities 
in which the pooling arrangements were in 
force are Philadelphia, Baltimore, Chicago, 
Boston and St. Louis. 

It is thought that the amicable settle- 
ment of the Hitchcock dispute, which the 
Shuberts considered a victory, precipitated 
their latest step. 

In the announcement given out by J. J. 
Shubert, in which he admits having dis- 
solved the booking arrangements, he said: 

"We had a booking arrangement with 
Klaw and Erlanger, according to which a 
settlement was to be made every six 
months, on Feb. 1 and Aug. 1. As we 
consider that they have not made settle- 
ments according to the contract we have 
cancelled it. 

"Klaw and Erlanger are only booking 
agents and have few clients, while we 
own and control our own theatreB. As 
far as we are concerned, we consider them 
two old and antiquated men, whom the 
procession has passed. They represent 
such a small portion of the theatrical 
business that they can no longer be taken 
seriously. 

"We have now accomplished the Shu- 
bert program, the plan which the late Sam 
Shubert set out to perfect, namely, to 
open the theatres throughout the country 
to independent producers, so that they can 
book free of any oppression, such as Klaw 
and Erlanger tried to execute on Raymond 
Hitchcock last week. 

"We have notified the following inter- 
ests of our cancellation of agreement, as 
they are interested in theatres in all the 
five cities affected: Sam Nixon, Fred Zim- 
merman in Philadelphia, Hairy Powers 
and Will Davis in Chicago, the estate of 
William Harris and Will Davis for Bos- 
ton, and Charles E. Ford and Nixon and 
Zimmerman for Baltimore. Also the es- 
tate of Charles Frohman." 

That there is dissension inside the syn- 
dicate itself was alleged by Mr. Shubert, 
on the grounds that Klaw and Erlanger 
recently instituted suit against Nixon and 
Zimmerman, their Philadelphia represent- 
atives, alleging fraud in the accounting of 
disbursements and receipts. 

Klaw and Erlanger in reply issued the 
following statement: 

"The Messrs. Shubert almost before the 



ink was dry upon the original contracts 
began evading and violating their obliga- 
tions. The initiative for the break came 
from the managers in Boston, Chicago, 
Philadelphia and elsewhere, who com- 
plained that the Shuberts were constantly 
violating the stipulations of the agree- 
ment. 

"The letter which appeared in the 
papers, purporting to be a call upon us 
for settlement, was not written until 
Saturday, or several weeks after we be- 
gan suit against them in Philadelphia, 
and Mr. Erlanger in that city and in New 
York stated that we considered the con- 
tract broken and would govern ourselves 
accordingly. Statements to that effect 
were made and printed. 

"As for the list of allies which they 
mention, we suggest that they put identi- 
fication tags on some of them so they 
may be known in case of a loss. Several 
men mentioned in their list are associates 
of ours in various enterprises. As far as 
the line-up which they mention, we are 
quite content with our roster, including 
the names of David Belasco, George C. 
Tyler, Henry Savage, Alf Hayman, Flo 
Ziegfeld, Cohan and Harris, Chas. Dilling- 
ham and others to stand against their 
forces as producers, managers or men of 
business integrity. 

"We have never discovered any sense 
of humor in the Shuberts, but if they had 
one they would have made no reference 
to the fact that this is the culmination of 
their fight to open the theatres through- 
out the country to independent producers, 
when the very suit in Philadelphia grew 
out of their effort to tie up the country 
by incorporating in their agreements with 
attractions the following clause: 

" The commercial value of the said play 

in cities other than the City of : 

being largely dependent upon and en- 
hanced by its presentation in said city, it 
is agreed, as part of the consideration 
moving to the parties of the first part, 
and to induce them to enter into this con- 
tract and furnish the said theatre for 
presentation of the said play in said city, 
{Continued on page 121) 



NATALIE ALT BEING SUED 

Lionel Hein has entered a- judgment to 
recover $160, said to be due him through 
a contract entered into with Natalie Alt. 

It appears that, on Sept 7, Miss Alt en- 
gaged Hein as her personal representa- 
tive, press agent and manager, and agreed 
to pay him one-half of the second week's 
salary received by her. 

He -began work Sept. 12. and secured 
an engagement for her to commence Sept. 
25 at Proctor's Palace in Newark and the 
following week at the Palace in New York. 
Hein received $300 for this, but main- 
tained that there is still a balance due him 
of $160, and that, notwithstanding fre- 
quent requests for the amount, Miss Alt 
has refused to pay him. Nathan Burkan 
is representing Hein in the action. Miss 
Alt has filed a denial 



HAVUN SUED BY PATRON 
Cincinnati. Dec 14. — John H. Havlin, 
manager of the Grand Opera House, has 
been sued for $2,000 in the courts here by 
Frank S. Hardwick, vice-president of the 
Bath Hardwood Lumber Company, White 
Sulphur Springs, W. Va. Hardwick says 
that he was-assaulted by employes of the 
theatre while attending a performance of 
"Pals First" Hardwick alleges that he 
and two men friends were seated in the 
front row; one of the men's feet slipped 
from the rail around the orchestra pit 
and kicked a musician's bald head. The 
musician was angered. During intermis- 
sion, Hardwick claims, he was attacked 
and ejected from the theatre. He says 
it. wasn't his foot that did the kicking. 



NO SHOWS; HOUSE IS DARK 

Cihcothati, O., Dec. 12. — For the first 
time in many, many seasons, the Grand 
Opera House will be dark for a week in 
mid-season. While this dark week hap- 
pens to be the dull pre-Ohristmas period, 
this fact does not entirely account for the 
absence of an attraction. It is believed 
that the dark bouse is an indication of 
the plight in which road shows are finding 
themselves. Klaw & Erlanger informed 
Manager Ed. Aylward that they could 
send no attraction for the week ; efforts to 
book a moving picture were stopped. 



DRAMATIC CRITIC MARRIES 

C mcm.H A.Ti, Dec. 16. — Adlal 8. Saund- 
ers, dramatic editor of the Commercial- 
Tribune, and Miss Mabel Wick, exchange 
editor of the same paper, were married 
in Indianapolis to-day. Saunders suc- 
ceeded Montgomery Plaster upon the tat- 
ter's death several months ago. Miss Wick, 
until recently, was mode editor of the 
CommeretaUTribune. 



CHRISTMAS WILL DELAY THE CLIPPER 

Owing to the fact Oat Christinas falls, next weak, on the day The 
Clipper goes to press, ti« edition will be) on* day late in H— M— n*w* 



NEXT RATS 

HEARING TO 

BE LIVELY 

ATTORNEYS EXAMINE BOOKS 



Developments of considerable importance 
are expected to be brought out at the next 
session of the investigation being made 
into the financial status of the White Rats- 
Actors' Union before Referee Louis Shul- 
denfrei. This session has been adjourned' 
from week to week for Borne time, but has 
finally been set down for December 28th, 
one week from Friday. 

The time which has elapsed since the- 
last hearing, however, has not been allowed 1 
to go to waste, and Alvin Saplnsky, at- 
torney for Miss Goldie Pemberton, on- 
whose application the hearing is granted 
by the Supreme Court, has been busy 
during the interim. making an exhaustive 
examination of the books and ledgers of 
the union, with the view of being in a 
position, when the next hearing is taken 
up, to get at once into that part of it* 
history which, it has been stated, contains 
transactions which were not beneficial to 
the union or its members. 

It is very likely, also, that beginning 
with the next hearing, a long string of 
witnesses will be subpoenaed for question- 
ing, as the examination of the books is 
reported to have broadened the scope of 
the investigation to a point where there 
are questions to be asked of a considerable 
number of persons. Just who they are 
has not been divulged, but it is prob- 
able that all the former directors of the 
anion will be asked to attend the bearings. 



•TOOT TOOT OPENING SET 

Wilmington, Del., has been picked as 
the town in which "Toot Toot," Henry W. 
Savage's new musical piece, will open. 
Christmas Day is the date. The play ia a 
musical version of Rupert Hughes' "Ex- 
cuse Me," by Edgar Allen Woolf and Ber- 
ton Braley, with mnaic by Jerome Kern. 



CECIL CUNNINGHAM ILL 
Cecil Cunningham has been removed to 
Price's Sanitarium, having suffered a sad- 
den attack of pneumonia following a ben- 
efit performance Sunday night The 
physicians announced later that the was 
reatbag easily, but would probably not 
be aide to return to her engegementa for 
some time. She had been billed to appear 
at the Riverside this week. 



FREEMAN AND DUNHAM SPLIT 

The vaudeville act of Freeman and* 
Dunham, who were with the "Stop, Look 
and Listen" company, have ■put, 
Freeman, who has left the show, is 
to New York. 



6 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



December 19, 1917 



BERG AND THOR, 

PRODUCERS, 

ATWAR 

IN TANGLE OVER PLAYERS 

B. D. Berg and M. Thor, both vaudeville 
producers, have gotten into a tangle over 
the alleged stealing of players which has 
furnished Broadway with considerable to 
talk about during the past week. Both 
producers openly state that they have 
declared war on each other, and much ex- 
pectancy is felt as to just how things will 
turn out. 

Tbe trouble started some weeks ago, 
when two chorus- girls, Joan Frazer and 
Dorothy Duncan,, left Thor^ act, "The 
Isle of Innocence," to go with Berg. At 
this time, it is claimed, words and blows 
passed between the producers, whereupon 
Berg is said to have declared a fight to 
the finish, promising to take all of Thor's 
people that he required. 

Since then he has signed Joe Phillips, 
a comedian, and Tom Aiken, a straight. 
Berg admits taking these men, but says 
they gave two weeks' notice and simply 
desired to better themselves. Thor, on 
the other hand, declares he has had to 
withdraw three acta on account of the 
loss of players. 

Thor also reports that five girls open- 
ing in one of his acts Monday in Phila- 
delphia jumped out Sunday. He declares 
he met them in the station in that city, 
having gone over there to witness the 
opening. They are said to have told him 
they had a better job, and he is of the 
opinion that they went to Berg. This 
Berg denies. 

Tom Aiken, one of the men who signed 
this week with Berg, was with Thor a 
year, he says, in which time he was dis- 
satisfied. He claims that he simply 
signed with Berg to better his condition. 

Although several of the alleged "steals" 
are reported to have been brought to the 
attention of the N. V. A., Henry Chester- 
field, secretary of that organization, de- 
nies having received any complaints what- 
ever from either party to the conflict. _ 

Meanwhile, both producers are remain- 
ing in their respective offices, keeping 
tight on future plans. Berg has publicly 
stated that he will take whatever players 
he wants, and he adds that he will not 
enter the Putnam Building in which Thor 
is located, without a body-guard. 

NEW LOEW HOUSE OPENS DEC. 31 

Hamilton, Can., Dec 17. — Loew's 
Vaudeville Theatre, the new theatre which 
Marcus Loew has erected here, is to be 
dedicated on New Year's Eve, and the 
event will be one of more than usual in- 
terest. The house, which is another link 
in the chain of theatres Loew has in Can- 
ada, is one of the finest in the country. 
It is of modern construction and has a 
seating capacity of 2,800. Among those 
who will be at the opening are Kitty Gor- 
don, jack Wilson and MoHie King. 

GOODWIN LOSES $25,000 SUIT 

Los Angeles, Dec. 17. — An injunction 
has been obtained here against Nat Good- 
win in the suit of C. G. Shipman to_ fore- 
close certain mortgages securing promissory 
notes to the amount of $25,000. Shipman 
is a Santa Monica banker. Goodwin filed 
an answer to the suit, but did not appear 
in court, and the case was taken by de- 
fault. The notes were given by Goodwin 
on March 21, 1913, and bear seven per cent 
interest. — — — — 

CRANDALL ENLARGES CIRCUIT 
Washington, D. C, Dec. 14. — Harry 
M. Crandall, head of Crandall's Circuit of 
Theatres, has added the American Theatre, 
on Rhode Island avenue, to his list. Cran- 
dall's chain of theatres in this city now 
Includes: The Knickerbocker, Savoy, Ave- 
nue, Grand, Opollo and American. 

LAWRENCE ANHALT SUED 

Lawrence J. Anhalt, of the Park The- 
atre Company, is being sued for a judg- 
ment of $500 by the Orella Producing 
Company. 





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CO. 

SAYS CANCELLED BECAUSE GERMAN 



EMMA SHARROCK 

Xow Presenting a Mind Reading Act with 
Her Husband in "Over the Top" 

WOMAN FAINTS AT TRICK 
Hoboken, Dec 15. — A woman, whose 
name is unknown, fainted in the Lyric Thea- 
tre here Saturday night during the perform- 
ance of Everett, a magician, and was car- 
ried to the rest-room in an unconscious con- 
dition. She later recovered and was taken 
to her home. She became frightened at one 
of the tricks done by the performer, in 
which be took two white rats, held them 
over her head, and seemingly threw them 
at her. She shrieked and fainted, and 
the bouse was thrown into something of a 
panic, necessitating the calling of policemen 
to prevent a riot. 



"LIGHTNIN" , SELECTED TITLE 

"Lightnin' " is the title selected for the 
new play by Wincbell Smith and Frank 
Bacon, which Smith and Golden will pre- 
sent at the National Theatre, Washing- 
ton, on January 28- The play will later 
be brought to New York. 

Bacon, besides being one of the authors, 
also enacts the title role of the play, a 
character who is nicknamed "Lightnin' " 
because of the exceedingly slow nature of 
his movements. Edward Robbins and 
Frances Carson are also in the cast. 



Madame Abner Ober filed suit against 
the Metropolitan Opera Company last 
week for $50,000, on tbe ground that they 
broke a contract held by her. The suit is 
expected to fix the status of aliens in this 
country. 

Madame Ober, a subject of Germany, 
was engaged by the Metropolitan Opera 
Company to sing during the seasons of 
1913 to 1918, inclusive, according to the 
papers in the case. On the night of No- 
vember 2 last she, together with four 
other members of the company, Melanie 
Kurt, Johannes Sembach, Herman Weil 
and Carl Braun, rehearsed their roles for 
tbe coming season until 10.30 p. m-., the 
papers state. The management, that after- 
noon, had notified them, however, through 
the mail, of their dismissal. Mme. Ober 
charges that, although she has been out 
of the cast for seven months, she was 
until December 6, still being announced in 
the program as a coming attraction. The 
last announcement appeared in a program 
at the Brooklyn Academy of Music on 
that date. 

She maintains that' the reason she was 
not allowed to sing this season is because 
she is a German. 



CLEVES KINKEAD MARRIES 
Louisville, Dec. 17. — Cleves Kinkead, 
author of ''Common Clay," and' now a 
lieutenant in the United States Army, 
married Kathleen Patch, of Shelbourne 
Falls, Mass., this week, suddenly and with- 
out announcement. The marriage took 
place in Toledo, Ohio. The two had met 
several years before, at the premiere of 
Kinkead's play in Boston. 

WELTY ILL IN CHICAGO 

Chicago, Dec. 17. — George M. Welty, 
manager of William A. Brady's "The Man 
Who Came Back," is dangerously ill in 
this city. He was suddenly stricken this 
week, and is now in a local hospital. Mr. 
Welty has been with Brady and George 
Tyler since the retirement of the Lieblers, 
with whom he was associated for many 
years. 



"GOOD NIGHT PAUL" GOES WEST 

"Good Night Paul," which had a short 
run in New York early this season, is' to 
be tried on the Pacific coast by its pro- 
ducer, Ralph Hera, It opens Christmas 
Day at the Cort, San Francisco. Nego- 
tiations are said to be under way to sign 
Blanche Ring for the part played by Eliza- 
beth Murray. 



CORT SIGNS WANDA LYONS 

Wanda Lyons, who has appeared re- 
cently in the Winter Gafden- shows," has ' 
been added to the cast of "Flo-Flo," which 
opens at the Cort Thursday night, under - 
the management of John- Cort. 



WONT PAY FOR CAMP SHOWS 

Following the closing of the sixteen can- 
tonment shows booked by the Y. M. C. A, 
announcement was -made this week that 
that organization will undertake to handle 
no more attractions which do not donate 
their services. 

It has been the custom of the. X. M. 
C. A., which has auditoriums in all of the 
sixteen training camps, to secure shows for 
short stands when possible, paying them 
sacrifice salaries and running expenses. 
These were shown to the soldiers at the 
lowest possible admission price, the idea 
being to make them self-supporting. 

Among the plays thus shown were many 
which happened to be showing at towns 
near the camps. The regular attractions, 
intended to be run on the entire circuit, 
were furnished by the White Lyceum Bu- 
reau of Boston. 

Tbe attractions were not successes, how- 
ever, as the soldiers did not like the style 
of plays given. As there are many com- 
panies which are willing to donate their 
services and pay their own expenses from 
purely patriotic motives, the paid shows 
have been therefore discontinued, it was 
announced by John R. Higgins, secretary 
of Y. M. C. A. war work. 



WAR TAX ENDS FREE LIST 

Zajtesv tt . t . f , Ohio, Dec. 14. — Managei 
W. C. Qnimby has placed over tbe box of- 
fice of the Quimby Theatre here the fol- 
lowing sign: "Free List Suspended — The 
enormous increase in expenses makes it 
necessary that those who have heretofore 
enjoyed the courtesies of this theatre shall 
buy tickets:" 

This is the first step taken by man- 
agers of local "movie" houses, hoping to 
increase the box office receipts which have 
fallen off at some houses since the theatre 
ticket tax went into effect. 



ACTRESS' RING STOLEN 

A diamond ring belonging to Juanita 
Moore was taken from the actress's room 
in the Hotel Remington last week. The 
matter was reported to the Second Branch 
Detective Bureau. Tbe ring was said to 
have been worth $900. 

Miss Moore was at rehearsal during the 
m'orninp. and when she returned she dis- 
covered that the ring, which was an heir- 
loom, possessing sentimental as well as 
intrinsic value, was missing. Detective Ed- 
v.-ard Dillon has been assigned to the case. 



TO. BUILD GLENS FALLS THEATRE 

Glens Faixs. N. Y., Dec 14. — J. R. 
Lockwood and F. E. Corburn have pur- 
chased a block on Warren street which 
they will reconstruct into a theatre with 
a seating capacity of 2,000. The World 
in Motion Theatre was formerly in the 
block. . The new house will open about 
April 1 with vaudeville and pictures. 



DYLLYN ENGAGED FOR REVUE 

J. Bernard Dyllyn will play "Chu Chin 
Chow" in the new Cohan Revue to open 
New Year's Eve 



WARD GOES TO MOUNTAINS 

Fred Ward, connected with the Dilling- 
ham and Ziegfeld forces, left late last week 
for the mountains, where he is going to re- 
cuperate and enjoy a much needed rest. 



FILM SHIPMENT SIX DAYS LATE 
. Washington, D. C, Dec 12. — Owing 
to existing conditions in express shipments 
to and from or between this city, Balti- 
more, Philadelphia and New York, ship- 
ments of films are piled up in the Wash- 
ington branches of the express companies 
without a chance of getting them in time 
for the showings for which they are 
booked. As an instance of the delay oc- 
casioned, "The Fall of the Romanoffs" 
lithographs, shipped on Nov. 28, the pic- 
ture being booked for showing on Dec 2 
at the Tom Moore theatres, arrived Dec 
5. The photographs for the same showing 
shipped from New York Nov. 30 arrived 
six days later, and the print of "The Fall 
of the Romanoffs," which was shipped for 
the opening on Dec 2, did not arrive till 
Dec 8. 



ASCOUTH MADE DEFENSE HEAD 

Hartford, Conn., Dec 17. — William D. 
Asconth, manager of the Palace Theatre, 
tbis city, has been appointed head of the 
new division of motion pictures of the 
State Defense' Council. He will have 
charge of tbe exhibition of Government 
pictures dealing with the war throughout 
all Connecticut. 



TO PRESENT "BILLETED" ON XMAS 
Margaret Anglin will open at the Play- 
house on Christmas night in "Billeted," a 
new comedy by Miss F. Tennyson Jesse 
and -H. M. Hardwood. In her support win 
be Phyllis Birket, Roland Rushton, Lollie 
Williams and Howard Lindsey. 



MANAGER DESHON PARALYZED 

Huntington, W. Va„ Dec 13. — Wm. 
Deshon, manager of tbe Huntington The- 
atre, suffered a severe paralytic stroke 
last Sunday while sitting in his office. He 
was removed to Guthrie Hospital. Mr. 
Desbon is a brother of Frank Deshon, the 
actor. 



MRS. LESLIE CARTER SUED 

Dayton, Ohio, Dec. 15. — Mrs. Leslie 
Carter, in private life Mrs. Caroline Louis 
Dudley Payne, was one of the defendants in 
a suit for foreclosure filed by tbe Franklin 
Savings Loan Association on a claim for 
$25,689.60 last week Her husband and 
her son, Leslie Dudley Carter, and the 
tatter's wife, Frances S. Carter, are Co* 
defendants. 























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HARRY PRESCOTT 

With the Harry Von Tiker Music 



Co. 



December 19, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



GREEN ROOMERS 

GIVE DINNER 

ANDJHOW 

BASEBALL MEN PRESENT 



The first of a series of winter revels 
planned by the Green Boom Club was held 
Saturday night in the clubhouse, with 
one hundred and fifty present. A beef- 
steak dinner was served, after which a 
vaudeville bill was given in the hall on 
the second floor. 

"Baseball Night" was the name by which 
the celebration was called, and the officers 
of the National and American leagues had 
been invited' to be present. Many were 
present, while others were kept away by 
the blizzard. 

John C Peebles was the chairman of 
the dinner committee. President John K. 
Tener of the National League was one of 
the speakers, and Hughey Jennings wag 
another. 

After the banquet the crowd adjourned 
to the theatre, specially erected for the 
occasion, and were treated to three one-act 
plays and some big time vaudeville. 

"The House of Rest," which opened the 
show, was written by Joseph Noel, author 
of "The Pawn," and its sheer gruesome- 
ness caused the audience to gasp. The 
scene was a morgue in Paris. A man 
searching for his missing wife, and a 
woman searching for her husband, come 
to the morgue and meet over the six 
coffins that are there. ' 

Carl Gerrard played the woman and 
Rollo Lloyd the man. The two became 
acquainted and discover that the dead 
husband and wife had known each other. 
The rlimnT comes when the living husband 
bitterly denounces the wife as being the 
cause of the double death. The play was 
warmly received. 

"While You Wait" was introduced by S. 
Jay Kaufman, who was chairman of the 
entertainment committee. He announced 
that the plan was to have a sketch writ- 
ten, rehearsed and given a first perform- 
ance before the audience. 

He proposed to be the author of a play- 
let beginning with a husband suddenly 
coming on his wife in the arms of her 
lover. Hal Caine was chosen from the 
audience to be the wife, Hal Briggs was 
picked for the husband and Richard 
Tucker was the lover. The sketch ran 
eight minutes, and was brought to a suc- 
cessful conclusion through the combined 
efforts of the audience, the author and 
the cast. 

"In the Winter League," a skit writ- 
ten by Bugs Baer, followed. This wa» 
laid in a country store, in which the old 
natives had gathered to talk baseball. 



CECIL CUNNINGHAM 

The ornate picture adorning this Christ- 
mas number of The Clipper is that of Miss 
Cecil Cunningham, who is appearing this 
week at B. P. Keith's Riverside Theatre. 
Miss Cunningham is a headliner of estab- 
lished reputation, who has a novel way of 
adding to the joy of the nation in the wsy 
of entertainment. She was recruited to 
the vaudeville field from comic opera, where 
she has made a deep impression, and since 
her advent into the two-a-day she has 
added to her laurels as a star line enter- 
tainer. 

Miss Cunningham really does not special- 
ize in any distinct form of entertainment 
but handles her songs in an original and 
deft manner, getting enough out of each 
to make it seem like a two-dollar produc- 
tion song. Her material is all restricted 
to her own personal use, and the ideas of 
the. songs emanate from herself. She has 
successfully written several new songs, 
two of which she is using during her present 
engagement this week. She was about to 
Join a musical comedy production at the 
beginning of the New Tear, but the vaude- 
ville powers prevailed and she did not de- 
sert her favorite field of endeavor. She will 
remain in vaudeville for the remainder of 
the season, being booked under the direction 
of M. S. Bentham. 



"HER SOLDIER BOY" CLOSES 

Cincinnati, Dec, 15. — "Her Soldier 
Boy," Shubert's military musical comedy, 
is in full retreat before the invisible enemy, 
"bad business," closing to-night, following 
its week's run at the Lyric Theatre. The 
blizzard weather conditions kept the busi- 
ness below zero here ; but even good weather 
could not have made up for the make-shift 
cast that was left after the "original com- 
pany" was shot up. The company is on 
its way back to Broadway. 

Before coming to' Cincinnati the cast was 
deleted. Clifton- Crawford was called back 
to New York for a new role. Marjory 
Gateson, Forrest Huff and Elizabeth Ger- 
gely followed him. Then Cyril Chadwick 
announced bis intention of leaving to-night, 
being' lonesome in the cast that was sub- 
btituted. Mabel Weeks was the only 
"original" featured player left. 



CIRCUS EXPERTS 
OFFER AID TO 
GOVERNMENT 

WILL ADVISE ON TRANSPORTATION 



SAN ANTONIO WINTERS 5 SHOWS 

Sa.n Antonio, Tex., Dec. 15. — Five cir- 
cuses with over seven hundred people of 
the profession and all their shows are 
now wintering at San Antonio, the C. 
A. Wortham Shows, Con T. Kennedy 
Shows, DeKrako Bros, and Brundagc 
Shows, and in January the Bernada Shows 
will come. San Antonio . has on account 
of its splendid climate and cosmopolitan 
population attracted many of the show 
people here. 



AL WILSON SHOW DELAYED 

Knoxviixe, Tenn., Dec. 12. — Owing to a 
delayed train, Al. Wilson, bocked for last 
night at Staub's Theatre, could not start 
his performance till 10 o'clock. The final 
curtain fell at 12.30. 



At a meeting of important circus men 
held this week, it was decided to offer to 
the government the services of experts on 
transportation, who have learned by long 
experience with the tent shows just how 
to transport large bodies of men and 
equipment. 

It is expected that the offer will be re- 
ceived gladly by the State Department at 
Washington, as the efficient methods of 
circus men can be applied directly and 
with great advantage to the moving of 
supplies for the army. 

Through long years of close application 
and study the circus men have familiar- 
ized themselves with the various roads of 
the country, and with the -obstacles that 
aie met in transportation. For this rea- 
son there is probably no class better 
equipped on this subject in the world. 

The booking of a circus or show de- 
pends largely on its transportation ex- 
perts for its success. In touring across 
the country the making of jumps in the 
most efficient way \b essential to the suc- 
cess of the company. This fact is dem- 
onstrated by the instance of the Barnum 
and Bailey tour of Europe Bome ' years 




TWO SHOWMEN ARRESTED 

Jersey Citt, Dec 17. — Jacob Pollack 
and his son Abraham, were arrested here 
last week on the charge of obtaining 
money under false pretences.' They were 
the proprietors of a traveling show which 
was booked to appear at the Whits Eagle 
Hall Saturday night. Pollack is said to 
be a New York tailor. 

For several days previous to the open- 
ing agents sold tickets for fifteen cents, 
which were supposed to admit the pur- 
chaser. At the box office, however, it waa 
learned that another quarter was being 
asked. Then a local man, Harry Galkin, 
appeared with a ten dollar MIL The 
cashier, known as Gerbecki, disappeared 
with this and has not been seen since. 
' The proprietors were immediately ar- 
rested, and are now in the county jail, in 
default of the $1,000 bail asked by Judge 
William Driscoll. 



NEW STRAUSS OPERA COMING 

The first production in America of 
Johann Strauss's operetta, "On the Blue 
Danube," will be given Christmas Day at 
the Yorkville Theatre, on Eighty-sixth 
street. Mizi Gizi will be seen in the lead- 
ing role, and Adolf Phillip will stage the 
opera. The score has been arranged by 
Karl Reimann, and the book and lyrics 
are by F. Landsberger. Johann Strauss 
is known as the "Waltz King," and many 
of his works have been popular in this 
country, notably "The Bat," "The Gypsy 
Baron," "The Merry War" and "Gas- 
parone." 



IT WAS ABOUT TIME 

Cincinnati, Ohio, Dec 15. — Robert O. 
Harris, press agent of the Grand Opera 
House, was reading the "Information for 
Patrons," that is run in the Grand's pro- 
gramme. He discovered this line last 
week: "Carriages arriving shall approach 
the Opera House from the north, etc, etc'.' 
That line has been running for about ten 
years. No wonder traffic was congested ; 
so Harris had the "carriages" changed to 
"autos." 



LUTTRINGER SUES TENNIS 

Alf. Luttringer filed suit Monday 
through his attorney, Frederick Gold- 
smith, against Peter J. Tennis, of the 
Duchess Theatre, Poughkeepsie, N. T. 
Luttringer was under contract through 
Walter J. Plimmer to . play three weeks 
of stock at the house at $25 per week. 
The agreement was made November 14. 
On the 15th Tennis stated that he would 
not run stock, therefore Luttringer sued, 

RIVOU TO OPEN DEC. 27 

The Rivoli, the new motion picture the- 
atre at Broadway and Forty-ninth Street; 
will open to the public on Thursday night 
December 27. The house, which win be 
under the management of S. L. RothnpXel, 
is to be turned over to him by the builder 
to-day. ' 



CHANCE PAIR CONVENTION DATE 

Vancouver, B. C, Dec. 12. — The date 
of the convention of the North Pacific Fair 
Association has been changed and will be 
held on Jan. IS and 19 in New Westmin- 
ster, B. C. 



LEWIS DROPS GERMAN MAKEUP 

Henry Lewis, the German dialect come- 
dian, has discarded his German make-up 
and dialect and now appears in "Doing 
Our Bit" at the Winter Garden as a 
"straight" comedian. 



HARRY WEBER 
Representing Only the Very Best in Vaudeville 



THEATRE CONTRACTS LET 

The Moredall Realty Company has let 
contracts for a six-story theatre and of- 
fice building on the southwest corner of- 
Broadway and Fifty-first street. 

WILL FURNISH OWN LIGHT 

The Shuberts will begin this week the 
construction of a kerosene fuel electric, 
generating plant in the basement of the 
Forty-fourth Street Theatre. 

"FLO FLO" ENGAGES MICHELENA 
Vera Michelena has been engaged by John ' 
Cort for the title role in "Flo Flo," which 
will have it's premiere at the Cort Theatre 
Thursday night 



8 



T HE NEW YORK C LtP PE R 



■': December 19» 1917 




«S ^ " Ci A Resume W1R& Past Accomplishments -arioSa 

What ilt Plans to Do • in the Near Future- -All 



r1917 

rorecast pf «» 



actor and the 
manager, to insure 
Justice to both, and 
to improve the lot of 
the vaudeville . per- 
former in every poeaible way— tht-Hc have 
been the ansa of the National Vaudeville 
Artists during the last year. And these 
aims will be followed out sincerely, and 
wholly during the on j just about to begin 
and those that follow. 

The practical work of the organisation 
lies largely in the settlement of disputes 
between pe rfor m ers , and between perform- 
ers and managers. In every dispute the 
aim is to be fair and Just to both parties, 
favoring neither one nor the other. This, 
during the last year, haa often been ex- 
tremely difficult, as, many times, the claims 
of both sides have been possessed of merit. 
In. such cases, every energy was devoted to 
reaching the truth of the matter, and giv- 
ing equity regardless of the labor involved. 
That the work of the association haa 
AUed a long-felt want in the vaudeville 
profession during the year just about to 
end may be shown by the fact that the 
N. Y. A. has settled, fourteen hundred and 
sixty disputes daring that time. Of these, 
eleven hundred were-between artists, and 
related largely to material. The other 
three hundred and sixty were between actor 
and manager, and dealt with contracts, un- 
paid salaries and similar differences. 

ONE of the most frequent causes of dis- 
pute between actors is the stealing 
or. innocent using of material, jokes, 
bits and business belonging to. another. 
And in these cases, because of the difficulty 
of obtaining actual documentary "evidence, 
judgment was extremely difficult of achieve- 
ment. ... 

The installation of the protected material 
department has largely solved this diffi- 
culty. Under this arrangement, the actor 
•ends at once, before he .has produced his 
act on any stage, a complete manuscript or 
description of it in every detail, explaining 
carefully each bit of business used. .This 
is submitted in a sealed envelope and Sled 
according to a card index system. 

At any time later, if the actor believes 
his material to be stolen, the envelope is 
opened, and its contents gone over by a 
committee appointed for this service. The 
act accused of plagiarism is then witnessed, 
and, if the contentions are found to be true, 
the guilty act is notified to cease using the 
bit under discussion. 

In enforcing decisions, the Vaudeville 
Managers' Protective Association works 
hand in glove with the N. V. A., and this 
gives the N. V. A. absolute power over all 
eneh disputes. ■ • — " " . 

In cases of alleged stolen material, where 
the act has not been registered in the pro- 
tected material department,- priority- of 
presentation is considered to give rights of 
ownership. The burden of proof here rests 
with the complaining party. If he can 
prove to the satisfaction of the committee 
that he used a certain piece of work before 
it was presented by another, the second 
user is stopped at once. 

It is to the credit of the vaudeville pro- 
fession that in practically every one of the 
eleven hundred cases settled daring the last 
year in which decisions on material have 
been made, there was nothing but good 
feeling on the part of both parties. . It was 
discovered in most cases that the infring- 
ment was usually caused by ignorance of 
the other's act. There has seldom been the 
need of any pressure being brought to en- 
force a decision. 

In the other three hundred and sixty 
cases, which were between actor and man- 
ager, the aid of the V. M . P. A. has also 
been invoked. The manager who was 
guilty of withholding a ' salary due' a per- 
former was forced by the association to pay 
up at once. Infractions of contract, on 
either side, were adjusted with the prin- 
ciples of equity always in mind, the object 
being to protect the manager as well as the 
actor. 



Aimed at the Betterment of Vaudeville 

yy/HILE these are the most important 



services rendered to the profession 
by the association, during the last 
year, many others of leaser scope have been 
put into effect, and plana are constantly 
being discussed and formulated whereby the 
members will profit more and more. 

In. the way of practical service, the care 
of. the destitute, dead, and disabled, has 
been one of the things which the associa- 
tion has always held in mind. Fortunately, 
there has not been much need of this service 
during the last. year, only fourteen burials 
having been conducted. The N. V. A. paid 
for. and took. care of all arrangements in 
these cases. 

Another aid to the actor is now being 
planned, and will soon be in practical 
operation. This will be the bureau .of 
advice and criticism, which is to be 
inaugurated shortly after the first of 
the year. 

- A committee of experts on vaude- 
ville is to be appointed and these 
.men will do everything in their 
power to help, the performer 
work his act into the best poe- 
aible -shape. — The-'-mett - who - 
make up the committee will be 
persons of long experience in 
the vaudeville field, and their 
criticisms will be thoroughly 

constructive and helpful. 
Any member of the society 
will be welcome to use 
this service whenever he 
desires it. 

The working out of 
this plan is' expected 
not only to help the 
aetor get better book- 
ings, but also to raise 
the entire standard of 
vaudeville. No act is 
perfect, not even the big- 
gest headline turns, and 
it is well known that the 
actor is usually the least 
qualified to judge his own 
work with an unbiased mind. 
Snch criticisms aa he gets at 
present are of "little aid. They 
tell him what is wrong with his 
act, but they do not tell him how 
to remedy- lt 

The bureau of advice will look 
carefully . at any act that is pre- 
sented, and will then hold a discus- 
sion. The results of this discussion 
win be conveyed to the actor, to- 
gether with practical suggestions' as to 
improvement. He will not be told that 
his act is ail wrong. He will be told to . 
eliminate this line, to change that bit of 
business, to get new '■ material, to make 
this exit at this place; in short, just 
what to do and how to do it. 




THIS service |"~~«™»» 
will be I 
free to all - 
members. 1 1 s j 
installation is ••■™-~~™» l ;^ u » u - UJ ~" i ™^"" , ™~' 
the result of a need long felt by all per- 
formers. An actor often comes into the 
club rooms distressed by some unfavorable 
criticism in a newspaper or by a manager 
or agent. He realizes that something is 
wrong with his act, bnt he. is at his wits' 
end to know what to do about it. 

In most cases he has worked for months 
to. raise it to its present shape, and fur- 
ther improvement is beyond his personal 
ability. Here the aid of experts, who have 
his interest at heart, will come in very 
handy. 

This branch of the N. V. A.'a service to 
its members will probably be one of the 
most useful and practical that has been 
devised. ■"-' " 

The members who have been told of its 
expected installation, have been heartily in 



BY HENRY CHESTERFIELD 
(Secretary N.y. A.) 



favor of it, and many have proclaimed it 
the greatest boon to thi actor that has yet 
been worked out. ' '. * *'" 

Bnt there are ether plans ahead for the 
coming year also. At present, the cramped 
quarters render much innovation a prac- 
tical impossibility. But, in the new club- 
house, which, according to all expectations, 
will be finished by the first of March, much 
more will be accomplished than ever before. 
One' of the things which is expected to 
prove of much service to the performer is 
the rehearsal hall, which will be fitted up 
as a minature theatre. Here 'the members 
can rehearse their acts and show them to 
persons interested. Here, also, the bureau 
of advice can see them in actual perform- 
ance, and this will enable its members to 
give much fuller and more valuable criti- 
cism than either reading a '"manuscript 
or seeing the turn in a theatre would 
do. ' The act which is . undergoing im- 
provement will be allowed to show as 
many times as is necessary to bring 
it np to standard. . - .=• 

A complete and convenient place 
wherein the actor can demonstrate 
his ability has always been needed 
by the professi-n, and this nov- 
elty is expected to prove ex- ' 
ceedingly popular. 

A thing which has consider- 
ably harmonized the dealings 
between the actor and the 
manager is the equity con- 
tract which is now being 
used in nearly. all_ cases. 
This was adopted in a 
series of conferences be- 
tween our representa- 
tives and those of the 
managers, and every 
concession that was 
fair and just was made 
by both parties. Aa a 
result, this contract is 
about the last word in 
equity. The legitimate 
branch of the theatrical 
profession recently adopted 
this step, and we hope that 
all other branches will see the 
need of this important agree- 
ment. Its adoption has wiped 
out many disagreements, and we 
' hope, in time, that it win be so 
-improved as to make from its 
.very nature all quarrels impossible. 
- Other things which will be taken 
up in the coming year will be the 
bettering of conditions in small time , 
houses, the socialization of the profes- 
sion; and the demonstration to the gen- 
eral public that vaudeville artists are 
ladies and gentlemen, and not the low 
order of people that is still in some quar- 
ters supposed; In some theatres the 
.1 '-...,..i— ...... ,..i-i..i. I rn n m a are 

! badly kept, 
■ and this is - 



"T" 



a 
I greater incon- 
venience to the 
actor playing there than might be im- 
agined. It is largely the result of care- 
lessness on the part of the manager, and 
we hope to wipe it out entirely during 

- the' coming year. Conditions in theatres 
are. better than they have ever been be- 

"fore, "but we desire to have constant im- 
provement. 

With the new club house it is expected 
that closer bonds of fraternity between 
the artists will be effected.^ All of the 
pe rf ormers are really working together 
now, and constant rivalry and enmity 
between them only work to the harm 
of the whole profession. The power of 
personal acquaintance which the . new 
house wiU bring into being should do 
much to solidify the relations between all 
members - of the society. 



- AQ 

Tflis clubhouse will 
undoubtedly be the 
finest in New York. 
No expense has been 
spared, the object 
: t being to make it aa 
' perfect and com- 

ibrtable as possible. 

A special feature of the new house will 
be the accommodations for ladies who be- 
long to the society. It is estimated that 
at least fifty per cent, of the profession 
is made np of the feminine element, and 
they, therefore, deserve to be shown aa 
much attention in the drawing up of the 
plans as the men. ; ,'- 

Hany private parlors are to. be in the 
new house, where they can have absolute 
quiet and rest whenever . they- desire to 

- come in. Maids will be always in attend- 
ance in these sections of the club, and 
the lady artists can have meals served 
privatelyv.if they desire. . 

Hitherto, clubs where the membership 

.-was both male and female have been 

usually . built with great regard for the 

men: but' little for the women, for some 

unknown .reason. -The N. V. A. desires 

.to give a. perfectly even deal, and we are 

- sure that" women wfll gain just as many 
benefits from the new home as will the 
men. . - -•: 

•' ./ ■-' -. '• - -. . ; .* 

EVERYTHING in the new house will 
he owned by the hT. V. A. This wffl 
include the restaurant, the bar, cigar 
stands, news stands, and all other such 
conveniences. There will be 'ho letting 
out of -these privileges to persons ■ whose 
Only desire is to cheat as thoroughly as 
possible." The fact, that nothing will be 
sold except by the society itself will in- 
sure fair prices, good treatment, and the 
best of service. 

The cuisine will be-in the hands of first 
class cooks, and, as the aim will be to 
make the dining room. of service rather 
than as a means of profit, the members 
will be able to obtain as good a dinner 
as at any hotel in the city, and at much 
lower prices, right in the clubhouse. 

A reading room which will contain 
books of value will also be a feature. Our 
present cramped quarters make it impos- 
sible to provide any reading matter ex- 
cept the periodicals. The new one will 
be in the nature of a complete and well 
selected library, where the members can 
come and read or study in peace and . 
quiet. 

We hope during 1918 and the years to 
f oUow to prove to the world at large that 
the vaudeville profession contains a larger 
per cent, of ladies and gentlemen than . 
any other single profession: Persons who 
are familiar with the facts know this to 
be the case, hut it is still doubted by the 
general public; 

That the performer is generous, kind- 
hearted and public-spirited to a great 
degree is a fact with which all in the 
profession are acquainted. He is usually 
so generous as to make himself easily im- 
posed upon - by the unscrupulous. That 
he is patriotic is demonstrated by the 
fact that over three-quarters of a million 
dollars' worth of Liberty Bonds were 
bought by. members of this organization. 

To raise the tone of the profession 
even higher and to make the conditions 
in it such as are fair and reasonable are 
our main aims for next year: And we 
are thoroughly confident that they will 
be completely realized. 



EVERY energy wfll be devoted to this 
end. and nothing will be left undone 
to bring such a condition about. In 
fact, the hope is uppermost that a condi- 
tion of harmonious co-operation may be 
fostered such as has never existed in 
years gone by between performers and 
their employers. It has already - been 
stimulated and quickened, and there is no 
reason why it should not -increase until 
all traces of former conditions that re- 
tarded the progress of all concerned are 
wiped out v . . •-'.;..'..: •'; _ ' 



December 19, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 




DALLAS HOUSE 

■DEStROTED 

BY FIRE 



WILL BE TOTAL LOSS 



Dallas, Tex., Dec.' 14. — The Majestic 
Theatre here burned down. Wednesday 
night, and, as far as can be told at present, 
will result in a total loss. The cause of 
the fire is not knowm ..The theatre was 
one of the Interstate houses. 

' All the acts playing there are at present 
appearing at the Grand, the local legiti- 
mate house, which happened to be dark at 
' the time. Several theatres were offered 
to the manager, Stephen Von Pool. 



At the offices of the Interstate in New 
York, Celia Bloom, booking manager, 
stated that she was' waiting for further, 
details of the fire and. had not. heard, as 
yet, just how great, was. the damage. 

The Interstate had been contemplating 
building a new theatre in Dallas for some 
time, but, on account of the scarcity of la- 
bor and materials was postponing the step . 
until later. The destruction of the Ma- 
jestic will probably hasten the construction 
of the new one. 

The Majestic was in the centre of the 
city, in the best possible location. > It was 
quite an old house and has beeni booked 
by. the Interstate for several years. 

Bert LaMont, vaudeville producer, re- 
ceived a wire from Dallas which stated 
that his act, "The Race of Man,": playing 
the Majestic Wednesday, suffered- a com- 
plete loss, all scenery and properties hav- 
ing been destroyed. 



LOEW GETS NEW HOUSE 

Memphis, Tenu., Dec. IT. — Marcus Loew 
has added the Princess Theatre here to his 
list of houses, and it win be opened Dec 
23 with a high-class picture policy. It has 
been extensively remodeled. A. B. Morri- 
son, who has recently been assistant man- 
ager of Loew's Lyceum Theatre here, will 
manage the new house, which will be called 
Loew's Princess. 



PRODIGIES TO TOUR ENGLAND 

Cora Youngblood's instrumentalists, 
known as the "Oklahoma Prodigies,** are 
about to sail for London, England, for a 
concert tour of Great Britain. Glen Con- 
don, editor of the Tulsa (Okla.) World, 
will accompany them as press representa- 
tive. They will return to the, United 
States in August. 



LeMAIRE ENLISTS IN NAVY 

Rufus R.' LeMaire, who. arranges the 
Sunday night concerts at the Winter Gar- 
den, has enlisted as a first-class yeoman 
in the U. S. Naval Reserve. Mr. LeMaire 
is at present stationed in Brooklyn, and 
until transferred elsewhere will continue 
his activities at the Winter Garden. 

O'MEARAS RETURN TO LOEW 

The Gliding CMearas have returned to 
the Loew time after playing several weeks 
for the U. B. O. They opened at the Amer- 
ican last Monday for a full week and are 
booked for the Loew Circuit. 

BROWNING AND DAWSON FORM ACT 

Billy Browning, formerly of Browning 
and Dean, and Ben DawsOn, formerly of 
Lemaire and' Dawson,- have formed a new 
act and make their first New York appear- 
ance next Monday at the American Theatre 
for a tour of the Loew time. 

LOEW GETS KNAPP AND CORNALLA 

Knapp and Cornalla have signed for. a 
tour of the Loew Circuit. They open next 
Monday at the American Theatre. 

. Appearing with 



SEVERAL BILLS CHANGE '.. 

Several changes in bills took place last 
Monday at the vaudeville, houses. Cecil 
Cunning ham could , not .-appear at the 
Riverside Theatre on account of illness 
and Dorothy Toye. replaced her. 

Dooley and Nelson did not open at the" 
Colonial Monday matinee on account of a 
delay in the arrival of their trunks- and 
Emmett Devoy and Company replaced 
them. .., .._■ , 

Lyons and Yobco could not appear in 
the number two spot at the Monday mati- 
nee at the Palace on account of the non-- 
arrival of the harp used in the act, but 
found it in time to appear later. At the 
evening performance they were on second. 
. At toe Alhambra Theatre, Randall and 
Meyers appeared as per billing, although 
: they were out of the bill at the Colonial 
Theatre after last Thursday night's show. 

The Bushwick, Royal and Orpheum The- 
atres ran the ehaws as originally sched- 
uled. 



N. V. A. WANTS POLITE ACTORS 

A new poster adorns the entrance to 
the N. V. A. club rooms, it being an idea 
of Secretary Chesterfield. It is entitled 
"A Lesson in Politeness,*' and portrays 
President Wilson, showing his .card to the 
attendant, also a "Hick" actor presenting 
his" version of a similar request. R. H. 
Kahili y designed the poster land Happy 
Mack posed as the "Hick" actor. 
"The Gloom Chasers in Hard Luck," to 
open on U. B. O. time under the direction 



EDESON REHEARSING NEW SKETCH 

Robert Edeson has in rehearsal a new 
sketch entitled "Jewels." The skit is a 
comedy and requires three people. It will 
be given an out-of-town try-out and then' 
be brought to New York. 



EXPECT APPEAL 

IN MERCEDES 

JUDGMENT 

PANT AGES CLAIMS RIGHTS 



. Los Angeles, Dec. 17. — Attorneys for 
Alexander Pantages here are considering 
an appeal on the decision rendered last 
week in the case' of Mercedes and Mile. 
Stantone, against Pantages. Although the 
decision was given in favor of Mercedes, 
the attorneys feel that they are neverthe- 
less legally right in the matter, and be- 
lieve that an appeal may result in a re- 
versal of judgment. 

Pantages alleged a breach of contract, 
and attempted to restrain Mercedes from 
appearing at the Orpheum here. Mercedes 
claimed to have been released from the 
' contract in October, but stated that he 
continued to appear on the Pantages time 
in order to oblige the manager until some 
one could be found to take his place. 

Pantages began action by getting out an 
injunction against the performer to pre- 
vent his appearing it the Orpheum. The 
injunction was dissolved. in the middle of 
the week, but Mercedes nevertheless did 
not appear, as the Vaudeville Managers' 
Protective Association of New York 
ordered the manager of the house to re- 
fuse to allow Mercedes to appear there 
-until the lawsuit was settled. 

The court decision gave Mercedes the 
right to appear on any vaudeville time in 
the country. He brought up no witnesses, 
although Pantages had ■ seven present. 





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MARSHALL SUES FORD SISTERS 

Henry I. Marshall has filed suit to re- 
cover $2,000 said to have been lost by 
him, through the inability pi tbe Ford 
Sisters to live up to their contract with 
him. •' ; 

According to an agreement made be- 
tween them Marshall was to lay out a 
singing and dancing turn for the sisters 
and himself. Marshall was to receive 
33 1/3 per cent, of - each week's ' salary. 
The act was booked over* the U. B. 6. 
time, but On Dec 1 the sisters abandoned 
the contract and refused to appear with 
him. They also cancelled all bookings. 

The sisters have filed a denial, and the 
ease will come up shortly. Nathan Burk- 
an represents Marshall. 



DO ACTS IN STREET CLOTHES | 

Two acts on the bill at the Audubon 
Theatre, the first half were forced to go 
on in street clothes, owing to delay In 
getting their baggage. The first, "Lincoln 
of the U. S. A.," did its turn in their 
street clothes, while in the second, "Miss 
Melancholy," every one waa in costume 
but the king. 

HAVE NEW ACT 

Marven Chester and Elsie Wheeler 
have a new act entitled "The Look Alike 
Girls," which will open shortly. The act 
carries special scenery and an .expensive 
wardrobe. Miss Chester was formerly in 
Lasky's "Three Types" and Miss Wheeler 
was- in "The Green Beetle." 



NEW PARTNERSHIP FORMED 

William Lytell and Minnie Palmer 
have formed a partnership, and will be 
in the future associated in all theatrical 
matters. The agreement was signed In 
the presence of John R. Rogers. The two 
will be next seen in a vaudeville act en- 
titled "My Sweetheart," 

NEW FIRM IS FORMED 

Harry Smith and Irving' Lee bare 
formed a partnership to put out several 
of Lee's own vaudeville productions. The 
DeForest Girls and Mystifying Gillette 
acts are now playing and "The Actress 
and the Peddler" and "The Two' Urchins" 
are in preparation. 



MARTIN ACT IS BOOKED 

Jack Martin and Company, presenting 
a novelty dancing, act with three people, 
has just been booked for a long run of 
Western vaudeville. Martin dances with 
one leg. -The act carries a special setting. 
It is under the direction of Jack Llnder. 



PRODUCER TO GIVE DINNER 

The actors in "From Quakertown to 
Broadway," playing Washington naxt 
week, are to receive a Christmas dinner at 
the expense of the producer, B. D. Berg, 
who will journey to that eity for the pur- 
pose of playing the host 



BROOKS HAS NEW ACT 

Marty Brooks has in preparation a one- 
act musical comedy entitled "The Fly 
Guys," written by Eddie Clark, author of 
"De Luxe Annie." Nine people are in 
the cast. It Will open in January. 



NEW RUBE ACT OPENS 

"The Corn Cob Cut-Ups," a rube act 
employing ten men, under the direction of 
Charles Bornhaupt, opened out of town 
last week. It has ten weeks' booking on 
the U. B. O. time. 



MISS CONNIE CRAVEN 

much success in Wm. B. FriedUnqrjr's production, "THE RECKLESS EVE" 



BENWAY FORMS NEW ACT 

A. .P. "Happy" Benway, who recently 
closed his Twentieth Century Minstrel 
act, has formed. a partnership with Pete 
Mullen and will do a new act entitled 
Of Pete Mack. 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



December 19, 1917 



THE SERVICE FLAG 

(No profession throughout the world has answered the call of the colors as freely and willingly as has the theatrical 
profession. Actors, stage hands, electricians, playwrights, all have heard the summons to free the world of autocracy. 
Some have already given up their lives. Others may never return. In the following list, we have tried to furnish our 



Adams, Chaa. W. 
Adams, Bailer 
Arnold, S. J. 
A: well, Lionel 
Agerd. Hares 
Attle. Joseph M. 
Arnold, Harold Victor. 
Armstrong. Tbomss 3. 
Andrea, Joseph 
Angiitis, William 
Anderson, Frank 
Allen. Carl. A. , 
Alfred. Julian 
Archalnbanf. George 
Anthony. Clifton S. 
Austin. Don 



Barker. William 
Bar.o-v. Reginald 

Harli-tt, Eddy 
barrif . - Nigel 
Li-11. liobln. T. 
faeulhani. M. S. 
Bluu.lell. M. 
BodW.ieinier, Sydney 
Boyton, Harry - ■ 
Bndd. Harry 
Saddle, Henry B. 
Broodhunrt. assail 
Brooks. Harvey B. 
Brown. Van o. 
Brace, Albert' 
Buchanan. Thompson 
Bettlebelm, IS. 8. 
Bettlebelm. Spencer D. 
Hurt ess. W. H. 
Budde. Harry H. 
Bernstein, Nat. 
BalcH: B. 3. 
Brady, S. E. 
Banman. Loals 
Block. G. B. 
Booth. K. J. 
Berger, Harry 
Brandon, Edward J. 
Brant. Herbert 
BUt. DM 
Bird. Thomas 
Boothe. Earle 
BUas. Gordon L. 
Baker. Sergt. Peter J. 
Black, -Fred M. 

Barns. II. R. 
Bruckner. Max. Jr. 
Battle. George E. 
Bracco, Paol 
Boyd. Clasde 1~ 
Black. ■William 
Boyer. Bennle 
Bernstein. Elliott 
Blett, Wilfred 
Byrnes. ' Jack 
Boiler. Harry 
Backley. Harry 
Bxoer. Ernest 
Bnrbank, Sam. 
Brllant. Solly 
Burke. Bay 
Rodlngton. Manrlee B. 
Brooks, George 
Benton, Charles B. 
Blome, Norman A. 
Beeeman. Dwight 
Brennan. Martin 
Rransky. Harold 
Bowers. Abe. 
Bnrrldge. William E. 
Rierbauer. Charles 
Brllant Arthur B. 
Revsn*. Lionel 
Bntterfleld. Everett 
Brahm. Horace 
"Reltew. Cosmo 
Blackton, J. Sroart. Jr. 
Berzmsn, Helmer W. 
Renthsm. M. S. 
Blsche. Msnrlce 
Brunston. Douglas. 



CsMn. Leonard 

(Bob Toungl 
CalTitt, Gordan 
Caoman, Loot* P. 
Carter. Frank 
Chadwlck. Crydl 
Cbapln, Lee 



Adams. Eddie 
Anderson. Chaa. G. 
Anderson, George W. 
An* tin, Leslie 
Altken, Robert I. 
Allen, Chaa. 
Applnstllle, A. 
Abbott, E. G. 
Addison, D. af. - 
Allen. W. H. 
Armstrong, E. B. 
Adams. Franklin P. 
Alner .Sallie 
Anderson. Ray 
Anstett, Bobby 
Amber. F. 



Brooks, Ted. 

Berry, C, L. 

BDCbaar, A. E. 
Brown. H. H. 
Barney, Frank 
Bengel. William 
Barard, Loals 
Ball. Arthur 
Bernd. A. B. 
Rassett. Albert 

Bull, B. O. 
Babb. Mackar 
Backus. J. W. 
BaRlnger. T. P. 
Bannon, B. If. 
Barber. Stewart E. 
Berkley, A. H. 
Barnes. James 
Beachem. J. W. 
Beares. H. I. 
Beecber. J. S. 
BerryhlU. T. A. 
Bingham. G. S. 
Bishop. Loals W. 
Blamer. D. W. 
Began, 8. W. 
Bowne. W. B. 
Brabam, Horace 
Bristol. A. L. 
Brown, George P. 
Brown, Thoa. H. 
Bulmer, Bayard T. 
Broker, P. P. 
Babbitt. Dr. Then. P. 
Basaett. peter 
Beresford, J. Cooke 
Bernstein. 3d". Mor. 
Bevans, Lionel ' 
BInme. Norman A. 
Brabam, Horace 
Brongbton. Lewis 
Berren. Herman 
Blerbaner, Charlie 
Bottomley, Roland 
Bolts. L. 
Bonnet, Harry 
Brown, H. 
Brlgxs. John 
Brasher, B. E. 
Brown, Rnaeell J. 
Bingham. 0. R. 
Baker, Ben. 
Bits' Gordon L. 
Blackton. "Buster" 
Bingham Oliver 
Beck. Morton 

Basin. Henri. 

Barron. William 
Boas. Edward 
Breharry, B. A. 
Bird. Lyndon 
Breltenfeld. Emit 
Brenna, Bar 
Backley, Harry 
Barkaa, Sonny 
Blanton, Chris, s. 
Brook*. Harry 
Berrens. Herman 
Bodkin, Arthnr 
Brace. Air. 
Barke. Donglss 



Clarke, Frank H. 
Carter, Thomas 
Clocks, C Carroll 
Clime, W. S. 
Crone. Johr 
Cambell. Colin 
Core. Ernest G. 



Clsggett, 8. R. 
Colby, Arthur Allen 
Collins, Sandy (C. M. 

ConieU,* John 
Conner, Back 

Consollor. L. L. 
Cooper. L. M. 
Cooper, Al 
Crisp, lack 
Croft. Join 
Crotta, Chaa. H. 
curtls, Bert Lee 
Chambers, If. W. 
Carpenter, Laurence 
Clark. Frank H. 
Campbell, Bertie 
Campbell. Harry 
Campbell, Donald 
Clinton. Stewart S. 
' ClLTke, Jat'.es 
Crosaby, William 
Cohan, Mack If. 
Coon. Leo. 
easier. Dan. 
Cooper. Jimmy 
Colt, RnsaeO G. 
Cbeny,' J. J 1 . 
Cahn. Leo. 
Castle, L. Andrew 
Curtis, Llnwood 
Cbamberlin. HaroM 
Callahan. Bobby 
Crocker, Henry 
Chambers. Manton W. 
Chapln, Lee 
Carlton, Sam 
Curtis. Dick 
Conway, Jack 

Cnneo, Lester 
Carter, Tom 
Conner. C. W-. 
Chain, Dell 
Clayton. Jerry 
Craig. Alec Y. 
Chm-chil, 'Ben. 
Corbett, Frank 
Castle, Andrew 
Connery, Wm. P. 
Conklln. James 
Carroll. Earl 
Cohan. Willi* 
Cantwell, Bernard 
Connelly," Thoa. J. 
Craig, Alex. 



Cole. Owen G. 

Chadwlck. Cyril 
Cochrane. Duncan R. 
Carey, Charles C. 
Couner, J. Bryar 
Carmody, H. F. 
Clare, Richard 
Conlon, T. Ralph 
Crane. Odgen 
Carroll. Alfred E. 

Crane, Gardner 
Chester, E. F. 
Coleman. Charles 
Campbell, Donald 
Casey, Chss. Catron 
Carlock. -Wm. 
Cllne. R. L. 
Clappan, L. T. 

Cummlngs, Robert 
Carey. Edward 
Cameron, H. 
Cardenas, Oscar 
Carrol. Earl 
Clayton. Jlmmle 
Crane. Gardner 
Cbamberlin. Paol E. 
Chandler. C. de F. 
Clomen. S. A. 
Coflln, J. M, 
Colby. Fred B. 
Collins, Edw. 
Corbln. CIsrenee 

Craodall. R. Percy 
Crane, - Gardner 
Crapo, George R. 
Craven, Joseph 
Croxton, Joseph 
Croxton, Richard C. 

Carrol, Albert 
Crist, Jack 
Carlton, Sam 
Curtis, Al. 
Curtis, Dick 
Crane, Hamiltoi 
Coden. Billy 
Carpenter, Billy 
Caatellane, Gas. 
Carpentler, Edward 
Clark, Charles Rob 
CUB*. Laddie 
Cloudman, Wm. H. 
Coleman. John 
Combennore, Edw. 
Cossart, Ernest 



Daley, Harry L. 
Daltoo, Harry 
Darla. Hal 
Dayton. Edward 

Dempsey, Paul 
Dtemer, Paol 

Drew. 8. TtanYtn 
Donning. Phillip 
De Costa, E. u. ■ ■ 
Dempsey. Past 
Daly. John' T. 
De Gaerra, Vincent 

Vowao, A. P. Sergt., 
Damm. Emil A. - 
Duckworth. W. J. 
De Lanrentils. M. 
Datton, Edward 
Dooley. Tom 
DeTereani. Jack 
Dnnlop. R. H. 
Paris. H. 8. 
J>letch. Sydney A. 
Donoelly. Leo 
Dwrer. (Dwyer A' 

Oliver) 
Dale. Dan 
Dench. Hal 
Davis. Frank 
Dorm. Ad. 
Downes. C"L. Lt. 
Desmond. Eaireoe If. 
Dillingham. C. B. 
Demnsey. Panl 
Dobbs. Harry L.- 
Dllts. Dlamondo 

VHn". Lionel 

Dallev. Kenneth 
Ps'-'dson. Jack 
Dovle. Albert 
PaMherg. Rav 
Dalby, Alfred R. 



Edmunds, Joe - 
Edwards, William 



Driscoll, Thoa. Barton 
Dntton, Edward. 
Davidson, David ■ 
Doncette, " Earnest 
De Becker, Harold 
Doherty. Pat 
Dwyer,- Walter . 
Davidson. William B. 
De Bondy. Fred D. 
Dnrand. Camlfle > -. 
Derwent. Clarence 
Dillon. John AT 
Dalty, Alfred E. 
Devereaox, Jack 
Denny, Reginald 
Drew, S. w^..ih„ 
Davis, J.-.B, . 
Pellerocca, Tony 
. Drne. Eugene 
Pnrkee; Joseph 
Day. Hsrrr L 

Desmond. P hill to 

Darts. Hilton F. 

Dean. Warren 

rwstelgner. L. B. 

Plck^on. Trscy C. 

TVmlds. W. H_ Jr. 

Doberrv. U. W. B. 

Dowell. J. S. 

Drooniard. Jas. 7. 

Dunn. John If. 

Dean. Jaek 

Dfxon. Thomas W. 

De Vare, Emlle 
i Del man. Jack 
. 'Pari*. Earl 
' Dun can . T. B. 
-Daly. Joe 

Dnrant, Camllle 

Drake. John 
•Downing, Harry 



English. Granville 
Egan. Raymond 



Elnstlen, Larry 
Rlsenberg. Lew 
Elliot, Cary 
Ellis, Ward Ray 
Bngelke. Rlcuard 
Bsta. J. D. 
Evans, J. W. 
Eddy. Claude 
Eadale, Charles 
Evans. Jack 
Edelfceit. Harry 
Evans, Lee Well* 



Fanning. John 
r'arlcy, Arthur 
l-orley. Will F. 
rarreil, Frank 
t'arrlugton. Clifford 
Fernando, Fred 
Fsvri. Tony 
Field. S. 
Fish, tieorg e f. 
Footc, John Talnter 
Flrnn, Dan 
Flynn, Packy (Grady 

Lynn) _ 

Friedman. Ben B. 
Fleming, Thomas J. 
Flnley. Horace If. 
Franklin, BenJ. H. 
Friedman. Herman 
Ferris, Bobert 
Frltxgerald, James 
Fowler, Herman C. 
Fields. Joseph 
Fleming. Claude 
Flaherty, William A. 
Flnneran, Jean 
Franklin. Bennle 
Felgley. Harry F. 
FlnneQl, Antonio 
Flnhrer. G. B. 
Fuller. Donald 
Falknes, George 
FoUansbee, Slanaoo 
FarreB, Duke 
Flnck. Max 
Fleming, Victor C. 
French. B, B. 



EUla. Bobert 
elagar. Le»'Ia 
fcjaklne, Laurie G. 
Lxtrier, Herbert 
Elliott. Frank T. 
tstrelch. Max 
Edwards, G. M. 

Edwards. W. Atlee 
bills, Richard T. 
Ecklond. I_ 

Evans, toy 



I'lnneran. James J. 
Franz, Stuart 
Ferraro. Alfred 
Foley (Foley A O'Nell) 
Fo«l, Leo 
Ferragnlo, James 
Ford, Thomas J. 
Flalkow. F. W. 
Flynn, Jack 
Fltxscrald. Jack 
FUreUe, Edger 
Farrlngton, Frank 
Foote, Ooartenay 
Frohman, Loals H. 
Ford. Sterrett 
Fits. Cnthbert S. 
Fields. Arthnr B. 
Flatoro. Leon 
Ford, Shadow 
Falconer, W. M. 
Fanntleroy. A. M. 
Fergnsson. F. E. 
Fischer, H. E. 
Fisher, Charles L. 

Freeman. -1*. H. 
Fisher. H. C. (Bad) 
Flemming. Clauds 
Foreman, Frank 
Frauds, Charles 
Ferdlnando. Rowden B. 
Farren. Joe 
Fllnton, L. B. 
Forman, Tom 
FltrgeraW, Leo 
Flaher. Bob 



Glegerleh. Leonard i 

Goraen, Paol 

Gordon, Willie 

Goes. Job. C 

Graham, Stephen 

Grainger. Percy 

Gray, L. M. 

Greene, Eddie 

Grossman. Al 

Groaman, Jack 
.Gregory. J. A. 
.Gondllng. Edmund 

Gettlngs. Michael 

Grlffen. Martin 

Gorman, Frank 

Greaham. Dndley K. 

Glenn. Harold 

Goldman. Samuel 

GaRabektrw. Lola 

Greenfield. Saul J. Y, 

Griffith. James A. 

Gentile. Ernest 

-Gorman, James, Jr. 

Grimes. Rollin 

Green. Howard. J. 

Gardiner. David 

Graham. George 

Gray, Tommy 

Grimes, Jimmy 

Grace. Billy 

Grlesz, Walter 

Gordon. Charles 

Gallagher. T. J. 

Gradwell. C. B. 

Grace. Bllty - 

Gannon. Thoa. - -• 

Grossman, Henry 

Goodman. Danny 

Gnber, Alex 

Gibson, George 

Griffin (Chits. A Grit. 

GoWsworthy. John. 

Gompers, Henry - 

Goldenberr. HaroM 

Gannon.- Harry 

Green. Lent* 



Hall. C. Porter 
Halperln. Max 



b Greensehlage. Charles 

Grady, Edward 

Glick, Loals 

Glover, James 

Graf. Henry 

Glick, Albert 

Graham, George 

Gayer, Bchlin 

Glover, Oliver 

Grant, Laurence 

GUI, Bobert Stowe 

Grieg. Algernon 

Graham,' George 

Graydon, Laurie 

Glllman. Chaa. J. 

Goodrich. John 

Gonstram. Henry 

Godwin. Clifton 

Guerney, O. E. 
'. Granville. Bernard 

Gorman. James 

Gartner. Chaa. 

Goodrich. Joseph 

Globe, Walter 

Goldstein. Monroe M. 

Gray, John 

Gold. R. 

Gate*. Hal E. 

Geiser. Hal 

Glck. Albert 

Gllka, Al 

Gilford. W. 

Goldstein. Nathan 

Gnstafson. Harry 

Goodwlo. Gna 

GlUis. Stephen E. 

Griffin. E. Elliott 

Grooms, Stanley 

Carton. W. M. 

Gara John 
) GI111. J. B. 

Gleeson. M. C. Rev. 
■ Glenn. COL E. I*. 
'"•' Qteen- John B. 

Greene. Capt. B. A. 

Gnllck, Mason L. 

H ■ ' 
Hsrklns. Larry 
Hehn. Carl 



Halperln. Frank 
Hamilton. Dak* 
Hammer, Louis 
Hsnley. C Vernon 
Hareonrt, George 
Hardy, w. H. 
Hartzel, Alfred 
Hawks. WeUa 
High, Louis 
Hill. George 

Bodgdon, Kit 

Holms, B. 
Houston. Jack 
HoweU, Leroy 
Hughes, Joe 
Hanley, Jack 
HUlman, John F. 
Harris, BenJ. 
Hamilton. Barry 
Handte, Fred 
Hodder. Clinton F. 
Hallabaa. William 
Hansteln, Lambert 
Barter, 0. P. 
Baeale. Leo M. 
Hatler. Lynn W. 
Hill, Jacob 
HUIery, Andrew 
Bnmphrey. B. J. 
em, Joseph r. 

Hunt, Charles 
Hodalns. William 
Halllday. Stewart 
Hunter, J. L. 
Holloway, George 
Howard, Bobby 
Harris, Herbert 
Howard, Bobert 
Harmon, Raymond 
Howard, George 
Hamilton, Harry 

Houston. Jack 
Hickman, Walter 
Hughes, James B. 
Horner, Mickey 
Hunt, Jess 
Hanley, Jlmmle 
Hugo. Chester 
Hodder, Clinton 
Hoffman, D. 
Harrison, Harry 
Hanloo, Fred 
Hunter, Jack H. 



Izaat. Bobert 
Irey. L. B. 
Imlach, Charles 



Hartman, Edward 
Hodder, Clinton 
Hares, Walter 
HoUlns. Art 
Hagen, Barney 
Holding, Thomas 
Harden, Thomas c. 
Halllday. Barbour 
H1U, Frank 
Hall. Frank 
HadOeld. Harry S. 
Hellrlegle, WUllan 
Henry, Jack 
Hodgson. Jack 
Hopkins, John A 

Harrlgan, William D. 
Hooper. Lewis 
Hay. levins; 
Harwood. John 
Hasscll. George 
HoweU. Bert 
Huganln, H. Les 
Henulsy, W. N. 

sulttCssUllAOsfcaL *T> 

Bongate, Pierre 
Houghton, Robert 
Hannahn, Jo*. 
Halford, Frank 
Hall. A. M. Capt 
Hand, Daniel W. 
Barbeson, J. P. 
Herman. Lester 
Billiard. B. Bell 
Hooker, R. 8. 
Hooner. Lewis 
Hough, r. p. w. 
Houston. J. B. 
Hurst. Brandon 
Huston, Thoa. L. 
Hoban. Walter C. 
Hodgdon. Raymond F. 
Hunter, Kenneth 
Hnstlon, T. L. 
Harrison, PblUp 
Hookallo, Fred 
Hlgglns, V. 
Hamilton. Geo. 
Henry. Joseph 
Helnerle. H. Jr. 
Hennessy. Wm. S. 
Hsrrison. Ben 
Holrman, Bennle 
Hogan, Albert H. 



Icard. Forrest ' 
Irving. Pete 



Jackson, Alfred Johnson, Kenneth 

James. Louis Jewell, Ben 

Jefferis, S. Wicker- Jacobs. William 



sham, Jr. 
Johnson. George C 
Jackson. Charles B. 
Jones, Dave 
Jacob*. Frank J. 
James, Arthnr 
Jackson. Raymond 
Johnson, Wadswortb 
James. W. P. 
Jennings. Percy 

O'Malley 
Jodsoo. Basil 
Jual, Ralph 



Kemp, Harold 
Kelly. Edward J. 
KeUy, Thomas E. 
Kendall. Guy 
Kwitahotr, Ed. Jr. 
Klelnfeldt. Herman 
Kay. William B. 
Kelly, Barney 
King. Charlie 
Bundle (S Bundles) 
Kslser. Norman 
Kelly. John M. 
Knowles. Bert 
Kelly. Joe 
Kaon. Leo M. 
Ksoffmsn. Al 
Kline. Theodore 
Kenaak. Stanley L. 
Keyes, Don B. 
Kent, Edgar 
Kelly. John 



Lothian. Robert 
Lerlne. Maurice 
La Monica, James H. 



Jacobson, Chas. A. 
Johnson, Clarence 
Jeanette. Bob 
Johnson, Fred 
Johnson, T. A. 
Jefferson. Frank 
Jordan. R. H. 
Jordan, W. B. 
Juroe, B. Harry 
Jones, D. W. 
Johnson. A. 
Jacolow, Lew 
Jordan, B. 



Kelly. James F. 
Kennedy. Charles 
Kolvoord. John, Jr. 
Kenny, Sam 
Kelghtley. Cyril 
Kramer. Wright 
Klrkpatrlck, Herbert 
Bolster, ' Clarence 
Kreer. George. 
Kalrf. Herman 
Kenly. W. L. 
Kimberly, Allen W. 
King. Jno. C. 
Klpp. H. H. MaJ. 
.Klrkpatrlck. G. W. 
Kavanagh. B. C. 
Knower, F. L. 
Kennedy, Cbas. H. 
Keeton. R. T. 
Kay, Emanuel 



Le May. Pierre 
Lelser. O. M. 

Lazsno, John 



SOME WHO HAVI 



E. GIBSON 



u 



ERICMAXON 



ARTHUR BERTELLA 



BERT HARDING 



][ 



ALAN J. MINNS 



1 



***¥¥¥**¥*¥*¥¥¥**¥*** * ■¥■ * •¥■ * -¥> ■¥- ■¥• ¥ 



December 19, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



11 



:•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• 



DF THE PROFESSION 

readers with the names of some of those, at least, who have either been drafted or who have joined in some branch of 
the service. Hundreds upon hundreds have gone "over there" of whom no record has been made. The field is so large 
that it is practically an impossibility to know of all and only until the world struggle is over will their names be known.) 



Livingston, Lou M. 
Levy. Lester A. 
Lorkowskl. J. M. 
Leaner, Due 
LebeU. Cliff. 
Laurence, Charles 
Laiar, L. (Mazapa) 
Lcoaj, Kerre 
Levy. Joe 
Utterfield. Lnclen 
Locke. Ralph 
London, Jack (Yaude- 

Tllle pert.) 
Lott, J. W. 
Luce. H. P. 
Loescher, Mark 
Leary. Noised 
Lea. Frank P. 
Lag-en. Marc A. 
Lgvett, Geo. E. 
Jen-ay , Eddie ■ • 
Leach, Charles Joseph 
Lothian. Robert 
Lynton, W. Mayne 
Lee. Eddie 
Lorraine, Prank G. 
Loess. C. Can-Ill 
Lee. John 
Lewis, Monte 
Levy, Sim 
Lee. Wnile 
Lee. Rowland 
Loensberry, James 
Lloyd. Frederick 
levy, Jos. 
Usage. Ernest 
Llord. Roy L. 
Lawler, John A. 
Lone Walter H. 
Lear. Herman 
Longhboroagh. R. 
Lynch, George R. 



Lowy. William 
Lamond, Jack 
Lux, Arthur 
Lewis, Roy H. 

Le BruD. Lou 
Lewis, Morgan 
Uttle. James T. 
LJnehan. Walter J. 
Lore, Montague 
Lambdln, W. McK. 
Leahy, Lamar B. 
Lee, W. H. Lt. 
Liggett, Wlofleld. Jr. 
Llpton, Sir Thomas 
Littell, W. J. 
Little, Arthur W. 
Lorraine. Robert 
Lowe, R. V. 
Luchslnger, J. J. Jr. 
Lamed, Jr., Richard 

M. 
Latham, John C. 
Loasbery. James 
Low, Harry 
Lowentbal. Edgar 
Ladella, Pete 
Lennox. Dick 
Lang, Karl 
Le May. Pierre J. 
Lynch, James 
Livingstone. Hnck 
Leary. Walter 
Lewis, E. L. 
Long, Walter 
Llttlefleld. Laden 
Lyon, D. E. 
Lasky. Myron 
Lobenthal, J. S. 
"Le Bom Australian" 
Lockwood, E. 
Lee. Bon 



M 



McDonald, Mack 

MeFarland, Denman 
McKee. Frank 
MeKeekln. Malloy 
MeLeod. James (Irish) 

E 

Mabcraey, E. W. 
Mallor, George 
MaiicD, Sid 
Martin. Fred 
Mirer, Norman J. 

Meth, Max Enill 
Mlckaela, Zeno . 
Miller. Monroe P. 
Miner, H Clay 
Molsant, Bert 
Molloy. Jack 
Moore, Jay 
Moore, Charles 
Moran. Jack 
Morey, N. L. 
Morrlssey. Jack 
Morrlssey. William E. 
Murray. George 
Matthews, George C. 
Morlarty. Henry Lt. 
Mullen, Richard 
Mack. James 
Morry. P. J. 
MlUlngton. P. W. Set. 
Murphy, William cfi. 
Moore, Eugene. Jr. 
Miller. Wendell P. 
Miller, Monroe P. 
McLaughlin. F. J. 
McDonald, Matthew 
Marry. Bud 
MeKowen. James B. 
Moore, Baker 
MeGlnotss, Joe 
Mack. Geo. C. 
MeGrath, Jim 
Melaomey, Chria. 
Miller. Joseph 
MandeL Albert 
Muldoon. Prances E. 
Medbory. John 
Marlon, Cliff 
Morton, Wsde L, 
Myers, Datl 
Meaoman. Fred. 
Marsh, Clyde 
McBannas. Artbnr 
Miner, Samuel 
Msver. Freddy 
McKenna. Harry 
Wsck. Larrr 
Mark. Anatln 
McCov. Bob 



McKee, Frank 
"Merlin" 

MacFetrlch. William 
Murdoch. William T. 
Marsh, Clyde 
Michel. Nathan 
Martelle. Tommy 
MelTllle, Harold 
aCnrry, Stephen Norman 
McNaughton, Charles 
Mnflie, Leonard 

Murphy, Bernard 
McCallom. Barry 
McVey, Hartley 
Morris, Herbert 
Mason, Jack 
Maber, Prank T. 
Mulrone'y. Ray 
Miller. William 
Mosley, Harry W. 
Muckenfnas, Lee P. 
Myers. Raymond W. 
McCaffrey, William 
MeGreal. Walter B. 
Mack. Pete 
Myers. Jack H. 
MacDonald. Thomas 
March. Val 
McAllister. Paul 
Moranee. E. M. 
Marceau. Tbos. 
Mayer. Norman J. 
MM Eric Richard 
MeFarland. A. C. W. 
Mack, Stanier 
Meeker. Edward R. 
MaeMa«tera. P. 
Mannfcln. D. 
McKeever. Jo**. 
McAl'Iater. Psnl 
McAtot. Stanley 
MaeGInley. Arthur 
Menlon. Adolf 
MaeFarland. James H. 
Moore. Wm. J. 
Madden. Jno. F. 
Marquai-t, E. J. 
Mayo. Claude B. 
McCutchcon. Wallace 
Mel Henry de F. 
McKenoer. R. I. 
Mlteben, Jno.. Jr. 

MofTett. W. A. 
Morris. Charles. Jr. 
Morrison. Victor I. 
McVuT. C. Chaa. 
"erlvale. PhfUp 
Mack. Cbas. 
Mack. Austin 



Uoakowltx. Arthur 
Michael. WUllam C. 
Metcalfe, Earl K. 
Moseley, Harry J. 
MlUer, Julius 
Mannes. David 
McVey, Hartley 
Mans, Hubert 
McCarty, Edward 
Monster, "Doc" 
Murphy, Frank E. 
Mallory. Clyde 
Mitchell, Llddy 
Manning, S. P. 
MeKowen. James B. 
McKee, Samuel 



Neff. Goy 
NeTllle. Harry 



a.cCarty. Joe Austin 
Marsh. Clyde 
Marin, Matt 
Mlttenswer. Harry 
Marchnad, C. 
Manrlquez. E. 
Morrlsoa, Edward 
McQneston, A. H. 
Moorland, Remit 
McDanlels. Homer A. 
Moseley, Harry J. 
Murphy. Thos. 
McColdlre. William 
McKean. Tom 
Mato. Anthony 



NeTllle. Henry 
Nairn, Ralph 



Nlxson, Charles (Billy) Neary, Joa. 



Nordella, Peter E. 

Nalmolb. George 
Nicholson, V. L. 
Norton, Charles 
Nomls, Leo 
Naldy, Frank 
Nellan, Marshal 
Newman, Frank 



Osborn, Harry 

O'Brien, Aloyslus 
O'Toole, Thomas 
O'Hara. Slater 
Osso. Adolpb 
Owen, Frank 
O'Brien. Frank 
Osgood. Charles. Jr. 
O'Brien, Cornelius 
Oyerbolt, Tommy 
O'Hara. William 
O'Connor, Martin 



Packwa, Frank 
Pauley, Charles 
Paul!, Harry 
Pemberton, Henery W. 
Pennyennl, Beth 
Peters, F. 
Phelan, Joe 
Phillips. Charles 
Pope, H. Q. 
Pneh. William B. 
Patchen, E. C 
Paulson, Acrid 
Pantxer, George 
Plermont. Benny 
Powder, Solly 
Parker, Barnet 
Poppe, Harry H. 
Plues. A. W. 
Parks, Sam J. 
Parker, Chaa. M. 
Pemberton, Mnrdock 
Price. E. A. 
Preston. Lew 
Page, George 
Pantxer. George 
Plngne, Earl 

Pearlle, Morry 
Prnwell. Neaf 
Pembell, Roy 
Paulton. Walter J. 



8ulnn. Leonard 
ntnn, L. B. 
Qulnn, Frank 



Newberry. Truman H. 
Newton. W. V. 
Norwood, John W. 
Nesblt. T. Hunter 
Nice, Geo. 
Nlcco. W. 
Nlmkln, J. 



Olsen, Irving A. 
O'Donnell. Tim 
Ormond. Wm. 
O'Gorman, H. J. 
Oman. G. M.. Dr. 
Oswald, J. L. 
O'Shaughnessy. Louis 

B. 
O'Doone, Brian 
O'Nein. Wm. J.- 
Osborne. Frank 
Orendorff, A. 



Parker. Wm. B. 
Phillips, Frank 
Pemberton, Munroe 
Peccbla, Frank 
Phinip8, L. W. 
Poser, Johnson J. 
Petal, Lew 
Parker. Joe 
Prltchard. H. B. 
Prager, Carl w. 
PasQUette, W. 
Pan, E. 
Payne, F. R. 
Pearson, W. F. 
Perils. Victor 
Pickering. W. A. 
Polllon. Arthur 
Powell. Halsey 
Pape, E. Lionel 
Patrick, Jerome 
Plermont. Benjamin 
Panzer, Geo. 
Preston. Lew 
Pine, Hal 
Plngne. Ear] 
Poress, Bdward 
Palmerton, F. 
Poe, Joseph 
Peebles. Jack 



Qnlnn. Dan 
Qolncy, S. 
Qulgley. Ed. 



Ranft. Henry 
Redmond, Leo 
Belebard. Kenneth, J. 
RelTly. W. J. 
Rensch. Walter 
Rice. Ben 
Robinson, James 
Robinson, Leo 
Robinson. Robert B. 
Robson. Stnart 
Rockwood, Wilfred . 
RothweU. Irrlhg 
Russell. Herbert 
Ryan, Allen 
Robinson, Wagner Leo 
Rnmalne. E. 
Rarey, B. A. 
Ryan. Kenneth 
Rrnn. Alan 
Rancher. BenJ. B. 



Revenes. Morris S. 
Rath. Fred . . 
Robinson. Alan 
Romberg Slgmoud 
Ruggles, Wesley 
Rule. C. 
Roach, Joseph 
Rieler. J. 
Rnttach. Ray 
Fntb, Ben 
Rakestraw, Frank 
Rose, Charles 
Robertson. Albert L. 
Relnold, Bernard 
Robinson. Leo 
Rochdale. Jack 
Reed. Cecil 
Rhodes. P. L. 
Rnttman. Victor 
Roth. WHlIam 



FINISHED THEIR "BIT" 



Rose, BUI 
Ryan. John 
Roche, Jack 
Rigler, Joseph B. 
Rucgles, Wesley 
Roth, Joseph 
Roddy, B1U 
Relnert, Harry 
Rochoo, Fred 
Rudolph. George 
Rose, Irving 
Raymond, Joe 
Robinson, Lloyd 
Rae. William Weston 
Roach, Joseph 
Rook. Helen 
Rancher. BenJ. Brooks 

Rlsaland, Carl 

Reynolds, Dnke 
Rice, George J. 
Reges. Arthur 
Rochoo. Fred F. 
Relsoer, Chuck 



Savage. H. B. 
Schafer. H. 
Schank, Wright 
Scboene, Paul 
Schwalbe, Edwin 
Schwartz. Jack M. 
Senior, William 
Sever, Lester 
Sexton, Charles 
Seymour, Orley 
Sblnn. George H. 
Sofranakl. George 
Sousa. John Phillip 
Sproule, B. 
Stsndford. Tony B. 
Stembrldge, Hap 
Stratton, Chester 
Sullivan. John K. 
Sullivan. Jack 
Swain. W. I. 
Starr. Walker E. 
Schnyler, Van B. 
Sokoloff. M. Mase 
Shnbert. John D. 
Smith. Buyler J. A. 
Siefert. H. G. 

Stokes, George 
Shear, Orrln G. 
Schnlxe. Francis 
Stanley, Herbert 
Schneider. Samuel B- 
Sawyer, Frank 
Stnart. William 
Soye, Stuart 
Simmons. Frank 
Sutherland. Frederick 
Spalding. Albert 
Schnebble. Allan 
Snmmervllle. Clarence 
Shonk. Wallace 
Steroad. John 
Selby, Norman 
Shelvey. Robert 
Stables. Glen 
Salle, Abner 
Stern. Harry 
Sweatman. Harry 
Stoker. Floyd 
Sampson. Kenneth 
Steuart, Lawrence 
Srhoenecker. Robert . 
Smith, Victor 
Smith, Sammy 
Seballman, Sidney 
Kchnelbe, Allen 
Standlnc. Percy 
Sage. Edward 
Sennits. Francis T. 
Shapiro, Abe 
Snlegle. Harry 
■athwart. Bert 
sofrsnakl. George 
Senear. Arthur 
Scarlett. Le Rol 
Sharp. George 
Silver. Harry A. 
Steffan. Wslter 
Sofranakl. ri«org» 
Sternber- Theodore 



Tarrte, Thomas C. 
Thomas. Carl 
Thomas. Clifford 
Tomes, F. A. 
Toms. Ralph J. 
Toy. Barney 
Tncker. Richard 



Robinson, Lloyd 
Ryan, Arthur 
Kaclcot. aA. A. 
Reeves, George N. 
Richardson, W. P. 
Robinson, A. G. 
Richardson. Louis C. 
Relnold, Bernard A. 
Rodgera, John L. 
Richardson. Sir Ed- 
ward 
Rlker, G. A. 
Rubm, Tbos. F. 
Kellly, John J. 
Bennle, James 
Rtekarda. J. E. 
Roddy, Wm. M. 
Rose, Hugo 
Reynold, Bert 
Rhodes, Harold 
Robertson. A. L. 
Rellly, William 



Shapiro. Abe 
Stutx, Louis 
Schwab, Lawrence 
Slattery, Herbert 
Sanbourn, Bert 
Shay, Daniel 
Sinclair, Horace 
Sltuon. David 
Stirling, Frank 
Snowden, Eric 
Santon. Gay A. 
Sawyer. Frank 
Sackett, Paul 
Swain, James 
Soby, John F. 
Sterns, Louis 
Sullivan, Frank J. 
Summers. Harry 
Synge, Alan 
Sbaw, Frank 
Smith. Vie 
Stoker, Floyd 
Snlgel. Alan 
Shields. Ernest 
Stewart, Donald 
Simons. Ed. 
Schnoelder. John L. 
Smith. James 
Shlnn. George 
Schumann, R. w. 
Shepard, J. L. 
Simpson. Iran P. 
Smith, C. Gordon 
Stanton. C. E, 
Stewart. M. B. 
Stirling. A. G. 
Strtne. H. F. 
Schoellkopf. Walter H. 
Shapley. L. S. 
Slmonpletri. Felix 
Smyth, Samuel 
Stone. A. Jackson 
Stirling. Yates 
Schafer, Geo. C. 
Settle, Douglas 
Shirley. M. C. 
Skerrett. Delamore 
Smith. Harry 
Steruberger. Walter 
Snears. W. O. 
Stirling. F. W. 
Ssnford, Henry 
Sherwin. Cook H. 
Sage, Stnart 
S»e. G. W. 
Stone. SeTmoTjT 
Steams. Fred 
Shenerd. George 
St. Claire. A. 
Smith. DonaM B. 
"»reth. Artbnr 
Sberer. W. N. 
Searie. Sam 
Strickland. Artbnr 
srelherg. H. T. 
strern. Arthur 
st-nrt. Tton 
Selgel. R. 



Taylor, W. H. 
Trainor. Clifford V. 
Tends. Wm. L. 
TreTor. Norman 
Trareka. Henry 
Tryek, Harrr 
Taylor. BITlIe 



Turnbull. liecter 
Thorp, Brlatow 
Tuma, Jamea 
Traband. Hubert A. 
Tuerk, Johnny 
Taylor, Andy. 
•Twlato" 

Tbompaon, Charles 
Tootle, Harry King 
Taylor. Elliott 
Tarbutt, Fred 
Ttoney, Joa. 
Thompson, David S. 
Trovers, Richard 
Toy, Barney 
Tint. Moe 
Tacgart, Ben 
Trooghton. John M. 
Tesseman, Robert B. 



Vennllye, Harold 
Vlolette, U. J. 
Vaughn. Walter 
Vorer. Chas. 
Vineyard, Clyde 
V'oorhies, Jay 
Vanderminder. George 
Vogel. Pan! 



Turnbull. Hector 
Tweedle, Dave 
Thomas, Albert F. 
Toey, Bert P. 
Taklta, Areso 
Trooghton, J. M. 
Tucker, Richard 
Tomllnson, W. 
Tedrlck. Frank 
Taylor. William B. 
Treadwell, T. C. 
Tfaarp, Norman 
Turnbull, Hector 
Tomb. J. H. 
Torrlll. J. S. 
Tltheradge, Dion 
Tracy, Royal Dana 
Termlml, Joe 



Van Dnser, Louis S. 
Vlckery. Dr. E. A. 
Vahdegrlft, John M. 
Van Meter. T. E. 
Vaodusen, Major 
Venable, George 
Von Wedeklnd. L. 



W 



Wagner, Fred 
Walker. Ray R. 
Walters, Harold B. 
Welch, John 
Watson, "Red" 
Weston, Sammy, 
Weyman, Bruce 
Whalcn. James 
Wharton, Leo R. 
Wheeler. Al. F.. Jr. 
Wnltneld. Mitchell 
Wilcox. Boy 0. 
Wilde, Joe 
Willis, Macon 
Wilson, Walter B. 
Windsor. Strafford 
Wood, Grant 
Woolfenden. William 

WUklns. 

.Valah, Richard 
Watklna. 8. Warren 
WelsbeTger. J. 3. 
Wood. Stanley G. 
Williams. Joseph 
Ward, Sergt. 
Ward. Jobn L. 
Walsh, Jack 
Waters, Tom. Jr. 
Waxman. A. P. 
Wentx. Jeane 
Weston (W e a ton' 

Models) 
Weil. Milton 
Wallace. David H. 
Ward. Arthur F. 
Whitman. Arthur L. 
Welsafeld. Isadore 
Wells. Ed. 
Wolfe, Harry 
Wanger, Walter F. 
Walsh. I. A. 
Weiss. Tom 
Well. Jesse 
Wesson, Charles 
Wsldron. Jsck 
Wlllsrd. John 
Wars (Nortblsne 

Wsrs) 
Walton, W. 
West. Pst 
Wagner. William W, 
Winthrop, Phnilp 
Warwick. Robert 
Wank, Jese 
Wren. L. 
Webster. Ralph 
Walker, Carl 
Weber. Harry 
Wolff. Louis 
West, Arthur 



Wedd, Edgar Charlea 

West, Harold 

Woodbury, Edward B. 

Wood, Frank 

Wilbur. Frank 

Wllstach, Panl 

WhiUleld. Ray 

Waters, John 

Wills, Jack 

Wallace, David H. 

Wlllard. Jobn 

WIdman. Frank T. 

Ward. Steward 

Waggoner, L. A. 

Walters. Lester B. 

Woods, Joe 

White. Arthur S. 

Whiting, S. P. 

Wenck. Jesse 

Wlllard. John 

Woolfenden. William 

Welsh, Dan 

Watt. Allen 

WaddeM. J. J. 

Ward, Joa. D. 

Wolman, Albert 

Wormecke, John 

Well. Harry 

Washington, Pope 

Wetzler. Edwin A. 
a Wood. Leonard 

Wollason E. A. 

Wlllcox. 3. P. 

Wsltoo. D. C. 

Weill. Michel 

Wlllsrd. John 

Whltlock, Goy 

Wallace. W. O. 

Walsh. Lionel 

Wlldman. Leonard D. 

Woodward. Clark H. 

Wortman. Ward K. 

Walker. George H. 

Waak, Henry 

Weber. Harry 

Waldron, Jack 
A Wilson. Billy 

Whelan. Joe 

Walsh. Jack 

Whitman, Arthur L. 

Winkle. Albert 3. 

White. Arthur 

wniard, H. 

Wheeler, W: 

Westehera-. F. 

WhvTer.. Howard 

wmiarnst. Harry 

w— t. wniiarn 

wnia. H. W. 

Wheeler. Jack 



Young, James Herbert Young, Charles 

Yates. Warren Young. Roland 

Young. Stanley V. I ork «. Jay C. 

Yantts, Luther Young, Francla E. 



Zeldman, Samnel Zimmerman, Van 

?ikn. Bert Zohn. Arthur 

Zlmerman. Charlea Z. 



t 



ARTHUR CURTIS 



H 



UONEL WALSH 



][ 



BASH. HAIXAN 



][ 



C APT. JOHN LAUDER 



T* TT 



JTiJIIl^Jtl^X^ltt^Xlti^^AtAt^lrTT^TTTT 



12 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



December .19, 1917 




PALACE 

Two large audiences greeted the excel- 
lent performance at this house on Mon- 
day, where a capacity attendance showed 
marked approval of everything offered. 

Gordan and Rica offered a cycling act 
which opened in one with a neat song and 
dance. Then Paul Gordan mounted a tall 
bicycle and went through a great routine 
of tricks, during which he had a running 
line of chatter of the comedy kind which 
brought many laughs. Miss Rica helped 
out splendidly with her dancing and 
straight work during the running of the 
act, which went over in fine style. 

In the number two spot Gallagher and 
Le Maire fooled around with a skit on 
the war, the action of which is supposed 
to take place in a trench. Le Maire is a 
capital black-face performer, and Gal- 
lagher does well with his dramatic speeches 
and posing. However, the act is using 
gome very old material, such as "back 
from the front," "had to kill nine Ger- 
mans to find a hat to fit," and the refusal 
to drag a horse after him when the re- 
treat is called for. 

Lyons and Yosco were billed in the 
second spot, but the harp did not get to 
the theatre in time, and they waited for 
the third position. Their act slowed 
things considerably, as they also are using 
much of their old stuff as "couple a' 
clock" and "petite potato." Several good 
songs were sung, and a comic war song 
let them off in good shape. 

To Belle Baker fell the lot of getting 
the first big reception. Miss Baker was 
resplendently clothed and offered a good 
routine of excellent songs, which brought 
great results. She followed Lyons and 
Yosco, who also sang ballads, but she had 
her audience in the palm of her hand, and 
just put over the biggest sized hit of her 
life with a string of seven songs. She 
retired amidst the loudest applause heard 
here for some time, and responded with a 
short speech of appreciation. 

The Cameron Sisters and Burton Daniels 
next offered a iano and dancing act, which 
opens with a song, showing that the girls 
have no singing voices. Then they went 
into an eccentric dance that was fairly 
well executed. Daniels next offered a 
dandy piano solo. He might, however, pay 
a trifle more attention to his make-up and 
also have removed the- first drop, which 
la a yellow affair, meaning nothing, and 
not at all artistic to look at. The girls 
then returned to do an Egyptian dance in 
gold dresses, the effect of which would 
be considerably improved if the shoes worn 
were more in keeping with the rest of their 
costume. This number was done in a 
manner which indicated that the girls 
lack team work. Daniels then did an- 
other solo, after which the girls finish with 
a fox trot. 

After intermission, Frank Carter offered 
a fast running act, which is more fully 
reviewed under "New Acts." . 

Mme. Sarah Bernhardt received a great 
big reception and offered an act in French 
running twenty-eight minutes, which is 
also more fully reviewed under "New 
Acta." Mme. Bernhardt easily proved her 
right to .the big billing, judging by her 
reception and the ovation she received at 
the finish of her offering. 

EI Brendel and Flo Burt returned after 
an absence of seven weeks, playing also 
the Colonial Theatre. The act is pretty 
nearly in the same shape it was when 
last seen here, excepting that Miss -Burt 
is using some new mannerisms and EI 
Brendel has interpolated several new pieces 
of business and chatter. The act held at- 
tention following Mme. Bernhardt, and 
held them in their Beats at a very late 
hour to good results. 

Mario Lo and company offered .a. posing 
novelty in the closing position, showing 
various poses in porcelain. Although the 
bill .could be divided into two distinct parts 
on account of the big hits scored by both 
Mme. Bernhardt and Belle Baker, it really 
was, a .smoothly, running affair. . Miss. 
Baker has heretofore been known as "The 
Bernhardt of Song." and she easily proved 
tt at this performance. S." L. H. 



SHOW REVIEWS 

(Continued on paces 31 and 15) 



RIVERSIDE 

James J. Morton, held over for the 
second week, started off the show with 
his clever and humorouB introduction of 
the acts, the first of which was Robert 
Everest's Novelty Circus, a well-trained 
monkey act, in which the intelligent sim- 
ians produce a miniature vaudeville show. 

Clara and Emily Barry, on second, found 
their clever songs and patter much to the 
audience's liking, and scored well with a 
number of songs well selected, and rend- 
ered in a pleasing and effective manner. 
Their material is Well arranged, and the 
act closed strongly. 

Florenz Ames and Adelaide Winthrop, 
whose "Caught In a Jamb" was one of 
the comedy hits of "Bitchy^Koo," are pre- 
senting practically the same act in vaude- 
ville, with the addition of a clever bit of 
dancing, which had it been used in the 
Hitchcock production would have scored 
for them a far bigger success than they 
met with in the two-dollar production. 
While the first part of the act, showing 
the young woman with her dress caught 
in a locked door is amusing, it is the danc- 
ing which really carries the act over. 

Dorothy Toye replaced Cecil Cunning- 
bam, and her remarkable voice was never 
heard to better advantage. . Miss Toye's 
billing proclaims he'r the' possessor of two 
separate and distinct voices, and this ex- 
actly tells the story. Her upper range is 
a pure soprano, while the lower resembles 
the male tenor so closely that off stage 
her singing ran not be distinguished from 
a man's. Her voice is not merely one of 
long range, which is comparatively com- 
mon, but is of two distinct timbres and 
qualities. 

Her first selection was the big soprano 
aria from "Cavalieria Rusticana," next a' 
specially written song, and for her 'Closing 
number the duet from "II Trovatore," 
singing both the soprano and tenor roles. 
Between her numbers, her pianist played 
a medley of some of the best known airs 
from "Rigoletto," for .which he was en- 
thusiastically applauded. 

Miss Toye, whose voice might be called 
of the freak' variety, is no freak when it . 
comes to the matter of singing, for she 
is an artist. Her voice is. well trained 
' and she sings with a taste and intelligence 
which is a delight. She. was a big -hit at 
the Monday night -performance. 

Imhoff, Conn and Coreene, in their new 
sketch, "A Pest House," were the comedy 
hit of the bill, and rocked the house with 
laughter for neatly.' the entice twenty 
minutes of their act. The offering has 
been well and carefully built up and moves 
from one comedy situation to another with 
great speed. There, ia ijot a dull spot in 
the act which ends at just the ' right mo- 
ment and does not, as is so common with 
comedy acts lag at the. finish. 

Harry Cooper, assisted by Jim Reaney, 
opened intermission, and Mr. Cooper, in 
the role of- the Tetter carrier who con- 
templates giving up his job to become 
the outside man for a matrimonial agency, 
was most amusing. There are some clever 
lines in the little sketch, and Cooper does 
well with them. Reaney renders a song 
well for the finish of the act, and Cooper 
joined in the last few bars of the chorus. 
, The. duet was so well received" -that the 
introduction of one or two more songs 
in the act seems advisable. 

Gus Edwards' big song revue, "The 
Fountain of Youth" followed, and fur- 
nished the vaudeville surprise of the sea- 
son. _ Theatre goers who have followed the 
' Edwards' revues have been "led 16 expect' 
a great deal from- this producer, but in 
his latest efforts he has.. exceeded the ex- 
pectations of even his greatest admirers. 
Judging the "Fountain of Youth" from 
all^ theatrical .standpointSj it is by .far 
the biggest and." best 'thing* of ' the kind 
ever seen in vaudeville. It will be further 
reviewed.-under-51New.Acts." .W. V. -. 



COLONIAL 

The bill was switched around after the 
second aet. Dooley and Nelson did not 
appear on account of their trunks not ar- 
riving in time for the matinee perform- 
ance. Emmett De Voy, not programmed, 
appeared in the second half. The final 
curtain descended at 4.45. 

Pa the News opened. 

The Three Johns opened with a one-hand 
stand to the head, while the understander 
carried his top-mounter up and down a 
flight of stairs. The balance of the act 
is one series of wonderful tricks after 
the other. The Trio are marvels and 
were applauded for their pretty work. 

Alfred Bergen, a baritone with a voice 
that is melodious and cultivated, proceeded 
to entertain with semi-classic songs and 
ballads. . His volume and tone quality is 
rich with melody. Just as a suggestion, 
Mr. Bergen should not request a number 
from the audience, as it takes* the polish 
from his showmanship. This piece of 
business got a laugh, but it is not worth 
the gamble. The spectators liked his sing- 
ing and gave him a big hand. He could 
hold down a position further down on the 
bill. 

Mons. and Alf. W. Loyal and their 
trained poodles were billed to close the 
show, but held down third position. . An 
accident occurred' when the bicycle fell 
and the dog was thrown heavily to the 
stage. Aside from that, the act went along 
in a smooth fashion. Loyal, when doing 
the "lay dead" bit, spoke broken English, 
conveying the impression that he is an 
alien. If possible, this should be elim- 
inated. 

Brendel and Bert introduced many new 
comedy ideas that are bound to land them 
in the foremost ranks of vaudeville. The 
break-away suit was a scream. Brendel 
is & real comedian, who knows the art of 
putting his material over. Miss Bert sings 
well and possesses youth and person- 
ality. The act was the laughing hit of 
the show. 

Robert T. Haines and company in a 
novel war act closed the first half. It ia 
more fully reviewed under "New Acts." 

After intermission came Bill Bailey and 
Lynn Cowan in .one of the most entertain- 
ing interludes now before the public. Not 
alone.. are they masters of their instru- 
ments, but the singing of Cowan and the 
wonderful personalities of both are truly 
marvelous. Bill Bailey and his banjo 
plunked out more harmony than many a 
"jazz" band. The boys wear full dress 
suits that fit them to a "T." Before the 
encore they played and sang a rag num- 
ber, which was a riot for them, 

Emmett De Voy and company, consist- 
ing' of seven people, was enjoyed. The 
story of- the playlet has been told many 
times before, and has lost none of its 
popularity, j De Voy, as the grouchy step- 
father, who afterward is converted into a 
real human being by 'the call of "Hal- 
lowe'en," gave an excellent performance. 
All concerned did well with their assign- 
ments. The audience gave them five cur- 
tains. 

Florenze Tempest opened, attired in a 
white flannel suit, and delivered a song 
that, caught on immediately. She then 
talked about Broadway. Her next num- 
ber consisted of a comedy war song 
that she renders in a pleasing manner. 
For this song, she is dressed as an 
officer in khaki. George Harris at the 
piano played a medley of popular songs. 
F flowing 'this. Miss Tempest appears in 
'a cloak, and offers a recitation called '"The 
Rose and the Lily." This contained a 
good story well told. For the finish, the 
cute- songstress introduced a song and 
dance with a raggy swing, and closed the 
act with a duet, assisted by Harris. 

'Miss Tempest is doing' a good act' and 
carries a special drop in one. The audience 
liked Miss Tempest greatly. - J. D. 



ROYAL 

The bill at the Royal this week is one 
of the best that was ever at this the- 
atre. 

After the Hearst-Pathe News, which 
showed the first scenes of the Halifax 
disaster, came the Eddy Duo, a girl and 
boy, who do some very clever if not re- 
markable tight wire walking. The girl's 
dancing on the wire received generous ap- 
plause. Another good stunt is the man's 
back somesault through a hoop. The act 
got away with a very fine hand for the 
opening spot. 

The Bison City Four offered a fine lot 
of songs and equally as good comedy. 
The turn consists of four men — straight, 
Italian, tramp, who looks somewhat like 
Billy Arlington, and an Irish cop. The 
policeman's talk is somewhat muddled. 
A great bit of comedy on the slapstick 
order afforded the audience the first real 
big laugh of the show, the bit being the 
tramp trying to prevent the Italian from 
knifing the cop. One bit should be cut 
out. That is the part where the tramp 
announces that they "will play the same 
number backward, and then, turning 
around. The act -received generous ap- 
plause. 

Herman and Shirley, presenting "The 
Mysterious Stranger," certainly have a 
dandy act. When the turn was reviewed 
before at the National the writer was of 
the same opinion. Herman bets his wife 
that she will not recognize him at a 
masque ball in his costume. He makes 
his appearance as a skeleton and the dances 
that this boy performs are a marvel. 
Every bone in his body must be double 
jointed. He had the audience on edge 
throughout hla entire performance. 

In the fourth spot were the Farber 
Girls. They put over some fine numbers, 
Constance playing the tough and doing 
it to perfection. A new -gag put over 
by her took the audience by storm. 

"Why is the audience- so restless to- 
night:" she asked. "Maybe Itfa the tax 
on the seats," her sister replied. 

They were well liked by the Bronxites 
and got away to a great hand. 

Probably the Royalites couldn't place 
their old friends Macart and Bradford, for 
not a hand greeted them upon their en- 
trance. They are presenting a new turn, 
"Love, Honor and Obey, written by 
Macart. The situations, persiflage, in fact 
everything about the act is a winner. 

Intermission followed. The orchestra 
at the Royal is no longer a plain, 'onery 
orchestra. It is now billed on the pro- 
gram as Nat Kamern's Harmonists. / 

Grace Fisher, "The Sunshine Girl," and 
late of the Winter Garden, opened the 
second half of the bill, assisted by Jack 
Stern at' the piano. She sang s number of 
songs, and finally offered her old song of 
The Winter Garden show, last season, 
"Naughty, Naughty." 8he should smile 
more often. . She takes her work too ser- 
iously, and doesn't show a ripple on her 
face until after she finishes a number. 

Cummings and Mitchell have a neat 
little skit. The way the man ill treats 
the curtain ia a shame, but it ia a laugh- 
getter. His awkwardness at dancing is 
very cleverly done and not overdone. 
! Joe Boganny's Lunatic Bakers were 
rightly named when they called themselves 
lunatics. Too much slapstick, bordering 
on the order of Keystone comedy, is in 
the turn. The audience was so used to 
laughing at the rest ■ of the bill they 
couldn't very Well" ref ruin from laughing 
at thiB turn. "■-■' - • :<* - . 
. Maude Lambert and Earnest Ball, the 
composer, had the next to closing spot. 
They proved great favories with the 
patrons of the Royal, .and each number 
of Ball's selections drew . -generous ap- 
plause. 

■» "Makers of History,'' a posing turn, did 
not get on until 10.10. The poses are 
splendid and are supposed to be in marble. 
Great men and statesmen were imper- 
sonated, among them Lincoln, Edison, Wil- 
son, Washington, McKinley, Roosevelt, 
Jefferson, Dewey and Lafayette. 

.•• ' ■ -■• I* R, G. 



December 19, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



13 




FRANK GARTER - 

Theatre-^-PoIace. 

Style — Piano and song*. 

Time — Eighteen minutes. 

Setting — In two. 

Frank Carter, in retaining to vaude- 
ville, is assisted by a piano player and 
several members of the house staff who 
applaud him as he steps oat. 

He then notifies the audience that he 
has brought his own applause with him 
and they can go to sleep. He also has 
some cross fire talk with his piano player 
and the leader and sings a topical song. 
Another topical song follows in which he 
explains it is the the best Southern song 
he has ever heard and in which he inter- 
polates a patter chorus. 

A line of talk about bis girl is not so 
good and an old gag in the way of "she 
can get nothing to fit her but handker- 
chief s,". brought the talk to an endless 
point 

He next tried an exemption story which 
was in exceedingly bad taste. A serious 
ballad entitled "Alsace Lorraine" fol- 
lowed, and was really the best thing in 
the act, vocally speaking. His talk about 
actors being jealous has been done to 
death, and a nut song followed which 
went well. He finished the act with an 
eccentric and acrobatic dance which won 
him big applause. 

Frank Carter is offering a new act in 
which one can find a composite of Al 
Jolson, Harry Fox and Frank Tinney, 
which should make the act get over in 
good Btyle anywhere. S. L. H. 

MME. SARAH BERNHARDT 

Theatre — Palace. 

Style — Sketch. 

Time — Twenty-eight minute*. 

Setting — Wood, in four, special. 

Mme. Sarah Bernhardt returned to 
vaudeville with a new one act playlet en- 
titled "From the Theatre to the Field of 
Honor" in which she plays the part of a 
wounded French soldier who was once ui 
actor.' 

Before the curtain ascends a man 
dressed in sandals and a toga steps out 
and reads briefly from a piece of paper 
that the act concerns a French soldier 
who was trying to get away from the 
enemy and suffered several wounds. The 
soldier is discovered by a dog who sum- 
mons a British officer who in turn sum- 
mons the Bed Cross nurses and a' doctor. 
The soldier then goes into delirium, finds 
the flag he saved and then dies while kiss- 
ing the emblem. 

The curtain then rises and Mme. Bern- 
hardt impersonates the soldier. The act- 
ing was splendid and fairly carries one 
who understands French to the very scene. 
This act will be shown the first three 
days of the week and during the later 
part of the week Mme. Bernhardt will ap- 
pear in a scene from "Camllle." As a 
drawing card she is there, and as an 
actress of emotion in vaudeville she seems 
to have the entire field of honor to her- 
self. S. L. H. 



ERNIE POTTS AND CO. 

Theatre— Proctor' a 325th St. 

Style — Variety. 

Time — Eleven minute* 

Setting — Full stage. 

Ernie Potts and Company consists of 
three men and a woman who go through 
a routine of club - swinging, wrestling, 
boxing and bag punching. 

They open their act with ' two of the 
men, and "the woman, swinging clubs 
expertly. A velvet drop rises and then 
one of the' men gives an exhibition 
of punching several bags at one time. A 
wrestling and boxing match is then put 
on by two of the men, showing the finer 
points of 'the different champions. It 
is done in a very clever manner. They 
finish with the four punchbag the bags 
playing a nopular song on them. 
■'■■••'■ This act can either be used to open 
or close a show. ' :. •• .tt.-t Ml L. 



NEW ACTS 

(Continued on page 22) 



^S >*, 



v ■' 



EDWARDS' SONG REVUE 

Theatre — Rivereide. 

Style — Song Revue. 

Time— Seventy minute*. 

Setting— Special. 

With a company of twenty-six, beau- 
tiful scenery, georgeous costuming, de- 
: lightful music, a chorus good to look 
upon that can sing and dance, a cast 
of principals every one of which could 
easily fill a role in a big Broadway 
production, Gus Edwards' annual song 
revue, "A Fountain of Youth," is little 
short of a vaudeville sensation and is 
far and away the most pretentious act 
of the sort ever presented. Olga Cook, 
the young prima donna, is featured in 
the revue, and Mario Villain, Helen 
Coyne, Gloria Foy and Dan Healy have 
important roles. 

The revue, which compares very fa- 
vorably with many of the big two-dollar 
productions, is presented in ten scenes 
or "spouts," as the program reads, and 
one song and its accompanying setting 
and chorus follows the other with such 
rapid succession throughout the entire 
seventy minutes of the act as to be well 
nigh bewildering. 

All the numbers are excellently 
mounted, the best of the ten being the 
opening showing the Cafe Sky Blue, 
where one of the best numbers is ren- 
dered, a Red Cross scene in which Miss 
Cook finely rendered "We Need You 
Now." "In the Shadow of Vesuvius," 
where a finely executed Tarantella 
dance is performed and the "Golden 
Harvest Days," in which Miss Coyne 
dances charmingly. "I Can't Keep 
Away from Broadway" is another strik- 
ing number in . which Healy scored a 
decided hit with a particularly well 
executed bit of dancing. "When I Went 
to School With You," a school room 
scene with the usual precocious pupils, 
was another and a motion picture 
studio served, to introduce some movie 
mad maids. 

The production ended with one of the 
best and most elaborate patriotic finales 
that vaudeville has ever witnessed. The 
scene shows the steps of the Capitol at 
Washington and down the steps in won- 
derful costumes marched the company, 
each division singing some well known 
song hit. "Good-bye Little Girl, Good- 
bye" scored strongly, then came "Tip- 
perary," "Blue Bell," "Over There," the 
entire company ending with "Laddie 



"# 



"A Fountain of Youth" is about the 
last word in vaudeville revues. 

W. V. 



DEAN AND THATCHER 

Theatre — Proctor'* 23rd St. 

Style — Talking and tinging. 

Time — Twelve minutes. 

Setting — In one. 

Starting off at a rapid pace of sure- 
fire talk this act, at first sight, looks 
like a winner. But it only takes about 
a minute for them to shoot their bolts, 
as the dialogue then refers to talk of 
the "h'ome town." Too many acts are 
using this line of chatter now-a-daya 
tor it to have any effect. The one re- 
deeming point of this offering is a poem 
recited by Thatcher concerning a base- 
ball game be witnessed. 

The act finished with a song, which is 
well put over. This team has the ability 
to present something more original than 
the act they are now using, and should 
be suitable for a good spot on the time 
they are now playing, when that is 
done. 

The changes, however,' are very impor- 
tant and,- if not made, the present vehicle 
is useless. •■ C« •"•- -M. L. 



ROBERT T. HAINES & CO 

Theatre — Colonial. 

Style— Playlet; —....... 

Time — Twenty minute*. . 

Setting— In three. 

Winthrop Hastings, of the Royal 
Flying Corps (Robert T. Haines), is 
seated in a chair, the back of which 
is facing the audience. He cannot be 
seen. 

A love scene between Mrs. Hastings 
(Mrs. Haines) and Harry Belding, of 
the war office (J. Malcolm Dunn) in 
which Belding persuades the wife to 
leave London and go with him to Monte 
Carlo, is going on. At first she re- 
fuses, but later tells Belding that- she 
dreamed that her husband was killed in 
action. After much persuasion she con- 
sents to elope and forget her surround- 
ings. 

At this point, Hastings walks ■ to 
center stage, amazing the lovers. Both 
are in fear that he will denounce them, 
but on the contrary, he preaches a ser- 
mon, telling how faithful' a wife should 
be, especially in time of war. He then 
declares that he will not be an obstacle 
to them, and commands his wife to play 
the piano. 

He then goes back and seats himself 
in the same position as before. A 
telegram then arrives, stating that 
Winthrop Hastings was killed in 
action. At this both laugh aloud as 
they know he just went to seat himself. 
Tbey both go to the chair and Hastings 
is gone. 

This is the punch, and is carried out 
in splendid fashion. The three principals, 
fit their roles well, and as for Haines, 
he has the best playlet of hia entire 
career. ... .1.1). 



JACKIE; Mcdowell 

Theatre-rtf aiionat (try-out). ' 
Style — Trained- 4og: o 

Time — Eighteen minute*. 

Setting— in one. t 

The dog in this act is very well 
trained, and obeys orders patiently. He 
displays great endurance and quickness. 

The trainer is dressed in jockey cos- 
tume. The dog balances a small goblet 
filled with water on his nose, sitting 
on the table meanwhile. The usual 
routine of questioning follows, the dog 
telling the number of days in a week, 
etc. 

He is next dressed up in a fashionable 
female costume, in which he does a 
dance, finishing by balancing a parasol 
on his nose, which be holds for a re- 
markably long time. A clever trick in 
which the dog places his four feet on the 
four legs of an upturned chair follows. 
The trainer lifts the chair and bounces 
it around considerably without destroy- 
ing the animal's balance. For a finish 
the dog is dressed in khaki, and executes 
several military movements. 

The act is much too long at present. 
all the good points being stretched out 
until the effect is simply to produce 
sympathy for the dog. All the tricks 
should be cut short P. K. 



SAWYER AND HOPE 

Theatre — Greenpoint. 

Time — Fourteen minute*. , . y 

Style — Tall;, songs, dance. 

Setting — Full stage. 

A lot of junk slapped together is the 
quickest way to describe this act. One 
of the partner's name is Hope, but if 

' there is any for this act, it can't be seen 

, with a microscope.. *.*».», .■». v ...::• 
The size and Blimness of the male 
half of the act are depended upon to 
provide the "comedy," if it can be called 
such. The girl does some dry solo danc- 
ing, which can be seen at any church 
bazaar. She wears white pantalettes 
with a blue dress and blue stockings, 
which makes it look rather risque, how- 
ever. 

As a' whole, the act Should be able to 
make any time that is smaller than the 
smallest. - . LB. G. 



DE LISLE AND JOHNSTON 

Theatre — Loew's Avenue B. " " 

Style — Singing. 

Time — Ten minute*. 

Setting — In one. <k , 

De Lisle and Johnston, two good 
looking girls, have splendid voices and 
displayed good taste in " selecting their 
wardrobe. Their repertoire consists of 
five or six well selected song numbers. 

Tbey open with a love song which is 
put over well. After they sing a few 
other songs tbey finish with a yodeling 
number in high soprano voices. Tbey 
make three changes apiece, the last be- 
ing that of a Dutch boy and girl. The 
team is gifted with a good amount of 
personality and have a knack of pre- 
senting their routine in such a maimer 
as to get the most out of it. 

This team should make good on' what- 
ever time they play, as they possess 

- the xjualificntions necessary- to be a hit 
... . i:. ..; :=:=-.- jj. I*. 



HELEN KEELEY 

Theatre — National (try-out). ., 

Style — Hag-punching. 

Time — Twelve minutes. 

Setting — In one and special three. 

Helen Keeley . opens In one with a 
. Bong, which has no particular applica- 
tion to her act, and then goes into 
a special drop in three, which represents 
a sporting goods store. Here she begins 
with one overhead bag, and gives an eo- 
-.- durance demonstration. A good novelty 
is introduced here by bringing out a 
stage hand who tries to duplicate her 

- performance and fails. 

She next works with a floor bag. work- 
ing it first with her hands and then with 
her knees. She finishes with two over- 
heads and one below, all working in 
perfect rhythm. During her entire tarn 
she exhibits great technical skill, never 
missing a stroke, and working fast and 
smoothly throughout. She should cat 
oat the opening song and confine herself 
to the bags. 

This is an . exceptionally good act of 
its kind, and should get across. P. K. 



HUBERT DWYER AND CO. 

Theatre — Protpect. 

Style — Aoroooiic. 

Time — Ten minute*. 

Setting— in four. 

.Hubert Dwyer has a corker of an 
opening act. He is dressed in a suit 
much too. large tor him, and gets lot* 
of laughs out of his bits of business, 
such as getting tangled up with the 
apparatus. This is all old stuff, but, 
as handled by Dwyer, it is sure fire. 
His partner does "straight" acrobatics, 
and his work was appreciated, bat 
Dwyer is. the act. His falls and tumbles 
over the furniture are screams, mat) 
with his. present turn, be should find 
it easy to get big time bookings. 8. E. 



ALVERA AND STERN 

Theatre — Loew's Deloneey. 

Style — Singing and dancing. • >• 

Time — Ten minute*. 

Setting — Special. 

This is a man and girl act which has 
no exceptional merit The act is opened 
by Stern's singing while Alvera H«m«— - 
The next is a song by Stern followed 
by a toe dance by Alvera. Stern stags 
another number while Alvera makes a 
change of costume, and then do. another 
song and dance. Alvera does some good 
high kicking. 

Alvera, who proves to be a female 

' impersonator, is the; entire act.S.. Ki.'.* 



14 



THE- NEW YORK CLIPPER 



December 19, 1917 



WILL BUSINESS IMPROVE AFTER NEW YEAR? 



Shou'u<r, WOODS, COHAN, CORT, COMSTOCK, BELAS- 

CO, GOLDEN, TELLEGEN, SELWYN, DILLINGHAM, 

WISWELL AND OTHERS THINK IT WILL 



David 
Bebuco 



WHILE I have had no 
cause for complaint, 

it having been one of the 
best seasons I have ever had, I, of course, 
realize that conditions have been bad gen- 
erally. I feel, however, that they will be- 
come better and better after the^ New 
ZTear, because the Government regulation of 
various industries will have begun to take 
effect. People will become more accus- 
toa.ed to the strained war condiuon^, and 
will demand amusement, since this is vitally 
necessary whenever people are kept at a 
high war tension. Such was true in our 
Chll War days, and duri-p the present war 
tV'atres have flourished in London as 
ne>?r before. 



slackness in the business. This is the nat- 
ural reaction to war. Tie people begin 
hoarding their money, war taxes are im- 
posed, and every one becomes frightened. 
Amusements, consequently. Buffer. But 
this state of things cannot last, and I think 
we are about at the end of it. ' I look for 
an improvement immediately after the New 
Year's opening. 



Weber 



John L. MEXT season will be a bad 

Gold season for bad plays, 

**° M but a good season for good 

plays, and we shall try to make ours come 
in that category. So far as business is 
concerned, this country, as Joe Cannon: 
once said, "will always be a hell of a suc- 
cess." In these murky days, perhaps it is 
a good thing to rememb the words of 
Abraham Lincoln. Our country was then 
in the throes of a war which seemed then 
as horrible as the one of today. Lincoln 
ahowed great interest in the theatre, and 
when his political enemies took him to 
task for his frivolity he replied: 

"I'm afraid if I lost my capacity for oc- 
casional enjoyment I couldn't bear up under 
the burden of this war." 

Our people have had that doctrine bred 
in their system, and next season will be a 
successful one for good plays. 

I AM of the opinion that 
the present financial 

tightness is caused largely 
by fear. People are hoarding their money 
out of pure emotional anxiety. What busi- 
ness will be like in the future will, there- 
fore, be determined by the progress of the 
war, and by nothing else. If a decisive 
Allied victory is accomplished, the public 
will take heart and spend their money 
freely again. On the contrary, if the Ger- 
mans win any big contest, conditions will 
be much worse. As no one can tell how 
the war will progress in the coming months, 
so no one can tell anything about business 
futures. 

Lea*. THE people have been 

Talk»«a starvii* themselves on 

ieueg enjoyment for the past two 

months, and- they are bound sooner or 
later to feel the need of entertainment. 
They must have it, and after a long pe- 
riod of staying at home they are certain to 
react strongly. For this reason, I think 
.that business conditions in the theatre will 
be immeasurably improved after the holi- 
days.* 

BUSINESS will be better 
LaaShsbert than ever after th* first 

of the year. 1 look for a 
season of unusual prosperity. The slump 
has reached its end, and the improvement 
will be sure and steady after the rest of 
the year. Of a better era in the theatrical 
business I am confident. 



L. C. J WAS in Canada at the 

Wiswell beginning of the war, 

and I witnessed a slump ex- 
actly similar to the present one. But busi- 
ness there has been better than ever before 
since that time, ana the same is true of 
England. While a large part of the in- 
creased patronage of London theatres, is 
due to the .fact that the soldiers on leave 
make up a great portion of the audience, 
this does not account for all the prosperity, 
and even without this facor I am confident 
we will have better business. Mr. Savage 
is In agreement with me, as is shown by 
the fact he is preparing to do more exten- 
sile productions than in some time. There 
, is no need to fear. I am of the opinion 
that conditions will right themselves and 
within the very near future. 

George M. JUST now the country is 
Cohan K 4 " 11 * through a process 

of adjustment to new condi- 
tions. This is to be expected, as is also 
the coming improvement in business. It 
always takes a while to get used to a new 
state of things, but I think that the proc- 
ess is nearly completed. The Liberty 
Loan has taken the savings of most of the 
people, and as they are still paying for it, 
they are now financially tight. But once 
that burden is off, tbe other things will 
right themselves, and improvement will 
continue steadily. 



AS the citizens and indus- 
A. H. Woods n tries of the United 

States will now be called up- 
on to exercise to the fullest extent their 
functions of usefulness, so will the theatre. 
Never in the world's history was there such 
a need for the service of this institution 
that has healed so many of the world's 
hurts, and brought so much comfort in 
sorrow. The public win realize this as 
soon as the adjustment is complete. And I 
venture to predict that the New Year, 
which will bring presages of victory and 
peace, will bring also a new era of pros- 
perity and usefulness to the theatre. 



John Colt 



Arek. 
Selwyn 



"THERE is no reason for 
theatrical managers to 

be pessimistic about tbe 
future, for what has been happening lately 
here is an exact duplication of the state 
of things abroad after war was declared 
But as business improved over there, and 
has been good ever since, we can expect a 
similar era of prosperity. I am exceed- 
ingly optimistic about the future. 

CbarUe WHILE I have had no 

n -n- ' cause for complaint as 

DiUmgham ^ rf my gn<|WS ^ d<me 

excellent business, I realise that, generally. 
there has been a period of unprecedented 



BUSINESS can't get any 
worse. There is certain 

to be a rebound. Whenever 
things are as bad as they have been a re- 
action always occurs and brings them up 
to standard. I am certain that this will 
happen in the theatrical business. From 
the first of the year on, things will steadily 
improve, as adjustments to new conditions 
become more and mnre complete. I look 
forward to an excellent rear and think 
that busiress is bound to make up for its 
recent: depression. 

ryjnj^, [ THINK prospects look ex- 

, ceedingly bright for the 

raversnam fomiag yeaT . So confident 
a'v I of a coming boom that I am now pre- 
perirjj tbe most expensive production I 
have ever attempted. "Lord and Lady 
Algy." which is costing me a great deal 
rf miner. I should not take this risk if 
I had any doubts of the future improve- 
ment in business. Many of the causes of 
our financial distress are now disappear- 
ing and the people throughout tbe entire 
country will be more and more in need of 
entertainment as the war proceeds, and by 
the time that the terrible conflict has ended 
we will find that the theatrical business 
did not frre ss bad as it might hare. 



BRADY, AMES, ELLIOTT, TYLER, ALL SHREWD JUDGES, 

SAY IT WONT, AND GIVE THEIR REASONS 

TO BACK UP THE OPINION 



Winthrop gUSINESS may be a trifle 
Arae» better for a while after 

the New Year, but the im- 
provement cannot be very great. I cannot 
see that the causes of bad business will 
be materially changed. 

One of the principal reasons for bad 
business is that we have too much produc- 
tion. There are twice as man? theatres as 
tbe country can well support. Even in 
good times the present production rate is 
too heavy, and now, with the tightening of 
money conditions, tbe income taxes, and 
other expenses, the business must suffer. 
Another cause for bad business is that 
women, who make up a large part of the 
audiences, are mostly all too busy to go 
to theatres. All of them are doing Red 
Cross or other war work, and their 
time is fully taken up. I cannot see any 
permanent improvement in business condi- 
tions. But. of course, no one really knows, 
and I may be wrong. 



F. Ray Q OOD shows will always be 

Comstock financial successes, and the 

bad ones will fail, regard- 
less of war or other emergencies. For my- 
self I am not worrying, for I know this 
to be true, and know how to act accord- 
ingly. Conditions generally are bad just 
now, but they always are at this time of 
yesr, regardless of general conditions, and 
I think things will pick up immensely after 
January first. The manager who wails 
about bad business is always the one who 
has a poor show. Those who put out tbe 
good ones never have cause to worry. 



William I AM an optimist, and al- 

EUiott ways look for the best, 

but I am frank to say I see 
little hope for better business for a long 
time to come. If the new German offen- 
sive goes through, stocks will go down, and 
financial conditions in all lines will be 
worse. The theatre always reacts to such 
unnatural conditions. The Wall Street 
men are largely responsible for the condi- 
tion?, as they attempt to force stocks down 
continually. But this is only a personal 
opinion, and I hope I am wrong. 



George C. gUSINESS will grow 
j-I^. worse and worse for an 

indeterminate length of time. 
Before the middle of the year I believe at 
least half the theatres will be put ont of 
business. This will improve the condition 
of those remaining, of course. 

The reasons for bad business are many. 
Overproduction, taxes and the poverty of 
the plays presented. The exceptional hit 
will always do a good business, war or no 
war, but there haven't been many of those 
Ibis season. A contributory cause is the 
v>y the managers have treated the public 
Most of tbem have been unfair, and the 
public knows it. As soon as they get a hit 
the entire house is sold to the hotels and 
agtncics. If any plays succeed they will 
be light ones. The people won't care for 
heavy drama during the war. All this 
sounds gloomy, but it is not a wail. It is 
said with a smile. 



Waiiara A. BUSINESS will be fright- 
Brady f al after the first of the 
year. It will continue so, 
and I expect the worst we have ever had. 
There i* nothing imaginable that can make 
it better. No . end of the war is in sight, 
and as long as we have war we have in- 
creased taxes. We will have more and 
more taxes imposed upon us as the war pro- 
ceeds. So far we have only seen the be- 
ginning of what is bonnd to happen. I 
can't see any relief in si?ht until after 
the war. One thing that the bad business 
will do is to force the amateur producers 
ont of business. Their houses can't last 
lone under present and co^ire conditions, 
and their failure will be of benefit to- the 
industry at large. 



Oliver I DO not know whether this 

Morocco , W 'U be * S°°d season or 

not, bnt I am of the opinion 
that it will be as good as recent ones. 
Even if it isn't, as I recently announced, 
I intend to keep my shows going in order 
to give the people entertainment. In war 
time it is a prime necessity, and if they 
can't afford it the manager should do 
his bit by losing a little and giving it 
to them. This oner of mine to Keep the 
shows going is not so wild as it may 
seem, for I confidently hope that they 
will not lose money. The past several 
months have been excellent for all my 
shows on the road, and I see no reason 
why the immediate future should be any 
the worse than during tbe past few months. 



. I EXPECT a banner year 

Morns Cast f or th e theatre. A great 

many things may happen to 
temporarily hurt the business, but after 
a blow there is always a rebound, and 
the periods of slackness never last long 
enough to do much harm. Especially in 
war time are the possibilities of heavy 
bumps the strongest. But war time also 
brings with it a keener need of entertain- 
ment, since the outside world is sorrow- 
ing, and I think this primal human in- 
stinct for pleasure will come to the fore 
again as soon as the present state of 
transition has been passed through. 



Arthur 

Hopkins 



PEOPLE will never go 
without amusement, 

even in war time, but they 
will have to choose more carefully, that 
is all. Instead of going to ten shows, the 
average man can now only go to one. So, 
while business may be worse generally 
than in the past, the man who puts out 
a good "show will not suffer. The only 
ones who have need to complain of bad 
business are those whose productions have 
not the merit to draw the crowds. There 
is one way to make business good in the 
theatrical as in all lines of industry. That 
is simply to give the people the best. Then 
they will patronize you. 



as in WHAT the future will 

Marc Haw bring no man can tell, 

bnt it will be a good thing 
if it purges the business of the incompetent 
and dishonest theatrical adventurers, who 
always break into any business at a time 
Hke this. The theatres are suffering very 
naturally from war depression, and the con- 
dition has been made more acute by the 
'imposition of the admission tax, as it is 
very difficult to make the people under- 
stand that we are collecting it for the gov- 
ernment. Then too, the insane multiplici- 
ty of theatres is having -its effect. There 
are real estate sharks and architectual 
promoters who are always ont with land- 
ing nets for the unwary to build theatres. 
In New York, theatres are becoming as 
common as garages, and will be as indis- 
criminately used if the building continues. 



Sam HISTORY is repeating it- 

Shannon a* 1 *. *nd we are under- 

going what England under- 
went during the first few months after the 
beginning of the war. There was at first 
a terrible slump. People were afraid to 
go to the theatres, and tbe managers nearly 
went ont of business. Then the King is- 
sued a proclamation urging the people to 
seek relaxation and amusement in order 
to have a better spirit with which to pros- 
ecute tie war. Since then business has 
been the best in years. The people here 
need some such urging. The newspapers 
should do it. I think the future will be 
bright if the press will do its share in en- 
couraging people to go to the theatre and 
in asking the public to seek relaxation from 
a war worn' spirit. 



December 19. 1917 



THE HEW YORK CLIPPER 



15 




President and Secretary 
Treasurer 



F s m aW d ax 1 SS3 lor Frank Queen 

Published by the 

CLirrER CORPORATION 

Orland W. Vaughaa 
Frederick C. atuller 

1*04 Broadway. New York 
Telephone Bryant 6117-6118 
.ORLAND W. VAUGHAN, EDITOR 
Paul C. Sweinnart, Managing Editor 

NEW TORI, DECEMBER 19, 1917 



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THE COBBLER TO HIS LAST 

The recent attempt of the Y. M. C. A. 
to run shows shduld prove an invaluable 
object lesson to everyone who believes it 
possible to conduct show business without 
practical experience. Hie enterprise 
proved the failure it deserved to be, and 
this organization ia not likely to again 
attempt it. 

There is no question that the Y. M. 
C. A. is a great institution, and, in its 
many years of existence, has gained an 
experience that eminently fits it for its 
work. Its heads have grown up with 
it, are familiar with its objects and its 
needs and are thus well qualified to gen- 
eral it. 

But its objects and needs are a far cry 
from the objects and needs of the Bhow 
business, and because its administrative 
heads have proved their efficiency in the 
conduct of the organization is no reason 
for them to believe that they could suc- 
ceed in a totally different line. 

No one questions the ability of Marc 
Rlaw and Abraham Erlanger as manag- 
ers. They have by their long experience 
won places in the very front rank. 
Theirs are names to conjure with in the 
theatrical business, but with all their ex- 
perience, with all their . knowledge which 
yean of devotion to their business has 
brought them, they would undoubtedly 
prove flivvers if they attempted to run the 
Y. M. C. A, 

Of what use would their knowledge of 
plays, of theatres, of routing shows, of 
all of the things material to the proper 
conduct of the theatrical business be to 
them if they were placed at the head of 
the Y. M. C. A.T Little indeed, aa the 
two lines have nothing in common. 

A man who ia a good blacksmith would 
undoubtedly make a fizzle as a jeweler. 
And this applies to any other two lines as 
widely separated as the 'theatre and the 
Y. M. C. A. 

Let the administrators of the Young 
Men's Christian Association stick to the 
business they know. There is always 
plenty of work for them, if they do it 
thoroughly and properly. Let them pot 
their best endeavors to looking after the 
moral and physical welfare of the youth 
of the country. 

Let them do this, and they do their duty 
well, and let them leave the show busi- 
ness to those who are equipped for ft by 
experience. 




s 



s 



§ 



1 I 
11 

1 ! 
|j 

s I 



THE PRESS AGENT 

By WALTER J. KINGSLEY 

{In "Tht Broadway Anthology"} 

By many names men call me— 
Press agent, publicity promoter, faker; 
Ofttimea tho short and simple liar. 
Charles A. Dana told roe 

1 was a buccaneer '"^ 

On the high seanof journalism. 
Many a newspaper business manager 
Has charged me 
With selling his space 
Over his head. 

Everyone loves me v!Ss*M 

When 1 get their names into print— 
For this is an age of publicity — Jj ":| 

And he who bloweth not his own horn ;>.-.' 
The same shall not be blown. r 

I have aired, nursed and reared 
Many reputation*. _. __, 

Few men or women have I found «**»*-. . 

Scornful of praise or blame tit*^ ' 

In the press. * 

The folk of the stage ' 
Live on publicity 

Yet to the world they pretend to dislike it. 
But to me they plead for it, cry for it. 
Oft times do that for* it 
Which must make the God Notoriety 
Grin at the weakness of mortals. 
I hold a terrible power 
And sometimes my own moderation 
Amazes me. 

For I can abase as well aa elevate. 
Tear down as well aa build up. 
I know all the ways of fair speaking 
And can lead any favorites 
To fame and golden rewards. 
There are a thousand channels j~<"' '■ 

Through which press agency can exploit - 
Its star or its movement. 
Never obvious, hut like the submarine 
Submersible beneath the sea 
Of publicity. 

But I know, too, of the waya 
That undo in Manhattan. 
There are bacilli of rumor 
That slip through the finest of filter* 
And defy the --med : al serums 
Of angry denial. 
Pin a laugh to your tale 
When stalking your enemy 
And not your exile or your death 
Will stay the "uffaws of merriment 
Aa the story flies 
Through the Wicked Forties 
And on to the "Road." 

Laughter giveth the rumor strong wings. 
Truly the press agent. 
Who knoweth his psychology, 
Likewise his New York 
In all of ita ramifications. 
And hath a nimble wit. 
Can play fast and loose 
With the lives of many. 
Nevertheless he hath no great reward 
And most in the theatre 
Draw fatter returns than he. 
Yet is he called upon to make the show. 
To save the show. 
But never is he given credit 
Comparable to that which falleth 
Upon the slightest jester or singer or dancer 
Who mugs, mimes or hoofs in a hit. 
Yet is the press agent happy. 
He lovath his work. 
It has excitement and intrigue. 
And to further the cause of beautiful women, 
To discover the wonderful girls of the theatres. 
And lead them in progress triumphal 
"Till their names outface the jealous night 
On Broadway, in incandescent*, 
Is in itself a privilege 
That compensates 

For the wisdom of the cub reporter. 
The amusement of the seasoned editor 
Shredding the cherished story 
And uprooting the flourishing "plant** : 
Makes one forgive 
The ingratitude of artists arrived. 
They who do not love me 
1 hope to have fear me: 
There is only one Hell 
And that ia to be disregarded. 




Rialto Rattles 



Thanks! The same to you. 

PAY UP I 

The life of Francis Fay is just ene lit- 
tle judgment after another. 

THE TRUTH WILL OUT 

The real names of Florence sad Marion 
Tempest are Florence and Marion Ijames. 

CHEER UP 

One advertisement reads "What's Your 
Husband Doing?" and directly below it Is 
"Ob, Boy l» 

WILD AND W00LY 

Some one asked for names sf all In- 
dians on the stage. Well, new— there's 
Eva Tanguay ! 

IN AND OUT 

Sir Johnstone Forbes Robertson just 
walked right in and turned arena* and 
Walked right out again. 

ANOTHER 

Harry Lauder, world's famous farewell 
artist, is going to take another auaal fare- 
well appearance in ApriL 



HENRY'S LOST 

Some one stole Doe Sua** tiwav rat fremt 
of the Olympic last week. Way didn't 
yon take it in with you, Dos! 

STILL WITH US 

Although Jerusalem has susveaatssen, 
the natives of that land are still aeldiag 
their own in the theatrical business. 



DRY SPOT 

Monday was Scotch-Irish day at Here 
Land, but those who searched far the 
Haig and Haig exhibit wars .iaaapeiatea. 



CHRISTMAS 

New Christmas is here, and asters all 
speak of Christmas cheer, but what good 
is the speaking for up goes the price sf 
beer. 



LET *BM ALONE 

Head line last week read "Mixed 
Blondes*' get Jewett.' Serves yen right, 
Henry. I never did have faith in a 
blonde, much less a bleached 



ENEMY ALIENS 

President Wilson has proclaimed neu- 
trality to Switzerland, but we hope this 
does not apply to most of the Swiss 
yodelers we bear in vaudeville. They 
should be interned at once. 



SUCH IS LIFE 

The strike of the motion picture oper- 
ators lasted just about long enough to 
allow the producers to make a news week- 
ly of them, which the operators sen shew 
when they go back to work. 

ONLY A SLIGHT MISTAKE 

A Salt Lake City paper is authority for 
the statement that Lon Tellegsn decided 
to marry Geraldine Farrar esTv after he 
had seen her in the movies. It shows a 
picture of Wallace Raid and her from 
"The Woman God Forgot,'* and says she 
"is "here seen making love te B ryan t 
Washburn." 

L0*""ED LIKE IT 

F— nk A. "Pander lip, milEoasars hanker, 
after making an address at a th eatre ia 
Pittsburgh, got mixed in trying to get 
out, and one of the ushers mhTtsok him 
for a Johnnie because he had bis cane 
with him. It's quite unusual far bankers 
to be taken for Johnnies, but sot so un- 
usual for Johnnies to be taken for 
bankers. 



TWENTY-FIVE YEARS AGO 

"The Theatre of Arts and Letters,'* tee- 
tered by H. B. McDowell and F. H. Sar- 
gent, opened operations at Proctor's Twen- 
ty-third Street Theatre, New York. Each 
person paid $5. No seats were reserved. 
Ladies were obliged to remove their hats. 



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Students of Situation Throughbtjl, Country Declare That Tying Up of {load Shows Through Monopoly 

£ of Transportation by Troops and Dwindling Interest in '*"* 
. ; - Films Make Big Revival Certain 



18 stock about to CO ICE BACK? At the present time, this is a very pertinent ques- 
tion and- one to which the answer is aa eagerly awaited by the Broadway .producer 
as it if by the manager in Oahko»h •or-KaUmar.oo. The 'latter believes the time is 
near when the transportation facilities wilT Be' so' taxed by the necessary moving 
of troops that it will be difficult for road shows to move with any degree of reg- 
ularity and, therefore, the provincial manager is going to find it difficult to play at- 
tractions aa in former seasons. _ # __ • -— - • 

And for once, the Broadway manager agrees" with nhn, for, just now, he is in a 
quandary aa to how he. is going to get a suitable ''return from his investment in any play 
he produces in Hew York. It is all right, so long as the play has draught in the 
metropolis, but the H ""» comes, even with the best, when successes wears out its wel- 
come. Then what! ~ s> |l < 

The answer, at present, seems to be stockl " j.c. ..- 

A success on Broadway ia reasonably sure to bring to its producers a good revenue 
for several years if it has a sufficient demand in stock, and sometimes even a play which 



does not meet with very material success- on the Great White Way proves to be well 
suited to Stock and through that channel produces: a very, substantial revenue. 

Thus, while the producer is -viewing the situation from- his angle the provincial man- 
ager- is also hoping that the' -craving of the public for amusement will induce it to torn 
to permanent stock for the relaxation that it has for years Obtained through the medium 
of road snows. ' ' ■".%«.- >-: 

Both managers are convinced that the public will never be satisfied to let motion 
pictures entirely take the place of the spoken drama, and therefore both are optimistic- 
ally inclined. '.-.'. --■-••■ 

Of all those interested in the amusement business none are better able to size up 
the situation and draw a logical conclusion than the play ^broker, the middle man who 
takes the play from the producing manager and places it. with the' stock manager. His 
opinion is of undoubted importance. 

-Following are the expressions of a number of the leading play brokers and stock 
agents in New York which are of interest at this time. ..- -•" ■' - «-■• 



Chamberlain Brown 

{(TN my opinion, stock. is sure to come back strong 
I in a few months. The public seems to be getting 

* tired of motion pictures as a steady diet-._No£ 
that they will ever die out, for I believe them to' be a 
national institution that will always be on the theatrical 
bill of fare. But, I believe they have reached their 
tenith and are due for a sharp decline. With pictures, 
as with everything else, there are but. two ways to go,' 
forward and backward. Nothing ever stands still and 
when the forward movement ceases, the backward one 
begins. 

"This is the law of nature and upon this law I base 
my conclusion. All other forms of entertainment "have 
had to meet the same crisis and I am loath to believe 
that motion pictures will prove an exception. 

"I thoroughly believe that stock, with the decline of 
pictures, is bound to again come into. .its, own. It was' 
at one time the most popular of all' branches of the 
profession and the leading players of this country, and 
of the world, were to be found as members of stock 
companies. . • 

"The stock company has an appeal to the play-goer 
not equalled by even what is called the dramatic com- 

ry. The performances are seen week in and week out 
practically the same- audiences and every member 
of the company, seen each successive week in a different 
character, has his or her admirers who like to compare 
their different performances. -.:< 

"I believe this season will see an unprecedented ad-- 
vancement in stock. I am sure the public will always 
demand a popular form of the drama. The silent drama 
has furnished it for some time and now, I am-suxe, the . 
spoken drama, as given by a stock company,' will take 
its place." 

Jack White 
(Century Play Company) 

iij CERTAINLY believe stock is coming back. Every : 
j thing points that way. In the first place, what 
form of entertainment is going to take the 
place- of the road show when it is unable to fill 
ita bookings, as they will be from now., on . because 
of lack of transportation facilities, due to the wart 
Surely it will not be motion pictures, for they can never 
take the full place of the spoken drama, wonderful 
though they. be. Neither will vaudeville, which .holds a 
niche of its own in the. public's fancy. What, then, is 
there left? The answer is stock. ' 

"In. my opinion, the coming of stock into its own is 
just as sure as anything in the future can be, save the 
proverbial death and taxes. = rri' 

"The best proof that I am right, in my opinion, is 
that many of the. leading stock managers, who have 
been in the business for years, believe the same as I do. 
They take, their cue from their public. They believe 
they. see in their patrons the signs of increased interest 
in stock. 

"Poll is- one of the managers .who holds this belief 
and is going to. back it by "■'""; an earlier Spring 
opening than ever before. - - .-, - 

"Perhaps 1 may be too optimistic, but I believe the 
coming Spring and Summer is going to be a business 
record breaker for stock, and that would mean a natural 
increase in the number of stock companies." 

Darcy A Wolford 

rE fully believe that the year of 1918 is to be 
the greatest for stock this country has ever 
seen. In fact, we cannot see how it can be 
otherwise. What are the people going to do when the 
road shows have to close because of transportation 7 
Of course, it would be possible for the shows to pur- 
chase automobiles and thus furnish their own transpor- 



tation, but this would only be feasible for the smaller 
companies. Few managers would have the temerity to 
at temp t to move a big scenic production. 

"What, then, is left far the "people outside of the 

« L 1 very big cities who want amusement other than that 

... furnished them by motion pictures and vaudeville T 

Why, stock, of course. And that stock is coming back 

in 1918 and coming back with a bang we firmly believe. 

"After the first of the year we look for the establish- 
ment of a permanent stock company in nearly every 
one, two and three-night stand in the country. - We are 
of the opinion that the moment the road shows have to 
close and the people are denied the pleasure of seeing the 
. drama they will get so show hungry that it will be al- 
most impossible to install the companies fast enough. 

Pan! Scott 

i frj^o me it Is just as sure that stock is coming back 

I with a rush rs I am that people will never be 

* willing to do without their amusements. And 

stock is the only logical form of entertainment to take 

the place of the road show. 

"The latter will be forced to close soon through lack 
of transportation' facilities. The very big cities -will 
probably suffer little, but the people of the e mailer 
.cities can scarcely be expected to be satisfied -with mo- 
tion pictures or vaudeville. They will not do it. They 
want the drama and if .they cannot get it via the road 
show route they will demand' it through the medium of 
stock. 

"I believe that the year 1818 will see more stock 
companies in successful operation in' this country than 
have ever been known before. I believe the top notch 
of the past wOl be more than trebled and that in every 
city of 50,000 or more population, and in many instances 
less than that, there will be a permanent stock company 
composed of capable players and producing a better 
grade of shows than are given by road companies. 

"Let me say in closing that if I am wrong in my opin- 
ion and stock does not come back, then good-bye 
dramatic entertainment for the duration of the war." 



"W" 



JnyFsntai I 

H J TRULY believe that at last stock is about to 
j come into its own. On every side I hear the 

x same thing. There seems to be an inclination 
in cities which heretofore dedicated its .new theatres, or 
most of .them, to motion pictures, to adopt stock as an 
offset to' the dearth- of road shows, which, on account of 
lack of proper transportation, facilities, are growing less 
every day. . . •'..':-•'• 

"I am at the present time- negotiating with the own- 
ers of the New Colonial Theatre, at JUtoona, Pa., to 
open the. house, with a permanent stock company. One 
year ago the house would have .probably divided its 
bookings between road shows .and motion pictures. ■ Now 
the managers realize that. the. time is near when .few, 
if any, road shows will reach Altoona and stock com- 
pany productions are the logical substitute, for the 
public will not consent to do without it's drama. 

"Another straw which tends. to show which way the 
wind blows is seen in the fact" that business at my stock 
house in Newark is about double what it was hut year 
when I ran a ten weeks' season. Motion pictures and 
vaudeville continue in this city the same this year as 
last and the houses devoted to those lines of entertain- 
ment show no increase in attendance, while that of 
stock jumps nearly 100 per cent.' ■ . 

"Yes, I believe stock is due -for an unprecedented 
boom. Some think it will come with the advent of the 
New Year, I do myself. This may be rushing thingB a 
little and the lull in amusements may continue for sev- 
eral -weeks into 1918, but just wait till the public gets 
hungry for the drama. Then stock will have its innings." 



Wale* Winter 

ii X S early as last September, when we first began 
L\ to realize that transportation facilities of this 

■* *■ country, would, to a large extent, be devoted 
to the needs 01 the Government, I was of the opinion 
that there would be a" general movement in favor of 
stock. At that time, I fully expected to see it by the 
holidays. 

"I figured that there would necessarily be a luU and 
that during that lull the public would be content to get 
it's entertainment from motion pictures and vaudeville. 
But I felt the awakening would come and the desire for 
the drama would be so strong that houses all over the 
country, many of them doing little, some of them dark, 
and being eaten up by taxes, would be turned over to 
stock, -■ ... 

"As X said above, I fully expected this to take place 
by or before Christmas. Events have proved I was 
wrong in my deductions as to time. Christmas is upon 
us and, while in certain quarters there is shown some 
stock activity, there is little change in the general 
situation, except that from various quarters comes the 
cheering news that stock business this year shows a 
marked increase over that of last. 

"This, in itself, proves to me that, in the main, my 
deductions were correct and makes me cling to the be- 
lief that stock is on the threshold of a big "boom." 

■ Alice Kaoser 

iff AM certainly of the opinion that stock is going to 
I come into its own during the coming year. It 

* seems bound to, for the public wUl not be satis- 
fied with pictures alone. They are excellent entertain- 
ment, but will never take the place of the spoken 
drama. 

"Just how soon the stock boom will come will differ 
in different localities as it will depend entirely upon 
how long a community will be willing to get along 
without the drama. Some will have more patience than 
others, but all will eventually reach their patience-limit. 
When this time comes, stock will come into the breach. 

"It may be with the beginning of the New Year, it 
may not be for a month, or even longer, but I expect 
cities that have never before had a permanent stock 
company to come into the fold one by one, for people 
must have their entertainment. I mean the kind of 
entertainment that the drama furnishes. 

"So, when the time arrives, be it soon or late, the 
condition of stock in the United States, both 'as to the 
number of companies and the business done by each, 
wiU be the best on record." 

■ E. W. Hart 

(Sanger and Jordan) 

• «f TNQUESTK>NABLY, the enforced closing of many 
1 I of the road companies win inure to Sic benefit 
^"^ of stock. Jnst to what extent, however, may 
be open to conjecture. Personally, I am of the opinion 
that when- the New Year is a month or so- old the 
public in cities of the second and, third class through- 
out the' country will be clamoring for stock as the only 
thing to take the place of the traveling company. 

"By that time, from present indications, there wiU be 
few traveling shows visiting the one, two and three- 
night stands, and the people of such - cities will be 
drama hungry. The very large cities like New. York, 
Philadelphia, Chicago, Boston, etc., will not ■ feel . the 
effects of the lack of show transportation, for they can 
then, as now, make productions. 

.. -pjjg ^{tiea of lesser "-sire, however, are sure to feel 
it and I expect to see a boom in Spring and Summer 
stock such as we have never seen before." 



December 19, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



17 




TO OPEN 

•TV* fir- 

CO/AT 

FUNSTOJf J 

GOVERNMENT TO SUPERVISE HOUSE 



Camp Funston, Kan., Dec. .14.— Mor- 
gan Wallace;' who has been conducting a 
stock company at Sioux City, la., for the 
but four years, is about to open .a new 
$40,000 theatre With stock, to furnish en- 
tertainment for the soldiers. The house 
is a frame building, finished in" stucco and, 
when entirely completed, will be an orna- 
mental structure. 

The house has one balcony and a Beat- 
ing capacity of 1,700 and has been erected 
according to government plans and specifi- 
cations. While it will be conducted by 
Manager Wallace it will practically" be 
under United States Government super- 
vision. 

The theatre, which is located in the cen- 
tre of the .cantonment, is the result of 
efforts of the . commanding officer who', 
having, ; had..: Wallace's enterprise highly 
recommended to him, selected him to con- 
duct a similar one here. The building of 
the theatre resulted. 

Wallace is now in Hew York engaging 
a company of capable players and the 
present intention is to open the house on 
New Year's. 

Owing to the difficulty of securing suit- 
able living accommodations for the mem- 
bers of the company, the management has 
taken over a large stone farmhouse, built; 
in Civil War times, which has been re- 
fitted and famished as a home for the 
players. | 

Manager Wallace ''will present in the 
camp theatre well known Broadway suc- 
cesses and. as many as possible of the re- 
cent ones which are new to the soldiers. 
The opening play, as at present planned, 
will be "Seven Keys to Baldpate." The 
prices of admission will be from 25 cents 
to 75 cents. 



SOMERV1JU-E LIKES ^1£L0DRAMA- 
Somekvjtxe, Mass.. Dec. 151— "For"the 
Man She Loved"" was" this w"eeVS'*6nering 
:byv t^-» v S6inerviJlB' Players and the local 
theatre-goers ptr£<their stamp of approval." 
on it, showing that they like good melo- 
drama. ,The work of the various mem- 
bers of the company was gilt-edged. Ade- ' 
: lynf BnahneU gave a .delightful portrayal 
' of 'Mary Ballard,' while Arthur Howard . 
in the opposite lead was manly and force- 
ful. Brandon Evans made a very satis- 
factory "villain" to the delight of the 
"gallery gods." 'Grace Fox furnished most 
of the comedy as the Irish woman. 1 ' John . 
Gordon and Ruth Fielding as the youthful 
lovers pleased and Rose Gordon, as Blonde 
Mabel, supplied the necessary "punch" to 
the last act. John M. Kline was good, and 
Director Arthur Ritchie, besides produc- 
ing the play with his usual excellence, - 
played the role of Thompson. Next 
week's biU is "Common Law." . . . 



DIRECTOR GETS ARMY DISCHARGE 

Charles Hosted, stock director, is re- 
turning to the theatrical profession after 
being honorably discharged from the Na- 
tional Army. After a successful Spring 
engagement as director of the Columbia 
Players in Grand Rapids, Mich., Husted 
spent the Summer on his farm prior to 
being called for army service at Camp 
Caster. 



PRIEST PLAYERS DOING WELL , 

Minneapolis, Minn., Dec. 17.— The 
Frank C. Priest Players, at the Shubert 
Theatre, are doing a splendid business. 
This week's bfll is "The Tidal Wave." 
The returns from this play were so good 
at the Shubert Theatre, St. Paul, that 
Manager Priest has sent it on the road 
for a torn of the Northwest, playing one, 
two and three night stands. , 

JOHN HALLLDAY MARRIES 

Denver, Col., Dec 12. — John HalUday 
and Eva -Lang, respectively leading man 
and leading woman of the Denham The- 
atre Stock Company, were married last 
Saturday. 



STOCK GETS BLANEY PLAYS 

The plays made popular by Charles and 
Harry Clay Blaney have been released for 
stock purposes. They aU belong to the 
melodramatic class and should prove suc- 
cessful in stock. , 



KNIFFTN REJOINS STRAND STOCK 

HoBOKxir, N. J„ Dec. 12.— W. Gard- 
ner Kniffin, a favorite in this city, has re- 
turned to rejoin the stock company at the 
Strand Theatre for the season. . ./^ 



VAILS CELEBRATE WEDDING 

Malden. Mass., Dec. 14.— Mr. and Mrs. 
Edwin Vail celebrated their tenth wedding 
anniversary by a dinner to their friends. . 
at the Hotel Somerset here. Mr. Vail is 
the director of. the Temple Stock at the 
Auditorium and his wife, Grace Wynden 
Vail, was formerly publicity manager of 
the Paramount and Artcraft Pictures in 
the South. The guests were members of 
the' Temple Stock and included: Mr. and 
Mrs. Stanley James, Hazele Burgees', Ada 
Dalton, Mark Kent, Robert Brister, 
Thomas Holden, Frank Vernoy and Albert 
Bushee. Messages of good wishes were 
received from Carl Pierce and C. E. Tandy 
of Paramount and Artcraft Corporations, 
S. A. Lynch, president of Triangle; Na- 
than Appel, and Mr. and Mrs. Richard 
Himmelein, of Portland, Me. 



EL PASO TO SEE TIDAL WAVE" 

El Paso, Tex, Dec. 14. — "The Tidal 
Wave" wiU be the offering of the Otis 
OUver Players at the Crawford Theatre 
opening next Monday. This play has 
been successfully presented by Manager 
Oliver in Richmond and Lafayette, Ind., 
- and Lincoln, Neb., and, as it played to 
top-notch business there, he looks for rec- 
ord attendance here, despite the fact that 
next week is considered the "hoodoo" the- 
atrical week of the season. On Christmas 
week, Oliver says he will present the piece 
at the Crawford, in Wichita, Kan. 



WASHINGTON TO 

« HAV&STQCK* 

ATPOLTS 

OPENS CHRISTMAS DAY 

Washington, D. C., Dee. 14. — Begin- 
ning with Christmas matinee. Poll's The* 
atie'bere is. to become the home of musical 
comedy revues. •■•" "" 

Preparations have been making for this 
departure for some time, under the per- 
sonal supervision of General Manager 
James Thaichefe/who has been making fly- 
ing trips between liis headquarters in' New 
York and this city. 

Manager Thatcher plana to get a little 
away from the present-day revue, and to 
this end will secure all of the latest musi- 
cal comedies available, preferably Broad- 
way hits, which will be made into revues. 
They will be played at the regular Poli 
popular prices. 

A company of .fifty people, including a 
chorus, has been engaged. In the cast are 
Louise Mink,, prima donna; Sarah Ed- 
wards, "Enlalut YoungVlnes Baurin," Carrie 
Zamp, George Nathanson, Jack Squire, W. 
J. McCarthy and Billy Linn, with Charles 
Sinclaire. producer. 

Tony Buffaflo. has been engaged as mu- 
sical director .and will he at the head of 
a large '6rebes < tra. 

"The Candy Shop," in which Rock and 
Fulton were starred by Charles Dilling- 
ham, will be, the opening' bfll. 

GREW TO HAVE ROAD SHOW 

Chicago, Dec 14. — G. P. Grew, the weU 
known stock leading, man, has acquired 
the rights to "The Heart of Wetona" for 
one-night stands in Western territory. 
Most of the cast of the company, which 
closed on the International Circuit at 
Louisville, has been re-engaged and' the 
Bhow will open in this city during the 
Holidays. Grew wfll play the role for- 
merly played by John Mfltern. 



PACKARD PLAYERS DRAW WELL 

Newark. N. J., Dec. 13. — Jay Packard's 
Orpheum Players are doing an excellent 
business and the company has firmly es- 
tablished itself. Among the most popular 
members are John Lorenz, Gus Forbes, 
John Dilson, Elsie Esmond and Director 
Claude Miller, under whose supervision 
the plays are given capital productions. 
"Playthings'" is this week's bill, "Madame 
X" next week, with "Excuse Me" to fol- 
low. 



CORM1CAN COMPLETES COMPANY 

Bayonne, . N. J., Dec. 15. — James Cor- 
mican has completed his stock organiza- 
tion and the company has a number of 
well known players. It includes: Lorna 
Elliott, Robert LeSuer, Howard R. Hall, 
Pat Barrett, Florence Raymond, Hall 
Briggs, John Robb, Rogers Barker, di- 
rector, and Thomas Wirth, scenic artist. 
Rehearsals began Tuesday, Dec 18, with 
"Rolling Stones" as the first bflL 



CLEARY GOES SOUTH 

Val C. Cleary and wife, Grace Pickert, 
well known in stock, together with Mabel 
Keightley, the playwright, left last week, 
by boat, for Miami, Fla., to visit Willis 
Pickert, the old-time manager, at his boms 
In that city. 



BASHFORD WRITES ANOTHER PLAY 

* San Francisco, Dec 14. — Herbert 
Bashford. literary editor of The Bulletin. 
and author of "The Woman He Married," 
which achieved success in stock, has writ- 
ten another, play called "A Light in the 
Dark," which - he has released for stock 
and repertoire through Darcy and Wolford. 



JULIE HERNE WRITES PLAY 

Julie Herne has taken to playwriting. 
The first effort -from her pen is entitled 
"A Young Girl's Romance, which, under 
the title of "The Girl Who Came Back," 
was recently given its premiere by the 
Cecil Spooner - Stock Company . at the 
Grand Opera House, Brooklyn. 

STOCK TO GIVE NEW PLAY 

Bridgeport, Conn, Dec 17.-r- M Blrds of 
Prey," a new play by Joseph Noel, author 
of "The Pawn" and other plays, which 
have been acquired by the Century Play 
Company, will be given its first produc- 
tion by the Poli Players week after next. 

EMERSON GETS "THE OTHER WIFE" 

Lowell, Mass, Dec 14. — Charles S. 
Emerson, general manager of the Emer- 
son-Sites Players, has contracted for "The 
Other Wife," -which win be presented by 
his stock companies in HsverhflL Law- 
rence and this city. 



LAWRENCE RELEASES NEW PLAY 

Vincent S. Lawrence has rel eased his 
new play, The Girl Outside," for stock 
through the Century Play Company. 



LORD'S SECOND SHOW OPENS 

PiNK BL&s*'Ark., Dec 12.— The Lord 
and Vernon Number Two Show opened 
at the Orpheo Theatre here last Monday 
ind went over big with the following com- 
pany: Tom WTBard, Ned Wilson, LaMont 
(Skinny) and Seymour, H. R. Hixon, Hy 
Heath and wife, Lillian Hodges, a musi- 
cal director and six chorus girl*. The 
show wfll play the Grand, Hot Springs, 
next week and open at the Kempner, Lit- 
tle Rock, the week following for an in- 
definite rnn of stock. Billy Jackson will 
do the producing.: Lew Hampton, black- 
face comedian and. principal comedian with 
Galvin's "Little Miss Mlxup'f Company 
for several years, will open with the show 
next week* to do comedy and also sing 
tenor, in the male quartette. The Lord 
and Vern on Number. One Show is now in 
if s thirteenth week at the Gem, Little 
Rock, and is breaking all records. Both 
shows will remain in Little Rock all sea- 
son, each offering two f orty-fl ve-minu t* 
bQls a week/ with a full scenic production 
for both. ■ - 



HARKTNS FORMS NEW STOCK 

CBASLcrrmown, Can, Dee. 14.— Man- 
ager WUl S. Harkins has engaged, throng a 
bis New York representative, Wales Win- 
ter, a stock company for his annual tonr 
through Canada and thence to the West 
Indies. Among those engaged are Mar- 
jorie Davis, Lillian Wirth, Lois Perkins, 
Charles Newsome, George Hall, Clay Cody 
and Max MacDonald. The show wfll open 
here' on Christmas Day and wfll play eight 
weeks in Canada. 



WILLIAMS ORGANIZES NO. 3 CO. 

KoKOMO, Ind, Dec 14. — Ed. Williams 
has organized a number three stock com- 
pany which he wfll open on New Tear's 
Day. The Middle West is ripe now for 
stock companies, and Manager Williams is 
taking advantage of it The Williams 
Stoctf Co. at this place, is in its eighteenth 
week, the current bills being "Vottj-fiva 
Minutes from Broadway" and "It Pays to 
Advertise." 



JEWETT COMPANY REHEARSING 

Boston, Dec IS.— Henry Jewett has 
started rehearsals with his company at 
the Copley Theatre, preparing for his re- 
turn to repertoire 'Tanny's First Play," 
the initial bfll, wfll open next Saturday 
and wfll be retained for Christinas week. 
"General John- Regan'' wfll follow New 
Year's week, when it wfll receive its first 
Boston production. 



WILL OPEN POCATELLO STOCK 

Pocateixo, Idaho,- Dec 14. — W. D. 
Maylon wfll open the Palace Theatre next 
Monday with a permanent stock company. 
He has secured "The Heart of Wetona," 
"Little Peggy CMoore," "Back Home,** 
"In WsJkedJlnimy" and "For the Man 
She Loved." The first named will be the 
opening* bfU and the others will follow in 
the order named. 



HART STOCK STARTS 2D YEAR 

Long Beach, Cal., Dec. 12.— The Hart 
Brothers last week celebrated the first 
anniversary of their -Co-operative Stock 
at the Hart Theatre, and this week the 
Hart Players start on'their second year. 
The theatre is a cozy house with a seat- 
ing capacity of upward of 700, and is 
filled at every performance. 



Stock and Repertoire continued on Pea~e 129 - 



PATTERSON ENTERS CAMP CUSTER 

Camp Custer. Mich, Dec 12.— Grand 
Patterson, the stock man, is here training 
in the 330th Machine Gun Battalion, hav- 
ing been here since last August. The boys 
are getting plenty of drill and are looking 
fit as fiddles. They expect to get ov 
in January.. 



18 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



December 19, 1917 



\A,\ 



Be a Stage Hit 



:v 



■>. "You GyVNi 
With a PI 



|*s*- ftmi 



A 2 2- Karat Gloom Chaser! A wonderful c< 



II 



Words by HARRY PEASE and HOWARD JOHNSON The Mild that |0eS 0V@r" WijHlOUt GXpl 



America's 
Greatest Song I 



World 5 * Biggest Hit! 
George M. Cohan's world-wide song-hiK 

Nothing that we ean say could add to Its 
history making success or fame! 



The song that put "Jazz" on the 



The Paddy of Air 



« 



' Songs! 



A Sure- 



_ ^CHICAGO 

GRANDOPERA MOUSE BLDG. 

BOSTON 

181 TREMONT STREET 

PHILADELPHIA e-re 

BROAD AND CHERRY, STS. 



LEO 

135 W. 44® 1 



THE. NEW YORK CLIPPER 




19 



o Wrong 
1ST' Song 



Sin£aEEISTsoit£ 
- a Stage 




medy song with real "professional" humor 

TO GET WELL 

ties and lands a wallop straight to the funny bone! 



Music by HARRY JENTES 



— — 




/ 


Ibbs ■IB ■■ 


li(| 




\ 



Gets Down 
Deep Under Your Skin 

HOMEWARD 




You can see victory and world peace In 
this number 

Words by 
HOWARD JOHN80N and COLEMAN GOETZ 
■ MlMie by GEO. W. MEYER 



That **4*sm f * melody that you hear all around! 

BALL 




Fire* Applause Winning Hit! 



ibTu Trie, 

t.,NewTfor!c 



BY SHELTON BROOKS, 
writer of "Welkin' the Dog" 



i/X^'' V?T. LOUIS 

TThTAND OLIVE STS" 




&C%S™k%b/ ,, V< SAN FRANCISCO 




PANTASES THEATRE BLD'G; 

MINNEAPOLIS 

LYRIC THEATRE BLD'G. 



20 



IS3J . . T1|^;NEW: YORK CLIPPER 



December 19, 1917 




'!!atre. New' York, ho 
. \ d a f 1 y newspaper 
/".tod ever, requested "*■ ' ' '& •"''• 

, ,,"* story on' tnestib- - ;: .,■* ■ .■*■. 

,'ject of burlesque nor sought an interview 
•on that subject with any person con- 

. nected with burlesque. The theatrical 

' departments of "the papers rarely men- 
tioned the performances either in advance 
.■or after the openings, and when they did; 
the notices Were extremely brief. Only' 
when some person on oar lists committed 

' *» crime dm the newspapers devote any 
considerable apace to our activities. ■ 
. Then then was the devil to pay. There 
' were no extenuating circumstances. We 

. were adjudged guilty before trial People 
in other divisions of amusement turned 
irp their noses at us. . 

We were a forlorn lot, to be sure. I 
will not say there was no justification 
for -at least" some of this sort of treat-, 
ment. While. some of the shows were 
Indifferent to the strict canons of pro- 
priety, it is a fact ■ that most of them 
were unobjectionable in their dialogue 
and action. Because the few were bad. 
by common assent they were placed in the 
same category. " • •» 

This is the situation that had much 
to do with the revolt in the ranks of 
burlesque producers along about 1902 and 
that resulted in toe secession from the 
old Empire Circuit and the incorporation 
of the Columbia Amusement Company. 
For the first few years it was hard sled- 
ding for the young organization. Dollars 
were as scarce as hen's teeth, but we had 
plenty of determination, and abundance 
of pugnacity and a deep-rooted sense of 
obligation to ourselves, our families,' our 
friends and not the least of all to the 
ideals of the American stage. 

■ MHST of all, vulgarity must be elimi- 
X nated and we must clean house In 
all other directions. Our theatres 
most be made inviting and brought up 
to modern standards. Our players must 
create laughter without resorting to the 
slap-stick and bladder and our scenery 
and costumes must be clean and har- 
monious in coloring even if we could not 
afford to pay hid priced painters and 
costumers. In brief, we were determined 
to be respectable and neat in appearance 
as a fixed fundamental principle. 

We had calculated on the possibility of 
driving away the established patronage 
of burlesque theatres, which consisted of 
men and boys of p rur ient minds who were 
attracted by the cooch dancer, the sala- 
cious jokes and the coarse, suggestive 
antics of the men and women on the 
stage. It was a problem that must be 
solved and worked out our way with as 
little detriment to our financial returns 
as possible. 

But we were patient and stuck to our 
task, although for a long time there was - 
little money to be divided at the end of 
the week. Perseverance finally won, how- 
ever. Old burlesque patrons gradually 
began to realize that clean, wholesome 
performances were more satis f actory and 
more enjoyable than the other kind and 
the general public, at first doubtful of 
the truth of the circulated reports that 
burlesque as presented in the Columbia 
chain of theatres could be attended * by 
self-respecting men and ladies and chil- 
dren, was not long to recognize the 
changed conditions. Constantly increas- 
ing patronage kept pace with our ad- 
vancement and it is a matter of record 
that our success proved the downfall of 
our old competitors. 

The Empire Circuit as a going institu- 
tion became extinct and for a time the 
Columbia Amusement Company was in 
sole possession of the burlesque field. 
Abortive efforts were made to establish 
other circuits, but as fast as they showed 
their heads we had little or no difficulty 
in overcoming them. 




Made It Objectionable and in Hlrepute 

F was not to be expected, that 'the Sties' • ""'of the popular kind, with spirited dancing 
wa could not reach. Or that aonui cer- - aid everything' else that typifies burlesque 
tain houses . throughout the . country and distinguishes' it from any <>ther form of 
„ that we did not care to include in our rir- ' amusement!-' ''''-■ 

cuit, could be permanently kept but of A" little walking trip made recently by an 

.'burlesque. We realized' that we must official, high 4n the councils' of tie Coltimbia 
ult ima t ely have opposition but we real- Amusement Company, brought to his atten- 
ded also that we had the strength to de- tlou most vividly the complete changes' which 




UP 



mand certain regularities of any opposi- 
tion; under penalty of encountering a 
vigorous and unrelenting fight from the 

Columbia. ' "*■ ■ ■ 

Taking advantage of our strength, we 
exacted clean shows as the most impor- 
tant observances of a new circuit that 
was formed four or five years ago. And 
without gutting the screws too strongly 
on it, and not desiring to be. too 'formid- 
able in our demands, we secured other 
: concessions of a minor kind and that 
related chiefly to prices and advertising 
methods, details of which are not. in- 
teresting to the public. 
. But to get back • to the - opening 
paragraph of this article, the estab- 
lishment of the Columbia Theatre 
at Broadway and Forty-seventh 
Street brought burlesque to the 
attention of- the daily newspapers 
and of that element of tbeatre- 
' goers that knew nothing about 
burlesque except from hearsay, 
'They came to the Columbia 
at first out .of curiosity, per- 
haps, and because the loca- 
tion is easily accessible. 
" And they" saw the fruition 
of our consummated, per- 
fectly worked out plan 
for clean, beautifully 
and! expensively pre- 
sented burlesque. They 
saw a thoroughly mod- 
ern theatre conducted 
with the same scrupu- 
lous care characteristic 
of the finest theatres on 
Broadway. The newspa- 
pers began to evince inter- 
est in our offerings, first by 
printing our advance an- 
nouncements and by assigning 
writers to review our shows. 
The pictures of our principal 
players were printed in the lay- 
outs alongside those of important 
Broadway stars. During six of 
the eight years the Columbia has 
been in existence, hardly a day has 
passed without its quota of requests 
from publishers of all classes of pub- 
lications for stories of one sort and 
another concerning burlesque and the 
activities of those concerned in it. This 
I regard as the most substantial and 
convincing indication of the progress that 
has been made in this division of Amer- 
ican theatricals. And this condition ob- 
tains today in 
every city where 
a Columbia 
Amueement 
Company thea- 
tre is operated. Not alone this. Scarcely 
a week passes that the services of our prin- 
cipal performers are not sought by what are 
called the "big two-dollar managements." 
It is not much exaggeration to say that 
there is not in this country today a two- 
dollar production nor a big-time vaudeville 
bill that does not include in its roster one 
or more principal men or women that 
came from the burlesque stage. 

AND burlesque will further improve as 
time goes on. Whatever changes 
may develop, there will be no devia- 
tion from the present general characteristics 
of the shows. It will always be lively, 
laughter-creating fun without any attempt 
at "high brow" libretto writing : with music 




BY SAM A. SCRIBNER 

(Secretary Colombia Amuwmmt Co.) 



have occurred in this branch of the amuse- 
ment profession, with 'which he has-been 
identified for many years. Down Fourth 
Avenue into Fourteenth Street, the journey 
took him and his friend. The old Dewey, 
which housed alternately Eastern and West- 
ern shows, is gone. On the north aide of 
the. street, the Olympic, for many years 
known as the home of Tony Pastor's Vari- 
ety, remains as one - of the older houses, 
' still catering to burlesque. 

Down Third Avenne and the Bowery 
their steps took them to the London, 
no w playing Jewish drama. To this 
bouse, many of the older managers 
had brought their first offerings' of 
burlesque and had jammed the thea- 
tre to the doors. The combina- " 
tion "Variety"' shows with their 
'long list of specialties, topped off 
with an' . afterpiece, gradually 
gave way to the girl shows, 
storting, with the old-. Bents 
Santley 'and Ida Siddons 
shows. "■ 

Combinations alternated . 
with bnrlssu.ni .shows, each 
playing the theatre several 
times during the season. 
Often the management 
did not book the follow- 
ing week until Friday 

night. 

The London, then 
the Criterion of Vari- 
ety and Burlesque 
houses, now compares in 
size and appointments to 
the Columbia, as a "black 
tent*' to the Strand of 
Bialto. 
Further down the Bow- 
ery, the trip took them to 
Miner's, now showing Italian 
vaudeville. Here the Hon. ■ 
Harry C. Miner laid the 
foundation of his fortune by 
catering to patrons of variety 
and burlesque along the same 
lines as the London, the same at- 
tractions playing both houses. 

The sight of the old Occidental 
Hotel, the home of the burlesqners 
during their Bowery engagements, 
and the see ■ of many jolly gather- 
ings awoke many pleasant recollec- 
tions as did the flalf Mile House on 
the corner above. - 
' In this section of ta city, a number 
of our well-known present Broadway 

— ■ — —j stars first listened 

| to' applause grati- 
| tying to their ears 
| if it did emanate 
" from the hands 
and feet of the East Siders. Sam Bernard, 
Emma Cams, Edna Aug, Weber and 
Fields, and many others have graduated 
from the London and Bowery burlesque 
theatres, and ail of them were members of 
the kind of shows referred to in this ar- 
ticle as "unobjectionable in their dialogue 
and action," and there were more of 
that kind than the other. Tights were 
the big attractions then, just as they 
are today, but the uncovered . lower limbs 
and other features, which, since then,. have 
had occasion to be censored, had not yet 
found their way to the stage. »•• 

What a vast difference between those 
days when Harry Miner's equipage would ' 
be the only vehicle ever discharging a pas- 
senger for either of these theatres, and the 



present time, when a 
steady line of autos 
and taxis bring men 
and women in eve- 
ning clothes to the 
Columbia. 

Then the Madison 
Avenue or Third Ave- 
rse car Jine was the traveling medium of 
•our managers. Now, there is hardly a 
'burlesque manager who does not arrive at 
the theatre in his private motor car. 

: ''f\C&' performers have fared equally 
v well. Big salaries are demanded by 
•-.'.. land paid to our principal perform- 
ers, who appear in our new theatres, dress 
in comfortable, sanitary rooms' and realise 
'the position of 'up-to-date burlesque by 
bringing to their patrons the best they can 
offer in their line of talent 
"'The Condition of the chorus girls has also 
improved with high salaries and elimination 
of expense to them for wardrobe. 

Burlesque offers to the actor today the 
most dependable line of work. Many of the 
principal comedians, prima donnas and sou- 
brettes are working on long term contracts, 
and a season of at least thirty-six weeks is 
absolutely certain, a condition which today 
hardly exists in any line other than ours. 

The old school of producers is being 
gradually eliminated through retirement of 
the members and turning over of franchises 
to the younger element, which has been in- 
strumental in placing before the public the 
Columbia brand of burlesque, but one cannot 
help to realize that "a good joke is always 
a good joke" when noticing the laughs 
brought on in the present burlesque and 
musical comedy houses by material that 
used to make us old-timers think it was 
funny. 

BURLESQUE Is one of th ; oldest forms 
of theatrical amusement and has al- 
ways devoted itself to the making 
merry of its patrons. Because it fell, at 
times, into' the nse of material that could 
not be called moral or clean, was not so 
much its fault as that of the audiences 
which choose it to the exclusion of other 
forms of entertainment.: From the earliest 
days, Thespeans have sought to find out 
what people wanted in the way of amuse- 
ment and have then devoted their energies 
toward providing It Thus the pioneer 
burlesqners found that people wanted 
what today Is utterly taboo and furnished 
it at the expense of the reputation of this 
branch of theatricals. 

Performances In those cays were mostly 
dialogue, with but slight attention being 
paid to scenery or other investiture. Any- 
thing in the way of stage settings was 
considered good enough — just so long as 
it furnished a set In wMch to present the 
loosely strung together jokes and quips. 
Of late years, however, the production end 
of the burlesque show has been receiving 
more and more attention until now we find 
that they are using scenery designed by 
Urban and costumes by the best and moat 
select modistes. 

And these facta are going to be prodig- 
ious factors in raising the public estima- 
tion of - burlesque for one of the reasons 
that people of the better class passed them . 
by in by-gone days was because everything 
from the rise of the curtain to the exit 
march was ragged and not pleasant to a 
refined taste. Class, however, has always 
been a winner in the theatre, whether 
vaudeville or the legitimate, and I feel sure 
that it will be equally so in burlesque. In 
fact, there need be no conjecture regard- 
ing it as there are plenty of Instances on 
either the Columbia or American wheels, 
which prove the correctness of that view. 

Whether the war will or win not make 
any change in the .type form of burlesque 
is, to my mind doubtful, although the same 
might have been said about the legitimate. 
As the main effort of burlesque, however, 
is to make people happy, it fa lately 
that it will go unscathed, people just ac- 
cepting it for itse]f and being satisfied with 
it as it is. '*.'•-. 



H'i^u 






'■. .;2 XJiOY W'3V 3JLLT 







. ■ v.„ari'. ,'•; " 1_; 



*!"«a'2ix BifflSSWwo^' 



M I N E *W 34JPhl^fe^*^i^« 



ANNIVERSARY 
CELEBRATED 



BRONX THEATRE STAGES EVENT 



Last week was Ted letter week ' at 
Miner's Bronx Theatre, made so by, the 
celebration, of the 54th anniversary of the ' 
entrance of the late Harry -C. Miner' Into 
the 8how business. 
I The bill was furnished- by Harry Hast- 
ings' 'Bis Show with the Nevassar Band 
of •sixteen girls as an added attraction. Aa 
an- extra feature, it wag made a week of 
special nights. Monday was given over to 
the i Bronx Athletic Club; Tuesday, War 
Songi Writers' Contest; Wednesday; 'Goon- 
try Store; Thursday, Old-fashioned Ama- 
teur Night; Friday, Wrestling, and Satur- 
day, a big augmented bill of star acta. 

The founder of- the Miner enterprises 
embarked in the amusement business in 
1864, and daring his '. career waa well 
known . as a manager of various lines of 
amusement, including the drama, variety 
and burlesque. He began with variety and 
his theatres on the Bowery became known 
for .giving the best in this line in the days 
of his early career. ' Many performers who 
later became sUrs in various branches of 
the profession, made their .first, bid for 
popularity in his theatres. 

From variety to burlesque was but a 
step. In . this 1 end of. the business Mr. 
Miner soon branched out, i and from that 
time to the present the name of Miner has 
been prominently identified with it 

In the 80'b he became a factor In the 
dramatic -field, both as a producer and as 
manager" of the Fifth' Avenue Theatre 
(now Proctor's), which waa then one of 
New York's leading homes of the drama. 
He made numerous productions, and had 
under his management many prominent 
actors, while at hia Fifth Avenue Theatre 
be presented only standard attractions and 
stars, from Gilbert A Sullivan operas to 
Sardon's "La Toaca," and from Nat C. 
Goodwin to Fanny Davenport and Bern- 
hardt. 

it is, however, with burlesque that the 
name of Miner has been most intimately 
associated, and since the passing of the 
Fifth Avenue Theatre to another manage- 
ment it has been only identified with this 
line of amusement. 

Among the theatres opened by Harry 
Miner were the London, the Bowery, the 
old - Newark Theatre, Miner's Brooklyn 
Theatre, People's and Eighth Avenue, all 
of which were under his management for 
years. He also founded the Miner Litho 
Co. 

His sons, H. Clay, Thomas W., George 
H. and' the late Edwin D. Miner, took up 
their . father's business at bis death and 
have 'increased the Miner holdings and in- 
troduced features tending to add to the at- 
tractiveness of burlesque. 

Amateur nights and the country store, 
which have become closely identified with 
burlesque shows, first became popular 
under the Miner banner, and wrestling 
boats ' were for years, a feature with the 
Miner shows. 



and 'wife of the* manager of the -Lyric 
Theatrefithfe cj^y.iajealsi* weeks**" her., 
home in this city from acute indigestion. 
She, •» about forty. four years of age. 
Among those at the funeral were : Mr-, and 
Mrs. Jules Hurtig and '.. Joe Hurtig, of 
Manhattan, Mr. and Mrs.' Henry Cohn and 
Mr. and Mrs. I, Hurtig, of; Cincinnati and 
Mr., and Mrs. Harry Hurtig ?f Toledo. , . ; 

CURTIN'S NEPHEW PROMOTED 
Saw Antonio,. Tex., Dec. 17. — W. EL 
Curtin, a nephew- of James Curtin, man- 
ager' of ' the - Empire .Theatre, . Brooklyn, 
N. Y.', has been appointed captain of the 
Field Artillery at Camp Travis, 'He, has 
190 men, four cannon and 380 horses un- 
der. Us command. Captain Curtin is 
twenty-five years of age, one of the young- 
est captains in the service. 



. SOLDIERS TOOK SUSS'S CAR 
Dr. Suss found the Ford automobile 
which was stolen from in front of the 
Olympic Theatre several weeks ago. The 
car was recovered at Camp Mills last 
week. Two soldiers from the camp, who 
were visiting New York, had taken the 
car. 



WAINSTOCK VISITS SHOW 
Wheeling, W. Vs., Dec. ' 13. — Morris 
Wainstock, owner of "The Military 
Maids," was' in the city last week paying 
a visit to the company and looking over 
the attraction. 



. ;- CLARK SUES PRIMA DONNA 
A summons in a-- suit to recover $385 
was served on Frances Tait Botaford, 
Dec. 12. Mr. Clark claims that he ad- 
vanced the amount for hotel hills and 
personal expenses i of his former prima 
donna, who left the show suddenly and 
without giving notice, , Lillian. Cameron 
played the role of Mrs. Chase after one 
rehearsal. R '• 



QUIT THE "PACE MAKERS" 

Crawford and Montrose closed with the 
"Pace Makers" at the Gayety, Brooklyn, 
last Saturday night. Nellie Montrose wfO 
undergo an operation' for appendicitis next 
Monday at the St. Luke Hospital, Phila- 
delphia.-' 

"ORIENTALS'' MISS MATINEE 

' Kanhar Citt, Mo., Dec. 10. — The "Ori- 
entals," which had been playing a few one- 
nigbters on, the lay-off week, were held up 
by the st6rm Saturday and arrived in this 
eity too late to give a matinee Sunday. 

TONY CORTEIXI TO ENLIST 

' Tony CorteUi, of the "Bon Tons," will 
enlist in the Navy at the close of the 
season. He was a member of the National 
Guard in Buffalo for three years. 



"DIXON REVIEW" PROSPEROUS 

Lou Reals, manager of the "Dixon Re- 
view, 1918," at the Star this week, states 
that the business with his show has been 
great so far this season. 



WILL QUIT BURTON STOCK 

Harry Harrigan, Rose Clifton and Ethel 
de Veau will close with the Joe Burton 
Stock Company at the Follies in the Bronx 
Saturday night. 

JEAN WAKEFIELD TO CLOSE 
Philadelphia, Pa., Dec. 17. — Jean 
Wakefield will close as prima donna of the 
"Bon Tons" at the Peaple's Theatre, this 
city, Saturday. 




MARION MISSES OPENING 
Dave Marion's Show had to omit the 
opening matinee, Sunday, Dec 9, owing 
to delay in arrival of baggage from 

Cincinnati. 



METZ SUCCEEDS HOWIE 

Harry Metz has succeeded Frank Howie 
aa stage manager - of Miner's, Bronx. 
Metz was recently with the Tbanhauser 
Film Co. 



CABARET GETS BURLESQUER 

Mae Sheridan has left the Mollie Wil- 
liams company to sing In cabarets. 



BURLESQUE 
REUNION 

GIVE PLAYERS ANNUAL BANQUET 



HURTIG f^NfPLOYEES ENLIST 
Two. employes of Hurtig and Seamon's 
Theatre enlisted lb the U. 8. service this 
week. Tony Musero, who has been with 
the house as assistant electrician for eleven 
years, . enlisted as " second class electrician 
. and is 'stationed I" at Fort Slocum. Morry 
Lewin', assistant superintendent for three 
years, joined the aviation corps. The thea- 
tre, how boasts of six employes in the serv- 
ice. 



Frank Damsel, Mike Kelly and I. Herk 
tendered the annual reunion banquet to 
the members of their "Pacemakers" and 
"Cabaret Girls" companies at Allaire's 
Hall, New York, Friday evening. Dec. 14, 
and a Jolly two hours and a half was en- 
joyed by all concerned. 

Mr. Damsel, bid everyone welcome, and 
Mr. Kelly closed the festivities -with a 
characteristic speech- of thanks to the two 
companies for .their splendid work and to 
his guests for: their attendance. 

In the interim many guests, were called 
upon by Toastmaater Kelly, among them 
being Mr. Damsel's aunt, Mary Maurice, 
famous throughout the world as.- "The 
Yitagraph Mother." 

Dr. Amey, Geo. Black, Mrs. Black, Mrs. 
Damsel, Mrs. Kelly, in fact, almost every- 
one at the table had an opportunity to ex- 
press their sentiments. Leader Billy 
Kerngood, of the Olympic, made one of the 
hits by reciting the following extempo- 
raneous poem: 

The Rule of Three 
All things that are good travel in thre es 
Health, wealth and happiness first, if you 

- please; 
Faith, Hope and Charity observed by each 

race 
Bat, drink and be merry, all right In Its 

place. 
In our journey through life, Stop, Look 

■ - and Listen ; 
Omit Wine, Woman and Song and a lot 

you are missln'. 
If you look through our history, three 

names there stand out — 
Washington, Lincoln and Wilson— each 

went the route. 
Along with three others, we fight and 

advance, 
Shedding onr blood to give Freedom its 

chance. 
Onr gathering tonight's in the form of a 

revel — 
Chorus, bosses and fiddlers, all meet on 

one level. 
If you'd know a man, for him you would 

.. work. 
So include in things good — Kelly, Damsel 
and Herk. 
The list of guests, besides those men- 
tioned, included Mrs. Lucy Farr, Grace 
Cochran, Ruth Menton, Lillian Semlow, 
Fred Hall, Helen Stuart, Annie Rose, Moe 
Wilson, Jack Healey, Both Brady, Mar- 
garet Howard, Elita Chester, Arthur 
Weinberg, Frances Marlow, Ed. Lawson, 
Margaret Hoyt, Carl Dellorto, Harry 
Steppe, Birdie Wyatt, Edna Schaefer, 
O. M Hunt, Ida Hanley, Frank J. Mur- 
phy. Elsie Clark, Elsie Scbroeder, Hattie 
McComb, Mabel Gordon, Jack Pearl, Lo- 
raine Matbieu, Manny King, Mary South- 
erland, Geo. F. Belfrage, Lillian Smalley, 
Eugene Bautb, Alma Hendrix, Walter 
Meyers, Harold Whalen. Martin Furey, 
Anita Mae, Mrs. L. O'Connor, Mr. and 
Mrs. Harry Rose, Norbert Sinai, Mr. and 
Mrs. Al. Hillier, Josephine Orth. Mr. and 
Mrs. Oesterle, Maud Livingston, Kyra, 
Bert McKenzie, Fred Miller, Chas. Feld- 
helm, John T. Fitzgerald, Anna Smith, 
Alice Reynolds, Chas, D' Andrea, Al. 
Hyatt, Polly Hyatt, Joe Gorman, Grace 
Goodwin, Harry and Rose Seymour, May 
Miller, Louise Pearson, Pearl Lang and 
Tiny Ramsay. 



SALLIE LA NOR JOINS "WIDOWS" 

Sallie La Noir has joined the "Sporting 
Widows" company In Jersey City. 



NEW BEDFORD OUT OF WHEEL 

New Bedford will be dropped out of the 
American Wheel as a three-day stand af- 
ter Christmas. Fall River will go in as 
a three-day following the Howard, -Boston. 
Fall River will precede the Thursday, Fri- 
day and Saturday stand at Worcester. 

SHOW GIRL RECUPERATING 

Mattie Sullivan, one of the ponies with 
Mollie Williams' show, is reported to be 
recuperating from a severe illness in the 
Prospect Hospital, Brooklyn. She was one 
of the four original "bricktops" under Ger- 
trude Hayes direction. 



HEADLINE WHILE LAID OFF 

Billy Mclntyre and Earl Sheehan, of 
the Mollie Wlliiams show, employed their 
lay-off week of December 10, in headlining- 
at the Howard Theatre, Boston. Mclntyve 
is a blackface comedian, while Sheehan 
works straight. 



BURLESQUER GIVES TO HOSPITAL 
Buffalo, N. Y., Dec 14. — Vivian Ma- 
dore, of the Puss-Pnss company, was taken 
suddenly ill and is now at the Emergency 
Hospital, this city, where she will under- 
go a serious surgical operation. 



GOVERNMENT GETS BURLESQUER 

Maude Harris, of the "Best Show in 
Town" company, has passed the civil serv- 
ice examination for stenographer for the 
Government at Washington, D. C, and will 
soon quit the show business. 



BURLESQUER ENTERS VAUDEVILLE 
Chicago, Dec. 12. — Charles Tyson, who 
closed last Saturday with the "Majesties," 
has taken Tessie De CoMa for a partner 
and Is rehearsing a new vaudeville act to 
have its tryout soon. 



BEATTY SIGNING FOR 1918-19 

Manager E. Thomas Beatty baa signed 
Ruth Hastings and Frankie Burke for an- 
other season and will continue under 
his management till the close of 1918-1019. 



BURLESQUERS GO TO YAPHAMK 

Al Coper, "Red" Watson, Dan BiH and 
Frank Halperin, well known in the bur- 
lesque field, left for Yaphank last week to 
join the colors. 



CELEBRATES 12TH ANNIVERSARY 

Louis Kursweil, stage carpenter with the 
Bostonians, is celebrating his twelfth ' suc- 
cessive season under the management of 
Charles Waldron. 



COOPER SIGNS DOLLY FIELDS 

Dolly Fields, now playing in stock at 
B. F. Konn's Follies Theatre, in the Bronx, 
has signed with James B. Cooper for next 
season. 



DORIS DE LORIS SIGNED 
Doris De Loris has signed with Sim 
Williams as soubrette with one of hia 
shows for next season. 



JEAN POLLOCK QUITS **WIDOWS" 

Jean Pollock closed with the "Sporting 
Widows" in Philadelphia last Saturday. 



THREE PLAYERS QUIT "MAJESTICS" 
Eloise Matthews, Eleanor Wilson and 
Charles Tyson closed with the "Majesties" 
In Chicago. 



Bttrleaqtw News centinasd en Paget 128 



HAS BIRTHDAY CELEBRATION 

Mona Worth celebrated her twentieth 
birthday anniversary last week in Brook- 
lyn- 



22 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



December 19, 1917 




LILLIAN HERLEIN 

Theatre — Greenpoint. 
Time— Seventeen minutes. 
Style — Singing and piano. 
Setting— Two. 

Lillian Herlein presents a neat sing- 
ing act. There is a man in the turn. 
- although he is not billed, who is also 
very good.- He accompanies Miss Her- 
lein on the piano. 

They open with a song. There is then 
another number by Miss Herlein, after 
which the man plays a selection upon 
the piano, which is all too short. 

A good comedy number is then pre- 
seated by Miss Herlein. The man after- 
ward sings again. His voice is very 
good. 

The "gowns" number is very good. 
The girl appears in a nice creation of 
spangles and colors, and with each 
chorus, snaps one gown off, displaying 
another, making five in all. 

The act should go good on the best of 
the small time. L. R. G. 




YOLANDO AND MIRVAL 

Theatre — Greenpoint. 

Time) — Severn minute*. 

Style — Violin and- piano. 

■Betting— Tmk>. 

This act opens with a girl at the piano 
and with a violin, off stage, playing "The 
Suwanee Blver." At the very end the 
player makes her appearance.. 

There is then another selection and a 
variation on "Yankee Doodle;" The 
American Flag is flashed on the screen. 
The audience went wild. And there is 
where the act ought to stop if they in- 
tend to get by on the George M. Cohan. 
As it is, the- girl just keeps sawing 
away on the addle and, by the time she 
is ready to make her exit, the audience 
has forgotten about the flag. The re- 
sult is that they flop. It is a poorly con- 
structed act. The playing: is ordinary. 
There should be a law passed preventing 
acts from using, the American Flag to 
get applause-. L. R. G. 



SAMPSELL AND LEONHARD 

Theatre — Harlem Opera Hovm. 

Style — Singing- and talking. 

Time — Ticelre minutes. 

Setting— In three. 

Guy Sampoell and Lily Leonhard 
have an act which they present in a 
clever fashion, and they have talent in 
abundance. Miss Leonhard ia very 
pretty. She also wears some elaborate 
and beautiful gowns. 

They open with a song which is re- 
markable chiefly for the rawness of its 
lyric. Crudity, aa a matter of fact, is 
abundant in the act, and, as it is the 
sort of crudity which isn't intrinsically 
funny, it should be dropped. It isn't 
necessary,, as the performers are. clever 
enough to get' across with legitimate 
stuff. 

Their routine is- the usual duet; solo; 
dance and- dialogue. They carry an ae> 
eompanist who gives one piano solo 
passably. P. K. 



JAMES HOWARD 

Theatre— Proctor's Vttth St. 
Style — XytepUonUti 
Time — Twelve minute*. 
Setting — In one. 

Dressed in a neat gray suit, James 
Howard makes a very fine appearance 
and certainly knows how to handle a. 
xylophone. 

He starts his well rendered routine 
with an operatic selection, in s^ way 
that pleases. His second number is 
also a classical song, followed by a 
popular one. The finishing number is- a 
medley of popular, songs, which are put 
over with a- lot of ginger. 

This act, when reviewed, held the 
opening- spot, but is strong enough- to 
enjoy a much better position. 

K. L> 



DOUGLAS FAMILY 

Theatre — Proctor 3 * 23d Street. 

Style — Singing and dancing. 

Time— Eighteen minutes. 

Setting— Full ttage. 

Father, mother, two sons and a 
daughter make up this family. All are 
fair singers and dancers. 

They start their routine with a fairly 
well rendered Scotch song, which is. fol- 
lowed by a song- by the youngster of the 
troupe, who, by the way, is the life of tile 
act. Two more of the- family, boy and 
girl, then put across a singing and danc- 
ing number that pleased; after which the 
boy recites a war poem that was well 
thought out; A sword dance by- a girl 
follows, and they finish with a song by 
the five, in which they are all dressed in 
the uniforms of different branches of the 
service. 

The act is one that can make * fair 
impression on- a three*Rrday bill. 

ML. 



F1LLIS FAMILY 

Theatre*— Proctor'* 23rd St. 

Style — Trained horse*. 

Time — Seven minutes. 

Setting— Full tage. 

The Fillis Family, two men and 
women, are expert equestrians, who put 
their; mounts through a series of dance 
numbers. They were accorded a- cordial 
welcome. 

They then introduce "Prince Henry,'' 
a horse which is billed as the champion 
high jumper of the world. He gives 
an exhibition that makes one believe 
the billing is correct. "Little Mine" 
comes next and offers for the approval 
of the audience a ' number of dances 
which he is put through by a- graceful 
Miss, finishing with the cake-walk. He 
was rewarded by an outburst of ap- 
plause. 

The act' is a good closing one for the 
time it is now playing. M. L. 

THE MUSICAL QUINTETTE 

Theatre — Loeu/s National {try-outs). 

Style — Singing and musical. / 

Time — Ten minutes. 

Setting— Full stage. 

The Musical Quintette, composed of 
four men and a girl, present a well- 
executed musical and singing act. 

They start their routine with a solo 
by the entire company. The band then 
plays a- selection, followed by a medley 
of popnlar songs. A classical number- by 
the girl and another Jazz selection- by 
the band pnt the act on a strong foun- 
dation. A rag time song is rendered, 
and- the quintette finishes with a- well- 
played war- selection. 

The act is- neatly dressed and every- 
one in it works very hard The turn is 
deserving of booking. M. L. 



JENNINGS AND MACK 

Theatrev-Hortem Opera. House. 

Style— Blackface. 

Setting — Special drop. 

Time — Ten minute*. 

This blackface team works with 
speed and vigor, getting; their songs 
over splendidly. Their dialogue is ex- 
tremely amusing, and well- done, both 
of them having a good sense of com- 
edy. There isn't a dull moment in their 
turn. Their- last- song,- "Happiness, Oh 
Joy," ia one of those nonsense- lyrics 
which appeal strongly, to most audi- 
ences, and, when seen, they were 
brought back several times on it. It 
is the best thing in their exesBent acta 

P. K 



WHEELER AND YOUNG 

Theatre — Greenpoint. 
Time — Fourteen minute*. 
Style — Violin and piano. 
Setting— One. 

Wheeler and Young present a classy 
little act. 

The violinist can certainly finger the 
Stradivarius. In fact, he can get just as 
sweet a note from the- very end of the 
fingerboard as he can front the. top. 

The opening selection is very well ex- 
ecuted; and then- they go into a number 
using the titles of songs to hold a con- 
versation with the instruments. 

They finish with a bagpipe Imitation 
and a medley of war .songs. 

The only poor spot in the act is tbe 
opening. They stroll on in evening 
clothes, remove their hats, canes, gloves 
and top coats, stroll leisurely to the piano 
and start to work.' The act is too full 
of life to have' a- dreggy opening' like 
this. It should- go good in an opening 
spot on tbe big bills. L. R. G. 

FIVE INDINAS 

Theatre — Bushteick: 

Style — Acrobatic. 

Time — Nine minute*. 

Setting — Full stage. 

This team consists of five women, two 
acting as a support for- the trapeze; 
which they hold up on their shoulders 
while the other three girls go through 
their routine. 

The three girls show considerable 
strength in several feats, lifting them- 
selves from various hanging positions. 
One of tbe girls bangs, from the trapeze 
bar and holds one of her sisters by her . 
teeth while she pivots around fast and 
effectively, far. about a minute.- - After 
a nnmber of other tricks they finish their 
act with a few lifting stunts. 

The act is good for either opening 
or closing position, and, as such should 
find no trouble being booked. M. L. 



RUBIO TROUPE 

Theatre — Keith's Prospect. 

style — Acrobats. 

Time — Seven minutes. 

Setting— Full stage. 

This troupe consists of five men -and a 
woman, who are dressed as gypsies. 

As far as tumbling and hand-springs 
are concerned, the members of this 
troupe are all good acrobats. The act is 
opened with a well rendered song, num- 
ber by the girl, who then does some effec- 
tive dancings 

They have considered the constructing 
and assemblage- of. the bits in the act so 
as to make it a very pleasing one, and.it 
can be counted on- as-an acceptable turn 
for the three-a-day. houses. M. L. 



MINI AND COCO 

Theatre — Greenpoint. 
Time — Ten minute*. 

Style— Patter. 
Setting^One. 

Mini and- Coco are a pair of Italian 
comedians who pot their, staff over in 
fairly good fashion. The bit at the 
opening, with an Italian loaf of bread 
as a life preserver is a corker. How- 
ever, tbe talk about "right, and wrong/' 
is so old it has whiskers. 

The man is inclined to muddle his 
speeches- and many a gag- is lost on ac- 
count of it. His speech should also 
be cut out. They finish with an Italian 
dance. 

The act, with a few changes, should 
he- a- good : one -for the small time. 

L. Rv G. 



ED WHEELER AND CO. 

Theatre — Rational (try-out). 

Style— Playlet. 

Time — Eighteen minutes. 

Setting— Full stage. 

This is one of those playlets dealing 
with the troubles of married people, and 
has no obvious reason for. existence. 
The dialogue is on the scold order frost 
beginning to end and what little plot 
there is is old and dull. The two peo- 
ple, man and woman, act well in spite 
of tbe nature of their material, and they 
should instantly get a new vehicle if they 
want to get any band of time. 

The wife is a scold and when the man 
comes- home late she begins to talk at 
him until he begins to break plates. 
He finally subdues her and, in the end, 
he is master of tbe bouse, presumably 
for all time. 

There ia nothing to recommend the 
act as it stands. P. K. 



GIRLS OF ALTITUDE 

Theatre — Harlem Opera Mouse. 

Style— Trapezitt. 

Time — Seven- minute*. 

The four girl's in this act are four 
dainty misses who perform a number ef 
good, stunts on the trapeze. They ope* 
with a- song and' dance that could be just 
as well done away with, as it does more 
to -arm than help the act. They per- 
form, several good tricks and as a closer 
hang from the trapeze by their teeth 
and pivot around fast and in an effec- 
- tive manner for a few seconds: 

The set is good for either an opener 
or closing and, as such, should experi- 
ence no difficulty in getting booked. 

m: l. 



BRENCK'S MODELS 

Theatre— Alhambra. 
Style — Poking. 
Time — Seven minute*. 
Setting— FuB stage. 

Two women and a horse present a- se- 
ries of poses which represent bronse 
statuary. . 

Tbe art subjects, which- are excellently 
posed for, are : The Golden Steed, posed 
by the horse, which is very well trained ; 
A Camel Sketch ; Idyll, at the Fountain, 
and The Awakening. The final pose. 
The Liberty Horse, was roundly ap- 
plauded. 

Tbe act is better than the average pos- 
ing acts, and makes a good- closing: . 

Mi L. 



CAVANAUGH AND WELLS 

Theatre — Loeio's National (try-nuts). 

Style — Dancing. 

Time — Eighteen minute*. 

Setting— FuB ttage. 

Cavanangh and Wells present a- rou- 
tine of dances, including a Spanish 
tango, a toe dance and a flashy whirl- 
wind, dance: All' of. them are well done. 
They are accompanied in all their num- 
bers by an excellent, pianist. 

The girls are graceful dancera, and 
have shown- excellent taste in the selec- 
tion of their wardrobe. This act should 
be easily booked in a good position . on 
neighborhood theatre bills. M. L. 



WILLIAM, AND ADA WHITE 

Theatre— Proctor'* 125lfr St. 
Style — Singing astd dancing. 

Time— Ten minutes. 
Setting — One. 

The ordinary style of song and dance- 
routine is presented by the man and 
woman in this turn. 

They offer several song numbers 
which are passable, bat lack the punch 
necessary to set- the act above the av- 
erage. The dancing is neat and well 
executed, especially the last nnmber, 
an eccentric selection. They finish 
with an exhibition of high kicking by 
the airl. M. L. 



December 19, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



23 



hfEL, 





RED CROSS GIRL SONG 
TITLE PAGES BARRED 

American Society Announces that It 
Will Proceed Against Any Pub- 
lisher Using Their Insignia 

The Red Cross Girl with the striking 
and attractive insignia worn on the arm, 
especially when the arm happens to belong 
to a beautiful girl, has long been an at- 
tractive subject for the title pages of popu- 
lar songs. 

A number of old-time songs bear this 
title page as well as many new ones issued 
since America's entry into the great world 
conflict. 

During peace times no attention was 
paid to the red cross title pages, bnt now 
that war is on, the American Society of 
the Red Cross has adopted an entirely dif- 
ferent attitude and announces that not only 
will it refuse to grant permission to nse 
their insignia on a song frontispage, bat 
all publishers issuing it will be prosecuted. 

The publishers of a number of the new 
songs were notified of the society's decision 
last week and immediately set about to 
make new frontispages for the numbers 
which were adorned- with a likeness of the 
red cross girl. 

This in many instances was accomplished 
only with considerable trouble and_ expense, 
especially on those songs which deal 
closely with the story of the red cross and 
whose story has to do with the famous or- 
der, yet it is announced, the society will 
grant permission to use the frontispage to 
no one. — 

BUCKEYE CO. HAS NOVELTIES 

The Buckeye Music Co. of Columbus, 
Ohio, has entered upon a campaign of pub- 
licity in connection with a number of 
new eongs, which on account of their de- 
cided novelty are meeting with popu- 
larity. 

The two numbers which are meeting 
with the greatest degree of success are 
"The U. S. A. Will Lay the Kaiser Away," 
a patriotic novelty which is being featured 
by many well-known singers, and "My 
Flower of Italy," a well-written ballad. 

In addition to these two feature num- 
bers, the Buckeye Co. issues "Sailing 
Home," "Rose of the Night," "Virginia 
From Virginia" and "That Red Ctobs Girl 
of Mine." 

All these numbers are enjoying popu- 
larity in the profession the country over. 

WITMARK HAS WINNERS 

"Jazzin* the Cotton Town Blues" is the 
title of a new number just published by 
M. Witmark & Sons. Not since the rag 
riot that greeted "Alexander's Ragtime 
Band" has there been a song so likely to 
set a new craze as this new song, which 
is one of the most attractive novelties 
heard in months. 

Another new song just issued by this 
firm is a finely written ballad by Alfred 
Solman called "Absence Brings You 
Nearer to My Heart," and the song itself 
is fully as charming as its title. It is 
likely to prove one of the most popular 
ballads of the year. 

"LOVE MILL" TO BE REVIVED 

"The Love Mill," a musical play which 
was seen in Boston and Chicago last sea- 
son, is to be revived and will be seen at 
a prominent Broadway theatre early in 
the new year. 

The music by Charles Francis is par- 
ticularly good and several of the songs 
have met with much popularity. Leo 
Feist is the publisher. 

HARRIS SONG WINS AGAIN 

"Break the News to Mother" won first 
prize in another war song contest last 
week. It competed witb ten other num- 
bers at Keith's Prospect Theatre. Brook- 
lyn, on Dec. 13, and although the most 
popular sonefi of the season were ren- 
dered, the old Harris hit easily won first 
place 



WITMARK SONGS AT HERO LAND 

Under the able direction of Harry Barn- 
hart a glee club made up of men of the 
National Army at Camp Upton, joined 
forces with a number of the members of 
Mr. Barnhart's Community Chorus and 
gave a short concert at Hero Land. 

Every number on their attractive pro- 
gramme was received with the greatest 
enthusiasm. Three of their big favorites 
were "Mother Machree," "There's a Long, 
Long Trail" and "Somewhere in France Is 
the Lily," all of which are from the cata- 
logue of M. Witmark & Sons. 



HARRIS HAS NEW SONGS 

Charles K. Harris has his new catalogue 
of songs for the new year ready for re- 
lease. The list of new publications in- 
clude four from his own pen and are en- 
titled "Is There a Letter for Me?" "When 
the Cherry Trees Are Blooming in Japan," 
"Just a Bit of Drift-Wood" and "Will You 
Be True?" 

Van and Schenck have a new one in the 
catalogue called "I Miss the Old Folks 
Now," and Eddie Leonard has contributed 
a number entitled "Sweetness." 



B'WAY MEN ON THE ROAD 

Eddie Moebus and Bob Kusaak, two of 
the Broadway Music Corporation's pro- 
fessional men, are now on the road and, 
according to the reports which they are 
sending to the home office, are meeting 
with ranch success placing the new Broad- 
way Bongs. 

This catalogue is particularly strong 
with popular success at present, and as a 
result they are placing the Bongs with 
scores of the best known singers. 



HEADLINERS SING NEW SONG 
Rarely in the history of music publish- 
ing has there been such an array of head- 
liners singing a new song as are featuring 
the new Gilbert and Friedland song, "Are 
Yon from Heaven?" The feature singing 
act in nearly every vaudeville house in 
New York introduced the new number last 
week and out of town records indicate 
that the same state of affairs existed 
throughout the country. 



COMEDY SONGS IN DEMAND 

There is a big demand among vaude- 
ville singers for clever comedy material, 
especially songs which are humorous and 
at the same time clean. 

One of the best songs of. this nature is 
the flew Feist number "I Don't Want to 
Get Well," which is one of the biggest 
comedy hits of the season. 



VON TILZER BALLAD SCORES 

Many of the best known ballad stagers 
of vaudeville and minstrel are using the 
Harry Von Tilzer ballad "Just As Your 
Mother Was," and the many letters re- 
ceived daily at the Von Tilzer offices bear 
evidence that all the singers using the 
number are scoring a decided success with 

it. 

ANNA CHANDLER SINGS "CHIMES" 

Anna Chandler, who is now appearing 
over the Orpheum Circuit, is scoring a de- 
cided success singing the new Gilbert & 
Friedland number "Chimes of Normandy." 



VON TILZER SONG FEATURED 

Teddy Dupont, with George Stone's 
"Social Mstids" company is successfully 
featuring the Harry Von Tilzer song hit 
"Give Me the Right to Love You." 



AUTHORS SOCIETY PLANS 
IMPORTANT CAMPAIGN 

Beginning With the New Year a New and 

Vigorous Line of Action Will 

Be Adopted 

The American Society of Authors, Com- 
posers and Publishers, have during the past 
two weeks held a number of meetings at 
which many new plans for the conducting 
of their business during the coming year 
have been laid out and adopted. 

The society, in existence in America for 
several years, has in spite of great oppo- 
sition grown in standing and importance 
until it has upon its books contracts 
amounting to approximately $86,000 in 
fees which proprietors of restaurants, cafes, 
motion picture theatre proprietors and 
others have obligated themselves to pay 
for the right to have performed in their 
resorts the copyrighted publications of the 
society's members. 

Notwithstanding this, the officers of the 
society believe that it has not conducted 
its affairs in as aggressive and business- 
like manner as possible, and to accomp- 
lish this have been in consultation with 
a number of men of ability and experience 
in the amusement world/ with the result 
that within the next few weeks a line of 
operation for enforcement ' of the collection 
of fees, entirely distinct from any of the 
methods employed in the past will be put 
into operation. 

JANIS SINGS STASNY SONG 

Elsie Jania. in the Century Theatre pro- 
duction "Miss 1917," is featuring "When 
Yankee Doodle Learns to Parlez Vous 
Francais," and is scoring one of the big 
hits of tile piece. 

This number is- one of the big popular 
sellers in tbe catalogue of the A. J. 
Stashy MUsic Co. 

NOVELTY SONG IN DEMAND 

The new Kendis.-Rrockman Music Co.'s 
novelty number "Hang the Kaiser," is in 
•big demand among the leading vaudeville 
singers. 

Its melody is catchy and the lyric par- 
ticularly clever, while its extra verses and 
comedy catch lines are exceptionally funny. 

SONGWRITER IS REJECTED 
Charles A. Bayha, writer of "I'm in the 
Army Now" and "Come Out of the 
Kitchen,*' now with Jos. W. Stern and 
Company, tried to enlist in the signal 
corps and also in the Navy but wAs re- 
jected from both on account of being 
underweight. 

LEO EDWARDS NOW WITH GUS 

Leo Edwards, the song writer and pian- 
ist; has joined the staff of the GUs Ed- 
wards Music Pub. Co. In addition to hav- 
ing charge of the professional department 
of his brother's company, he will also 
contribute to the catalogue a number of 
his recent compositions. 

HEWS PIECE HAS CLOSED 

"The Golden Goose," the Silvio Hein 
musical play which under the name of "Tbe 
Red Clock" played a short engagement in 
Boston early in the season has closed. The 
piece will be recast and probably brought 
into New York early in the New Year. 



BORNSTFJN COLLECTS $1500 
Ben Bornstein. professional manager for 
Harry Von Tilzer raised $1,500 for the 
Red Cross while on his way to New York 
from Chicago last week. 

He came in on one of the fast extra 
fare trains and as it pulled into Buffalo, 
he saw that it would arrive in New York 
considerably late. As the railroad Is 
obliged to refund a dollar for- each hour, 
the train is behind its time schedule, Ben 
figured that this would be an easy way in 
which to collect a small amount of money 
for the Red Cross. In company with two 
other gentlemen, he went through the train 
and collected the refund checks, which all 
the passengers gladly turned over. 

The last check had been turned in and 
the train pulling out ran into a blizzard 
and stalled. A long delay occurred and the 
train in consequence arrived in New York 
over eight hours late and Ben cashed the 
checks in for $1,500, which he turned over 
to tbe Red Cross the following morning. 

STERN HAS NOVELTIES 

Will E. Skidmore, whose novelty num- 
ber "Pray for the Lights to Go Out," and 
"It Takes a Long, Tall, Brown-skin Gal," 
were sung by hundreds of the best known 
singers, has written new ones which will 
doubtless be taken up by all who featured 
his first successes. 

The new number is entitled "Somebody's 
Done Me Wrong," and Sophie Tucker. Em- 
ma Cams, Elizabeth Murray and Nora 
Kelly are scoring big with it. 



"CHUCK" REISNER EXEMPTED 

"Chuck" Reisner, the actor song-writer, 
who was drafted for the National Army, 
was exempted in Chicago on account of 
dependent relatives. 

MORT GREEN WITH VON TILZER 

Mcrt Green has joined the staff of the 
Harry Von Tilzer Music Co.,- and will be 
Middle Western representative of the house. 



SILVER BACK FROM THE WEST 
Max Silver, manager of the Giis Ed- 
wards Music CO., is back from a trip to 
the Pacific Coast. His first business trip 
for this house was a particularly success- 
ful one. 



WITMARK SONGS SCORE BIG 

"There's a Long, Long Trail" and "Some- 
where in France is the Lily" were sung 
at the Riverside Theatre last week by Doro- 
thy Jardon and scored a hit of great pro- 
portions. 

Both numbers suited the voice of the 
prima donna excellently and she rendered 
both remarkably effectively. 



REYNOLDS 4 DONEGAN PUBLISH 
Reynolds & Donegan of Rensselaer, Ind., 
have published several new numbers which 
are meeting with some success and bid fair 
to become, popular. They are "My Hoosler 
Rose," "The Cornfields of Indiana," and 
"God Made Wilson for President, But 
Who Made the Kaiser?" 



"OVER THERE" IN COHAN REVUE 
The new George M. Cohan Revue, 
which will be seen at the New Amster- 
dam the latter part of December, will in- 
troduce the Cohan song "Over There'' in 
a manner, it is said, which Will surpass 
any song presentation ever witnessed. 



NEW NOVELTY SONG READY 

The H. and N. Publishers of Salt Lake 
City, Utah, have released a novelty num- 
ber entitled "Who Put the Germ in Ger- 
many?" 

The Plaza Mnsic Corapnny of New York 
are tbe distributors. 



MARSHALL TO LEAVE REM1CK 
Henry I. Marshall, the song writer and 
composer, who for several years has been 
connected with the Jerome H. Remick & 
Co. house, will sever his connections witb 
that firm on Jan. 1. 



P1ANTADOSI BRANCH OPEN 

The Chicago office of the Al. Piantadosi 
Music Co. has not closed, as reported in 
tbe columns of a trade paper, but under the 
management of George Piantadosi is doing 
an excellent business. 



"HOMEWARD BOUND" FEATURED 

Belle Baker, at the Palace Theatre this 
week, is featuring the new Leo Feist song 
"Homeward Bound," and is scoring one of 
the big bit: of her act with it. 

This number is one of the most popular 
in the big Feist catalogue. 



IRISH SONG WINS APPLAUSE 

Alice Hamilton in a letter to Harry Von 
Tilzer, wrote that the new Irish song "Says 
I to Myself Says I," is a big applause win- 
ner for her at every performance. 



MeCARRON OUT OF FEIST'S 

Charles McCarron, the lyric writer who 
joined tbe staff of the Led Feist bouse a 
few months ago severed his connection with 
that firm on Saturday. 



24 



THEN E W- X&R K CLIPPER 



— 



December 19, 1917 



WESTERN OFFICE, 

Room 210 

35 SO. DEARBORN ST. 




MANAGERS STOP 

BILLING OF 

SHOW 



ENJOIN THE POSTER 



The Theatre Managers' Association of 
Milwaukee this week began action for an 
injunction against Jack Jackson for break- 
ing the billing regulations in advertising 
The Natural Law," playing at the Shu- 
bert. 

Last November the managers agreed to 
bin shows with only lithographs and news- 
paper advertising, all fence posters and 
other forms of heralding having been 
■topped. 

. Manager B. Niggemeyer, manager of the 
house, had entered into the agreement with 
the others, it is alleged, bat, as the com- 
pany patting out "The Natural Law" waa 
willing to stand the expense of wider 
advertising, he is said to have allowed it 
to be used. The play is one of the Bailey 
& Goodwin International Circuit attrac- 
tions. 

The Managers* Association is said to 
have warned Jackson that an injunction 
would be brought if he used other posters 
than those allowed, but in spite of this 
warning, he is said to have gone ahead 
and baled the town thoroughly. The de- 
cision on the case is now hanging in the 
balance. 

Shows have an felt the loss of billposter 
ada since the role went into effect six 
weeks ago, it is said. The present in- 
fringement may result in an abandonment 
of the policy entirely. 



GOVERNMENT «***« SHOW CAR 

The baggage car, carrying, all the. ward- 
robe and effects of the William B. Fried- 
lander '^Naughty Princess" tabloid com- 
pany, playing the W. V. M. A. time, waa 
seized by government authorities at Wa- 
bash, Ind., Thursday of last week, for 
"government use.** , 

The ear waa loaded and ready to leave 
for the next stand at South Bend. The 
baggage waa placed on a freight car to 
make the trip. 



VAN PUT ON BIG SHOW 

George. Van, of the club department of 
the W. V. M. A., paid a visit to Sioux 
Falls, S. D., last week to put on & big 
show for the Sioux Falls Social Club, re- 
turning to Chicago Monday, Dec. 17. 



WARREN OFFERS SERVICES 

Warren Warren, . formerly • employed aa 
treasurer by several of Bobert Sherman's 
attractions, left Chicago last Friday for 
Washington, his mission being to offer 
his services for army duty. 



SILVERS INCREASES BOOKINGS 

Morris Silvers has completed arrange- 
ments whereby he will take over the 
cabaret bookings of the Green Mill Gar- 
dens and the Grand Pacific Hotel. 



"TAB" BUSINESS IS GOOD 

Sam ThaU, manager of the tabloid de- 
partment of the W. V. M. A., reports that 
business with all the tabs playing the 
Association time is very good. 



PETE MACK IN CHICAGO 
Pete Mack arrived from New York last 
Wednesday, calling here on account of the 
serious illness of his mother. His stay 
is indefinite. 



HENSCHEL PLACES ORCHESTRA 

Jimmie HenscheU has contracted -to 
put a new- orchestra in the Grand Pacific 
Hotel after the first of the new year. 



RAPIER JO HAVE OWN SHOW r " 

Gus Rapier has Been negotiating' with' 
Fred' Travis, an old Coast friend of' his, 
and with the $37,000 the latter recently feU 
heir to, will .produce a musical comedy. 
Travis is expected in Chicago this week. 
The attraction win be routed east. At 
present Gus and his wife (Rita Renter) 
are appearing with the Weingarden girl 
act, locally, supported by Leo Sulky, Tom 
Shagner, Marie Wilson and a chorus of 
six. 



BROWN CONFERS WITH CONSIDINE 

Chris Brown, on here from New York, 
has been in conference a few times the 
past week with John Considine at the 
Hotel Sherman, and some point toward 
something definite being announced in the 
near future as to a new vaudevHle circuit. 
Nothing has been made public by either, 
but the meetings have aroused rumor in 
and about the theatrical district locally. 



JIMMY HILL SIGNED 

Jimmy Hill, who had been rehearsing 
an act with a lady partner for the past 
few days, was suddenly engaged by the 
WoodhaU Amusement Company for a role 
with their "Broadway After Dark" at- 
traction, joining at Savanna, 111. Mrs. 
HfU (Gertrude Evans) is with People & 
Greenwald's "An Girl Revue" act, now 
playing Association time. 



AGENT SUED FOR DIVORCE 
Florence Lorraine, formerly of Lorraine 
and Dudley, has begun proceedings for an 
absolute divorce from her husband, Edgar 
Dudley, now of the vaudeville booking 
firm of Holmes & Dudley. De lisle Liet- 
zel, a local cabaret performer, is named 
as co-respondent. 



. DARLINGS GAVE NO MATINEE 

Charlie Taylor's "Darlings of Paris" 
matinee show didn't arrive from St. Louis 
for its Englewood Theatre week tin near 
4 o'clock Sunday afternoon, and, as a re- 
sult, no matinee was given. Taylor is re- 
covering rapidly from his recent Illness. 



AGENTS BACK IN GOOD STANDING 

The recent stand taken by the local in- 
dependent vaudeville agents has been 
smoothed out and all are now. back in the 
good graces of the Loew Western booking 
office in the North American Building. 



BOXY JACKSON PRODUCING 

Billy Jackson, the old-time producer and 
director, has been engaged to produce the 
musical comedies put out around this city 
by the firm of Lord & Vernon, who also 
control the Gem and Kempher theatres. 



SNOW BOOSTS BUSINESS 

The heavy snow storm, starting Wednes- 
day evening and lasting all day Thursday 
last week, showed an increase in the box 
office receipts in the Loop theatres for the 
two shows on Thursday. ' 



ONE-NIGHTERS DOING POORLY 

Bobert Sherman announced last week 
that business with the one-nighters 
throughout the Middle West waa "poor." 

GORDON AND MANZELL ROUTED 

The team of Gordon and Manzell were 
routed 'over the. Association time last week 
through the Beehler A Jacobs office. 



NOEL AND THOMAS REUNITED 

Harvey Thomas has reunited with his 
former partner, Eddie Noel, in a new sing- 
ing,' talking and dancing act. • 



ROGER LEWIS WITH FEIST 

Boger Lewis is now connected with the 
Chicago office of the Leo Feist Music Com- 
pany. .. - ■ 



EMMA WESTON GIVEN ROUTE 

Emma Weston' received a ■ 'route last 
week to open shortly on the Affiliated time. 



FEW NEW PLAYS 

OPENING IN 

JANUARY 

SEASON UNUSUALLY QUIET 



Fewer shows are opening in Chicago 
around the New Year than ever before 
in the memory of theatregoers. The 
period following the holidays is usually 
one of the' greatest activity here, as it 
is in New York, but bad business condi- 
tions and the fears of managers are sup- 
posed to account for the comparatively 
few new productions. 

"You Can Get What You Want," a 
three-act comedy by Alice Gerstenberg 
and Ethel Fairmont, is to open on Jan. 
7 at the Philistine Theatre. This is the 
only -really new production that has yet 
been announced for Chicago, the others 
all coming in from New York. 

"The Brat," which waa a success in the 
East last season, is scheduled for opening 
at the Colonial some time after the New 
Year. Oliver Moroeeo and his company 
arrived here Monday morning to begin re- 
hearsals of the play. Edmund Lowe, 
Helen Stewart, John Findlay, Bessie An- 
dra, Frank Kingdon and others are in 
the company, which will be headed by 
Maude Fulton, also the author. 

Jane Cowl will play the leading role in 
her own play, "Lilac Time," which opens 
Dee. 23 at the Grand. This play deals 
with the present war and was quite suc- 
cessful when presented in New York. It 
was written in collaboration with Jane 
Murfin. 

A musical version of "The High Cost of 
Loving" is to be seen at the Olympic in 
the early part of next ye ar. Kolb and 
Dffl are to be featured. 'What Next?" 
which has been running at this house, 
closed Saturday. 

Other plays promised are "Girl O* 
Mine," "The Very Idea" and the Maurice 
Brown company, which will give "Sha- 
vian" and other plays at the Little 
Theatre. 



PUNCH AND JUDY TO OPEN 

Charles Hopkins wfll shortly open the 
Punch and Judy Theatre with a play by 
Owen Davis entitled "The Arabian 
Nights." . The company wiU include 
Henry Eflker, Henry Stanford, Frank Gil- 
more, W. J. Ferguson, Edmund Ouraey, 
Bobert Ober, William Raymond, Mitchell 
Harris, Frank Westerton, Samuel Mo- 
harry, Lark Taylor, Charles Hopkins, 
Madge West, Margate Gillmore, Lucia 
Came, Elizabeth Patterson, MHdred Post, 
Carolyn Duffy, Anita Irving Wood and 
Mr. and Mrs. Hopkin s. 

"GENERAL POST" OPENS DEC 24 

"General Post" win receive its American 
premiere Christmas Eve at the Gaiety 
Theatre. The production will be made by 
Charles Dillingham, who has engaged a 
company including William Courtenay, 
Thomas A. Wise, OUve Ten, Synthia 
Brooks, Cecil Fletcher, Wigney Percyval 
and James-Kearney. 



BROADWAY TO SEE "SEVENTEEN ,, 

"Seventeen," Booth Tarkington's dram- 
atization of his story of the same name, 
i* to be presented in New York by Stuart 
Walker, shortly after the first of the year. 
The play was first produced last Summer 
by the Stuart Walker Stock in Indiana- 
polis. 

"SICK ABED" CAST COMPLETED 

Edgar MacGregor has completed the 
cast of "Sick Abed," which now includes: 
Fred Niblo, Mary Boland, Charles E. 
Evans, Mary Newcbmbe, Dallas Welf ord 
and Julia. Ralph. ,.'....,. 



FOR ADVERTISING RATES 
fhone Randolph 542 



CANADA HONORS MAUDE ADAMS 

Tobok.to, Can., Dec. 14. — The Canadian 
Government has extended to Maude Adams, 
all the privileges of a subject of King 
George. She haa been made an honorary 
member of the Chamberlain Chapter of the 
Imperial Order of the Daughters of the 
Empire, an active war organization. The 
ceremony was conducted at the Princess 
Theatre, after a special matinee- -perform- 
ance of "A Kiss for Cinderella," which 
Miss Adams had given for the wounded 
soldiers, from the various base hospitals 
in Toronto, who were well enongh to at- 
tend. Mayor Church in behalf of the city, 
presented the actress with a large bouquet 
of flowers. 



RUTH LAW REFUSED COMMISSION 

WASKiNGTOir, D. C, Dec. 14. — Buth 
Law was told by Secretary Baker to-day 
that he cannot give her a commission in 
the aviation section of the army because if 
he granted her request, it would open the 
way for applications by other women not 
so well equipped as she is. The Secretary 
went on to say, however, that it might be 
possible for the War Department to accept 
her services as a civilian instructor. 



FILM PLAYERS' CLUB CHARTERED 
AuisT, N. Y„ Dec. 14.— The Fflrn 
Players' Club has been granted a charter 
by the Secretary of State. The purpose of 
the organization which has its headquar- 
ters in New York is to promote and main- 
tain a fraternity among the men and women 
appearing in motion pictures. The direc- 
tors are : H. O. Petti bone. L. F. Daly, N. 
R Woth. J. M. Hannon, Louis L. J. O'Con- 
nor, William Kelley, James O'Connor, 
Joseph O'Connor, and B. F. Murray. 



"YES OR NO" DUE FRIDAY 

"Yes or No," a play by Arthur Good- 
rich, wUl be presented by G. M. Anderson 
and L. Lawrence Weber Friday night, De- 
cember 21, at the 48th Street Theare. Wil- 
lette Kershaw, Emilie Polini and Marjorie 
Wood will play the three leading roles. 
Other players are: Eva Francis, Byron 
Beasley, Malcolm Duncan, Bobert Kelly, 
Frank Wilcox, John Butler, Halbert 
Brown, Walter Began and John Adair, Jr. 



SHOW PRINT PLANT BURNS 
The J. H. Tooker Printing Company's 
plant at First avenue and 38th street, 
was completely destroyed by fire last 
Thursday night, with an estimated loss of 
$150,000. The Tooker concern furnished 
the Shnberts, Wm. A. Brady and other 
managers with show printing and, at the 
time of the fire, hnd a large stock on hand 
ready for immediate delivery. 



ACTOR'S WIFE DD2S 

Mrs. Bay Ilanna, wife of Franklin 
Hanna, actor fur the Vitagraph Company, 
died Friday at AmityvUle, L. L, after a 
long illness. Funeral services were held 
Sunday at Campbell's Funeral Church. 
Mrs. Hanna waa a native of San Fran- 
cisco, but had been in this city for 
twenty-four years. A son, besides her 
husband, survives. 



PROF. BAKER TO HEAD FTLM BOARD 

Prof. George P. Baker, head of the De- 
partment of Dramatic Composition of 
Harvard University, has been chosen by 
the United States Government ss Chairman 
of the Scenario Committee of the Film Divi- 
sion of the National Defense Committee on 
Public Defense. 



"THE RIVIERA GIRL" CLOSES 

The Riviera Girl" closed its New York 
run at the New Amsterdam Theatre last 
Saturday night and the house will remain 
dark till New Year's Eve, when it win re- 
open with "The Cohan Bevue 1918," as the 
attraction. 



HIPP TABLEAU SHOWS PERSHING 

A new character, representing General 
John J. Pershing, was" introduced into the 
American tableau, "The Land of Liberty," 
at tbe Hippodrome last Friday. 



•.•»'i- 



December 19, 1917 



THE NEW Y O R K C L I P P E R 



25 



MABEL CARRUTHERS has left the 
cast of "Blind Youth" at the Repub- 
lic Theatre. 



Frances Lee has left; the "Bon i-on's" 
chorus, and is now with Rector's Review. 



Oscar Spirescu is now conducting the 
afternoon concerts at the Strand Theatre. 



Cliff T. Green has arrived in New York 
after playing Western time in his act 
"The Morning After and After." 



Avery Hopwood is en route to the 
Hawaiian Islands, where he intends to 
finish some plays. 

Ferrara and Noble, who do singing, 
talking and instrumental music, will 
shortly he seen around New York. 

Browning and Dawson, blackface come- 
dians, have finished western time and are 
preparing ti open in the East. 

Rose Ressner has signed to appear in 
Gabriel and Lamar's "Boater Brown" 
show, to open in Philadelphia. 

Aileen Poe is playing the lead with Sam 
Blair's "Mary's Ankle" company through 
the South, and is winning praise for her 
work. 



Robert Henry RothweU was appointed as 
one of the conductors of the Cincinnati 
Symphony Orchestra in Cincinnati last 
week. 



Lester A. Walton, of the New York 
Age, has been appointed by Marc Klaw a 
a member of the military entertainment 
service. 



The Brokaw Brothers, singing and talk- 
ing, who are said to have gone well in 
the West, will shortly open on local vaude- 
ville time. 



Jack Martin, now a motion picture 
director, hut formerly well known in bur- 
lesque, has joined Englewood Lodge No. 
1157, B. P. O. Elks. 

John Halli&ay, leading man of the 
Denham stock company, and Eva Lang, 
of the same company, were married at 
Denver, Colo., last week. 

"Bud" Murray, having been discharged 
from the field artiUery at Camp Upton, 
returned to play his part in "Doing Our 
BR" at the Winter Garden, last week. 

Edwaurde Cansino, of the Cansinos, 
Spanish dancers, in "Doing Our Bit," is 
responsible for a movement which has been 
started to form a Spanish Actors' Society. 

Josephine Wehn is to play the Marquise 
in: "La Cordette," a drama of the French 
Revolution to be presented at the Acad- 
emy of Music on Saturday, December 22. 

Thomas R. Smith made his farewell 
vaudeville appearance last week at the 
Orpheum, Altoona. He is to star in a 
musical comedy under the direction of the 
Shuberta. 



Nigel Barrie, who has been appearing 
with Marguerite Clark in the "Sub Deb" 
stories, produced by Paramount, has 
joined the Royal Flying Corps, and left 
for Toronto Monday. 

John B. Vick, known to the stage as 
John B. Morris, of Morris and Parker, has 
been elected secretary of the KnoxviUe, 
Tenn., lodge of Eagles, and has charge of 
the Eagles' home in that city. 

Alice Lindahl opened Monday in the 
leading role of "The Man Who Came 
Back," succeeding Laura Walker, who 
was suddenly taken ill. The show playe 
this week at Loew's Seventh Avenue. 



Gladys Sice, daughter of the late John 
C. Rice, the comedian, is singing "Sally 
in Our Alley" at the Rialto this week. 
Miss Rice has studied voice in many cities, 
and has received several grand opera 
offers. 



ABOUT YOU! AND YOU!! AND YOU!!! 



^ Izy Herk has joined the Burlesque Clubi -HarryWarjl nr. now booking on the fifth 



floor for M.'S. Bentham. 



Billy K. Wells has just returned from; 
a trip. V, ~\ , 

Hazel Regan is joining the "Sightseers" 
company. 

Charles Horowitz is writing the book 
and lyrics of a new musical comedy for 
next season. 



Nadine Legot, the Russian coloratura 
soprano, is singing at the Strand Theatre 
all week. 



Mrs. James Marsters bought the 1,000- 
000th seat to "Cheer Up," the Hippodrome 
show, last week. 

Peter McConrt, Denver theatrical mag- 
nate, came to New York last week to 
spend the Christmas holidays. 

Helen Joseffy, dughter of the late 
pianist, has been engaged for the all-star 
cast of "Lord and Lady Algy." 

Knud Dalgaard, the Danish violinist, is 
appearing on the concert program at the 
Strand Theatre all this week. 



Henry P. Dixon is back in town and is 
thinking about burlesque shows for the 
Government at the cantonments. 



Countess Gena Mozzato, an Italian so- 
prano, made her American debut last Sun- 
day night at the Winter Garden. 

La Blanc Duo was booked for one day 
at the Strand Theatre, Racine, on Sun- 
day, and will start on the W. V. M. A. 
time soon. 



Charles Melber, head of the Grand 
Opera House orchestra, Cincinnati, has 
been elected president of the Cincinnati 
Musicians' Protective Association. 



Leo Edwards has just completed the 
musical score for the picture "The Strug- 
gle Everlasting," presented at the Forty- 
fourth Street Theatre Sunday night. 

Blanche Ring, Dainty Marie, Flannigan 
and Edwards, and other members of the 
"What Next" company, which closed in 
Chicago, have arrived back in New York. 

Elida Morris, the singing comedienne, 
who, for the past two or three seasons, 
confined her attention to musical shows, 
is scheduled to tour the Orpheum Circuit. 

Ruth Adair, a dancer in the "Miss 1917" 
company at the Century Theatre, was 
married to Emmett Grant, another dancer 
of the same company, in the City Hall, 
last week. 



Ramislaw Jovanovitsch, an actor, was 
cleared last week by Magistrate Nolan in 
the Jefferson Market Court, of the charge 
that he had criticised an audience for ap- 
plauding "The Star-Spangled Banner." 

The Great Western Fonr, which has 
just opened up again in vaudeville with a 
few new men, has been playing with the 
Lewis and lake Tab. Musical Co., and 
played the Strand Theatre, Racine, on 
Sunday. 

Hugh Herbert, playing Keith time, pro- 
poses to have house managers include one 
War Savings Certificate in the salary en- 
velope of performers each week. Manager 
Hastings of Keith's, Cincinnati, is taking 
up the idea. 

SHsabeth Marbnry has been chosen 
ehalrman of the committee on amusements 
and entertainments in connection with the 
Soldiers' and Sailors' Children Christmas 
Carnival, to he held in the Grand Central 
Palace from December 22 to December 29, 
under the auspices of the National 
League for Woman's Service. 



Joe Choyinski, the old-time pugilist, is 
sick with pneumonia in Chicago. 

. . Albert Spalding, the violinist, is a first 
lieutenant with the American Army in 
France. 



Mort Singer, Chicago representative of 
the Orpheum Circuit, arrived in New York 
last week. 



Sam Kahl and Mark Heyman, of the 
Chicago office of the Orpheum Circuit, are 
here on business. 



William Rock and Frances White have 
been re-engaged for the new "Midnight 
Frolic," now in rehearsal. 



Pat Woods is now assisting Ed. Darling 
with several vaudeville houses controlled 
by the B. F. Keith Circuit. 

Salita Solano, formerly of the Boston 
Traveler staff, has been appointed dramatic 
critic of the New York Tri&une. 



George Clayton, for ten years treasurer 
at the Morosco, Los Angeles, is now as- 
sistant manager of the Hippodrome, that 
city. 

Jake Wells, manager of the Atlantic 
Lyric, the Keith house at Salt Lake City, 
is building a theatre near Camp Cordon, 
Georgia. 

James Peede and wife, who is known on 
the stage as Jean Mnrdock, are being con- 
gratulated on the arrival of a son at their 
home last week. 



Vic Le Roy and Mae Cahili are in their 
second season with Lew Herman's Song 
and Dance Revue, now playing on the 
Pantages time. 

Irving Rose, formerly one of the book- 
ing men on the fifth floor of the United 
Booking Offices, enlisted last Friday in 
the Navy as a yeoman. 

Philip Morris, well known agent, has 
announced his engagement to Rose Sherry, 
of the B. S. Moss offices. No date for 
the wedding has been set. 

Richard Lloyd closed with Harvey D. 
Orr*8 "Million Dollar Doll" Eastern com- 
pany on December 15. He has been with 



the company all season. 



i 



Claude Kay, manager of Bert Lamont's 
"Montana Five," has wired in from De- 
troit that he has just got married. He 
neglected to give' the name of the bride. 



Hughy Woods, of the Keith press depart- 
ment, will be in New York for the Christ- 
mas holidays, after being in the mountains 
for several months recuperating from a 
recent illness. 



George Choos has produced a new act, 
entitled "An Arabian Night," which 
opened this week. The cast includes John 
Crawford, Johnnie Hughes, Kada Clarke 
and Ray Deusern. 

IsabeUe Howard last week haled her 
husband Frank into court on a charge of 
non-support. He was forced to pay her 
eight dollars a week for support. Both 
were Chicago cabaret performers before 
their marriage. 

Augustine Glassmire has in the course 
of production three new one-act plays 
which he will shortly send on a tour of 
the small time houses. They are "Girl of 
My Heart." "The Songsmiths" and "The 
Haunted House." 



Betty Brown, who has been with the 
Keystone Film Company on the Pacific 
Coast for two years, marks her return to 
New York by an engagement to play the 
role of the East Side girl in if Miss 1917," 



Roy H. Lewis has enlisted in the Army. 

"Jim" Murray baa been playing the 
Maine time doing a single. 



May Lang Mayers baa returned tc+Neir',; 
Xork after a two weeks' visit'. to Cuba. . ' : 



Mrs. E. A. Eberle, of the "Good Morn- 
ing Rosamond" company, celebrated the' 
sixty-first anniversary of her birth last 
Friday. 



Mabel S. Keightley, playwright, left 
Tuesday, December 18, for Miami Beach, 
Florida, where she will put the finuhing 
touches to a new play. 

Sybil Carmen has been re-engaged by 
F. Ziegfeld, Jr., for the new "Midnight 
Frolic" which wUl open the last of this 
month on the New Amsterdam roof. 



Thomas Davis, superintendent of the 
Family Theatre, Cincinnati, has been sent 
to a similar position with the Strand 
Theatre, Louisville, by Manager I. Libson, 
who controls both houses, 

Ralph Block, who succeeded Hey wood 
Brown as dramatic critic of the Tribute. 
has resigned to take an editorial position 
on the staff of the "New Republic. His- 
assistant, J. A. Pierce, succeeds him. 



Charles Mast, of the "Jack o' Lantern" 
Company, last Monday celebrated hia 
sixth anniversary as stage manager for 
Fred Stone and in honor of the event R. 
H. Burnside presented him with a gold 
watch. 



Mrs. Fred Stone will chaperone tin, 
children who attend the holiday matinees 
of "Jack o' Lantern" at the Globe The- 
atre. After each performance the young- 
sters will be entertained on the stage by 
Dorothy and Paula Stone. 



George Hayes, last seen in New York 
as a member of the late Sir Herbert 
Tree's Company, was in town last week 
on leave of absence from the Overseas 
Training Company at the University of 
Toronto, Can., where he baa been for six 
months. 



Mrs. Ned Wayburn, who underwent an 
operation for appendicitis two weeks ago, 
has been removed from Miss Alston's 
private hospital to her home on Riverside 
drive. The operation was entirely suc- 
cessful and her present condition indicates 
a speedy recovery. 

Russell Janney, Stuart Walker's repre- 
sentative, announces that he will not 
bring "Seventeen" into New York for 
several weeks, changing plans to take it 
to Broadway direct from Chicago. Week 
engagements have been arranged for Cin- 
cinnati, Detroit and Buffalo, before going 
into New York. 



George V. Hobart will celebrate the 
success of "What's Your Husband Doing" 
by giving a Christmas dinner to fifty 
poor children. Hale Hamilton, Jed 
Prouty, Joseph Conyera and Walter Lewis 
have volunteered to act as waiters and 
they, with other members of the com- 
pany, will give a special entertainment 
for the children after the dinner. 



George Donahue is manager of the 
"Step Lively" company, the roster of which 
includes: Roy Sampson, business man- 
ager; Max Bagley, musical director; Nor- 
man Hanley, stage manager; Raleigh Cow- 
gill, carpenter; William Morton, property 
man; Oren Piatt, electrician; Evelyn Ban- i 
♦.ell, wardrobe mistress; Billy House, Billy I 
Wyse, Lee Wentz, Billy H. Gordon, Nor- 
man Hanley, Carl Andrews, lone ODon- 
nell, Estelle Booth, Geraldine Malone, Nina ; 
Wallace. Chorus: Dot Ban tell, Laura King, 
Josephine Le Roy, Marg Higgins. Betty 
Bontell, Thais Lazarre, Isabelle Schippe, 
Agnes Courtney, Bobby Vinson, Mable 
Darnell. Trixie Vaughn, Inez Helene, Billy 
Long, Eva Marcelle, Edna Wheeler and ■ 
Mazie Lynn. 



26 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



December 19, 1917 



ET 



«• 



HOOFING 



** 



lit 1917- 



FIRST HALF 



v^ 



-%-^ 



a 









December 19, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



27 



U. B. O. 
IEW YORK CITY. 

Palace — Sarah Bernhardt — Dorothy Jsrdon — 
Eobert Emmett Keane — Lydell & Higglns— Little 
Billy— Dunbar's Mlaslasippl Misses. 

Colonial — Buroi ft Frabtto — Beaumont ft Arnold 
—Harry Carroll— Barry Glrla — Arthur Hill — SylTla 
Sylvanuy— Boatock'e Biding School — Eddy Dap. 

Royal— Eddie Borden — Nat Nassrro A Co.— Morln 
Sister* — Hawthorne ft Anthony — Klmberly ft Ar- 
nold — Era Tanguay — Imhoff. Conn ft Corlne. 

Aliambra — Walter Weems — Adeline Francie — 
The Littlejobns — Adelaide Rowland — Derkln's Ani- 
mate— O'Neil ft Wslmeley — Eddie Can ft Co. — 
Nonette. _ 

Bivsreide— Renee Floclgny — Harry Fox — Vander- 
bllt ft Moore — Boooey ft Bent— Eddie Dowllng — 
Joe Jackson — Lelghtner ft Alexander — Amovoa Sla- 
ter » ft Co. 

BROOKLYN. 

Buahwick— Helen Trlx ft Joeephlne— Cecil Con- 
nlngham — Morris ft Campbell— Everett's Monks— 
Three Jahms— Lemalre ft Gallagher— Paul Dickey 
ft Co. — Cole, Bcaaen ft Darts — Fraaer. Bonce A 
Hardy. 

Orphanm — Floren* Tempeat — Hallen ft roller — 
Farber Glrla— Joe Bogmnny'a Troupe — Fantasia — 
Sterling ft Marguerite — Rockwell ft Wood. 
BUFFALO, K. T. 

Shea's — Cbaa. Grapewyn ft Co. — Nolan ft Nolan 
— "Futurjatic Berne" — Adair ft Adelphl— Potter ft 
Hartwell— .Iscrkett ft Brown — Milt Colllna — Beneee 
ft BaircWX;; "-• 

';,.;, BALTIMORE, MS. 

Maryland— Bennett ft Richards — Herman ft 
Shirley — Ontkle — Dlax' Monkeys— Hennlnle Schon 
ft Co. — Adelaide ft Hashes. 

'}.-'■ BOSTON, MASS. 

Keith'*— Le Boy, Talma ft Boaeo— Gygi ft Vadle 

Francis ft Boca — Lambert ft Ball — Lew Dock- 

suder— Stella Mayhew— Chief Caupaulican — Grace 
De Mar— The Flemmlngs. 

CLEVELAND, OHIO. 

Keith's— Mr. ft Mrs. George Wilde — Frlti ft 
Lacy Brach— Lydla Barry — Medlln. Watts ft 
Townes— Wartenberg Bros. — Sam Bernard — Prevost 
ft Brown:.. 

Cincinnati, ohio. 

Keith's— Jack Alfred— O. ft A. Olocker— Hallen 
ft Honter— Gladys Hanson — Moaa ft Frye— Emmy's 

Pete. 

COLUMBUS, OHIO. 
Keith's— Jack LA Tier— Joyce, West ft Senas— 
fn, Gaxton ft Co. — Elmore ft Wimams — Santos 
ft Hayes — Mme. Cronln'a Electric Soieitles. 
DETROIT, MICH. 
Keith's— Gsutier's Toy Shop— Hamilton ft 
Barnes— Ferry — Walter C. Kelly— Ford Slaters ft 
Marshall— "Rising Generation" — Horn ft Ferris— 
Prosper ft Maret. 

DAYTON, OHIO. 
Keith's— Mr. ft Mrs. Jimmy Barry— Fleck's 
Males— Geo. Kelly ft Co. — "Married via Wireless" 
—Moore A Whitehead— Sansone ft De LIU. 
' GRAND RAPIDS, MICH. 
Empress— "Sports In Alps"— Three Chums — . 
Whiting ft Bert — American Comedy Four — Johnny 
Johnson ft Co. — Pllcer ft DoogUs— Evelyn ft Dolly. . 
HAMILTON, CAM. 
Keith's— Lew Madden ft Co. — Stewart ft Bono- . 
hoe — Abbott ft White — "Midnight Sollickers" — 
BarteUo. 

INDIANAPOLIS, INS. 
Grand — Ssllle Fisher A Co. — Merian's Dogs — 
Goold ft Lewis— Hugh Herbert ft Co.— Arnold ft 
riorens — Venlta Goold.. 

MONTREAL, CAN. 
Orpheom — Smith ft Austin — De Witt, Burns ft 
Tirrenee — Browning ft Denny — Street Urchin — 
"Forest Fires." 

PITTSBURGH, PA, 
Kelth'a— Bert Melrose— Maletm Booeonl— Theo. 
Koeloff ft Co.— Fox ft Ward — McConnell ft Simp- 
son — Brendel ft Bart. 

PROVIDENCE, R. I. 
Keith's — "Crnnberrieo" — Jennie MIddleton — 
•Dream Fantasies" — Maurice Burkhardt— Loyaj's 
Dogs— Jlmmie Hnssey ft Co.— Helder ft Parker— 
"The Shadow Men"— Larry Riley ft Co. — Pariah ft 
Pern. 

T*H T r aytgT.ysrTa PA. 

Keith's — Cameron Sisters — Kenny ft Hollia — 
Earl Cavanaugh ft Co. — Francis Kennedy — 8coneld 
ft Martin — Bailey ft Cowan — Breen Family— Borne 
ft Cox — Three Equlllla Bros. 

R0CHE6TER, N. Y. 
Kelth'a— Guertan ft Newell— Great Leon— Dick- 
inson ft Season — Six American Dancers — Violet 
McMillan— The KervDle*— Loula Simon ft Co. 
TOLEDO, OHIO. 
Keith's— De Leon ft Davies— Bert Lery — Lee, 
Koblmar ft Co. — Gene Green — Keralake's Plga — 
Clark ft Verdi— Stone ft Hayes— Fantlmo Troupe. 
TORONTO, CAN. 
Shea's— Sylvia Clark — Moore A Gerald— Wilson 
Aubrey Trio— "Beaoty"— Perelra Sextette — Lea- 
Tttt ft Lockwood. 

WASHINGTON, S. C. 
Keith's— Doree's Celebrities— ManklchI Troupe— 
Bandall ft Myers — Dorothy Brenner— Three Ger- 
alds — "Hit the Trail" — Great Leater — "Bonfires of 
Old Empires." 

Y0UN08T0WN, OHIO. 

Kelth'a— Bay Samuels— "Dancing Girl of Delhi" 
—Lew Hawkiua — CaaUug Cambella — Hoblen ft 
Coogan— Wright ft Dietrich— Three Hlckey Bros. 

ORPHEUM CIRCUIT 

CHICAGO, ni. 

Majestic— Eddie Leonard ft Co.— Morton ft Glass 
—McKay & Ardlne — Mrs. Tbos. Whlffen ft Co. — 
Bestrice Herford — David Saplrstein — "Cheyenne 
Days"— Mabel Russell ft Co. — Frank Hartley. 

Palace — Lucille Cavanagb ft Co.— Blossom See- 
ley ft Boys — John B. Hymer ft Co. — Cooper ft 
Rohinian— Spencer ft Williams— Poor Danube* — 
William lbs— Marie's esssssanws 



F&s> M&sst Waelk, 



CAXG ART, CAM. 
Orphanm— Alan Brook* ft Co.— Ban Dnegger ft 
Co.— Clara Howard— Mack ft Earl— King ft Har- 
rey— Toots, Paka ft Co, 

DE2TVEB, COLO, 
Orphanm— McCsrty ft Faye— Trlxle Frtgsnsa ft 

Co. Aveling ft Lloyd — Allen ft Francis — Roland 

Travers— Harold Da Kane ft Co. — Hasel Moran. 
BBS MOINES, LA. 
Orphanm— Gas Edwards' Bandbox Beiue— Bron- 
son ft Baldwin— Edward Esmonds ft Co. — Betty 
Bond — Frank Dobeon — Apdale's Animals — The Lo 

vetta. 

BULUTH, MINN. 
Ornhenm— Emma earns ft Co.— Foster, Ball ft 
Co.— Boothby ft Ererdeen— Kerr ft Ensign— Selma 
Braet* — Altruism. 

KANSAS CITY, MO. 
Ornhenm— Eddie Foy ft Family— Lillian, Fltager- 
ald ft Co. — Llbonati — Al Herman — H srry ■ ft sttta 
Council— Ferns, Blgelow ft Meehan— Sarah Psdden 
ft Co. • ' / " 

LINCOLN,, NEB. 
Orpheura— , '8ubnalrin«.F.r'— Ntan, Eayne— Mijo. 
—Arthur Harel ft Co.— Louis Hart; A -Co. -f Hag be* 
Musical Trio— Dierp. ,' > ■ .£•'* ' ,}' 
. • I^.ANOZIJES, OftU^-j' V * 
Orphsnra— Bmilv Ann- W ellmas « fr ..Co.— Burt. 
Johnson ft Co.— Mr. ft Mrs. Meuurr^BerV Baker 
ft Co. . . '. ' -.\rt»- •;..-. 

: MILWAUKEE, XTO. 3? *gf * 
Orpheom— March's Jungle Bayers-jars, .Gene , 
Hughe. A Co.— Mr. ft Mrs." .Frsdkln^-Boblns— 
Franklyn," Ardell -ft Co.— Imperil Cnlness Boo— 
Basil ft AUen^nsgUr^ilelsoo. "'■'.■■„ "■'■ ., " 
MINMEAPOUS, MXN5. . '", 

Orph earn— Creasy, ft Deyue-r£rlncess' Kalama ft 
Co. — Al .Shsjne— Capt. Anson A .Daughters — MUe. 
Lelt»el_-^Berale ft Baker Stan Stanley A Co. 
MEMPHIS, TENS. 
Orpbamn — Leona,- La, Mar— Alfred De Manby ft 
Co. — "In the Dark" — Xames ft Marion Hsrkin — .'' 
Olsa sst-fcfc- Trior- Jordan Slaters. 

■■<'•' tzw oiiXAis, 14. 

OrpkamB — Lew ' Brice ft Ban Twins — BUlle 
BeoTes ft Co. — Collins ft Hsrt — Charles Olcott — 
"Motor BoatloK" — Norwood , ft . Hall — Lorenberg 
Slaters ft.Ntaxy Brothers. 

, ; OAKLAND. CAI_ . 
Orpieam— Harriet Bempel ft Co. — Williams ft 
Wolfua — Bobbie Gordone — WllUe. Weston— Tennes- 
see Tan— Claude A Fannie Usher— Raymond Wll- 
bert— Fa'nchon ft Marco Co. 

'-.. v ;. : ' OafftHA, NEB. • • .-■ 
Orphellm — Gertrude Hoffman A Co.— San tley ft . 
Norton — Bath Boye — McDonald ft Rowland— '.'Act 
B*antif»l".— Bouble Sims. .' r " -f 

PORTLAND, ORE. -■' 
•CsMnunai Mclntyre A Heath— Trarara A Dons- 
las— Bae E. Ball— Alexander Kids— fiyWeater. ft 
Vance — Bae Ho Gray Co.— Three Stewart Slatera. 
ST. LOUIS, MO." '."■'. 
Osphesm— EreUyn Nash It ft O'Natl "Mark ft 
Walker— Kalmar ft Brown — Bert.' Fltaglbbon— 
•OhariM Howard ft Co. — Brodean ft 8ilrermooD— " 
Vardon A Perry — Mang ft Snyder. 

* SALT LAKE 0117, UTAH. 
Orpheom— Jean Adair ft Co. — Arthur Deagon — 
Skating Bear — Tower ft Darrel] — Lloyd A Britt — 
Cooper, A Bleardo — Koun'a Slaters. 
SACRAMENTO, FRESNO AND STOCKTON, OAX. 
Orphanm — Four Husbands — Rita Boland — Winona 
Winter — Bath Bros. — Jos. H. Cuilen — Levolos. . 

BAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 
i Orphanm — 'Tor Pity's Bake"— J. B. Morgan- 
Edwin George— Herbert Clifton— Scotch Lad* ft 
Lassies — Herbert's Dogs — Montgomery ft Perry. 
ST. PAUL, MINN. 
Orphanm— "The Night Boat"— "The Corner 
8tore" — Dnnbar's Msryland Singers — Frankie Heath 
ft Co.— Bernard ft Janls— Alfred La Tell ft Co.— 
Stuart Barnes. 

SEATTLE, WASH. 
Orpheom — Avon Comedy -Four — Harry Green ft 
Co.— Holt A Rosedale — The Gaudsmltb*— Tyler ft 
St. Claire — Bert Swor— Anna Chandler. 
VANCOUVER, CAM. 
OTpheum — Joseph Howard's Berne— Frank Crumit 
—Rice ft Werner— Connelll ft Craven— Isabella 
D'Armand ft Co.— The Le Crohs— Kanaxawa Japs. 
WINNIPEG, CAN. 
Orpheom — Four Marx Bros, ft Co. — Comfort ft 
Kins — Bessie Bempel ft Co. — Doc O'Nell — "Fire of 
Clubs"— Bogarr ft Co.— Moore ft Haager. 

LOEW CIRCUIT 

NEW TORE CITY. 

American (First Half) — The Valtoa — The 
Steamntters — Robinson ft Baboons — Dawson ft 
Browning — Six Royal Hussars — Irene Trerette— 
Leila Davie ft Co. — Leo Zarrell Duo. (Last 
Half) — Dow ft Dale — Remington ft Picks — Dan 
Casey— Notorlua Delphlne — Mitchell ft Mitch — 
Anger ft King Sisters — Knapp A Cornelia — 
Norvellos. 

Boulevard (First Hslf) — Scbepp's Comedy Cir- 
cus — Jeanette Chllds — Wm. Plnkhsm A Co. — 
Bobbe ft Nelson — El Cots. (Last Half) — Ben- 
nington ft Scott — Irene Trerette — Beulah Pointer 
ft Co. — Lane A Smith — Zeno Jordan ft Zeno. 

Avenue B (First Half) — Collier ft DeWalde — 
Florence Henry A Co. — Gardner's Maniacs. Last 
Hslf)— Flying Keelera — Herman ft Henly— Frankie 
Bice — Dawson, Lanlgan ft Covert. 



Lincoln Sonars (First Hslf) — Bennington ft 
Scott — Robinson ft Dewey — Ellnora A Csrleton — 
"What Really Happened" — Lew Cooper A Co.— 
Don Solano. (Last Half) — Cooper ft Lacey— 
Murphy ft Klein — Hunter ft Godfrey — Jessie Hay- 
wood ft Co. — Sale ft Burcb — Pieolo Midget*. 

Delsxoey Street . (First Half) — Alberta— Brown 
ft Tribble— Five Metsettis— Bernard ft Meyers— 
"The Right Man" — Tllllan Watson — Peggy 
Bremen ft Bros. (Last Hslf)— Robinson ft Dreey 
— Fennell ft Tyson— El Cots— Ryan ft Richfield— 
Dyer ft Perkhoff — Three Romans. 

GreeJsy Sonars (First Half)— The Sxatelles— 
Al Noda— Hobson ft Beatty— Dale ft Burcb — 
Pieolo Mldgeta, (Last fall) — Woolford's Dogs— 
The Steamntters — Evelyn Cunnlnghnm — "What 
Really Happened"— Francia ft Kennedy — Johnson, 
Howard ft Llsette. 

National (First Half)— Overnolt ft Young— Cur- 
ry ft Graham — Cora ft Robert Simpson — Al Fields 
ft Co. — Remington ft "FVcke. (Last Hslf) — Asakl 
Duo — -Grace -DeWtnt er s " excess Bsggsse" — Cook 

ft Steveua— Raskin's .Rnsslsn*. 

Orpheom '(First Hslf) — Nick. Versa— Williams 
4 Mitchell — Grace De Winters— East : n 's Russians 
—Will ft Mary Rogers— Johnaon, Howard ft 
Lttette. (Last 'Half)— Wm. Morris—Fergaaon ft 
SundeTlind— RawU A Von Kaufman— Lillian Wat- 
son — Six Royal Hussars — Gliding O'Mearaa. 

Victoria .{First Half)— Asakl Duo— Fennell ft 
Tyaoo — Anser ft King Sisters — Notorlua Delphlne — 
Dan Casey— Gilding O'Mearaa. (Last Half)— 
Adsms.ft Msngle^— Malaon ft Cote — Dawson, Brown- 
ing ft Dallas— Cbaa. ft Sadie McDonald— Robinson's 



■:. .*rs«}OKlTM^. . 

BUoa (First Half) -AOsms ft Mangle— Murphy 
A Klein— Lane A SmlthA-Skwlea ft Von Kaufman 
— Temple' Foot — Zeno; Jordan ft Zeno. (Last 
Half)— The Skstelles— Brown ft Tribble— Hobson 
ft Beatty — Wm. Plnkham ft Co. — Bobbe ft Nelson 
— Leo Zaire 11 Doo. - "*'"- ■ 

DaKalb (First Half)— The NorveUos— Hunter ft 
Godfrey — Evelyn* Cunningham — C. ft 8. McDonald 
— John A Mae Burke — Knapp A Cornells. (Last 
Hslf)— Overboil ft " 5To<ms— Je'snette Chllds— "The 
•Right Man"— Al Fields ft. Co.— Bell Tbaxer Bros. 

Warwick (First Half i— Maboney ft 'Auburn- 
Master Paul ft Ball— "The Job"— Three Morlarity 
Sisters. (Last' Half) — "Money or Your Life"— 
Will ft Mary Sogers — Gartner's Maniacs. 

Fulton (First ' Half)— The Zenaros — Herman ft 
Henley — Jessie Haywood ft Co.— Francis ft Ken 
nedy — Cook ft Stevens. (Last Half)— Isabelle Sis- 
ters — Nick Verge— Leila Davis ft Co. — Lew Cooper 
.A Co.— Scbepp's Comedy Circus. 

Pslsos (First Half) — Flying Keelera— Byao ft 
Rlchfleld— Dawson, . Lanlgan ft Coven. (Last 
Half)— Collier ft DeWalde— Florence Henry ft Co. 
— Fenton ft Green. '- .-••-- ?••'•' 



- MemrM,: 

Orpheom (First Hslf) — DeRenso ft LeDno — 
Green ft Miller — Johnny ' Dove— "Expansion" — 
Chase ft LsTour — "Besuty * Fountain." (Last 
Half)— Hall ft GuHdon-rlJpton'e Monkeys— "GLrl 
with Diamoud'Harp'^'^Jhe Mollycoddle"— Adrian 
— Penn Trio,*". .---". .... . - 

- St. Jam** '(First Half)— Dorothy Boy— Har- 
mon, Zauns. A Dunne — '"Rexular Business Man" — 
Convoy A 6'Donnell — Six Stjliah Sfeppers. (Last 
Half) — Kramer A Cross— Dorothy Burton ft Co. — 
John W. Rsnsome — DePsce Opera Co. 
... BALTIMORE, MD, 
Hippodrome — Cllntoo ft Rooaey— Weber ft Elliott 
. —Wm. . McKsy— Eddie Foyer. --'■-• 

FALL RIVER, -MASS. 
Bijon (First Half ) — Peon Trio — "Olrl with 

Diamond Harp"— "The Mollycoddle" — Adrian— Lip- 
ton's Monkeya. (Laat Balf>-Mlreen ft Miller- 
Johnny.- Dove — "Expansion"— Chase ft LsTour — Six 
Stylish Steppers. .'I -'; " V 

NEWARK, if. J. 

Majestic (First Hslf) — Wm. Morris— Malaon ft 
Cole— Mitchell ft Mitch— "Excess Bsggsge"— Andy 
Rice — Woolford's Dogs. (Last Hslf) — Lang ft 
Green— Baby Roelyn ft Bister— Gllmore ft Brown— 
Ellnore * Carletoo- Don Folano. 

NEW BOCHKLLZ, N. Y. . 

Loew's (First Half)— Sadie Sherman— Fenton ft 
Green — Great Santell. (Laat Half)— Mahony ft 
Auburn — Three Morlarity Sisters— Billy Swede 
HaU ft Co. 

PROYTDESCE, X,- J. 

Emery (First Half) — Dorothy Burton ft Co. — 
DePace Opera Co. — John' .W. Kanaone — Hall ft 
Goilsoo. (Last Half) — Dorothy Roy— Eckhoff ft 
Gordon — "Regular Business Man" — Conroy ft 
O'Donnell. 

SPRINGFIELD, MASS. 

Broadway (First Half) — Hlokel A Mse — Kckoff 
A Gordon — Ferguson ft Sunderland — Kramer ft 
Cross. (Laat Half)— Harmon, Zahns ft Dunne — 
"Besuty Fountain." 

TORONTO, CAM. 

Yonge Street — Burns ft Foran — Begal ft Mack — 
Lee ft Cranston — "Melody Land" — Ben Boy Trio 
^-Harvey DeVora Trio. 

PANTAGES' CIRCUIT 

CALGARY, CAM. 

Pantages — "Bachelor Dinner" — The Frescotts — 



EDMONTON, CAM. 
ruUgva— Grubcr* Anlmala Hsmpton ft Sarlner 
— "Song ft Danes Bevua"— Owsa ft Moore— Ward. 
Bell ft Ward. 

GREAT FALLS, MOST. 
Pantages (Dec 24-25)— Lottrs Mayer ft Co.— 
Brooks ft Pow er s "Lots ft Lots" — Beatrice Me- 
Kenxle — Johnny Singer ft Girla. 

K4NB4B CRY, MO. 
Pantages — "Follies DeVogos" — Sully Family— 
Three Moris — Trevltt's Canines — Lacy, 
Da via. 

LOS ANGELES, CAL. 
Pantages — Bigolstto Bros.— larvla 
-Ash A Shaw— Larson ft Wilson — Buhla Pearl — 
Biggs ft Ryan. 

MINNEAPOLIS, MINN. 
Pantages — Winston's Seals— Canneld A Cohen — 
Homer ft Dubard — Francia ft Nord— Lawrsnce- 
Jobnston — Eileen Fleury. 

OAKLAND, CAL. 
Pantages— Four Casters — Gllraln's Dancers — Psui 
Pedrlnl A Monks — Doris Lester Trio— Harry Jot- 
eon — Strand Trio. 

OGDEN, UTAH. 
Pantages — Four Hollowsys— Julia Curtis — Jsck 
Msck A Co.— Van Cello— Wlllard— Cook ft Lortu. 
PORTLAND, ORE. 
Pantases — Zlra's Leopards — Johnaon Dean Revue 
— Mumford A Thompson — Four Resdlnss — Jos. fit. 
Watson— Herbert Brooks ft Co. 

SAN DIEGO, CAL. 
Pantases — Wilson's Lions — Lord A Fuller — rar- 
sons A Irwin — "Fireside Reverie" — WUsoo 
Brothers. 

SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH. 
Pantages — "Dream of Orient" — The Younger*— 
Musical 1/eLuxe Four — Goldberg A Wayne — "All 
Wrong "— Hoej ft Lee— Claudia Coleman. 
SPOKANE, WASH. 
Pantages — "Bride Shop" — Senator Morphy — Jack. 
.Kennedy ft Co.— Walters Sisters— Rodrlgae*. 
,•- SEATTLE, WASH. 

'Pantages— Wilson's Lions— Marjorle Lake ft Co.— 

- Burke Touhy A Co. — Ems Antonio Trio — OriadeU 
'A Esther. 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 
Pantages — Hong Kong Mysteries — "Bevns Ds- 
Vogoe" — McDermott A Wallace — Frank Bnab — 
Martyh A Florence — Nan Gray. 

TACOMA, WASH. 
Pantases— Gasch Sisters— "Cyels of Mirth" — 
Nsyvjoa'. Birds— Van A Carrie Avery— BUI Prultt 
— Byal ft Early. 

VAHCOUVKK, OAK. 
Pantases— Unlay A Hill— Alice Hamilton — Geo. 
Primrose ft Minstrels— Jan Bublnl— Marlstt's. 
Marionettes— "Well, Well, Well." 
j ' VICTORIA. CAN. 

Pantages — "Courtroom Girls" — Cnsuncey Moorosr 
Co. — Marie Lavarre — Hill ft Ackerman — Burns ft 

- Lfnn-^-Jacason A Waul. 

j WIMNIPEO, CAM. 

Faniages — Iillly King ft Co. — Raymond ft 
Caverly — Hilton A Laser — Stelner Trio— Countess 
Verona. 

POU CIRCUIT 

• t BRIDGEPORT, CONN. 

Puis (First Hslf)— Orben ft DUie— Miller. 
fucker A S*U — "Cora Cob Cutups." (Last Half). 
—Stanley. GalUnl ft Co.— Earl A Curtla Co. — Vic- 
tor's Musics! Melange. 

Poll (First Half)— Wellington ft Sylvia— Jack. 
UcCauliffe— Rawson ft Claire— GaUarinl Slatara— 
Vncstan. (Last Half)— Paul Brady— Fsawick. 
Girls — Tom Brown's Highlanders — Frank Dobauo— 
Three Wllile Bros. 
• HARTFORD, CONN. 

Palace (First Hslf) — Fenwlck Girls — Too* 
' Brown's Highlanders — Frank Dobsoa — Glitetts- 
Munkeys. (Last Half) — Juno Salmo — Frances Dyer 
— Bawson ft Clair — Kennedy, Sheridan ft Dsy. 

PoU— Stanley, GalUnl ft Co.— Frances WUUsass- 
A Co. — Victor's Musical Melange. (Last Barf ) — 
Newell ft Moat— Arthur Whltelaw. 

NEW HAVEN, CONN. 



The Keubos — Mennettl A Sidelll— Aloha 
Wllkena A Wilkens. 

COLORADO SPRINGS, COLO. 
Pantases — "Bon Voysge" — "Saint A 8lnner" — 
The Cromwella — Millar Sisters — Brady ft Maboney. 
DENVER. COLO. 
Pantases — "Count ft Maid" — Tom Edwards ft 
Co.— Silber ft North— Alleen Stanley— Four Carles 
— Georgis Howard. 



BUon (First Hslf)— Barnes A Rohlssoa 1 
Willie Bros. (Last Half)— Harms Trio— Jo* ft 
Vera White — Grace Haxxanl — Yucatan. 

8FRIMQFJXLB. MASS. 
Palace (First Half)— Elrey Slaters-Jos ft Vara. 
White — "Congressman Kitty"— Arthur Whltelaw — 
Duquesne Comedy Four — "The New ModeL" (Last 
Hslf)— Gllmore ft Csstle— "The Clock Bbot"— 
Murphy, Van ft Kenyon — GaUarinl Sisters. 
SCRANTON, PA. 
Poli (First Hslf)— Turner ft Grsce— Wilbur Held, 
—Maxwell Quintette — Morgan ft Parker — SUmpsds- 
Rlders. (Last Halt) — GarclnetU Bros. — Mason ft 
Uwynne — Zelsys — Tooney ft Norman — "Oosour- 
Gems." 

WTLXX8-BARRE, PA 

Pall (First Hslf)— GarclnetU Bros.— Mason ft 
Gwynne — Zelsys — Tooney ft Norman — "Coloar 
Gems." (Last Half)— Turner ft Grsce — Wilbur 
Held— Msxwell Quintette — Morgan ft 
"Stampede Riders." 

WORCESTER, MASS. 

Poll (First Half) — Barms Trio— Newell ft 
— Frsnces Dyer — A. Seymour, Brown ft Co. (Last 
Half)— Jack McCauUn*— "Congressman Kitty" — 
Duquesne Comedy Four — Glllctt'a Monkeys. 

Plata (First Half)— Osseltlnes— Gllmore ft Cas- 
tle— "The Clock Shop"— "Levltstloo." (Last Half) 
—Wellington A Syirts— Morgan A Dixie— Fxsnces- 
Wllllsms A Co. — "Cora Cob Cutnps." 
WATERBURY, CONN. 

Poli (First Half)— Juno Sslmo— Kennedy. Bfeeri- 
den A Dsy — Grsce Haxxard — Earl ft Curtla Co. — 
Murphy. Via A Kenyon. (Laat Hslf) — Elrey Sla- 
ters — Barnes A Robinson — Belle Claire Bros. — 
Elisabeth Cutty — A. Seymour, Brown ft Co. 
(Cow itemed cm page 117.) 



28 



T H«T "^WYORK CE1 P PE R 



December 19> 1917 




December 19, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



29 



Roots* Muit Reach Tills Office Not Latar 

Than Saturday 

DRAMATIC AND MUSICAL 

Adams, Maude — Kingston, Can., 19; Hamil- 
ton, 20-21 ; London, 22 : Chicago, 111., 24- 
lndef. >."*-^ ;i u-.''. '.*iv,v-' '. ' VySC" *T- 

"Arabian Nights" — COtaBlal." Boston",- -IT-88.'.'. 

"Broadway After Darf^La Harpe, 111., 19; 
Lewlstown, 20 ; Abfncton 21 : Bushnell, 
22; Carton, 23; Mt. Sterling, 24; Qulncy, 
26. •;' r± ■ '.' ■■ 

"Blind Touth" — Republic, 17-22. v 

"Business Before Pleasure" — Etinge, New 
York, Indef. 'i 

"Barrle Plays" — HolUs, Boston, 17-22. 

-•Boomerang - ' — Garriek, Phlla., -47-28/ ir-* ■' 

Barrymore. Ethel — Washington. D. C, 17-22. 

"Brat, The" — Colonial, Chicago, lndef. 

"Cheer TJp" — Hippodrome, lndef. 

"Come Oot of the Kitchen" — Powers, Chi- 
cago, lndef. 

"Chu Chin Chow" — Manhattan O, H., lndef. 

"Country Cousin"— Gaiety, N. T., 17-22. 

"Cure for Curacies" — Majestic, Boston, lndef. 

"Chinese Lantern. The" — Little. Phlla., lndef. 

"Doing Our Bit" — Winter Garden. N. Y., 
lndef. 

"De Luxe Annie" — Wilbur, Boston, 17-22. 

-••Everywoman" — Durham, N. C„ 19; 'Balls- 
bury, 20 ; Charlotte, 21-22 ; Birmingham, 
Ala., 25-26. 

■"Eyes of Youth" — Maxine Elliott's Theatre, 
lndef. 

-Flo-Flo" — Cort, N. T„ lndef. 

"Flame, The" — Cort, San Francisco, Cat, 
17-22: Santa Rosa. 24; Petaluma, 25. 

"Furs and Frills" — Plymouth, Boston, lndef. 

"Girt Without a Chance" (East) — Cornwall, 
Out., 25; Famham, Quebec, 26; Tleonde- 
rogs, N. T„ 27; Plattsburg. N. T, 28-29. 

"Girl Without a Chance" (Coast) — Van- 
couver. B. C, 17-22. - it ' 

"The' Girl Without a Chance" (Western) — 
Pocatello, Idaho, 25; Ashton, 27: .Black- 
foot 28; Dillon, Mont, 29; Phlllipsbnrg, 
31. • - ■ • -.- • 

"A Good for Nothing Husband" (Eastern) — 
Suffolk, Va.. 25; Scotland, N. C„ 2ft; Kin-. 

.-. ston, 27: Newberne, 28; Wilmington-, 29 ; 
■'. Lumberton, 81. ■ ■. . -jc* '".'' -\. : * ' 

"Gypsy Trail, The"— -Plymouth? N. T-- lndet". 
r'Grasa Widow"— Liberty, N. Y., 17-8*. 73?.! 

"Have a Heart" (H. C. Savage, mgr.)—' 
New Orleans, La.. 16-22 : ' Lake Charles, 
23:. Beaumont. 24. ■' CVJ-' 

"Have a Heart" (West)-^IlllBdla'. Theatre, 
Chicago. 16-22; Milwaukee, WW., 28-26. 

■"Her Regiment" — Knickerbocker,' N. .T., lndef. 

"Her Unborn Child" — Globe. Boston, lndef. - 

"Johnny Get Your Gun" — Cort, Chicago, 
lndef. V •' • , 

"Jack o' Lantern" — Globe, N. T:, indef. 

"King, The"— Cohan's. N. Y., lndef. 

Eellard, John E., Co. — Calgary, Bask, Can.; 
20-22. ""T\« ; -~ . 

"Lorn bard I, Ltd." — Morosco, N. Y..< lndef. 

"Leave It to Jane" — Longasre Theatre, ln- 
def. *•• "- ' ■..*■ ■ 

"Land of Joy"— Park, N. Y_ indW. 
. "I/EIevaaon"— Playhouse. N. Y„ 1,7-22: 

"Love o' Mike" — Studebaker. Chicago, lndef. 

"Lord and Lady Algy" — ,- ..." : ~ - 

"Miss 1917"— Century, N. T' lndef.. 

Mack, Andrew — Tltusvllle, Wi IB; Pltts- 

bargh, 25-Jan. 5. 
"Madame Band" — Criterion, N, T., lndef. 

"Maytlme"— 8hubert Theatre, lnder. 

"Man Who Came Back" — Princess, Chicago, 
Indef. -. '-. 

"Masquerader, The" (B. W. Tally) — Booth, 
N. x., lndef. -i • :. 

Mantell. Bobt . Co.— Cincinnati, O., 17-22; 
Lexington, Ky., 24-26. 

"Nothing But the Truth"— Adelphl. Phlla., 
lndef. 

"Naughty Wife, The" — Harris, N. X., lndef. 

"One Girl's Experience" (B) — Oskaldbsa, la., 
23 ; Cedar Rapids, 25; 

"Oh, Boy"— Casino. N. T., lndef. 

"Oh. Boy" — La Salle. Chicago, Indef. 

"Odds and Ends"— Bijou, N. T., lndef. 

"Over the Top" — 48th St. Roof. N. Y.. lndef. 

W. B. Patton (Frank B. Smith, mgr.) — 
Waterloo, la.. 18-26. 

"Peter Ibbetson"— Standard, N. Y„ 17-22. 

"Passing Show of 1917" — Garrlck, Chicago, 
lndef. 

"Polly With a Past"— Belasco, N. Y.. lndef. 

"Pom-Pom." with Mltzl Hajos (H. W. Sav- 
age) — Columbia Theatre, San Francisco, 

m dat, 17-29. 

"Pipes o" Pan" — Hudson Theatre, N. Y., 
lndef. 

"Pals First"— His Majesty's Theatre. Mont- 
real. Can.. 17-24, V-: 

'Rambler Rose" (Chas. Frobmau, mgr.) — 

, Boston, Mass., 24-Jan. 12. 

"Rainbow Girl" — Forrest Phlla., 17-22. 

Skinner. Otia (Chos. JSnshman, mgr.) — 
Cleveland. O.. 24-29. 1"-;«K;' 

"Tailor Made Man"— Cohan A Harris, lndef. 

"Tiger Rose" — Lyceum. N- Y. r indef. 

^uru to the Right" — Tremont Theatre, Bos- 
ton, 17-21. 

"Twin Beds" — Montauk. Brooklyn, 17-22. 

TTncIe Tom's Cabin" (Wm. Kibble) — Osceola, 
la.. 19; Clarlnda. 25. *J- '■■ 

"upstairs and Down" — Park So., Boston, 

, Mass.. lndef. • v 1 

"What's Your Husband Dolns?"— 39th 8t, 

„J». Y.. lndef. > 
Wanderer. The"— Boston Opera House, Bos- 
ton, lndef.' :* 

Wilson, Al. H. — Richmond. Va.. 26-26; Hamp- 
ton Soldiers' Home, .27; Newport News, 

„28: Norfolk, 29. 

Washington ttU Players — Comedy, N. Y., ln- 
def. . . . f 

"Why Marry" — Cohan's Grand. Chicago. 
17-22. «-.••■; 

"Tou're In Love" — Chestnut St O. H., Phlla., 

l<-22. " 

"Yes or No" — 48th St. lndef. 





STOCK ... " '_t.-c.i ■ 

Auditorium Players — Maiden. Mans, lndef. 
Alcazar Players — San Francisco, lndef. . 
Austin. Mildred, Musical Comedy (Star) — 
Louisville, Ky., indef. ' T" *Sfy . 



. . A born. Opera Co. — Pittsburgh, Pa„ lndef. 
• ^Alhambra- Players— Alhambra Theatre,, York, 
Pa., thdef.' •'•• '•'■' '•■-■■• ■-■"•■.• '- ."•-~. " 
Baker Stock Co. — Portland, Ore.. Indef. 
Bunting, Emma, Stock Canpany — Grand 
-i Opera House, Saa, Antonio. Tex, Indef. 
« Bishop Players— Ortfand, Cab;, lndef. 
m Blaine's James.- Players — Saskatoon, Can., 
J lndef. > '•• ■ ■ *• . " a 

Burnea, Melville — Northampton, Mass.. lndef. 
. Bradley * Earl. Stock Co. — Strand, San An- 
tonio. Tex.,' lndef. - -•.■ - - <■ --■• 
Byers, Fred. Co.— Bbldredge, Neb.. 17-23. 
Cooper Balrd Co. — Zanesvflle, O., Indef. 
Crown Theatre Stock Co. (T. W. Rowland, 

Sr.) — Chicago, lndef. 
Cutter Stock Co. — Oneonta. N. Y., 17-23. 
Chicago Stock Co. (C. H. Roaskam, mgr.) — 
Lewlaton. Me., 17-22. -■ 3 

. Dominion Players — Winnipeg, Manitoba, Cau.. 

lndef. •: <T:... -" -■;-.* . 

. Dwlgbt. Albert, Players (G. A. Martin, mgr.) 
— K. and K. Opera House, Pittsburgh, Pa., 
lndef. ; 

Dainty; Bessie, Players (I. E. Earle, mgr.) — 
Orphenm Theatre, Waco, Tet, lndef. 
. Tlublnsky Bros. — St Joseph, Mo lndef. 
Dublnsky Bros. — Kansas City, .indef. .. 
"Enterprise Stock Company (Norman. Bllyard. 
- jngr.)— -Chicago, lndef, V 

Earl Stock -(Larry Powers, mgr.)— r J>harps- 

burg. Pa., lndef. •""• ■ - . V • - 

Emerson Play era — Lawrence. Mas»., Inflef. 
Elbert & Getcbell Stock— Des Moines, Xa„ 

lndef.- 
Earle. Ira; Stock — Waco, Tex., lndef. 
r« Edwards^Mea, Players— Bath, N., Yi 1T-22. 
FleMer. Frank, Stock — Elmlra, N. YV, lndef. 
Fifth Ave.' Stock — Fifth Ave.. Brooklyn, ln- 
def.' • • r' r i ■ ■ ..• 
. Gordinler Bros.', Stock— Ft. Dodge, la.. lnd«f. 
Grand Theatre Stock Co.*— Tuuva, Okla., lndef. 
. Glaser, 'Vaughn, Stock — 'Detroit Mich;, lndef. 

Holmes, W. Hedges-Troy, N. Y., lndef. 
■ Howard. : George. Stock Co.— Vancouver, 
— '. .B.' Ci Can., lndef. - " ■ ' -i - '- ' ' 

v Hippodrome 8tock. Co. — Hippodrome,' Oak- 
-- Tand, Cal., indef. .. ""•".■-. 

Jewett, Henry, Players— Copley, Boston, in- 
def. .•.•-..*.- 
Kenyon Stock Co. (Forrv L. Bott, mgr.) — 

Kenyon. Pittsburgh, lndef. ..-■..■■ 
Knickerbocker Players — Philadelphia, lndef. 
Katzes, Harry. Stock — Salem. Mass., lndef. 
Krneger, M. p. — Wllkea-Barre, Pa,. Indef. 
Lakeside Musical Comedy Co. — Denver. Colo., 
lndef. .-'•.. 

Lleb. Harris. Stock Co. — Wilson, Chicago, ln- 
def. ..•=.-. * ■ . . . 
Lewis. Jack X,, Stock (Jack X. Lewis, mgr.) 

— Chester, Pa., Ibdef. ■ - • 

Liberty Players — Strand, .San Diego, Cal. ... 
LUIem. Ed. Clark, Stock — Chester, Pa., lndef. 
Levy, Robt — Lafayette. N, Y.; lndef. 
Levy, Eobt— Washington, "-D, C.. lndef. 
MlUer & Ball ■ Stock Co.-^SteubenvlUe, O., 

indef. ' m 

Moses & Johnson Stock — Paterson, N. J., 

lndef. -w. 

MacLean. Pauline, Stock (W. W. .Richards, 
.' mgr.) — Samuel's -Theatre, Jamestown, 

N. Y., lndef. ; ■ 

Modern Players— Pabst Milwaukee, Wis., ln- 

Marcna Musical .Stock -Co.— New Bedford. 
Mass.. lndef. .'-'"• 

.Morosco Stock — Los Angeles, lndef. .'"•-, 

Mills. E. C. — Oklahoma, Otla'., lndef. 

Marks Bros. Stock Co. 

Nlggemeyer, C. A. — Minneapolis,- Minn... lndef. 

Orpheum Players (Geo. Ebey, mgr.) — Oak- 
land. Cal • „ _ 

Orpheum Stock Co. — Orphenm, Newark, N. J., 
lndef. _ '- -' ' 

Oliver, Otla, Players — El Paso. Tex., lndef. 

Oliver. Otis. Players- (Otis Oliver, mgr.) — • 
Wichita. Kan., lndef. 

O'Neill, Wm. — Manchester. N.-.H., lndef. 

O'Hara-Warren-Hatnaway — Brockton, indef. 

O'Connell. J. F., Stock — Halifax, N. S., lndef. 

Poll Stock — Bridgeport.. Conn., lndef. ; 

Poll Stock — New Haven, Conn- lndef. 

Packard-Jay — Jersey City. N. J- indef. 

Phelan, E. V. — Lynn. Mass.. lndef. . 

Shannon Stock Co. — Richmond. Ky., wk. 24. 

Shnbert Stock — St Paul. Minn., lndef. 

Somerville Theatre Players— Somervllle, 
Mass., lndef. '.._.' . :• 

Spooner, Cecil, Btocli — Grand Opera Honse, 
Brooklyn, lndef. 

Sltes-Emcrson Co. — Lowell. Mass.. lndef. • 

Sites-Emerson Co. — Haverhill. Mass., lndef. 

Van Dike & Baton Stock (F. Mack, mgr.) — 
Joplln, Mo., lndef. ■ .. . ^ , 

Vollman, E. H„ Stock — Stockton, Cal ..-lndef. 

Vollman — Salt Lake City. Utah, lndef. 

Williams. Ed.. Stock — Kokomo. lndef. 

Wilkes' Plavers— Seattle. Wash., indef. 

Wilson, Tom — Lyric. Butler, Ind. 

Wallace, Morgan, Stock— Sioux City. la., ..ln- 
def. 

Wlllard, Fred, Stock— White Plains, N. Y„ 
indef. 

INTERNATIONAL CIRCUIT 

Attractions for the Week of December 23 
"Buster Brown" — Orpheum. Philadelphia. 
"Bringing Dp Father — Cleveland. 
"Dauehter of the Snn" — Pittsburgh. 
Griffith. Hypnotist — Milwaukee. 
"Hans una Fritz" — Louisville. 
"Her Onborn Child" — Columbus. 
"Honolulu Lou" — Nashville. 
"Lure of the Citv"— National. Chicago. 
"Little Girl In a BIc City"— Worcester. 
"Mutt and Jen™ — Omaha, 23-26; Lincoln, 

27: St Joseph. 28-29. 
"Millionaire's Son and the Shop Girl" — 

"One Girl's Experience — Imperial, Chicago. 
"Peg o" My Heart" — St. Louis. 
"Pretty Baby" — Indiaaapolts.. - -.'•"'. 
"Storv of the Rosary" — Lexington, N. Y. 



"Turn Back the Hours" — Peoria. 23-26. 
i^Churston"— Kansas City... . ._ . .. 
: I TWhich.' ; One- • jBfcali , ^^j^aarr^f^B^aiflv,,^- 

BURLESQUE 

' ..« ........ CoInmhU Wh*al 

Al : BeeveV-rGayety,, Toronto, Out,' 17-23 ; 

Gayetyi- Buffalo, 24-29. », ;i ' 

Ben Welch — Gayety, Montreal, Can.,' 17-22; 

Empire, Albany, 24-29. 
Beat Show in Town — Caaino, Brooklyn, 17- 

22; Empire, Newark. N. J., 24-29. 
Bowerys — Gayety, Washington, 17-22; Gaye- 
ty, Pittsburg, 24-29. 
Burlesque Revue — Gayety, Pittsburg, 17-22; 

Star. Cleveland, 24-29. 
Burlesque Wonder Show — Star, Cleveland, 

17-22: Empire, Toledo. O., 24-29. 
Bon Tons— People's. Philadelphia, 17-22; 

Palace, Baltimore, 24-29. 
Behman Show — Colonial, Providence, 17-22; 

Casino, Boston, 24-29. 
Broadway Frolics — Star and Garter, Chicago, 

17-224 Gayety, Detroit 24-29. 
. Bostonlans— Casino, Philadelphia. 17-22; 

Hurtlg' 4 Seamon'a, New York, 24-29. 
Follies of the Day — Cohan's, Newburg, 17- 

19; Cohan's, Poughkeepsle, 20-22 ; Miner's 

Bronx. New .York,- 24-29. 
Golden Crooks — Colombia, New York, 17-22; 

Casino, Brooklyn, 24-29. 
Hello American-— Gayety. Buffalo, 17-22; 

Corinthian, Rochester, 24-29. 
Harry Hastings- — Open 17-22; Orpheum, Pat- 
erson, 24-29. 
Hip. Hip, Hoorah — Miner's Bronx, New York, 

17-22; Empire, Brooklyn, 24-29. 
Howe. 8am— Grand. Hartford. Conn., 17-22; 

Jacques', Waterbury, Conn., 24-29. 
Irwin'a Big Show — Majestic Jersey City, 17- 

22: People's, Philadelphia, 24-29. 
Liberty Girls — Hurtlg & Seamon'e, New York, 

17-22: open 24-29; Orpheum, Paterson, 81- 

Jan. 5. . a ■; "'r*' 

Majestic — Gayety. Omaha. 17-22 \ Gayety, 

Kansas City, Mo.. 24-29. . .'—'.<•: 

Merry Rounders — Columbia, Chicago, 1 1-2T\ 

Berchell, Des Moines, Iowa, TS-tt. V 
Million » Dolls— Gayety, St Louis. 17-22 ; 

Colombia; Chicago; -24-29. . 
Mollle Wllllaros^ — Orpheum, Paterson, 17-22 ; 
• Maiestle, Jersey City.. 24-29. 
.Marion's, Dave — Berchell, Des Moines, la., 

16-20; Gayety, Omaha, Neb. ,2-j-l'U. 
Maids of America — Lyric, Dayton, 17-22; 

Olympic, Cincinnati, 24-29. 
' Oh, Girl — Empire, Brooklyn, 17-22 ; Park, 

Bridgeport, 27-29. "v * ! ':- 

Puss Pass— Ba stable, Syracuse. 17-19; Lum- 
bers, Utlea, 20-22; Gayety, Montreal, Can., 
> .24-29. -I- 

Roseland Girls — Gayety, Kansas City, 17-22 ; 

Gayety, 8t Louis. 24^29. ... : 
Rose. Sydell's — Caaino, -Boston, 17-22 ; Colum- 
bia, New York, 24-29. 
Step Lively — Park, Bridgeport 20-22 ; Colo- 
nial ' Providence, 24-29. . 
Star ft Carter— Jacques*, Waterbury,, Conn., 

17-22; Cohan's, Newbnrg, N. Y., 24-26; 

Cohan's. Poughkeepsle, 27^29. . - 
Bportfiig Widows — Hurtlg ft Seamon'a. New 

York, 17-22; Empire, Brooklyn, 24-29. 
Social Maids — Olympic, Cincinnati, 17-22; 

Star and Garter, . Chicago. 24-29. 
Sight Seers— Corinthian, Rochester, 17-22; 

Bastable, Syracuse, 24-26 ; ; Lumbers, Utlca, 

Sam Sl'dman-^-Gayety, Detroit 17-22 ; Gaye- 
ty. Toronto, Oat, 24-29. 

Spiegel's- Review — Empire. Toledo, 17-22; 
Lyric, Dayton, .O.,. -24-29. '- •".•■ 

Some Show — Gayety. Boston. 17-22 ; Grand, 
Hartford, Conn., 24-29... 

Twentieth Centurv • Maids — Empire, Albany, 
17-22 ; Gayety, Boston, 24-29. 

Watson's Beef Trust — Empire, Newark, 17- 
22; Casino, Philadelphia, 24-29. 

American Wheel 
American— Star, St . Paul. 17-22 : Duluth. 

23 ; open' 24-29 ; ' Century, Kansas City, 

31-Jan. 5. . 
Army and Navy Girls — Orpheum, New Bed- 
ford, 17-19 ; Worcester, Worcester, 20-22 ; 
■ . OJymplc, New York. - 24-29. 
Aviators^ — Open - 17-22 : Lyceum. Columbas. 

?4-29.,. . . 

Anto Girls— Gayety, Brooklyn, 17-22; War- 

burton, Yonkers, N. Y., 24-26; Hudson, 

Schenectady. 27-29. 
Broadway Belles— Bingbimton, N. Y^ 17-18: 

Oswego, 10: Niagara Falls, 20-22; Garden. 

Buffalo, 24-29. 
Biff, Blng, Bang — Victoria, Pittsburg. 17-22; 

Penn Circuit, 24-29. 
Cabaret Girls — Gayety. Philadelphia, 17-22; 

Majestic, Scranton.Pa., 24-29. 
Charming Widows — Holyoke. 17-19? Spring- 
field, 20-22: Howard, Boston, 2fr29. 
Darlings of Paris— Empire, Chicago, 17-22 ; 

Fort Wayne, 23; Majestic, Indianapolis, 

24-29. ■- ... 

Follies of Pleagure^ — Olympic New York, 17- 

22 : Gayety, Philadelphia. 24-29. ' ' • 
Forty Thieves — Gayety, Baltimore; 17-22 { 

Trocadero. Philadelphia, 24-29. 
French Frolics — Maiestle. Scran ton,' 17-22 : 

Armory, Bingham ton. 24-25: Oswego, 26; 

Nlagsra Falls. 27-29. 
Gay Morning Glories — Open 17-22; Gayety, 

Kin snn City, 24-29. 
Grown Dp Babies — Grand, Akron, 20-22; 

Empire, Cleveland, 24-29. 
Girls from Follies — Century. Kansas City, 

17-22: Standard. St Lonls, 24-29. 
Girls from Joyland — Gayety, Minneapolis, 17- 

22. Star, St Pant 24-29. 
Girls from Happyland — Grand. Trenton,- 19- 

22; Gayety, Baltimore, 24-29.: j . '■■■■' 
Hello - Girls— Howard-. Boston-. 17.^2 ; New- 
Bedford, 24-26 ; Worcester, 27-2K?T' . ,*' 



Innocent Maids— Savoy. Hamilton ; Cadillac. 

Detroit 24 29. 
Jolly Girls — Wtlkesbarre, 19-22; Empire, 

Hoboken, 24-29. 
Lid Lifters — Lyceum, Columbus, 17-22 ; 

Court, Wheeling, W. Vs., 24-26; Grand. 

Akron, 0„ 27-29. 
. Lady Buccaneers — Penn Circuit,. 17-23; 
. . Grand, Trenton, N. J.. 27-29. '• ■ 
(JilftQoier Makers — Star, Toronto, Ont, 17-22; 
'^Bawiy, Hamilton. Ont, 24-29. ; 

Military Maids— Park, Youngatown, 20-23: 

Victoria, Plttsbnrg, 24-29. y.> 

Monte : Carlo Girls — Garden, Bofalo, N. Y-, 

17-22: Star, Toronto, Ont, 24-29. 
Mlle-a-Mlnute Girls — Empire, Hoboken. N. J., 

17-22; 8tar, Brooklyn, 24-29. 
Orientals — Standard, St. Louis, 17-22; Bngle- 

wood, Chicago, 24-29. ' ' 

Pacemakers — Warbnrton. Yonkers, N. Y^ 17- 

19; Hudson, Schenectady, 20-22; Holyoke, 

Mass., 24-26: Springfield, 27-29. 
Pst White's — Empire. Cleveland. 17-22 ; Brie, 

Pa., 24-25: Ashtabula. O., 26; Park, 

Youngstown. 27-29. 
Parisian Flirts — Trocadero, Philadelphia, 17- 

22: South Bethlehem, 24 j Easton, 25; 

Wllkesbarre, 26-29. 
Review of 1918 — Star, Brooklyn, 17-22; 

Gayety, Brooklyn, 24-29. 
Record Breakers — Gayety, Chicago, 17-22 ; 

Gayety, Milwaukee, 24-29. 
Social Follies — Cadillac, Detroit 17-22: 

Gayety, Chicago, 24-29. 
Some Babies — Gayety, Milwaukee, 17-22; 

Gayety, Minneapolis, 94-29. 
Speedway Girls— Majestic, Indianapolis, 17- 

22 ; Torre Haute, Ind.. 23 ; open 24-29 ; 

Lyceum, Columbus. 31-Jan. 5. . 
Tempters— Englewood, Chicago, 17-22 ; Em- 
pire, Chicago, 24-29. 

PENN CIRCUIT 
Monday — New Castle. Pa. 
Tuesday — Johnstown, Pa. :. 

Wednesday — Altoona,-. Pa. 
Thursday — Harrlsbarg*, Pa. 
Friday — York, Pa. . 

CIRCUS AND WILD WEST 

Shlpp ft Feltus — En route through Booth 
America. Address us at Blvadavla 885, 
Buenos Aires, Argentina. 

3 TABLOIDS 

Fajes, Chas. T., Comedy Co.— ^Gfeer, S. C, 
17-22. . 

Hale, Jessie, Co. — Gage, Okla.. 18-22. 

"Isle of Roses" — Houston. Tex., 17-Jan. 12. 

Lord ft Vernonr-Gem. Little Rock. Ark.-Ind. 

Zarrow's American Girls (Mrs. H. D. Zarrow. 
mgr.) — Northfork. W. Va„ 17-22. 

Zarrow's Zlg Zag Town Girls (Jack Fuquay. 
mgr.) — Bluefleld. W. Va'.. 17-22. 

Zarrow's Little Bluebird Co. (Jack Grant 
mgr.) — Washington. Pa., 17-22. 

Zarrow's Variety Review (Art McConnell, 
mgr.) — Grafton, W. Va., 17-22. 

Ob! Johnny, Oh! (Floyd King, mgr.) — Lens- 
ford, Pa., 19 : Shenandoah, 20 ; South 
Bethlehem, 21-22. 

"Oh * Johnny, Oh !" (Western — Jno. T. 
Fisher, mgr.) — Des Moines, la.. 19; 
Omaha, Neb.. 20-22. 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Adams, James — Floating Theatre, Elisabeth 

City, N. C, indef. 
Bragg ft Bragg Show — Southbnry, Conn., 

17-22. 
Mysterious 8mith Co. (A. P. Smith, mgr.) — 

Grand Junction, Colo., 19-20 ; Delta, 21-22 : 

Montrose, 24-25. 
Packwa, Hypnotist — Chicago, 111., 17-22. 
Rlcton'a Show — Montezuma. Ind.. 10-16 ; 

Clinton. 17-22. 

MINSTRELS 

Anderson's, C. E., Lady Minstrels — Atlanta.' 

Ga., 19 : Knoxville. Tenn.. 20 : Lexington. 

Ky.. 21: Evansvllle. Ind., 22. •• 
Ccburns, J. A. — Tallahassee. Fla.. 19 : Lake 

City, 20; Gainesville. 21; Brooksvllle, 22. 
Fields. A. G., Minstrels — Columbus, O., 18- 

24: Dayton, 25-26. 
Lowery's Greater Minstrels — Brooklyn. la., 

19: Knoxville. 20: Des Moines. 21-22. 



COMMONWEALTH ELECTS 

The New Commonwealth Opera, Com> 
pany got a flying start last week when 
its first meeting of directors waa held. 
John Philip Souea waa elected president; 
DeWolf Hopper, first •vice-president; Syl- 
vio He in, second vice-president; Raymond 
Hitchcock, treasurer, and C. R. LeMassena, 
secretary. W. G. Stewart, at present resi- 
dent director of the Hippodrome, was of- 
ficially named general director of the new 
organization, and he will soon begin to 
select singers and arrange a repertoire for 
the first season. Mr. Hitchcock has of- 
fered the company the use of his newly 
acquired theatre, the Fulton, in which 
try-outa will be held in the future. The 
offices of the company will also be lo- 
cated in this building. Besides the elec- 
tion of the above-named officers, the meet- 
ing also named George Hamlin to com- 
plete the quota of fifteen directors, the 
others being Tyrone Power, Harry Howe 
Shelley, Romualdo Sapio, Richie ling, 
Philip Spooner, Van Rensselaer Wheeler. 
Clarence Fullerton, H. S. Hechheimer and 
Jacques Pierre, in addition to the officers 
above named. -The Constitution and By- 
Laws were presented and approved by the 
directors.. - -.,..' 



30 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



December 19, 1917 








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ELTINGE 

Who has received hundreds of 
letters from motion '/picture 
exhibitors congratulating 
him on his excellent work 
and drawing powers 
in that profession. 
Through their en- 
couragement Mr. 
Eltinge has de- 
cided to remain 
in pictures indefi- 
nitely. Mr. Eltinge 
has held an enviable 
position as a stage star for 
many years and his marvel- 
ous success in the movies 
is not to be wondered at. 









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December 19, 191," 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



31 



CITY. 

After the orchestra had rendered an 
overture, the show was opened by Kale 
and Coyne, two comedy jugglers, one of 
whom does' bits of nonsense that just fit in 
right. They juggle' everything from ballB 
to screens and guns with. ease. The ec- 
centric doe's several, stunts iu.Jjiimbling, 
while the other is doing difficult tricks in 
juggling- ..■■■- 

Then comes Lowe and the Sperling Sis- 
ters, a singing and dancing act of real 
merit. They open with a triple, and go 
into a number of specialty songs and 
dances. Their medley numbers are Virell 
arranged and they finish to a good sized 
hit They were allowed off only after 
they had taken six bows. 

The third act on the bill was Henry 
Horton and company in a. sketch that is 
full of bright comedy lines, and well acted. 




FIFTH AVENUE 

- An enthusiastic audience filled this house 
at the opening show on Monday. 

Ernie Potts and Company, three men 
and a woman, opened the bill. They started 
with a showy exhibition of club swinging, 
at which they are very adept Then two 
of the men gave a short boxing bout fol- 
lowed by wrestling. Then, in succession, 
two of the men did some bag punching, the 
second one of them keeping seven bags mov- 
ing at one time. For a finish, the four 
punched bags. . The act is well presented, 
the performers are experts in their line and 
they work quickly. 

Warren and Frost, man and woman, in 
The story deals with a young couple who » ^ offered a Uasing 

are in love, but who cant get • married » anfl ^ 

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raving about her dead mother, and when 
her father tells her he is going to marry 
the mother of her sweetheart, there's the 
devil to pay. However, all is finally ex- 
plained and the young couple go out to 
be married, while the old man makes ar- 
rangements for his own wedding on the 
morrow. The piece is well written and 
played, and scored one of the comedy hits 
of the bill. . 

The program waB split here by the Bixth 
episode of the "Retreat of the Germans," 
the official British pictures of the battle 
of Arras. 

The vaudeville part of the bill was then 
started again by Housh and Lavelle, in 
a skit called "Inspiration." A young 
couple, newly married, are stranded in 
the deserts of Arizona, because the huB- 
band is looking for inspiration for Tub 
songs. The line of talk is snappy and 
well handled. The singing of the man 
is good, and the souse take-off by the girl, 
though not pleasing, is well done. They 
were well received. 

Caryll and Flynn came next and, with 
their high-class singing act gave much 
needed relief from the comedy acts. Their 
voices blend well and their numbers are 
well arranged, the double version of their 
last song being very pretty. They took 
five bows, and might have responded to 
an encore had they wished to. 

"Intelligence," an unusual mind-reading 
act, was on in the sixth position. The act 
carries two women and a man. One of the 
women answers questions, while the other 
plays any selections asked for. The man 
works down in the audience, calling on 
people to give titles and questions. The 
act is a novelty, inasmuch as the women 
guess the question voluntarily. . The audi- 
ence was not skeptical, and this made the 
work of the women much easier. They 
■went over for a good sized hit, and left 
the audience mystified as to their methods. 
In number seven spot was Jim and Anna 
Francis, two eccentric dancers and singers. 
The woman is a comedienne of a peculiar 
type, and her way of putting over her 
lines got the audience from the start, 
the man does two eccentric dances that 
were well put over and paved the way for 
an eccentric dance by the woman. Her 
rendition of a popular war novelty num- 
ber was good, and she was easily the fea- 
ture of the act. For an encore, they play 
on a whistle and Jew's harp, and the way 
they had the audience going they might 
have kept playing indefinitely. 

The last act was the De DeMarlOs, two 
contortionists. The man opens the act 
with several stunts used by all contortion 
acts and, after several tricks, the woman 
comes out and sings a number that could 
not be heard beyond the tenth row. There 
is no need for this number, and it could 
be eliminated without hurting the act. 
The man then does a neat stunt, twisting 
his legs around Ms bead, .and balancing 
himself on a number of empty cans that 
he piles up on the table. The woman does 
a dance also, in which aha wears a cos- 
tume that is too much abbreviated, and 
which does not help the act, rather de- 
tracting from it. life man then does some 
trapeze work, while the woman does 
several stunts that are good. The act 
pleased, and if the numbers mentioned 
were eliminated would be a much bigger 
.hit S. K. 



sang alternate numbers, the woman render- 
ing operatic selections and the man bits 
from Irish songs. The scene then went 
to two and they gave an imitation of a 
quarrel between a man and wife, the mate- 
rial used being bright and crisp repartee. 
They closed with a duet and were rewarded: 
with hearty applause. 

The Four Colored Harmony Kings scored 
one of the big bits of the bill. They gave 
four quartette numbers and the bass singer 
rendered "Old Black Joe." AU of their 
songs were well liked and won hearty ap- 
proval, but their best effort wss their rendi- 
tion of a yodel song for which they gave a 
chorus with calliope effect. It was remark- 
ably well done and brought forth a storm 
of applause. The bass solo earned well de- 
served favor. These boys are clever per- 
formers and put their songs over with tell- 
ing effect. 

Harry Beresford and Company, two men 
and three women, were seen in the sketch, 
"Mind Tour Own Business," which was 
well liked. The skit tells of a quarrel 
between a young married couple which 
causes the wife to go home to her parents, 
her husband following. The young woman's 
father determines to cure her and forthwith 
arranges with his wife to pretend to quarrel 
in the presence of their daughter. The ruse 
works splendidly and the young people set- 
tle their differences, when the old man 
finds himself "up against it" in reality as 
his wife believes he has presented a dia- 
mond brooch to another woman. All ends 
happily, however, when the old man con- 
vinces his wife that the brooch was bought 
for her as a birthday present. 

Beresford, as the father, gave a capital 
performance. He is a finished actor and 
ie sure to be artistic in anything he at- 
tempts. H1b support was fair. 

McCormlck and Irving, man and woman, 
have a very pleasing act composed of sing- 
ing and dancing, and were so well liked 
that they were called upon to respond to 
'an encore. They rendered six songs and 
danced twice, the latter being of the cabaret 
style. They have a pleasing stage presence, 
are graceful dancers and well deserved the 
approval accorded them. 

Mabel Burke, always a favorite with the 
patrons of this house, won hearty applause 
for her illustrated song rendition. 

"The Corner Store," a rural comedy play- 
let, with four men and three women In the 
cast, was presented in number seven posi- 
tion. It has little story, but that little tells 
of two rubes and a deacon courting a 
widow, the deacon winning out while the 
rubes are quarreling. It is a slapstick 
comedy, and is crudely written. The finish 
is an old-fashioned barn dance. 

Trovato, with his comedy and violin play- 
ing, was a pronounced hit, and was recalled 
several times and finally responded with an 
encore. He gave four complete numbers, be- 
sides his imitations of whistling sounds 
made by the audience. 

GladyB Taylor, assisted by John Darby 
and Gertrude Gay, were seen in Moon- 
light Caprice," an act made up of singing 
and dancing. The act opens with a special 
set in three with Darby and Miss Taylor 
doing a dance. Miss Gay follows with a 
song and also dances with Darby. Miss 
Taylor then gives a classic dance, her part- 
ners dance again, Darby gives a single and 
the trio finish with more dancing. Miss 
Taylor and Darby are graceful dancers and 
Miss Gray sings well. 



; AUDUBON ."i;, -..,; ■ ,- 

In spite of the non-arrival of the baggage 
of several of the acts, the show for the first 
half at this house went over nicely. 
..After a well played overture, it was 
opened by DeRenzo and LaDue, a team of 
gymnasts, who started things off with a 
bang. One of the men is made up as a 
clown, and his bits of business helped the 
turn along. They open using- a regulation 
gymnasium bar and change to a long pole, 
on which they do several difficult stunts. 

In number two position were Mills and 
Moulton, who, although they had a bad 
spot, got over nicely. Their skit concerns 
the efforts of a girl to save her brother 
from jail, and the mixup that ensues. 
The lines are bright, and the man, who 
ia a real comedian, knows how to handle 
them. Their- closing number is clever, 
and the only thing that spoiled them for a 
hit was the position they held. . 

The Russell Quintette, three men and 
two women, who sing and play, came after 
them. They open with the entire com- 
pany singing, and then go into a number 
of double and solo numbers. The fellow 
who tries to be funny should cut out his 
hokum, as it did not go. He is not a 
comedian, and should stop trying to be 
one. The act was well liked, and had 
to respond to an encore. 

The bill was split here by "The Retreat 
of the Germans at the Battle of Arras," 
a film showing the activities of the Brit- 
ish at the front. 

The vaudeville portion was then resumed 
by George Jesel, a nut comedian, wbo has 
veal talent. His patter and songs got the 
audience, which was rather cold one, 
and, at the end, be had them laughing 
heartily. He should change his line of 
talk, as it has been heard in the neighbor- 
hood before, and detracts from hi» act. 

The fifth spot was filled by a sketch 
called "Lincoln of the U. 8. A." The act 
bad to go on without scenery or costumes, 
due to the non-arrival of its baggage. The 
turn scored a big hit in spite of this. The 
story concerns a southern girl who tries to 
get a reprieve for her brother, who has 
been sentenced to be shot as a spy. She 
is successful, due to the intervention of 
President Lincoln. The sketch is well 
acted, and went over in fine style. The 
-work of the man playing .Lincoln is very 
good. 

George Jesel came out again, to fill up 
a spot in the bill while th last act was 
getting ready to go on. This turn, too, 
was delayed by the non-arrival of its 
baggage on time, and, while they were try- 
ing to get ready, he filled in, and, it must 
be said, scored a bigger hit than when his 
turn was first presented. 

After some delay, the last act, "The 
Melancholy Miss," went on. The act has 
been seen elsewhere under the name of 
"Miss Hamlet," and ib a travesty on 
Shakespeare's famous play. It shows how 
it would be acted if he had written it to- 
day. The work of the members is ex- 
cellent, and the chorus works without a 
hitch. The one who plays the king had 
to work without a costume, but that did 
not hinder the turn any. The hill was 
closed by "The Silent Man," a William 
S. Hart picture, for which the audience 
stayed. 



S. K. 



BJ. W. 



EDNA MAY GETS HUSBAND'S MONEY 

By the will of her late husband, Oscar 
Lewisohn, who died recently, Edna May 

receives $125,000 outright and a life inter- 
est in hts residuary estate, which is esti- 
mated at $6,000,000. The only other he- 
quests were $500 to each of the servants 
who had been employed In the Lewisohn 

'home for more than two years. Accord- 
ing to the terms of the will, Edna May is 
to receive the interest of the residuary 
estate during her life, to use as she may 
Bee fit. She ia permitted to dispose of the 
principal in her will. Edna May. Jesse 
Lewisohn, a brother, and Martin Vogel, a 
brother-in-law, are made executors. 

"BABY CLOTHES" GETTING READY 

"Baby Clothes," the newest slrit from 
the pen of Ethel Clifton, is being put into 
shape for production. 



AMERICAN 

Business was good here Monday when, 
a well arranged bill was presented. 

The Isabelle Sisters opened with an in- 
strumental and dancing, act that put them 
in instant favor., They started off with a 
duet oh violins that had a dance finish. 
Then one of them did a single, playing 
mandolin, and her sister followed with a 
violin solo, and they finished with an- 
other violin duet and dance. The girls do 
their dancing while playing the instru- 
ments, and dance with remarkable grace 
when one considers they play their own 
music They are very attractive, and 
everything they do is well performed. 

Tribble and Brown are a clever pair of 
black-face comedians, one of whom makes 
a capital wench. They have a good line 
of comedy talk, which they put over well, 
and from which they get many laughs. 
They have good voices and sing four 
songs well. They scored a success. 

Brosius and Brown are two boys who 
do wonders on wheels. One works 
straight, and the other does the comedy, 
but they are equally clever in their work. 
They start their act with a few stunts on 
roller skates, which they soon discard 
and get to work on the wheels. The 
straight is first Been on a unicycle, and his 
partner follows on the same. 

After this the straight gives a truly re- 
markable exhibition of trick bicycle riding. 
He makes four consecutive single swings 
on the handlebars, and follows with a 
triple swing. He also rides on the hind 
wheel of the machine, using the handle- 
bars for a seat and pedaling with his body 
thrown forward. Tnese are probably the 
most difficult of his feats, but his entire 
routine is excellent. The two then do 
some double riding, with the straight as 
top-mounter. For a finish the straight 
rides a unicycle, the seat of which is ten 
or twelve feet in the air. The comedian 
gets many laughs for his stunts. The act 
scored heavily. 

"It Didn't Take the First Time" is a 
clever comedy skit as done by Will and 
Mary Rogers. In it they act the roles of 
a divorced couple, and their lines contain 
many sarcastic quips and bright retorts, 
which are delivered in just the right way 
to get the best out of them. It ia a ques- 
tion which is the better at repartee, but, 
together, they make an excellent team, 
each being a good foil for the other. They 
finish with a song topped off with a jig by 
the girl. Much hearty applause was their 
well earned reward. 

Those ever popular dancers, the Gliding 
CMearas, made their reappearance here 
and made one of the big hits of the bill. 
This couple rank among our best dancers 
and are always sure of approval. They 
gave three long dances, in which the waltz 
step played an important part, and at the 
finish Miss O'Meara received a big bunch 
of roses over the -footlights. 

Evelyn Cunningham gets a little away 
from the average woman singer in the 
matter of songs, her selections being num- 
bers not frequently heard. They are, 
however, well suited to her, and she gets 
them over well. She renders four songs, in 
one of which she sings Cockney, Irish, 
French and Italian, doing all well. Miss 
Cunningham has a very pleasing person- 
ality, which draws her audience to her. 
An encore fell to her portion. 

O'Brien Havel, assisted by Miss Valeska, 
was seen in his well known and well liked 
comedy skit "Ticks and Clicks," which 
deals with a fake broker's office. O'Brien 
is as funny as ever, and his finish, where 
he slides off on his ear, brought its usual 
amount of laughs. Miss Valeska dances 
well. 

Britt Wood, "The Boob and Hia Har- 
monica," stopped the show. Wood opens 
his act with a rube song, playing bis own 
accompaniment on a banjo. He then plays 
various selections on a harmonica, running 
the gamut from syncopation to grand 
opera. For good measure be gives an ec- 
centric dance. He is master of the har- 
monica and an exceptionally clever dancer. 
He was forced to respond to two encores. 
The Sterling Rose Trio, two men and a 
woman, closed the bill with a fine exhibi- 
tion of ring work, hand stands and other 

-gymnastics. 

The feature film was "The Silent Man," 
with William 8. Hart as the Star. 

E. W. 



32 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



December 19, 1917 



I 



,»»00»0»00»»» 



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! 







IN NEW 




BUSINESS BEFORE PLEASURE 

By MONTAGUE GLASS and JULES ECKERT GOODMAN 

Witt 
BARNEY BERNARD and ALEXANDER GARR 

Biggest Comedy Saccets in Years '■• 

Now in lU Sixth Month it tie ' 

ELTINGE THEATRE 



PARLOR, BEDROOM AND BATH 

By C. W. BELL and MARK SWAN 

- - -,-'•.• ..^With ■•: 

FLORENCE MOORE and JOHN CUMBERLAND. 

FRANCINE LARRLMORE, WILL DEMING and SYDNEY SHIELDS 

A Whirlwind Farce Hit at tfee 

REPUBLIC THEATRE 



EYES OF 1 * YOUTH 

By MAX MARCIN and CHARLES GUERNON 

SMa?iS? MAXINE ELLIOTT THEATRE 



ON TOUR 



CHEATING 
CHEATERS 



By MAX MARCIN 



2nd YEAR 



MARY'S ANKLE 

By MAY TULLY 
With WALTER JONES 



POTASH *ndPERLMUTTER 
IN SOCIETY 

By MONTAGUE GLASS and THIRD 
ROI COOPER MEGRUE YEAR 



PETER IBBETSON 

Tin conjunction with til* M«ir». 

Shnbert) with 

John Barrymore, Constance Collier 

and Lionel Barrymore 



ALWOODS THEATRE 



CHICAGO 



The Handsomest Theatre in the World will open with an A. H. Woods' Attraction 

in February, 1918 



IN 



REPARATION 



HIS HOST'S WIFE 

A different kind of faros by Hflliard 
Booth 



SUSPICION 

By SAMUEL SHIPMAN 



A NIGHT A T E FRONT 

By HENRY KISTEMAECKERS 



THE 



DOWN a» OUTERS 



By MAY TULLY and ACHMED 
ABDULLAH 



MONTMARTRE 

By PIERRE FROND AIE 



REMNANT 

By MICHAEL MORTON 



TWO STREETS 

By KOBY KOHN 



FINGERPRINTS 

By MINNIE SCHEFF 



The WOMAN PASSED 

By ROMAIN COOLUS 



A New Play for Barney Bernard by 
Montague Glau and Jules Echert 
Goodman. 



A New Play for Fanny Brice by 
Montague Glass and Jules Eckert 
Goodman 



THE ONLY WITNESS 

By SOLOMON LIBIN 



A. H. WOODS, Ltd., LONDON 

Office, Queen's Theatre. ...:....: FRANK C. PAYNE, London Representative 



NOW F*LAYING 



DADDY LONG-LEGS 

In Association with Henry Muler 



FAIR AND WARMER 

In Association with Alfred Butt 



™ THIRTEENTH CHAIR 

With Mrs. PATRICK CAMPBELL 



m 



Association with 

William Harris, Jr., and 

Albert De Courville 



THE GIRL FROM CRO'S 

In Association with George MeLaDan 



POTASH AND PERLMUTTER 
IN SOCIETY 

In Association With Lannuard A. Groatnuth 



ii 



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THE HEW Y&RKUcLlMER 



33 



THE WAR WILL IMPROVE VAUDEVILLE FUTURE OF CIRCUS BUSINESS IN DOUBT 

* '-' .1: iflM .' ''»■- ir,i'. •:- :!*'■; ■ .*■ .. rtli .iri.h ,-).> '..*..'» .;..'. . .' .. .L ■" ... ■ '■ ■ -Hi; ItJTl .''... ■ ■ ! iTffl 




comes a sister 
,i things at top ' 
I '(the novajty 



- effects and condition-,, 
strate to be true. What loss the two-a- 
day suffers through the conflict ia .slight, 
and, in the opinion of many, not' a loss bat 
a gain.: 

The war has set np a new standard for 
vaudeville to follow in the years to come. 
Acts of the poor quality have been elimin- 
ated by public demand, for the better grade 
of stuff has been on the market more than 
ever before. This ia due to the bad busi- 
ness in other lines of the theatrical busi- 
ness. Stars who could not travel with road 
shows on account of the impossibility of 
getting baggage cars have turned to the 
variety stage. 

Better class entertainment than ever be- 
fore ia thus furnished to vaudeville patrons. 
Sarah Bernhardt, Lady Duff-Gordon and 
other stars known the world over have 
turned to it aa the only place where they 
could achieve the remits they desired. The 
dramatic stage has furnished the vaudeville 
profession with headliners innumerable. 
The sudden inactivity of cabarets ias also 
given the two-a-day managers an oppor- 
tunity to pick the choicest artists from 
this field. 

Because of the general gloom which over- 
spreads a country in time of war, enter- 
tainment of a lighter sort is demanded by 
the people, and sketches and plays have 
therefore had to be of different and better 
style in order to please. ■ Instead of the old- 
time melodrama, with its improbable situa- 
tions and soliloquies, we now see the lighter 
side of life in the form of legitimate farce, 
musical comediettas, tabloids, travesties 
and skits especially written to allow a star 
to display the best in his power. 

For the period after the war vaudeville 
can look forward to bright prospects. Those 
who come back from the front will make 
beadliners of unprecedented drawing 
power. This will give an entirely new 
style of act to the industry, and that it 
will be one of value as entertainment is 
unquestioned. 

These are the main things that vaude- 
ville has gained, and will gain in future 
from the great conflict. On the other hand, 
what has it lost? Nothing but the foreign 
turns, and these are scarcely to be ac- 
counted a loss. _ - 

Instead of the dumb act or pantomime 
filled with unintelligible humor and crude 
by-play, we have a first-class American act 
which provides a hundred per cent more en- 
tertainment to the average theatregoer. 
Another vacancy caused by the war is 
that made by the disappearance of the 
foreign single singing comedienne, who sang 
English popular songs and tried for the 
risque and indecent in order to get the 
punch in her act. The privilege of travel- 
ing on the high seas has been denied to 
women of all professions just at present, 
and therefore the music hall artist is lost, 
but scarcely missed. 

Her defection is usually supplied by the 
American singer, who gives her own songs, 
especially written for her by an American 
composer, who knows the audiences and 
knows the star's talents. This sort of com- 
poser usually furnishes a comedy gem, 
clean in story and lyrics and tuneful as to 
melody, out of which the singer makes a 
so-called "production.'* 
I ¥ THERE we used to get the panto- 
yl/ mimic juggling act, with its inane 
* comedy at the opening of a show, 
it is now the custom to present a flashy 
dancing or skating act The foreign act, 
and its work with the rosined handkerchief, 
its stalling around in shirt-sleeves, is now 
a thing which is fortunately lost in the 
shuffle, and these discards will never be re- 
dealt The second act of the typical show 
is a comedy skit which must keep the show 
at top speed with its song and dance or 
chatter. 

The third act is the comedy skit of the 
bin, and this baa to be well written and 
well acted in order to appeal to war-wearied 
patrons. The laugh-getter or concert singer 
follows in the number four spot. Closing 
the first part is usually the heavily billed 
feature which is depended to draw at the 
box-office, and, after the intermission period 




iaabjt, afiikeep|j: 
.pe,juextiknot conge*; 

^elfyiUiPsjnd in W n" 
to closing rtt)sitft& We ga( the act 
carriesijthe Brunt -of the bBl as far as ap ; 
plausei'i'laughs, entertainment and holduig 
the audience go. The average show usually 
finishes" wirVthe cooling or animal *et. 

' I 'HIS is an ideal bill for speed, but the 
£ war has added members from the 
' concert stage, the opera and